Database : MEDLINE
Search on : developmental and disabilities [Words]
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[PMID]: 29524016
[Au] Autor:Soke GN; Maenner MJ; Christensen D; Kurzius-Spencer M; Schieve LA
[Ad] Address:Epidemic Intelligence Service, Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. yxo2@cdc.gov.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of Co-occurring Medical and Behavioral Conditions/Symptoms Among 4- and 8-Year-Old Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Selected Areas of the United States in 2010.
[So] Source:J Autism Dev Disord;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1573-3432
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We compared the prevalence of various medical and behavioral co-occurring conditions/symptoms between 4- and 8-year-olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from five sites in the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network during the 2010 survey year, accounting for sociodemographic differences. Over 95% of children had at least one co-occurring condition/symptom. Overall, the prevalence was higher in 8- than 4-year-olds for 67% of co-occurring conditions/symptoms examined. Further, our data suggested that co-occurring conditions/symptoms increased or decreased the age at which children were first evaluated for ASD. Similarly, among the 8-year-olds, the prevalence of most co-occurring conditions/symptoms was higher in children with a previous ASD diagnosis documented in their records. These findings are informative for understanding and screening co-occurring conditions/symptoms in ASD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10803-018-3521-1

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[PMID]: 29520764
[Au] Autor:Ruane A; Carr A
[Ad] Address:Clinical Psychology, School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Stepping Stones Triple P for Parents of Children with Disabilities.
[So] Source:Fam Process;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1545-5300
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the effectiveness of Stepping Stones Triple P (SSTP) parent training programs on child behavior problems and parenting outcomes in families of children with developmental disabilities. Sixteen suitable studies including data from over 900 families were identified in a search for English language published and unpublished controlled outcome studies. SSTP has five levels on a graded continuum of increasing intensity targeting families with differing degrees of treatment need from low intensity media-based parenting information campaigns at level 1, through brief interventions at levels 2 and 3, to more intensive parent training and family therapy interventions at levels 4 and 5. Analyses were conducted on the combination of all levels of SSTP and separately for each level. For combined levels, significant overall effect sizes were found for parent-reported child problems (d = 0.46), researcher observed child behavior (d = 0.51), parenting style (d = 0.70), parenting satisfaction/self-efficacy (d = 0.44), parental adjustment (d = 0.27), and coparental relationship (d = 0.26), but not researcher-observed parent behavior. Strong support was found for level 4 SSTP as an effective intervention for improving child and parent outcomes in families of children with disabilities who have clinically significant problems. Less intensive SSTP interventions for cases with circumscribed difficulties yielded fewer significant treatment effects, and there were relatively few studies of such interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/famp.12352

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[PMID]: 29516447
[Au] Autor:Klin A; Jones W
[Ad] Address:Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine. Atlanta, Georgia, EE.UU.
[Ti] Title:Una agenda para la medicina del neurodesarrollo en el siglo XXI: lecciones aportadas por el autismo. An agenda for 21st century neurodevelopmental medicine: lessons from autism.
[So] Source:Rev Neurol;66(S01):S3-S15, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1576-6578
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:spa; eng
[Ab] Abstract:The future of neurodevelopmental medicine has the potential of situating child neurology at the forefront of a broad-based public health effort to optimize neurodevelopmental outcomes of children born with high-prevalence and diverse genetic, pre- and peri-natal, and environmental burdens compromising early brain development and leading to lifetime disabilities. Building on advancements in developmental social neuroscience and in implementation science, this shift is already occurring in the case of emblematic neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. Capitalizing on early neuroplasticity and on quantification of trajectories of social-communicative development, new technologies are emerging for high-throughput and cost-effective diagnosis and for community-viable delivery of powerful treatments, in seamless integration across previously fragmented systems of healthcare delivery. These solutions could be deployed in the case of other groups of children at greater risk for autism and communication delays, such as those born extremely premature or with congenital heart disease. The galvanizing concept in this aspirational future is a public health focus on promoting optimal conditions for early brain development, not unlike current campaigns promoting pre-natal care, nutrition or vaccination.
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL CONFERENCE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29514540
[Au] Autor:Sterman JJ; Naughton GA; Bundy AC; Froude E; Villeneuve MA
[Ad] Address:a School of Allied Health , Australian Catholic University , North Sydney , NSW , Australia.
[Ti] Title:Planning for outdoor play: Government and family decision-making.
[So] Source:Scand J Occup Ther;:1-12, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1651-2014
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite indisputable developmental benefits of outdoor play, children with disabilities can experience play inequity. Play decisions are multifactorial; influenced by children's skills and their familial and community environments. Government agencies have responsibilities for equity and inclusion of people with disabilities; including in play. AIM: This multiple-perspective case study aimed to understand outdoor play decision-making for children with disabilities from the perspectives and interactions of: local government and families of primary school-aged children with disabilities. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Five mothers, four local government employees, and two not-for-profit organization representatives participated in semi-structured interviews. Inductive and iterative analyzes involved first understanding perspectives of individuals, then stakeholders (local government and families), and finally similarities and differences through cross-case analysis. FINDINGS: Local government focused more on physical access, than social inclusion. Local government met only minimal requirements and had little engagement with families. This resulted in poor understanding and action around family needs and preferences when designing public outdoor play spaces. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: To increase meaningful choice and participation in outdoor play, government understanding of family values and agency around engagement with local government needs to improve. Supporting familial collective capabilities requires understanding interactions between individuals, play, disability, and outdoor play environments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/11038128.2018.1447010

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[PMID]: 29426389
[Au] Autor:Friedman C; VanPuymbrouck L
[Ad] Address:Carli Friedman, PhD, is Director of Technical Assistance and Data Analysis, CQL | The Council on Quality and Leadership, Towson, MD; cfriedman@thecouncil.org.
[Ti] Title:Occupational Therapy in Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services Waivers.
[So] Source:Am J Occup Ther;72(2):7202205120p1-7202205120p9, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0272-9490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) 1915(c) waivers are the largest provider of long-term services and supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). In this study, we explored how HCBS IDD waivers projected providing occupational therapy services in Fiscal Year (FY) 2015. METHOD: Medicaid HCBS IDD waivers across the nation gathered from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed to determine how they projected providing occupational therapy services in terms of service expenditures and utilization. RESULTS: In FY 2015, $14.13 million of spending was projected for occupational therapy services of 7,500 participants. However, there was large heterogeneity across states and services in terms of total projected spending, spending per participant, and reimbursement rates. CONCLUSION: Comparisons across states strengthen the profession's ability to assert the value of its services. These findings can help identify best practices and can advocate for the refinement of state occupational therapy programs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5014/ajot.2018.024273

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[PMID]: 29426387
[Au] Autor:Selanikyo E; Weintraub N; Yalon-Chamovitz S
[Ad] Address:Efrat Selanikyo, PhD, is Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Professions, Ono Academic College, Kiryat Ono, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of the Co-PID for Students With Moderate Intellectual Disability.
[So] Source:Am J Occup Ther;72(2):7202205090p1-7202205090p10, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0272-9490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: We aimed to corroborate the effectiveness of the Collaborative Consultation for Participation of Students With Intellectual Disability (Co-PID), intended for enhancing participation in classroom-related activities. METHOD: The study took place in two special education schools and included students with moderate intellectual and developmental disabilities ages 7-20 yr. The schools were randomly assigned to intervention (Co-PID; n = 28 students, n = 4 teachers) and control (In-Service [IS]; n = 32 students, n = 7 teachers) groups. Participation was evaluated at pre- and posttest of an 8-mo intervention. RESULTS: The Co-PID improved students' ability to choose among provided options. Additionally, the Co-PID group achieved more goals (measured by goal attainment scaling) than the IS group in all participation areas, and their enhanced participation transferred to other school environments (as measured by the School Function Assessment). CONCLUSION: The Co-PID was found to be an effective program for enhancing classroom and school participation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5014/ajot.2018.024109

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[PMID]: 29325143
[Au] Autor:Hedgecock JB; Dannemiller LA; Shui A; Rapport MJ; Katz T
[Ad] Address:J.B. Hedgecock, PT, DPT, PCS, Children's Hospital Colorado, Parker Therapy Care, 19284 Cottonwood Dr, Ste 101, Parker, CO 80138 (USA).
[Ti] Title:Associations of Gross Motor Delay, Behavior, and Quality of Life in Young Children With Autism.
[So] Source:Phys Ther;, 2018 Jan 09.
[Is] ISSN:1538-6724
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have gross motor delays (GMD) that may accentuate problem daytime behavior (PDB) and health-related quality of life (QoL). Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the degree of GMD in young children with ASD and associations of GMD with PDB and QoL. The primary hypothesis was that GMD significantly modifies the associations between internalizing or externalizing PDB and QoL. Design: This study used a cross-sectional, retrospective analysis. Methods: Data from 3253 children who were 2 to 6 years old and who had ASD were obtained from the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network and analyzed using unadjusted and adjusted linear regression. Measures included the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, 2nd edition, gross motor v-scale score (VABS-GM) (for GMD), the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (for PDB), and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) (for QoL). Results: The mean VABS-GM was 12.12 (SD = 2.2), representing performance at or below the 16th percentile. After adjustment for covariates, the internalizing CBCL t score decreased with increasing VABS-GM (ß = -0.64 SE = 0.12). Total and subscale PedsQL scores increased with increasing VABS-GM (for total score: ß = 1.79 SE = 0.17; for subscale score: ß = 0.9-2.66 SE = 0.17-0.25). CBCL internalizing and externalizing t scores decreased with increasing PedsQL total score (ß = -0.39 SE = 0.01; ß = -0.36 SE = 0.01). The associations between CBCL internalizing or externalizing t scores and PedsQL were significantly modified by VABSGM (ß = -0.026 SE = 0.005]; ß = -0.019 SE = 0.007). Limitations: The study lacked ethnic and socioeconomic diversity. Measures were collected via parent report without accompanying clinical assessment. Conclusions: GMD was independently associated with PDB and QoL in children with ASD. GMD modified the association between PDB and QoL. Children with ASD and co-occurring internalizing PDB had greater GMD than children without internalizing PDB; therefore, these children may be most appropriate for early physical therapist evaluation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ptj/pzy006

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[PMID]: 29293868
[Au] Autor:Jacobson LA; Schneider H; Mahone EM
[Ad] Address:Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA.
[Ti] Title:Preschool Inhibitory Control Predicts ADHD Group Status and Inhibitory Weakness in School.
[So] Source:Arch Clin Neuropsychol;, 2017 Dec 26.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5843
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Discriminative utility of performance measures of inhibitory control was examined in preschool children with and without ADHD to determine whether performance measures added to diagnostic prediction and to prediction of informant-rated day-to-day executive function. Method: Children ages 4-5 years (N = 105, 61% boys; 54 ADHD, medication-naïve) were assessed using performance measures (Auditory Continuous Performance Test for Preschoolers-Commission errors, Conflicting Motor Response Test, NEPSY Statue) and caregiver (parent, teacher) ratings of inhibition (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool version). Results: Performance measures and parent and teacher reports of inhibitory control significantly and uniquely predicted ADHD group status; however, performance measures did not add to prediction of group status beyond parent reports. Performance measures did significantly predict classroom inhibitory control (teacher ratings), over and above parent reports of inhibitory control. Conclusions: Performance measures of inhibitory control may be adequate predictors of ADHD status and good predictors of young children's classroom inhibitory control, demonstrating utility as components of clinical assessments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/arclin/acx124

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[PMID]: 29512564
[Au] Autor:Gupta H; Sabde Y
[Ad] Address:Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Sciences, Indore, India.
[Ti] Title:Medicosocial characteristics as predictors of school achievements in students with intellectual and developmental disabilities: A follow-up study in ujjain and shajapur districts of Madhya Pradesh, India.
[So] Source:Indian J Public Health;62(1):39-46, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0019-557X
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: For a long time, there have been arguments about which factors influence the skill development of students with intellectual disability in rehabilitation centers. Objective: The present follow-up study was thus planned to analyze the effect of the demographic variables related to disabled child, his/her parents and the family; their schooling pattern and types of study settings and the associated comorbidities on improvement in the performance score of students attending these study settings in one academic year. Methods: The study was conducted among children (n = 204) with intellectual disability receiving rehabilitation services in centers run by a nongovernmental organization in two districts of Central India. Results: : Application of regression analysis concluded that among various hypothesized factors higher birth order, more time spent by parents for child's development at home, high performing classes, absence of epilepsy, psychiatric comorbidities, and associated physically challenged were significantly associated with improvement in overall mean performance score. Conclusions: : The study delineates the need to motivate parents, so that they can involve themselves to develop their child's full potential. Identification of associated comorbidities is recommended and parents need to be appraised accordingly.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijph.IJPH_366_16

  10 / 52235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512155
[Au] Autor:Frampton SE; Alice Shillingsburg M
[Ad] Address:Marcus Autism Center.
[Ti] Title:Teaching children with autism to explain how: A case for problem solving?
[So] Source:J Appl Behav Anal;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1938-3703
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Few studies have applied Skinner's (1953) conceptualization of problem solving to teach socially significant behaviors to individuals with developmental disabilities. The current study used a multiple probe design across behavior (sets) to evaluate the effects of problem-solving strategy training (PSST) on the target behavior of explaining how to complete familiar activities. During baseline, none of the three participants with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) could respond to the problems presented to them (i.e., explain how to do the activities). Tact training of the actions in each activity alone was ineffective; however, all participants demonstrated independent explaining-how following PSST. Further, following PSST with Set 1, tact training alone was sufficient for at least one scenario in sets 2 and 3 for all 3 participants. Results have implications for generative responding for individuals with ASD and further the discussion regarding the role of problem solving in complex verbal behavior.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jaba.445


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