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[PMID]: 29511365
[Au] Autor:Wu X; Hu L; Li Y; Li Y; Wang F; Ma P; Wang J; Zhang C; Jiang C; Wang S
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University.
[Ti] Title:SCAPs Regulate Differentiation of DFSCs During Tooth Root Development in Swine.
[So] Source:Int J Med Sci;15(4):291-299, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1449-1907
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The tooth root transmits and balances occlusal forces through the periodontium to the alveolar bone. The periodontium, including the gingiva, the periodontal ligament, the cementum and the partial alveolar bone, derives from the dental follicle (DF), except for the gingiva. In the early developmental stages, the DF surrounds the tooth germ as a sphere and functions to promote tooth eruption. However, the morphological dynamics and factors regulating the differentiation of the DF during root elongation remain largely unknown. Miniature pigs are regarded as a useful experimental animal for modeling in craniofacial research because they are similar to humans with respect to dentition and mandible anatomy. In the present study, we used the third deciduous incisor of miniature pig as the model to investigate the factors influencing DF differentiation during root development. We found that the DF was shaped like a crescent and was located between the root apical and the alveolar bone. The expression levels of WNT5a, ß-Catenin, and COL-I gradually increased from the center of the DF (beneath the apical foramen) to the lateral coronal corner, where the DF differentiates into the periodontium. To determine the potential regulatory role of the apical papilla on DF cell differentiation, we co-cultured dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) with stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAPs). The osteogenesis and fibrogenesis abilities of DFSCs were inhibited when being co-cultured with SCAPs, suggesting that the fate of the DF can be regulated by signals from the apical papilla. The apical papilla may sustain the undifferentiated status of DFSCs before root development finishes. These data yield insight into the interaction between the root apex and surrounding DF tissues in root and periodontium development and shed light on the future study of root regeneration in large mammals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.7150/ijms.22495

  2 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510696
[Au] Autor:Gupta N; Vujicic M; Yarbrough C; Harrison B
[Ad] Address:American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute, 211 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. guptani@ada.org.
[Ti] Title:Disparities in untreated caries among children and adults in the U.S., 2011-2014.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;18(1):30, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The Affordable Care Act of 2010 increased dental coverage for children in the United States, (U.S.) but not for adults. Few studies in current scholarship make use of up-to-date, nationally representative data to examine oral health disparities in the U.S. POPULATION: The purpose of this study is to use nationally representative data to determine the prevalence of untreated caries among children and adults of different socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups and to examine the factors associated with untreated caries among children and adults. METHODS: This study used the 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) demographic, oral health questionnaire, and oral health dentition examination data (n = 7008 for children; n = 9673 for adults). Participants that had a standardized oral health examination and at least one natural primary or permanent tooth considering 28 tooth spaces were included in this study. Our main outcome measure was untreated coronal caries defined as decay on the crown or enamel surface of a tooth that had not been treated or filled. Population estimates were calculated to determine the prevalence of untreated caries among children and adults in the United States. Frequencies and Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare those with and without untreated caries. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the factors associated with untreated caries. We conducted analyses among children and adults separately. RESULTS: From 2011 to 2014, 12.4 million children and 57.6 million adults in the United States had untreated caries. Age, family income level, recent dental visit, and financial and non-financial barriers were significantly associated with untreated caries in both children and adults. Race/ethnicity, gender and education level were also significantly associated with untreated caries among adults. The odds of untreated caries associated with financial barriers were 2.06 for children and 2.84 for adults while the odds of untreated caries associated with non-financial barriers were 2.86 for children and 1.67 for adults. CONCLUSIONS: Demographic and socio-economic disparities in untreated caries exist among children and adults.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12903-018-0493-7

  3 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524028
[Au] Autor:Pabel SO; Freitag F; Hrasky V; Zapf A; Wiegand A
[Ad] Address:Department of Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Randomised controlled trial on differential learning of toothbrushing in 6- to 9-year-old children.
[So] Source:Clin Oral Investig;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1436-3771
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of differential learning of toothbrushing compared to habitual toothbrushing and instruction/demonstration of toothbrushing on plaque reduction and gingival inflammation of primary school children. METHODS: Children (6-9 years) were subjected to a toothbrushing training consisting of 15 days (3 × 5 days, interval 2 days, 3 min/day) and randomly assigned to one of three groups (each n = 18): habitual toothbrushing/control, instruction/demonstration of toothbrushing, differential learning of toothbrushing. The differential learning approach comprised 15 different movement exercises (1/day), while instruction/demonstration of toothbrushing was based on repetitive practice of toothbrushing. Plaque (Turesky-modified Quigley-Hein plaque index (T-QHI)) and papilla bleeding (papilla bleeding index (PBI)) scores were assessed prior to the first toothbrushing (t0, baseline) and 21 (t1), 42 (t2) and 63 (t3) days after beginning of the study. Primary statistical analyses were performed with cumulative logit regression models with repeated measures. The global significance level was set to 5% two-sided. RESULTS: At all time points, PBI and T-QHI were significantly reduced by differential learning compared to instruction/demonstration of toothbrushing and habitual toothbrushing. Compared to baseline, differential learning improved PBI and T-QHI significantly at all time points. In the other groups, no significant reduction of PBI compared to baseline was observed. T-QHI was significantly reduced by habitual toothbrushing only at t1 and by instruction/demonstration of toothbrushing at t1 and t2. Differential learning had an improved effect on posterior compared to anterior teeth. CONCLUSION: Differential learning of toothbrushing improved plaque reduction and reduced gingival inflammation compared to habitual toothbrushing and instruction/demonstration of toothbrushing in 6- to 9-year-old children in mixed dentition. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Toothbrushing skills of children might be improved by differential learning. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN14951343, https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN14951343?
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00784-017-2313-x

  4 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508445
[Au] Autor:Zucchelli G; Sharma P; Mounssif I
[Ti] Title:Esthetics in periodontics and implantology.
[So] Source:Periodontol 2000;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0757
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Periodontal plastic surgery comprises an increasing part of clinical periodontology. Clinical trials have traditionally used professionals to judge esthetic outcome, and few studies have addressed patient needs and requests (true end points). Development of universally accepted and validated methods for professional esthetic assessment, together with standardized questionnaires for patient-perceived outcome, may help to provide better insights into the true needs and benefits of periodontal and implant-associated plastic surgery. In this volume of Periodontology 2000, experienced researchers and clinicians from different subdisciplines of periodontology evaluate: treatment of gingival recession with or without papilla elevation; clinical crown lengthening in the natural dentition and in prosthodontic preparative treatment; periodontal regeneration around natural teeth; and soft-tissue augmentation in edentulous areas. Similarly, experts in different areas of implant science address esthetic outcomes with single and multiple implant rehabilitation, alveolar ridge preservation, implant positioning and immediate implant placement in the esthetic zone.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/prd.12207

  5 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520827
[Au] Autor:Beck JD; Moss KL; Morelli T; Offenbacher S
[Ad] Address:Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
[Ti] Title:In search of appropriate measures of periodontal status: The Periodontal Profile Phenotype (P ) system.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;89(2):166-175, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This paper focuses on Periodontal Profile Class (PPC), a component of the Periodontal Profile Phenotype (P ) System that may be more representative of the periodontitis phenotype than current case definitions of periodontitis. Data illustrate the unique aspects of the PPC compared with other commonly used periodontal classification indices. METHODS: Latent Class Analysis (LCA) identified discrete classes of individuals grouped by tooth-level clinical parameters. The analysis defined seven distinct periodontal profile classes (PPC A through G) and seven distinct tooth profile classes (TPC A through G). This LCA classification was an entirely data-derived agnostic process without any preconceived presumptions of what constituted disease. RESULTS: Comparing the PPC with the Centers for Disease Control/American Academy of Periodontology (CDC/AAP) and European indices, the PPC is unique in that it contains four disease classes not traditionally used. Less than half of individuals classified as Healthy by both the CDC/AAP and European indices were Healthy using the PPC. About 25% of those classified as Severe by CDC/AAP and European indices were PPC-Severe. The remainder spread out over the High Gingival Index, Posterior Disease, Tooth Loss, and Severe Tooth Loss phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS: The PPC classification provides a significant departure from the traditional clinical case status indices that have been used, but has resulted in clinical phenotypes that are quite familiar to most clinicians who take notice of the distribution of missing teeth, areas of recession, diminished periodontal support, and other aspects of the dentition while conducting a periodontal examination. The mutually exclusive categories provided by the PPC system provide periodontal clinical summaries that can be an important component of precision dentistry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0424

  6 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29499242
[Au] Autor:Chatzopoulos GS; Koidou VP; Lunos S; Wolff LF
[Ad] Address:Department of Developmental and Surgical Sciences, Division of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, 515 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. Electronic address: chatz005@umn.edu.
[Ti] Title:Implant and root canal treatment: Survival rates and factors associated with treatment outcome.
[So] Source:J Dent;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1879-176X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To assess and compare the survival rates of implant and root canal treatment as well as to investigate the effect of patient and tooth related variables on the treatment outcome in a large-scale population-based study. METHODS: Dental records of patients who received root canal treatment and implant therapy were retrieved from the electronic records of the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Demographic characteristics, dental insurance status, socioeconomic status as well as medical history and tobacco use were recorded. The treatment outcome was included as a binary variable (survival/failure). RESULTS: A total of 13,434 records of patients who had implant (33.6%) or root canal therapy (66.4%) were included. The survival rate analysis and Kaplan-Meier table revealed the majority of the implants were removed within the first year (58.8%), while only 35.2% of the root canal treatments failed in the same time period. The overall survival rate was significantly (p < 0.001) higher for implant therapy (98.3%) compared to root canal treatment (72.7%). A statistically significant association was found between treatment (p 
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29495026
[Au] Autor:Milosevic A
[Ad] Address:Head of Prosthodontics, Building 34, Hamdan Bin Mohamed College of Dental Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences (MBRU), Dubai Healthcare City, POB 505055, Dubai, UAE.
[Ti] Title:Clinical guidance and an evidence-based approach for restoration of worn dentition by direct composite resin.
[So] Source:Br Dent J;224(5):301-310, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5373
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper aims to provide the dentist with practical guidance on the technique for direct composite restoration of worn teeth. It is based on current evidence and includes practical advice regarding type of composite, enamel and dentine preparation, dentine bonding and stent design. The application of direct composite has the advantage of being additive, conserving as much of the remaining worn tooth as possible, ease of placement and adjustment, low maintenance and reversibility. A pragmatic approach to management is advocated, particularly as many of the cases are older patients with advanced wear. Several cases restored by direct composite build-ups illustrate what can be achieved. The restoration of the worn dentition may be challenging for many dentists. Careful planning and simple treatment strategies, however, can prove to be highly effective and rewarding. By keeping any intervention as simple as possible, problems with high maintenance are avoided and management of future failure is made easier. An additive rather than a subtractive treatment approach is more intuitive for worn down teeth. Traditional approaches of full-mouth rehabilitation with indirect cast or milled restorations may still have their place but complex treatment modalities will inevitably be more time consuming, more costly, possibly require specialist care and still have an unpredictable outcome. Composite resin restorations are a universal restorative material familiar to dentists from early-on in the undergraduate curriculum. This review paper discusses the application of composite to restore the worn dentition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.168

  8 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29495025
[Au] Autor:Carvalho JC; Scaramucci T; Aimée NR; Mestrinho HD; Hara AT
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Catholic University of Louvain, Av. Hippocrate 10, B-1200, Brussels, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Early diagnosis and daily practice management of erosive tooth wear lesions.
[So] Source:Br Dent J;224(5):311-318, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5373
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper explores some of the most relevant questions faced by dental practitioners when diagnosing early erosive tooth wear (ETW) and implementing non-operative management of this condition over time. It focuses on the identification of clinical signs and common locations of ETW lesions, the assessment of individual risk and the implementation of non-operative management strategies, aiming to arrest and/or reduce the rate of ETW progression and avoid its advance to pathological stages. To this end, we present a novel and comprehensive approach that considers the whole dentition of patients rather than individual groups of teeth or dental surfaces only, illustrating it with a series of clinical photographs. Dental practitioners may find this approach particularly helpful as it closely simulates the clinical examinations of patients of all age groups carried out in daily practice. The clinical signs of early ETW lesions are subtle and often not perceived as relevant by unaware clinicians. However, the early diagnosis and implementation of non-operative management strategies, especially at younger ages, is fundamental for the proper control of ETW over time.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.172

  9 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 29267662
[Au] Autor:Santos PSD; Pedrotti D; Braga MM; Rocha RO; Lenzi TL
[Ad] Address:Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, School of Dentistry, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Materials used for indirect pulp treatment in primary teeth: a mixed treatment comparisons meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Braz Oral Res;31:e101, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:1807-3107
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study aimed to systematically review the literature to address the question regarding the influence of different materials in the clinical and radiographic success of indirect pulp treatment in primary teeth. A literature search was carried out for articles published prior to January 2017 in PubMed/MEDLINE, CENTRAL, Scopus, TRIP and ClinicalTrials databases; relevant articles included randomized clinical trials that compared materials used for indirect pulp treatment in primary teeth. Two reviewers independently selected the studies and extracted the data. The effects of each material on the outcome (clinical and radiographic failures) were analyzed using a mixed treatment comparisons meta-analysis. The ranking of treatments according to their probability of being the best choice was also calculated. From 1,088 potentially eligible studies, 11 were selected for full-text analysis, and 4 were included in the meta-analysis. In all papers, calcium hydroxide liner was used as the control group versus an adhesive system, resin-modified glass ionomer cement or placebo. The follow-up period ranged from 24 to 48 months, with dropout rates of 0-25.7%. The material type did not significantly affect the risk of failure of the indirect pulp treatment. However, calcium hydroxide presented a higher probability of failure. In conclusion, there is no scientific evidence showing the superiority of any material used for indirect pulp treatment in primary teeth.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Calcium Hydroxide/therapeutic use
Dental Pulp Capping/methods
Dental Pulp/drug effects
Glass Ionomer Cements/therapeutic use
Gutta-Percha/therapeutic use
Tooth, Deciduous/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Dental Caries/therapy
Humans
Publication Bias
Radiography, Dental
Tooth, Deciduous/diagnostic imaging
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Glass Ionomer Cements); 9000-32-2 (Gutta-Percha); PF5DZW74VN (Calcium Hydroxide)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 24995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28459247
[Au] Autor:Tunkiwala A; Chitguppi R
[Ad] Address:Prosthetic Dentistry, University of Mumbai, Mumbai, India; Clinical Practice, Mumbai, India; Director, Impart Education, Mumbai, India.
[Ti] Title:Conservative, Functional, and Esthetic Rehabilitation of Severe Palatal Erosion (Class IV) Using Modified Dahl Approach.
[So] Source:Compend Contin Educ Dent;38(5):289-294; quiz 296, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2158-1797
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This article demonstrates the clinical application of biomechanical and occlusal principles to conservatively provide optimal clinical outcomes in restoring an eroded anterior dentition. The authors manage a challenging case involving limited palatal clearance (ie, deep bite) coupled with palatal erosion and wear by combining the centric relation (CR) and Dahl principles to create anterior interocclusal space to reduce the need for more invasive palatal reduction. The combined use of adhesive restorations-resin composites on the palatal surface and indirect porcelain veneers on the facial/incisal surfaces-through enamel and dentin bonding helped optimize esthetic and functional/biomechanical aspects. This ultraconservative approach enabled the desired esthetic and biomechanical outcomes to be achieved through the treatment of localized anterior tooth erosion and wear. In short, when treating eroded maxillary anterior teeth with deep bite, adequate restorative space should first be created by conjoining CR and Dahl principles before using adhesive dentistry to restore with bonded composites and porcelain veneers.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dental Restoration, Permanent/methods
Dental Veneers
Esthetics, Dental
Tooth Erosion/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Centric Relation
Dental Bonding
Dental Porcelain
Female
Humans
Incisor/pathology
Maxilla
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (lithia disilicate); 12001-21-7 (Dental Porcelain)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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