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[PMID]: 29521836
[Au] Autor:Aydinli HH; Peirce C; Aytac E; Remzi FH
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, New York University Langone Health, New York, New York.
[Ti] Title:A Novel Closure Technique for Complex Abdominal Wounds.
[So] Source:Dis Colon Rectum;61(4):521-526, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0358
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Abdominal wound closure is a challenge in patients undergoing colorectal surgery with a complex history of multiple abdominopelvic operations. Loss of domain of the abdominal fascia because of prior laparotomies precludes the use of simple, everyday abdominal wound closure techniques. Furthermore, ongoing intra-abdominal sepsis, with or without a concurrent entero- or colocutaneous fistula, increases the risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality in this patient population. We propose an abdominal wound closure technique for patients with multiple previous complex operations and subsequent ongoing abdominopelvic sepsis. TECHNIQUE: Following completion of the intra-abdominal component of the operation, the abdominal wall fascial edges are identified and mobilized to allow for a smooth skin closure. The skin is brought together with a small amount of subcutaneous tissue in the abdominal wound line and sutured with a 1.0 Prolene stitch by using the vertical mattress technique. For both wound edges, a dental roll is inserted between the entry and exit points of the suture, with the suture material placed above and over the dental roll, and thus the dental roll is incorporated within the stitch when it is tied down. These stitches and dental rolls are placed along the length of the wound. No mesh is utilized, and the technique achieves skin closure with development of a subsequent ventral hernia. RESULTS: Good postoperative short-term and long-term overall outcomes were achieved in 14 patients who underwent complex abdominal wound closure. Two patients required further late operative intervention because of the incarceration of the known ventral hernia (at 34 and 120 months postoperatively). CONCLUSIONS: Complex abdominal wound closure in this setting is safe and feasible to achieve a healthy abdominal wall closure and enable healing by primary intention after colorectal surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/DCR.0000000000001032

  2 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29503240
[Au] Autor:Buccheri D; Chirco PR; Geraci S; Caramanno G; Cortese B
[Ad] Address:Interventional Cardiology, San Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Agrigento, Italy. Electronic address: dariobuccheri@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Coronary Artery Fistulae: Anatomy, Diagnosis and Management Strategies.
[So] Source:Heart Lung Circ;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1444-2892
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Coronary artery fistula (CAF) is a relatively rare anatomic abnormality of the coronary arteries that afflicts 0.002% of the general population and represents 14% of all the anomalies of coronary arteries. Its clinical relevance focusses mainly on the mechanism of "coronary steal phenomenon", causing myocardial functional ischaemia even in the absence of stenosis, hence common symptoms are angina or effort dyspnoea. The suggested diagnostic approach is guided by the patient's symptoms and consists of a number of instrumental examinations like ECG, treadmill test, echocardiography, computed tomography scan, cardiac magnetic resonance and coronary angiography. If it is not an incidental finding, coronary angiography is required in view of the optimal therapeutic planning. Small sized fistulae are usually asymptomatic and have an excellent prognosis if managed medically with clinical follow-up with echocardiography every 2 to 5 years. In the case of symptomatic, large-sized or giant fistulae an invasive treatment, by transcatheter approach or surgical ligation, is usually a reasonable choice, and both strategies show equivalent results at long-term follow-up. Antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of bacterial endocarditis is recommended in all patients with coronary artery fistulae who undergo dental, gastrointestinal or urological procedures. A life-long follow-up is always essential to ensure that the patient is not undergoing progression of disease or further cardiac complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29476672
[Au] Autor:Du Y; Zhou W; Pan Y; Tang Y; Wan L; Jiang H
[Ad] Address:Number 136, Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, China, wanlinzhongren2006@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Block iliac bone grafting enhances osseous healing of alveolar reconstruction in older cleft patients: A radiological and histological evaluation.
[So] Source:Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal;23(2):e216-e224, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1698-6946
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Older alveolar cleft patients (>12 years old) often have wide bone defect as well as teeth loss, resulting in poor osseous healing with conventional alveolar bone grafting (ABG). In this study, we investigated a surgical technique of block iliac bone grafting for the alveolar cleft reconstruction and evaluated the clinical and radiological outcomes of these cleft patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifteen patients were included in this study. All cases received preoperative cone bean computed tomography (CBCT) scans for the alveolar cleft evaluation. Osseous outcomes of block iliac bone grafting were assessed at 1 week, 3- and 6-month postoperatively. Volume changes and bone resorption rates were calculated using the measurement modules of Simplant software. Bone samples from one patient undergoing dental implantation were assessed by micro-CT and histological examination. The morbidities of donor-site were analyzed by clinical examination and questionnaire survey. RESULTS: The average age of the case series was 18.53±2.50 years. The intraoral incision of thirteen cases healed well. However, two cases had oronasal fistula and graft exposure at 1-week postoperatively. The results of follow-up CBCT scans showed significant resistance to radiation on both sides of the bone graft, suggesting a good osseous healing and new bone formation. The mean residual bone volume was 1.68±0.26 cm3, 1.29±0.23 cm3 and 1.15±0.23 cm3 at 1-week, 3- and 6-month postoperatively. Correspondingly, the mean bone resorption rates in 3- and 6-month postoperative were 21.78±6.88% and 30.66±8.97%, respectively. From micro-CT and HE examinations, the block bone samples exhibited a cancellous structure in which mature bone trabecula and functional blood vessels appeared. The average scores of donor-site morbidities were drastically decreased at 3- and 6-month postoperatively compared with those at 1-week postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that block iliac bone grafting could achieve satisfying osseous outcomes in older alveolar cleft patients, and this technique provided favorable bony condition for further treatments, especially dental implantation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4317/medoral.21991

  4 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29486682
[Au] Autor:Nottrott K; Guio C; Schramme M
[Ad] Address:1 Equine Department, VetAgro-Sup, University of Lyon, Marcy l'Etoile, France.
[Ti] Title:Successful Treatment of a Persistent Oroantral Fistula via Transbuccal and Transnasal Endoscopic Debridement in a Horse.
[So] Source:J Vet Dent;35(1):28-34, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0898-7564
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report an unusual case of a young Quarter Horse with a large dental fracture fragment displaced into the maxillary sinus, leaving an oroantral communication that caused food impaction and metaplastic calcification in the sinus and facial deformation with cutaneous fistulation. Oral extraction of a remaining tooth fragment from its alveolus was succeeded by a maxillary sinusotomy for removal of the abnormal sinus contents. Since the oroantral fistula did not heal spontaneously following the placement of a silicone dental prosthesis, minimally invasive transbuccal and transnasal endoscopic approaches were used to encourage closure of the oroantral fistula by alveolar granulation. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic features of this case may be helpful to clinicians when dealing with similar cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0898756418754316

  5 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29485557
[Au] Autor:Demetoglu U; Ocak H; Bilge S
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin.
[Ti] Title:Closure of Oroantral Communication With Plasma-Rich Fibrin Membrane.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oroantral communication (OAC) is the opening between the maxillary sinus and oral cavity. It may cause oroantral fistula or maxillary sinusitis if left untreated. The surgical closure of the OAC within 48 hours was recommended to avoid the complications like sinus infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the treatment of OACs with plasma-rich fibrin (PRF) which is safe and easy to implement in the OACs.This study was conducted with the patients, who required the treatment of the OAC, which was developed after the posterior maxillary tooth extraction in the Dental and Maxillofacial Department of the Faculty of Dentistry in Adnan Menderes University.Plasma-rich fibrin membranes were inserted in layers into the tooth socket so that they covered the OAC. Then these membranes were fixated with the sutures to the surrounding gingiva. Antibiotic (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1000 mg), analgesic (dexketoprofen trometamol and/or paracetamol), and oral rinse (0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate) agents were prescribed to all patients. The patients were examined in the 3rd and 7th days and 2 months after the operation.All patients tolerated PRF perfectly, and the soft tissue recovery was completed without any problem. Full epithelization was observed in the defect area in all patients. The OAC did not relapse in any patient.Plasma-rich fibrin technique is a simple and effective method, which can be used in the treatment of OACs with a diameter of 5 mm or less with a low risk of complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004360

  6 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29388788
[Au] Autor:Petrungaro PS; Gonzalez S; Villegas C
[Ad] Address:Private Practice, Periodontics and Implantology, Chicago, Illinois.
[Ti] Title:Correction of Large Oro-antral Communications From Previously Failed Implant Treatment: Reconstruction of Hard and Soft Tissues.
[So] Source:Compend Contin Educ Dent;39(2):e5-e8, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2158-1797
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:As dental implants become more popular for the treatment of partial and total edentulism and treatment of "terminal dentitions," techniques for the management of the atrophic posterior maxillae continue to evolve. Although dental implants carry a high success rate long term, attention must be given to the growing numbers of revisions or retreatment of cases that have had previous dental implant treatment and/or advanced bone replacement procedures that, due to either poor patient compliance, iatrogenic error, or poor quality of the pre-existing alveolar and/or soft tissues, have led to large osseous defects, possibly with deficient soft-tissue volume. In the posterior maxillae, where the poorest quality of bone in the oral cavity exists, achieving regeneration of the alveolar bone and adequate volume of soft tissue remains a complex procedure. This is made even more difficult when dealing with loss of dental implants previously placed, aggressive bone reduction required in various implant procedures, and/or residual sinus infections precluding proper closure of the oral wound margins. The purpose of this article is to outline a technique for the total closure of large oro-antral communications, with underlying osseous defects greater than 15 mm in width and 30 mm in length, for which multiple previous attempts at closure had failed, to achieve not only the reconstruction of adequate volume and quality of soft tissues in the area of the previous fistula, but also total regeneration of the osseous structures in the area of the large void.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29351027
[Au] Autor:Tan A; Heijdenrijk K; Moues CM
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Medical Centre of Leeuwarden, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Custom-Made Palatal Shield Use in Cleft Palate and Fistula Repair: A Potential Benefit for Fast Postoperative Recovery.
[So] Source:Cleft Palate Craniofac J;55(2):307-311, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To review our experience with a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) protective shield used as an adjunct to protect the newly restored palate in wide bilateral cleft and complex fistula closure without diet restrictions. DESIGN: Clinical cohort study. SETTING: Division of Plastic Surgery and Maxillary Surgery. PATIENTS: A selection of 22 cleft palate children undergoing (tertiary) palatal fistula repair (n = 16) or closure of a complex wide primary palatal defect (n = 6). INTERVENTIONS: One month prior to surgery, a plaster model of the palate was made adding a 5- to 8-mm-thick layer of dental putty to the level of the dental arch. On top of the putty, a 1.5-mm-thick PMMA shield was created to cover the postoperative elevated and restored palate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Fistula recurrence rate, postoperative complications, days of hospitalization. RESULTS: All patients maintained durable and safe palatal closure without fistula recurrence within the follow-up period, varying from 1 until 4 years. Recovery was fast, with a mean duration of hospitalization of 1.5 days. All patients could directly resume their normal diet. CONCLUSIONS: A PMMA shield has been shown to be a safe and helpful adjunct in complex fistula repair and late anterior palate repair.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180119
[Lr] Last revision date:180119
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/1055665617727001

  8 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29282172
[Au] Autor:Soares TRC; Silva LPD; Andrade Risso P; Maia LC; Primo LG
[Ad] Address:PhD candidate, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, at the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Management of a Permanent Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Vital Pulp and Necrotic Dens Invaginatus Type III.
[So] Source:J Dent Child (Chic);84(3):149-151, 2017 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1935-5068
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This is a case report on the management of a vital lateral incisor with a radiolucent cervical area associated with the presence of necrotic pulp due to a dens invaginatus (DI) type III. A nine-year-old boy presented to a university pediatric dental clinic with dental trauma. The examination showed poor oral hygiene, an uncomplicated fracture in the permanent maxillary left central incisor, and a fistula near the permanent maxillary right lateral incisor. A radiograph showed that the right lateral incisor had incomplete root development and a type III DI. Although sensitive to thermal pulp testing, tracing of the fistula indicated that the radiolucent area was associated with the DI, extending laterally to the periodontal ligament. Endodontic treatment was performed only in the invagination, keeping the root canal of the lateral incisor vital. After two years of follow-up, complete root formation and injury repair associated with invagination were observed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171228
[Lr] Last revision date:171228
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29263519
[Au] Autor:Guo YD; Zhang S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing 100081, China.
[Ti] Title:[Preliminary research of Er:YAG laser used for pulpotomy of Beagle dogs].
[So] Source:Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban;48(4):714-719, 2016 Aug 18.
[Is] ISSN:1671-167X
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of erbium:yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG)laser irradiation on pulp and formation of dentin bridge. The beagle dogs' coronal pulp is amputated by Er:YAG laser. METHODS: In the study, 24 premolar teeth of two one-year-old Beagle dogs were used. They were divided into 3 groups: bur group, 200 mJ laser group,100 mJ laser group. The coronal pulp were removed by traditional bur or 200 mJ/20 Hz or 100 mJ/20 Hz Er:YAG laser. Then, they were dressed with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and sealed with resin. Clinical, radiological and histological analyses were performed 1 day, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment. The mobility and gingiva situation were evaluated for clinical evaluation. Periapical films were used for radiological evaluation. The extracted teeth were preserved in 10% formalin. After decalcification, tissue processing, paraffin embedding, serial sectioning at 5 µm thickness, staining (Hematoxylin and Eosin, HE), the samples were assessed by an independent observer for calcified bridge formation and radicular pulp inflammation. The mean thickness of dental bridge was measured if there was complete dental bridge. RESULTS: Clinical evaluation: there were no signs of fistula or mobility or any abnormal symptoms in Er:YAG laser groups and bur group during the observation period. Radiological evaluation: there were no signs of widened periodontal ligament or root absorption or periapical radiolucency in Er:YAG laser groups and bur group. Histological evaluation: there was no severe inflammation reaction in 200 mJ/20 Hz, 100 mJ/20 Hz Er:YAG laser groups and bur group 1 day, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks post-operation in Hematoxylin and Eosin staining. A complete dentin bridge could be observed in 200 mJ/20 Hz, 100 mJ/20 Hz Er:YAG laser groups, while no complete dentin bridge in bur group 2 weeks post-operation. Complete dental bridge could be observed in each group 4 and 8 weeks post-operation. The mean thickness of dental bridge 4 weeks post-operation in 200 mJ laser group was 77 µm, 100 mJ laser group 87 µm, and bur group 101 µm, and 8 weeks post-operation in 200 mJ laser group was 222 µm,100 mJ laser group 160 µm,and bur group 152 µm. CONCLUSION: The 200 mJ/20 Hz and 100 mJ/20 Hz Er:YAG laser pulpotomies show no harm to radicular pulp and can promote the formation of dentin bridge.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171221
[Lr] Last revision date:171221
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 1856 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29134118
[Au] Autor:Raeissadat SA; Babaee M; Rayegani SM; Hashemi Z; Hamidieh AA; Mojgani P; Fouladi Vanda H
[Ad] Address:Clinical Research Development Center of Shahid Modarres Hospital & Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Research Center of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:An overview of platelet products (PRP, PRGF, PRF, etc.) in the Iranian studies.
[So] Source:Future Sci OA;3(4):FSO231, 2017 11.
[Is] ISSN:2056-5623
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aim: The aim of the study was to carry out a review of published studies on various platelet products in Iranian studies. Materials & methods: Electronic databases were searched for relevant articles. Two review authors independently extracted data via a tested extraction sheet, and disagreements were resolved by a meeting with a third review author. Results: Bone disorders (25%), wound and fistula (16%), dental and gingival disorders (14%) and osteoarthritis (11%) have more relative frequency based on different fields. Conclusion: The necessity of pursuing standard protocols in the preparation of platelet products, stating the precise content of platelets and growth factors, and long-term follow-up of study subjects were the most important points in Iranian studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171127
[Lr] Last revision date:171127
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4155/fsoa-2017-0045


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