Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29510749
[Au] Autor:Sprong H; Azagi T; Hoornstra D; Nijhof AM; Knorr S; Baarsma ME; Hovius JW
[Ad] Address:Centre for Zoonoses & Environmental Microbiology, Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands. hein.sprong@rivm.nl.
[Ti] Title:Control of Lyme borreliosis and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):145, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lyme borreliosis (LB) and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases (TBDs) are diseases that emerge from interactions of humans and domestic animals with infected ticks in nature. Nature, environmental and health policies at (inter)national and local levels affect the risk, disease burden and costs of TBDs. Knowledge on ticks, their pathogens and the diseases they cause have been increasing, and resulted in the discovery of a diversity of control options, which often are not highly effective on their own. Control strategies involving concerted actions from human and animal health sectors as well as from nature managers have not been formulated, let alone implemented. Control of TBDs asks for a "health in all policies" approach, both at the (inter)national level, but also at local levels. For example, wildlife protection and creating urban green spaces are important for animal and human well-being, but may increase the risk of TBDs. In contrast, culling or fencing out deer decreases the risk for TBDs under specific conditions, but may have adverse effects on biodiversity or may be societally unacceptable. Therefore, in the end, nature and health workers together must carry out tailor-made control options for the control of TBDs for humans and animals, with minimal effects on the environment. In that regard, multidisciplinary approaches in environmental, but also medical settings are needed. To facilitate this, communication and collaboration between experts from different fields, which may include patient representatives, should be promoted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2744-5

  2 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524057
[Au] Autor:Rogers SW; Shaffer CE; Langen TA; Jahne M; Welsh R
[Ad] Address:Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, 8 Clarkson Ave, Potsdam, NY, 13699-5710, USA. srogers@clarkson.edu.
[Ti] Title:Antibiotic-Resistant Genes and Pathogens Shed by Wild Deer Correlate with Land Application of Residuals.
[So] Source:Ecohealth;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1612-9210
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The purpose of this study was to investigate genetic biomarkers of zoonotic enteric pathogens and antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) in the feces of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as related to proximity of deer to land that receives livestock manure or human waste biosolid fertilizers. Deer feces were collected in the St. Lawrence River Valley and Adirondack State Park of New York. Campylobacter spp. 16S rDNA was detected in 12 of 232 fecal samples (8 of 33 sites). Salmonellae were cultivated from 2 of 182 fecal samples (2 of 29 sites). Genetic virulence markers for Shiga-like toxin I (stx ) and enterohemolysin (hylA) were each detected in one isolate of Escherichia coli; E. coli O157 was not detected in any of 295 fecal samples. ARGs detected in deer feces included ermB (erythromycin-resistant gene; 9 of 295 fecal samples, 5 of 38 sites), vanA (vancomycin-resistant gene; 93 of 284 samples, 33 of 38 sites), tetQ (tetracycline-resistant gene; 93 of 295 samples, 25 of 38 sites), and sul(I) (sulfonamide-resistant gene; 113 of 292 samples, 28 of 38 sites). Genetic markers of pathogens and ARGs in deer feces were spatially associated with collection near concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs; Campylobacter spp., tetQ, and ermB) and land-applied biosolids (tetQ). These results indicate that contact with human waste biosolids or animal manure may be an important method of pathogen and ARG transmission and that deer in proximity to land-applied manure and human waste biosolids pose increased risk to nearby produce and water quality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10393-018-1316-7

  3 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523202
[Au] Autor:Lagrée AC; Rouxel C; Kevin M; Dugat T; Girault G; Durand B; Pfeffer M; Silaghi C; Nieder M; Boulouis HJ; Haddad N
[Ad] Address:UMR BIPAR, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, Anses, INRA, Université Paris-Est, Maisons-Alfort, France.
[Ti] Title:Co-circulation of different A. phagocytophilum variants within cattle herds and possible reservoir role for cattle.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):163, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a zoonotic tick-borne intracellular alpha-proteobacterium causing tick-borne fever, which leads to significant economic losses in domestic ruminants in Europe. Its epidemiological cycles are complex and reservoir host species of bovine strains have not yet been identified. Given that little genetic information is available on strains circulating within a defined bovine environment, our objective was to assess the genetic diversity of A. phagocytophilum obtained from the same farms over time. METHODS: Blood samplings were performed several times in two European herds. In the French herd, 169 EDTA-blood samples were obtained from 115 cows (32 were sampled two to four times). In the German herd, 20 cows were sampled six times (120 EDTA-blood samples). The presence of A. phagocytophilum DNA was assessed using a qPCR targeting msp2. The positive DNA samples underwent MLST at nine genetic markers (typA, ctrA, msp4, pleD, recG, polA, groEL, gyrA, and ankA). For each locus, sequences were aligned with available bacterial sequences derived from cattle, horse, dog, and roe deer hosts, and concatenated neighbor joining trees were constructed using three to six loci. RESULTS: Around 20% (57/289) of samples were positive. Forty positive samples from 23 French and six German cows (11 of them being positive at two time points) were sequenced. Six loci (typA, ctrA, msp4, pleD, recG, and polA) allowed to build concatenated phylogenetic trees, which led to two distinct groups of bovine variants in the French herd (hereafter called A and B), whereas only group A was detected in the German herd. In 42% of French samples, double chromatogram peaks were encountered in up to four loci. Eleven cows were found infected three weeks to 17 months after first sampling and harboured a new variant belonging to one or the other group. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the occurrence of two major bovine strain groups and the simultaneous infection of single cows by more than one A. phagocytophilum strain. This challenges the role of cattle as reservoirs for A. phagocytophilum. This role may be facilitated via long-term bacterial persistence in individual cows and active circulation at the herd scale.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2661-7

  4 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29320820
[Au] Autor:Ahmed H; Sousa SR; Simsek S; Anastácio S; Kilinc SG
[Ad] Address:Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Park Road, Chakh Shazad, Islamabad, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:First Molecular Characterization of Hypoderma actaeon in Cattle and Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) in Portugal.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(6):653-658, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypoderma spp. larvae cause subcutaneous myiasis in several animal species. The objective of the present investigation was to identify and characterize morphologically and molecularly the larvae of Hypoderma spp. collected from cattle (Bos taurus taurus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the district of Castelo Branco, Portugal. For this purpose, a total of 8 larvae were collected from cattle (n=2) and red deer (n=6). After morphological identification of Hypoderma spp. larvae, molecular characterization was based on PCR-RFLP and mitochondrial CO1 gene sequence analysis. All larvae were morphologically characterized as the third instar larvae (L3) of H. actaeon. Two restriction enzymes were used for molecular identification of the larvae. TaqI restriction enzyme was not able to cut H. actaeon. However, MboII restriction enzyme differentiated Hypoderma species showing 210 and 450 bp bands in H. actaeon. Furthermore, according to the alignment of the mt-CO1 gene sequences of Hypoderma species and to PCR-RFLP findings, all the identified Hypoderma larvae were confirmed as H. actaeon. This is the first report of identification of Hypoderma spp. (Diptera; Oestridae) from cattle and red deer in Portugal, based on morphological and molecular analyses.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cattle Diseases/parasitology
Deer/parasitology
Diptera/classification
Diptera/genetics
Larva
Myiasis/parasitology
Myiasis/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cattle
Diptera/anatomy & histology
Electron Transport Complex IV/genetics
Larva/anatomy & histology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Portugal
Sequence Analysis/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 1.9.3.1 (Electron Transport Complex IV)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.6.653

  5 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519265
[Au] Autor:Albery GF; Kenyon F; Morris A; Morris S; Nussey DH; Pemberton JM
[Ad] Address:Institute of Evolutionary Biology,School of Biological Sciences,University of Edinburgh,Edinburgh EH9 3JT,UK.
[Ti] Title:Seasonality of helminth infection in wild red deer varies between individuals and between parasite taxa.
[So] Source:Parasitology;:1-11, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8161
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Parasitism in wild mammals can vary according to myriad intrinsic and extrinsic factors, many of which vary seasonally. However, seasonal variation in parasitism is rarely studied using repeated samples from known individuals. Here we used a wild population of individually recognized red deer (Cervus elaphus) on the Isle of Rum to quantify seasonality and intrinsic factors affecting gastrointestinal helminth parasitism over the course of a year. We collected 1020 non-invasive faecal samples from 328 known individuals which we then analysed for propagules of three helminth taxa: strongyle nematodes, the common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica and the tissue nematode Elaphostrongylus cervi. Zero-inflated Poisson models were used to investigate how season, age and sex were associated with parasite prevalence and count intensity, while Poisson models were used to quantify individual repeatability within and between sampling seasons. Parasite intensity and prevalence varied according to all investigated factors, with opposing seasonality, age profiles and sex biases between parasite taxa. Repeatability was moderate, decreased between seasons and varied between parasites; both F. hepatica and E. cervi showed significant between-season repeatability, while strongyle nematode counts were only repeatable within-season and showed no repeatability within individuals across the year.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0031182018000185

  6 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518225
[Au] Autor:Serrano MP; Gambín P; Landete-Castillejos T; García A; Cappelli J; Pérez-Barbería FJ; Gómez JA; Gallego L
[Ad] Address:Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Albacete, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Effects of Mn supplementation in late-gestating and lactating red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) on milk production, milk composition and calf growth.
[So] Source:J Anim Sci;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1525-3163
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study describes the effects of Mn supplementation of 20 late-gestating and lactating Iberian red deer (Cervuselaphushispanicus) females (hinds) fed a balanced diet on milk production and milk composition over the lactation period. Body weight of their calves at birth and at weaning was also evaluated. In addition, the effect of lactation stage was studied. For these purposes, 2 groups of hinds, one composed by 12 individuals (experimental) and the other by 8 individuals (control) were compared. Experimental hinds were s.c. injected weekly with Mn (2 mg Mn/kg BW) from d 140 of gestation until the end of lactation (wk 18; forced weaning by physical separation). Control hinds were injected with a physiological saline solution with the same volume and at the same frequency as the experimental group. Serum Mn content of hinds was assessed just before the first Mn injection and at wk 10 of lactation to assess whether the injected Mn increased Mn concentrations in blood. No differences were observed for BW of calves at birth but calves whose mothers were injected with Mn tended (P = 0.07) to have greater gain of BW from birth to weaning in proportion of BW at birth compared to calves from control hinds. In addition, supplementation with Mn increased (P ≤ 0.05) daily milk production by 10.2%, milk fat content by 11.2%, and total fat yield by 17.8%. Also, milk from hinds supplemented with Mn had more Ca (P < 0.001) and P (P < 0.05) than milk from control hinds. Manganese supplementation did not influence Mn serum content when blood was analyzed at wk 10 of lactation, but increased the Mn content of milk by 18.3% (P < 0.001). Lactation stage affected (P < 0.001) fat, protein, lactose and DM. Their contents increased as lactation proceeded, and protein was substituted by fat. Therefore, results suggest that Mn supplementation of hinds is recommended, even when they are fed a balanced diet, to increase milk production and the content of fat, Ca, P and Mn of milk.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jas/sky087

  7 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29414064
[Au] Autor:Edwards TH; Stoll S
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98103, United States. Electronic address: edwardst@uw.edu.
[Ti] Title:Optimal Tikhonov regularization for DEER spectroscopy.
[So] Source:J Magn Reson;288:58-68, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0856
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tikhonov regularization is the most commonly used method for extracting distance distributions from experimental double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy data. This method requires the selection of a regularization parameter, α, and a regularization operator, L. We analyze the performance of a large set of α selection methods and several regularization operators, using a test set of over half a million synthetic noisy DEER traces. These are generated from distance distributions obtained from in silico double labeling of a protein crystal structure of T4 lysozyme with the spin label MTSSL. We compare the methods and operators based on their ability to recover the model distance distributions from the noisy time traces. The results indicate that several α selection methods perform quite well, among them the Akaike information criterion and the generalized cross validation method with either the first- or second-derivative operator. They perform significantly better than currently utilized L-curve methods.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29517428
[Au] Autor:Soilemetzidou SE; Greenwood AD; Czirják GÁ
[Ti] Title:VERY LOW INFLUENZA A VIRUS PREVALENCE IN CERVIDS IN GERMAN NATIONAL PARKS.
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;49(1):252-254, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Influenza A viruses are one of the most important and most studied pathogens in humans and domestic animals but little is known about viral prevalence in non-avian wildlife. Serum samples from three free-ranging cervid species (red [ Cervus elaphus], fallow [ Dama dama] , and roe deer [ Capreolus capreolus]) were collected from six German national parks between 2000 and 2002. The serum was tested for the presence of influenza A antibodies using a commercial competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Only one of 137 samples tested positive.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1638/2017-0095R.1

  9 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516663
[Au] Autor:Camp JV; Haider R; Porea D; Oslobanu LE; Forgách P; Nowotny N
[Ad] Address:Institute of Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Serological surveillance for Tahyna virus (California encephalitis orthobunyavirus, Peribunyaviridae) neutralizing antibodies in wild ungulates in Austria, Hungary and Romania.
[So] Source:Zoonoses Public Health;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2378
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A serosurvey for Tahyna virus (TAHV), a mosquito-borne California encephalitis orthobunyavirus (Peribunyaviridae) endemic to Europe, was performed to estimate the activity of TAHV on a broad geographic scale. Sera from wild boar (Sus scrofa), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) were collected from Austria, Hungary and Romania. Samples were tested for neutralizing antibodies against TAHV using a virus microneutralization assay. The results demonstrate that TAHV transmission to mammals is widespread in Europe, particularly in the wild boar population where the mean rate of seroconversion is 15.2%.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/zph.12457

  10 / 15993 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514432
[Au] Autor:Na Y; Li DH; Choi Y; Kim KH; Lee SR
[Ad] Address:Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Effects of feeding level on nutrient digestibility and enteric methane production in growing goats (Capra hircus hircus) and Sika deer (Cervus nippon hortulorum).
[So] Source:Asian-Australas J Anim Sci;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1011-2367
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of feeding level on nutrient digestibility and enteric methane (CH4) emissions in growing goats and Sika deer. Methods: Three growing male goats (initial BW of 22.4 ± 0.9 kg) and three growing male deer (initial BW of 20.2 ± 4.8 kg) were each allotted to a respiration-metabolism chamber for an adaptation period of 7 d and a data collection period of 3 d. An experimental diet was offered to each animal at one of three feeding levels (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5% of BW) in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. The chambers were used for measuring enteric CH4 emission. Results: Nutrient digestibility decreased linearly in goats as feeding level increased, whereas Sika deer digestibility was not affected by feeding level. The enteric production of CH4 expressed as g/kg DMI, g/kg organic matter intake (OMI), and % of gross energy intake (GEI) decreased linearly with increased feeding level in goats; however, that of Sika deer was not affected by feeding level. Six equations were estimated for predicting the enteric CH4 emission from goats and Sika deer. For goat, equation 1 was found to be of the highest accuracy: CH4 (g/day) = 6.2 (± 14.1) + 10.2 (± 7.01) × DMI (kg/day) + 0.0048 (± 0.0275) × DMD (g/kg) - 0.0070 (± 0.0187) × neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD; g/kg). For Sika deer, equation 4 was found to be of the highest accuracy: CH4 (g/day) = - 13.0 (± 30.8) + 29.4 (± 3.93) × DMI (kg/day) + 0.046 (± 0.094) × DMD (g/kg) - 0.0363 (± 0.0636) × NDFD (g/kg). Conclusion: Increasing the feeding level increased CH4 production in both goats and Sika deer, and predictive models of enteric CH4 production by goats and Sika deer were estimated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.5713/ajas.17.0708


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