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[PMID]: 29513211
[Au] Autor:Wiebe CB; Hoath BJ; Owen G; Bi J; Giannelis G; Larjava HS
[Ti] Title:Sterilization of Ceramic Sharpening Stones.
[So] Source:J Can Dent Assoc;83:h11, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1488-2159
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traditionally, periodontal hand instruments are honed or sharpened during patient care as they dull easily during contact with enamel, calculus and cementum. This approach is taught in dental and hygiene schools around the world and remains the standard of care. Recently, some professional organizations have questioned whether this practice should be abandoned because of safety issues. Questions have been raised whether sharpening stones can be properly sterilized and whether the sharpening of contaminated instruments poses a health hazard for the provider. Using bacteria culture techniques and scanning electron microscopy, we tested whether contaminated ceramic sharpening stones can be sterilized. Our results demonstrate that the stones were sterile after being subjected to the manufacturer's sterilization protocol. In addition, over the last year, no incidents related to periodontal instrument sharpening have been reported among nearly 400 students at the faculty of dentistry, University of British Columbia, where chair-side sharpening is taught. Therefore, we conclude that ceramic sharpening stones can be sterilized using normal office protocols and that chair-side sharpening adds little risk beyond routine handling of operatory or periodontal instruments during patient care when proper protocols are followed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira
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[PMID]: 29491390
[Au] Autor:Valente MT; Moffa EB; Crosara KTB; Xiao Y; de Oliveira TM; Machado MAAM; Siqueira WL
[Ad] Address:School of Dentistry and Department of Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Acquired Enamel Pellicle Engineered Peptides: Effects on Hydroxyapatite Crystal Growth.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):3766, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that duplication/hybridization of functional domains of naturally occurring pellicle peptides amplified the inhibitory effect of hydroxyapatite crystal growth, which is related to enamel remineralization and dental calculus formation. Histatin 3, statherin, their functional domains (RR14 and DR9), and engineered peptides (DR9-DR9 and DR9-RR14) were tested at seven different concentrations to evaluate the effect on hydroxyapatite crystal growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite crystal growth. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC ) was determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls pairwise comparisons were used to compare the groups. DR9-DR9 increased the inhibitory effect of hydroxyapatite crystal growth compared to single DR9 (p < 0.05), indicating that functional domain multiplication represented a strong protein evolution pathway. Interestingly, the hybrid peptide DR9-RR14 had an intermediate inhibitory effect compared to DR9 and DR9-DR9. This study used an engineered peptide approach to investigate a potential evolution protein pathway related to duplication/hybridization of acquired enamel pellicle's natural peptide constituents, contributing to the development of synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and periodontal disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-21854-4

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[PMID]: 29360293
[Au] Autor:Hwang SH; Park SG
[Ad] Address:Department of Dentistry, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, South Korea.
[Ti] Title:The relationship between depression and periodontal diseases.
[So] Source:Community Dent Health;35(1):23-29, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:0265-539X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate whether depression is associated with periodontal diseases in a representative sample of South Korean adults Methods: We used data from the sixth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES VI), conducted in 2014. We included in this study 4328 participants aged over 20 years (1768 males and 2560 females). Depression was assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and history of physician-diagnosed depression. Periodontal diseases were assessed a gingival bleeding, calculus and periodontal pockets. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: People with any periodontal diseases tended to be old, male, married, low income, poor education, blue-collar occupation, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, smoking, not using dental floss or interdental brush in univariate analysis. Neither self-reported nor diagnosed depression was associated with the presence of any or severe periodontal disease in the total sample. In participants aged 20-29 years only, the presence of any periodontal disease was associated with self-reported depression (OR, 2.031; 95% CI, 1.011-4.078). In the same age group, the presence of severe periodontal disease was associated with both self-reported depression (OR, 6.532; 95% CI, 2.190-19.483) and diagnosed depression (OR, 7.729; 95% CI, 1.966-30.389). CONCLUSION: Self-reported depression was significantly associated with the presence of any or severe periodontal disease, and diagnosed depression was significantly associated with severe periodontal diseases only in participants aged 20-29 years.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1922/CDH_4150Hwang07

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[PMID]: 29291254
[Au] Autor:Manresa C; Sanz-Miralles EC; Twigg J; Bravo M
[Ad] Address:Adult Comprehensive Dentistry, Dental School, University of Barcelona, Feixa LLarga s/n, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain, 08907.
[Ti] Title:Supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for maintaining the dentition in adults treated for periodontitis.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD009376, 2018 01 01.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Periodontitis is a bacterially-induced, chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the connective tissues and bone that support teeth. Active periodontal treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory response, primarily through eradication of bacterial deposits. Following completion of treatment and arrest of inflammation, supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) is employed to reduce the probability of re-infection and progression of the disease; to maintain teeth without pain, excessive mobility or persistent infection in the long term, and to prevent related oral diseases.According to the American Academy of Periodontology, SPT should include all components of a typical dental recall examination, and importantly should also include periodontal re-evaluation and risk assessment, supragingival and subgingival removal of bacterial plaque and calculus, and re-treatment of any sites showing recurrent or persistent disease. While the first four points might be expected to form part of the routine examination appointment for periodontally healthy patients, the inclusion of thorough periodontal evaluation, risk assessment and subsequent treatment - normally including mechanical debridement of any plaque or calculus deposits - differentiates SPT from routine care.Success of SPT has been reported in a number of long-term, retrospective studies. This review aimed to assess the evidence available from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) in the maintenance of the dentition of adults treated for periodontitis. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 8 May 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 8 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 8 May 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating SPT versus monitoring only or alternative approaches to mechanical debridement; SPT alone versus SPT with adjunctive interventions; different approaches to or providers of SPT; and different time intervals for SPT delivery.We excluded split-mouth studies where we considered there could be a risk of contamination.Participants must have completed active periodontal therapy at least six months prior to randomisation and be enrolled in an SPT programme. Trials must have had a minimum follow-up period of 12 months. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened search results to identify studies for inclusion, assessed the risk of bias in included studies and extracted study data. When possible, we calculated mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for continuous variables. Two review authors assessed the quality of evidence for each comparison and outcome using GRADE criteria. MAIN RESULTS: We included four trials involving 307 participants aged 31 to 85 years, who had been previously treated for moderate to severe chronic periodontitis. Three studies compared adjuncts to mechanical debridement in SPT versus debridement only. The adjuncts were local antibiotics in two studies (one at high risk of bias and one at low risk) and photodynamic therapy in one study (at unclear risk of bias). One study at high risk of bias compared provision of SPT by a specialist versus general practitioner. We did not identify any RCTs evaluating the effects of SPT versus monitoring only, or of providing SPT at different time intervals, or that compared the effects of mechanical debridement using different approaches or technologies.No included trials measured our primary outcome 'tooth loss'; however, studies evaluated signs of inflammation and potential periodontal disease progression, including bleeding on probing (BoP), clinical attachment level (CAL) and probing pocket depth (PPD).There was no evidence of a difference between SPT delivered by a specialist versus a general practitioner for BoP or PPD at 12 months (very low-quality evidence). This study did not measure CAL or adverse events.Due to heterogeneous outcome reporting, it was not possible to combine data from the two studies comparing mechanical debridement with or without the use of adjunctive local antibiotics. Both studies found no evidence of a difference between groups at 12 months (low to very low-quality evidence). There were no adverse events in either study.The use of adjunctive photodynamic therapy did not demonstrate evidence of benefit compared to mechanical debridement only (very low-quality evidence). Adverse events were not measured.The quality of the evidence is low to very low for these comparisons. Future research is likely to change the findings, therefore the results should be interpreted with caution. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there is insufficient evidence to determine the superiority of different protocols or adjunctive strategies to improve tooth maintenance during SPT. No trials evaluated SPT versus monitoring only. The evidence available for the comparisons evaluated is of low to very low quality, and hampered by dissimilarities in outcome reporting. More trials using uniform definitions and outcomes are required to address the objectives of this review.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Chronic Periodontitis/therapy
Periodontal Debridement/methods
Periodontics/methods
Photochemotherapy/methods
Tooth Loss/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Periodontitis/complications
Dental Plaque/therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180102
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009376.pub2

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[PMID]: 29351752
[Au] Autor:Elias-Boneta AR; Ramirez K; Rivas-Tumanyan S; Murillo M; Toro MJ
[Ad] Address:School of Dental Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico. augusto.elias@upr.edu.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of gingivitis and calculus in 12-year-old Puerto Ricans: a cross-sectional study.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;18(1):13, 2018 01 19.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Gingivitis is a common oral health problem. Untreated gingivitis may progress to periodontitis, a common cause of tooth loss. The prevalence of gingivitis and calculus among Puerto Rican children is unknown. Understanding this prevalence can support early public health preventative strategies. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of gingivitis and calculus among 12-year-old Puerto Ricans by health region and to explore differences in distribution by school type (proxy for socio-economic status) and gender. METHODS: A probability-based sample of 113 schools was selected proportional to enrollment size and stratified by health region, school type, and gender. Two trained examiners evaluated the presence of gingivitis and both supragingival and subgingival dental calculus. Gingivitis was defined as the presence of gingival bleeding upon gentle probing (BOP) in at least one site, and the extent of the problem was classified according to the percentage of teeth whose gingiva presented BOP (limited: 25-49% of the teeth tested; extensive: >50% of teeth tested). Logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for health regions, were used to compare gingivitis and calculus prevalence and extent between genders and school types. RESULTS: Gingivitis was found in 80.41% of the 1586 children evaluated. Urban-public schoolchildren had a slightly higher prevalence (83.24%) compared to private (79.15%, p = 0.16); those in rural-public (77.59%) and private schools had similar prevalence (p = 0.15). Extensive gingivitis was present in 60.81% of all children. The mean percentage of sites presenting BOP (BOP%) was 17.79%. Rural and urban public schoolchildren presented significantly higher BOP% compared to children from private schools (p = 0.0005, p = 0.002, respectively). Dental calculus was detected in 61.59% of the sample, boys presenting significantly higher (p = 0.005) total and supragingival calculus. Rural-public schoolchildren had a significantly higher prevalence of subgingival calculus compared to private schoolchildren (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Gingivitis prevalence is higher among 12-year-old Puerto Ricans compared to data reported for U.S. adolescents. Public schoolchildren presented significantly higher BOP% sites compared to private schoolchildren. Boys presented a significantly higher total and supragingival calculus prevalence than girls. Oral health disparities related to gender and school type were identified by this study. Studies exploring the reasons for these disparities are recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12903-017-0471-5

  6 / 3878 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29321070
[Au] Autor:Ye T; Sun D; Dong G; Xu G; Wang L; Du J; Ren P; Yu S
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Shanxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, School of Stomatology, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710032, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:The effect of methamphetamine abuse on dental caries and periodontal diseases in an Eastern China city.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;18(1):8, 2018 01 10.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Dental diseases are among the most frequently reported health problems in drug abusers. However, few studies have been conducted on oral health of methamphetamine (meth) abusers in China. The aim of the present study was to investigate the caries and periodontal health profile of former meth abusers in Eastern China. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 162 former meth abusers in the male Zhoushan Compulsory Detoxification Center. A standardized questionnaire, which collected information about age, drug-use duration / pattern, oral hygiene habit and systemic diseases, was administered. Then, a dental examination was performed to investigate the severity of dental caries and periodontal diseases. In evaluating dental caries, the prevalence of dental caries, the scores of decayed teeth (DT), missing teeth (MT), filled teeth (FT), and decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) were recorded. In evaluating periodontal diseases, community periodontal index (CPI), and the prevalence of gingival bleeding, dental calculus, periodontal pocket and loose teeth, were recorded. Additionally, the non-parametric test was adopted to analyze the potential risk factors via SPSS. RESULTS: All the participants abused meth by inhalation. The mean scores of DT, MT, FT and DMFT in the former meth users were 2.72 ± 2.78, 3.07 ± 3.94, 0.33 ± 1.03 and 6.13 ± 5.20 respectively. The prevalence of gingival bleeding, dental calculus, periodontal pocket and loose teeth was 97.53%, 95.68%, 51.23% and 9.26% respectively. The DT, DMFT and CPI scores in those who had abused meth for longer than 4 years were significantly higher than those who abused for less than 4 years (P = 0.039, 0.045, P < 0.001, respectively). The DT score in those who brushed their teeth more than twice a day were significantly lower than those who brushed less (P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: The status of caries and periodontal diseases among former male meth users in Eastern China was poor. Prolonged drug abuse and lower frequency of tooth brushing may be the risk factors of their poor status of caries and periodontal diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12903-017-0463-5

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[PMID]: 29446362
[Au] Autor:Rokaya D; Suttagul K; Karki S; Rokaya N; Seriwatanachai D; Humagain M
[Ad] Address:Department of Dentistry, Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences, Dhulikhel, Kavre, Nepal.
[Ti] Title:A Survey on Oral Health and Practice of Nepalese in Areas Affected by Earthquake in 2015.
[So] Source:Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ);15(57):45-50, 2017 Jan.-Mar..
[Is] ISSN:1812-2078
[Cp] Country of publication:Nepal
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background Understanding post-earthquake oral health indicators is essential for developing oral health interventions of the victims. Presumably, due to a geographic difficulty, there has been no investigation to reveal the oral health status of individuals after the Gorkha earthquake in Nepal. Objective The main objective was to determine the oral health and practice of Nepalese affected by earthquake in April-May, 2015. Method The epidemiological cross sectional study was done at 5 different districts (Sindhupalchok, Dadhing, Bhaktapur, Kathmandu and Kavre) of Nepal from September till November, 2015. Altogether 500 subjects aged form 16 to 80 years of age living in the transitional shelters community were included in earthquake-affected areas. Different parameters were studied from past and present medical and dental problems, habits, oral hygiene habits. DMFT, gingival index, periodontal index were studied and correlation was studied among them. Result It shows that 98% of the participants had plaque and 96.4% of the participants had calculus. Mean decayed was 9, mean missing was 4 and mean filling was 1. 22.60% of the participants had score 0, 34.8% had score 1, 34% had score 2 and 8.60% had score 3 of mean gingivitis index. 10% of the participants showed score 0, 36% showed score 1, 35% showed score 2, 10.2% showed score 3 and 8.2% showed score 4 of mean periodontal index. Moreover, significant correlation was observed among DMFT index, gingival index and periodontal index (p<0.001). Conclusion The oral health care practice, oral hygiene habits, nutritional intake of the people have been affected in the earthquake affected areas. It showed high caries index, gingival index and periodontal index in earthquake affected people suggesting further efforts are needed for an oral health improvement. Data from this study may be used as basic information for oral health planning and future steps in oral health care preventive and therapeutic programs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 3878 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29442089
[Au] Autor:Sangle VA; Pooja VK; Holani A; Shah N; Chaudhary M; Khanapure S
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, MIDSR Dental College, Latur, India.
[Ti] Title:Reactive hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity: A retrospective survey study and literature review.
[So] Source:Indian J Dent Res;29(1):61-66, 2018 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3603
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context: The reactive lesions are relatively common in the oral cavity because of the frequency with which the tissues are injured. They often result from a known stimulus or injury such as dental plaque, calculus, or foreign material. Aims: : The aim of this study was to review the clinicopathologic features of reactive hyperplastic lesions (RHLs) of the oral cavity at MIDSR, Dental College and Hospital, Latur, Maharashtra, and to compare these data with those of previously reported studies. Settings and Design: The patient case files from the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology from June 2010 to May 2016 were reviewed for cases of RHLs of the oral cavity. Subjects and Methods: Both clinical and histopathological diagnosis of reactive lesions was selected for the study. Data including the type of the lesion, age, gender, and the site involved were collected. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics was applied to the data and differences in frequencies among groups were evaluated using SPSS (IBM Corporation) software. Results: : A total of 155 histologically diagnosed cases of RHLs were obtained with a prevalence of 11.7%. The data consist of 56 (36.1%) males and 99 (63.9%) females. The most common lesion clinically was traumatic fibroma (36.5%) and histologically fibrous hyperplasia (37.4%). The reactive lesions clinically presented as either sessile (51%) or pedunculated (49%) lesions. Conclusions: The clinical features of reactive hyperplasia among our patients were similar to those reported previously with divergence in some analyzed data. The novelty in our study was the correlation between histopathology and clinical features which were not reported in literature till date.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_599_16

  9 / 3878 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29432640
[Au] Autor:Türktekin F; Buduneli N; Lappin DF; Türk T; Buduneli E
[Ad] Address:Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Diamond burs versus curettes in root planing: A randomized clinical trial.
[So] Source:Aust Dent J;, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1834-7819
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: This study compares diamond burs and curettes by clinical, microbiological, biochemical, scanning electron microscopic parameters and treatment time data in the non-surgical periodontal treatment of patients with chronic periodontitis. METHODS: Two quadrants of each of the 12 patients received root planing with diamond burs whereas other 2 quadrants were treated with curettes. Clinical periodontal measurements were recorded at baseline and then 1, 3, 6 months after completion of non-surgical periodontal treatment. Subgingival plaque, gingival crevicular fluid samples were obtained at baseline and 1-month control. Twenty-one hopeless teeth received root planing with diamond burs or curettes or no treatment at all and then extracted for microscopic evaluations. RESULTS: Clinical periodontal parameters improved similarly with both treatment modalities. Microbiological analyses revealed similar findings for the bacterial load (16S gene copy numbers), ratio of each bacterium to the total bacterial count at baseline, 1-month control. Cytokine levels in the gingival crevicular fluid samples exhibited differences between the two treatments. Scanning electron microscopic analyses indicated that diamond burs were better in terms of calculus removal, loss of tooth substance indices, but roughness index values were better for curettes. CONCLUSION: As a conclusion, diamond burs provide findings comparable with curettes in root planing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/adj.12602

  10 / 3878 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29409366
[Au] Autor:Caliento R; Sarmento DJS; Silva ÉMP; Tozetto-Mendoza TR; Tobouti PL; Benini V; Braz-Silva PH; Gallottini M
[Ad] Address:a Department of Stomatology, Division of Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry , University of São Paulo , São Paulo , Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Oral shedding of HSV-1 and EBV and oral manifestations in paediatric chronic kidney disease patients and renal transplant recipients.
[So] Source:Acta Odontol Scand;:1-6, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1502-3850
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Previous research demonstrated that salivary shedding of HSV-1 and EBV occurs often in adult renal transplant recipients, but there is a lack of studies on the presence of them in the saliva of paediatric population. Therefore, the objective of this study is to describe oral characteristics and to compare the shedding profile of HSV-1 and EBV in the saliva of children with renal transplant to that of chronic kidney disease patients and controls. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study involving 100 children, being 25 renal transplant recipients, 25 chronic kidney disease patients and 50 healthy children. Demographic and oral clinical characteristics were assessed. Saliva samples were collected and submitted to screening for EBV and HSV-1 by using nested polymerase chain reaction technique. Fisher's exact, Pearson's chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for statistical analysis at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Oral shedding of HSV-1 (28%) and EBV (60%) were significantly higher in renal transplant recipients compared to the other groups. Single vesicles in the oral mucosa were statistically associated with the presence of HSV-1 (p = .035). In children with chronic kidney disease, there was a higher prevalence of pale oral mucosa (32%) and enamel hypoplasia (40%) compared to paediatric renal transplant recipients and controls. Dental calculus (36%), candidiasis (8%), drug-induced gingival overgrowth (16%), mouth blisters (8%), xerostomia (12%) and salivary gland enlargement (20%) were more common in paediatric renal transplant recipients. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, it can be concluded that salivary shedding of HSV-1 and EBV in paediatric patients was more often found in renal transplant recipients than in the renal failure and control children. Transplanted recipients showed more oral manifestations than renal failure and control children did.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/00016357.2018.1437218


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