Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29510696
[Au] Autor:Gupta N; Vujicic M; Yarbrough C; Harrison B
[Ad] Address:American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute, 211 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. guptani@ada.org.
[Ti] Title:Disparities in untreated caries among children and adults in the U.S., 2011-2014.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;18(1):30, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The Affordable Care Act of 2010 increased dental coverage for children in the United States, (U.S.) but not for adults. Few studies in current scholarship make use of up-to-date, nationally representative data to examine oral health disparities in the U.S. POPULATION: The purpose of this study is to use nationally representative data to determine the prevalence of untreated caries among children and adults of different socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups and to examine the factors associated with untreated caries among children and adults. METHODS: This study used the 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) demographic, oral health questionnaire, and oral health dentition examination data (n = 7008 for children; n = 9673 for adults). Participants that had a standardized oral health examination and at least one natural primary or permanent tooth considering 28 tooth spaces were included in this study. Our main outcome measure was untreated coronal caries defined as decay on the crown or enamel surface of a tooth that had not been treated or filled. Population estimates were calculated to determine the prevalence of untreated caries among children and adults in the United States. Frequencies and Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare those with and without untreated caries. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the factors associated with untreated caries. We conducted analyses among children and adults separately. RESULTS: From 2011 to 2014, 12.4 million children and 57.6 million adults in the United States had untreated caries. Age, family income level, recent dental visit, and financial and non-financial barriers were significantly associated with untreated caries in both children and adults. Race/ethnicity, gender and education level were also significantly associated with untreated caries among adults. The odds of untreated caries associated with financial barriers were 2.06 for children and 2.84 for adults while the odds of untreated caries associated with non-financial barriers were 2.86 for children and 1.67 for adults. CONCLUSIONS: Demographic and socio-economic disparities in untreated caries exist among children and adults.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12903-018-0493-7

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[PMID]: 29524027
[Au] Autor:Cabral RN; Faber J; Otero SAM; Hilgert LA; Leal SC
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Dentistry, University of Brasília, Campus Darcy Ribeiro - Asa Norte, Brasília, Brazil. renatancabral@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Retention rates and caries-preventive effects of two different sealant materials: a randomised clinical trial.
[So] Source:Clin Oral Investig;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1436-3771
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the caries-preventive effect and the retention rates of sealants prepared with a new modified and a high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (GIC) in recently erupted first permanent molars.  MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-six children (224 teeth) were included in a split-mouth randomised clinical trial. All children had their four first permanent molars sealed with either Clinpro XT Varnish (CXT) or Fuji IX GP FAST (FJ). FJ sealants were placed according to the ART protocol. Retention rates and caries-preventive effect of both materials were assessed clinically after 24 months, and survival curves were created according to the Kaplan-Meier method. For sealant retention rates, analyses were performed according to both the traditional method and modified sealant retention categorisation. RESULTS: FJ sealants were retained longer in comparison to CXT sealants (p < 0.05), regardless of the categorisation used. In relation to the caries-preventive effect, no statistically significant differences were observed between materials (p = 0.99). Sealants prepared with the high-viscosity GIC according to the ART protocol survived longer than those prepared with the modified GIC, but both materials were equally effective in preventing cavitated dentine lesions over 24 months. CONCLUSION: We concluded that GIC-based sealants are effective in preventing dentine caries lesions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00784-018-2416-z

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[PMID]: 29524023
[Au] Autor:Seiffert A; Zaror C; Atala-Acevedo C; Ormeño A; Martínez-Zapata MJ; Alonso-Coello P
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Dental caries prevention in children and adolescents: a systematic quality assessment of clinical practice guidelines.
[So] Source:Clin Oral Investig;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1436-3771
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the quality of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for dental caries prevention in children and adolescents MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a systematic search of CPGs on caries preventive measures between 2005 and 2016. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, TripDatabase, websites of CPG developers, compilers of CPGs, scientific societies and ministries of health. We included CPGs with recommendations on sealants, fluorides and oral hygiene. Three reviewers independently assessed the included CPGs using the AGREE II instrument. We calculated the standardised scores for the six domains and made a final recommendation about each CPG. Also, we calculated the overall agreement among calibrated reviewers with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). RESULTS: Twenty-two CPGs published were selected from a total of 637 references. Thirteen were in English and nine in Spanish. The overall agreement between reviewers was very good (ICC = 0.90; 95%CI 0.89-0.92). The mean score for each domain was the following: Scope and purpose 89.6 ± 12%; Stakeholder involvement 55.0 ± 15.6%; Rigour of development 64.9 ± 21.2%; Clarity of presentation 84.8 ± 14.1%; Applicability 30.6 ± 31.5% and Editorial independence 59.3 ± 25.5%. Thirteen CPGs (59.1%) were assessed as "recommended", eight (36.4%) "recommended with modifications" and one (4.5%) "not recommended". CONCLUSIONS: The overall quality of CPGs in caries prevention was moderate. The domains with greater deficiencies were Applicability, Stakeholder involvement and Editorial independence. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Clinicians should use the best available CPGs in dental caries prevention to provide optimal oral health care to patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00784-018-2405-2

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[PMID]: 29522787
[Au] Autor:Eltahlah D; Lynch CD; Chadwick BL; Blum IR; Wilson NHF
[Ad] Address:University Dental Hospital, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:An update on the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations.
[So] Source:J Dent;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1879-176X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The aim of this study was to review patterns of restoration placement and replacement. A previous study had been carried out in the late 1990s and this study sought to update the literature in this important aspect of dental practice. METHOD: Studies based on the protocol of Mjör (1981) were selected. Such studies involved participating dentists completing a proforma each time a patient presented for a new or replacement restoration. RESULTS: Twenty-five papers were included in this study, of which 12 were included in the original review. The pre-1998 review reported on the placement of 32,697 restorations of which 14,391 (44%) were initial placements and 18,306 (56%) were replacements. The new studies included in the post-1998 review reported on an additional 54,023 restorations, of which 22,625 (41.9%) were initial placements and 31,398 (58.1%) were replacements. Therefore, across all studies considered, information is available on 86,720 restorations, of which, 37,016 (42.7%) were new placements and 49,704 (57.3%) were replacements. Comparing review periods, there was a reduction in the placement of amalgam restorations from 56.7% (pre-1998 review) to 31.2% (post-1998 review), with a corresponding increase in the placement of resin composites from 36.7% to 48.5%. The most common use of amalgam was seen in Nigeria (71% of restorations), Jordan (59% of restorations) and the UK (47% of restorations). The most frequent use of resin composite was seen in Australia (55% of restorations), Iceland (53% of restorations) and Scandinavia (52% of restorations). Secondary caries was the most common reason for replacing restorations (up to 59% of replacement restorations). CONCLUSION: In the years subsequent to the initial review, replacement of restorations still accounts for more than half of restorations placed by dentists, and the proportion of replacement restorations continues to increase. Trends towards the increased use of resin composites is noted in recent years. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Further research is required in this area to investigate changes in the approaches to the restoration of teeth, especially with increased understanding of the concept of restoration repair as an alternate to replacement.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29496806
[Au] Autor:Ria S; Cox MJ; Quinn BF; San Diego JP; Bakir A; Woolford MJ
[Ad] Address:Dr. Ria is a clinician, Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Northwick Park Hospital, London; Dr. Cox is Emerita Professor of Information Technology in Education, Dental Institute and School of Education and Communication Studies, King's College London; Dr. Quinn is Senior Specialist Clinical Teacher,
[Ti] Title:A Scoring System for Assessing Learning Progression of Dental Students' Clinical Skills Using Haptic Virtual Workstations.
[So] Source:J Dent Educ;82(3):277-285, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1930-7837
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to develop and test a scoring system to assess the learning progression of novice dental students using haptic virtual workstations. For the study, 101 first-year dental students at a UK dental school conducted one practice task (task 1) and four simulated cavity removal tasks (tasks 2-5) of increasing difficulty over two laboratory sessions in 2015. Performance data on the students' attempts were recorded as haptic technology-enhanced learning (hapTEL) log-files showing the percentage of caries, healthy tissue, and pulp removed. On-screen results were photographed and submitted by the students to the tutors. A scoring system named the Accuracy of Caries Excavation (ACE) score was devised to score these results and achieve an even distribution of scores and a calculated combined score. A total of 127 individual logged attempts by 80% of the students over sessions 1 and 2 were recorded and submitted to the tutors. The mean ACE scores for both sessions for tasks 2 through 5 were 9.2, 11.6, 6.4, and 4.9, respectively; for Session 2 (tasks 3-5), scores were 12.4, 6.7, and 5.0, respectively (p<0.001). The average performance on task 3, which was attempted in similar numbers during both sessions, improved from the first to the second session (8.14 vs. 12.38; p=0.009). Using the HapTEL system in a first-year BDS curriculum improved the students' performance of simulated cavity preparation after practicing over two sessions. Use of the ACE scoring system enabled tutors to make consistent assessments across a large student cohort and provided an objective method of formative assessment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Clinical Competence
Educational Measurement/methods
Students, Dental
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Clinical Competence/standards
Dental Cavity Preparation/standards
Education, Dental/standards
Humans
User-Computer Interface
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180303
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21815/JDE.018.028

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[PMID]: 29521375
[Ti] Title:Cost-effectiveness of caries-preventive fluoride varnish applications in clinic settings among patients of low, moderate and high risk.
[So] Source:Br Dent J;224(5):357, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5373
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Application of fluoride varnish targeted at high risk individuals may be more cost effective.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.194

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[PMID]: 29521364
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of oral health education on oral hygiene and dental caries in schoolchildren: Systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Br Dent J;224(5):357, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5373
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Analysis of recently published research appears to show only short-term improvements in plaque indices.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.195

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[PMID]: 29521360
[Ti] Title:Economic evaluation of dental sealants: A systematic literature review.
[So] Source:Br Dent J;224(5):357, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5373
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Caries risk assessment and the venue for placement may be relevant.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.197

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[PMID]: 29518788
[Au] Autor:Ekstrand KR; Gimenez T; Ferreira FR; Mendes FM; Braga MM
[Ad] Address:Department of Odontology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:The International Caries Detection and Assessment System - ICDAS: A Systematic Review.
[So] Source:Caries Res;52(5):406-419, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1421-976X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the overall reproducibility and accuracy of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) for assessing coronal caries lesions, and (2) to investigate the use of systems associated with the ICDAS for activity assessment of coronal caries lesions. Specific search strategies were adopted to identify studies published up to 2016. For the first objective, we selected studies that assessed primary coronal caries lesions using the ICDAS as a reference standard. A total of 54 studies were included. Meta-analyses summarized the results concerning reproducibility and accuracy (correlation with histology, summary ROC curves [SROC], and diagnostic odds ratio [DOR]). The latter 2 were expressed at D1/D3 levels. The heterogeneity of the studies was also assessed. Reproducibility values (pooled) were > 0.65. The ICDAS mostly presented a good overall performance as most areas under SROC were > 0.75 at D1 and > 0.90 at D3; DOR ≥6. For the second objective, we selected studies investigating activity assessment associated with the ICDAS. The meta-analyses pooled results based on the same methodology and parameters as above. Longitudinal findings regarding caries progression were described to estimate the validity of these systems. On average, the systems for activity assessment of caries lesions showed moderate values concerning reproducibility and overall performance. Active caries lesions were more prone to progress than inactive ones after 2 years. In conclusion, the ICDAS presented a substantial level of reproducibility and accuracy for assessing primary coronal caries lesions. Additional systems associated with the ICDAS that classify caries lesion activity can be useful as they are moderately reproducible and accurate.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000486429

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[PMID]: 29518346
[Au] Autor:Solbiati J; Frias-Lopez J
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
[Ti] Title:Metatranscriptome of the Oral Microbiome in Health and Disease.
[So] Source:J Dent Res;:22034518761644, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1544-0591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The last few decades have witnessed an increasing interest in studying the human microbiome and its role in health and disease. The focus of those studies was mainly the characterization of changes in the composition of the microbial communities under different conditions. As a result of those studies, we now know that imbalance in the composition of the microbiome, also referred to as microbial dysbiosis, is directly linked to developing certain conditions. Dysbiosis of the oral microbiome is a prime example of how this imbalance leads to disease in the case of periodontal disease. However, there is considerable overlap in the phylogenetic profiles of microbial communities associated with active and inactive lesions, suggesting that the difference in periodontal status of those sites may not be explained solely by differences in the subgingival microbial composition. These findings suggest that differences in functional activities may be the essential elements that define the dysbiotic process. Researchers have recently begun to study gene expression of the oral microbiome in situ with the goal of identifying changes in functional activities that could explain the transition from health to disease. These initial results suggest that, rather than a specific composition, a better understanding of oral dysbiosis can be obtained from the study of functional activities of the microbial community. In this review, we give a summary of these initial studies, which have opened a new door to our understanding of the dynamics of the oral community during the dysbiotic process in the oral cavity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0022034518761644


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