Database : MEDLINE
Search on : diabetes and insipidus [Words]
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[PMID]: 29093382
[Au] Autor:Koide H; Shiga A; Komai E; Yamato A; Fujimoto M; Tamura A; Kono T; Nakayama A; Takiguchi T; Higuchi S; Sakuma I; Nagano H; Hashimoto N; Suzuki S; Takeda Y; Shibuya M; Nishioka H; Yamada S; Inoshita N; Ishiwatari N; Horiguchi K; Yokote K; Tanaka T
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Chiba University Hospital, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Prednisolone-responsive Postpartum IgG4-related Hypophysitis.
[So] Source:Intern Med;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We herein report the case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with severe headache and visual field defects after childbirth. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked swelling of the pituitary gland, and an endocrinological examination revealed panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus. An immunohistological analysis of a transsphenoidal biopsy sample of the pituitary gland showed the significant accumulation of an immunogloblin G4 (IgG4)-positive population, leading to the diagnosis of IgG4-related hypophysitis. The patient was treated with prednisolone, which markedly reduced the swelling of the pituitary gland, in association with recovery of the pituitary function. This is a rare case of biopsy-proven IgG4-related hypophysitis with a postpartum onset.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.8446-16

  2 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29088954
[Au] Autor:Vedantam A; Robertson CS; Gopinath SP
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
[Ti] Title:Morbidity and mortality associated with hypernatremia in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Neurosurg Focus;43(5):E2, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1092-0684
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE Hypernatremia is independently associated with increased mortality in critically ill patients. Few studies have evaluated the impact of hypernatremia on early mortality in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated in a neurocritical care unit. METHODS A retrospective review of patients with severe TBI (admission Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8) treated in a single neurocritical care unit between 1986 and 2012 was performed. Patients with at least 3 serum sodium values were selected for the study. Patients with diabetes insipidus and those with hypernatremia on admission were excluded. The highest serum sodium level during the hospital stay was recorded, and hypernatremia was classified as none (≤ 150 mEq/L), mild (151-155 mEq/L), moderate (156-160 mEq/L), and severe (> 160 mEq/L). Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to determine independent predictors of early mortality. RESULTS A total of 588 patients with severe TBI were studied. The median number of serum sodium measurements for patients in this study was 17 (range 3-190). No hypernatremia was seen in 371 patients (63.1%), mild hypernatremia in 77 patients (13.1%), moderate hypernatremia in 50 patients (8.5%), and severe hypernatremia in 90 patients (15.3%). Hypernatremia was detected within the 1st week of admission in 79.3% of patients (n = 172), with the majority of patients (46%) being diagnosed within 72 hours after admission. Acute kidney injury, defined as a rise in creatinine of ≥ 0.3 mg/dl, was observed in 162 patients (27.6%) and was significantly associated with the degree of hypernatremia (p < 0.001). At discharge, 148 patients (25.2%) had died. Hypernatremia was a significant independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratios for mild: 3.4, moderate: 4.4, and severe: 8.4; p < 0.001). Survival analysis showed significantly lower survival rates for patients with greater degrees of hypernatremia (log-rank test, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Hypernatremia after admission in patients with severe TBI was independently associated with greater risk of early mortality. In addition to severe hypernatremia, mild and moderate hypernatremia were significantly associated with increased early mortality in patients with severe TBI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3171/2017.7.FOCUS17418

  3 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28943556
[Au] Autor:Ohashi K; Morishita M; Watanabe H; Sada KE; Katsuyama T; Miyawaki Y; Katsuyama E; Narazaki M; Tatebe N; Watanabe K; Kawabata T; Wada J
[Ad] Address:Department of Nephrology, Rheumatology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Central Diabetes Insipidus in Refractory Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis.
[So] Source:Intern Med;56(21):2943-2948, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We herein describe two cases of refractory antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) complicated with diabetes insipidus (DI) possibly related to hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP). One patient had microscopic polyangiitis and HP, which were refractory to cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and mizoribine. Remission was finally achieved with the use of etanercept, but DI occurred 5 years later. The other patient had granulomatosis with polyangiitis, which that was refractory to cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, MMF, and rituximab. DI subsequently developed, but was successfully treated with etanercept. Dura mater hypertrophy was macroscopically observed in the latter case.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.8683-16

  4 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28074401
[Au] Autor:Cuesta M; Hannon MJ; Thompson CJ
[Ad] Address:Academic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital/RCSI Medical School, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9, Co., Dublin, Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Adipsic diabetes insipidus in adult patients.
[So] Source:Pituitary;20(3):372-380, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1573-7403
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a very rare disorder, characterized by hypotonic polyuria due to arginine vasopressin (AVP) deficiency and failure to generate the sensation of thirst in response to hypernatraemia. As the sensation of thirst is the key homeostatic mechanism that prevents hypernatraemic dehydration in patients with untreated diabetes insipidus (DI), adipsia leads to failure to respond to aquaresis with appropriate fluid intake. This predisposes to the development of significant hypernatraemia, which is the typical biochemical manifestation of adipsic DI. METHODS: A literature search was performed to review the background, etiology, management and associated complications of this rare condition. RESULTS: ADI has been reported to occur in association with clipping of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm following subarachnoid haemorrhage, major hypothalamic surgery, traumatic brain injury and toluene exposure among other conditions. Management is very difficult and patients are prone to marked changes in plasma sodium concentration, in particular to the development of severe hypernatraemia. Associated hypothalamic disorders, such as severe obesity, sleep apnoea and thermoregulatory disorders are often observed in patients with ADI. CONCLUSION: The management of ADI is challenging and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prognosis is variable; hypothalamic complications lead to early death in some patients, but recent reports highlight the possibility of recovery of thirst.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11102-016-0784-4

  5 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29081004
[Au] Autor:Barbot M; Ceccato F; Zilio M; Albiger N; Sigon R; Rolma G; Boscaro M; Scaroni C; Bilora F
[Ad] Address:Endocrinology Unit, Department of Medicine DIMED, University of Padova, Via Ospedale Civile, 105, 35128, Padova, Italy. mattiabarbot@alice.it.
[Ti] Title:Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus.
[So] Source:Pituitary;, 2017 Oct 28.
[Is] ISSN:1573-7403
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Central diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease characterized by the excretion of excessive volumes of dilute urine due to reduced levels of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP), caused by an acquired or genetic defect in the neurohypophysis. The aim of this study was to identify any autonomic dysfunction (AD) in patients with DI as a possible cofactor responsible for their reportedly higher mortality. METHODS: The study involved 12 patients (6 females) with central idiopathic DI and a well-controlled electrolyte balance, and 12 controls matched for age, sex and cardiovascular risk factors, who were assessed using the tilt, lying-to-standing, hand grip, deep breath, Valsalva maneuver and Stroop tests. RESULTS: The tilt test showed a significantly more pronounced decrease in both systolic (- 20.67 ± 18 vs. - 1.92 ± 6.99 mmHg, p = 0.0009) and diastolic blood pressure (- 10.5 ± 14.29 vs. - 1.5 ± 5 mmHg, p = 0.012) in patients than in controls. Three patients with DI had to suspend the test due to the onset of syncope. The lying-to-standing test also revealed a marked reduction in blood pressure in patients with DI (1.05 ± 0.13 vs. 1.53 ± 0.14, p = 0.0001). Similar results emerged for the Valsalva maneuver (Valsalva ratio, 1.24 ± 0.19 vs. 1.79 ± 0.11, p < 0.0001) and deep breath test (1.08 ± 0.11 vs. 1.33 ± 0.08, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: All the principal autonomic tests performed in the study were concordant in indicating that patients with central DI have an impaired autonomic nervous system function despite a normal hydroelectrolytic balance under desmopressin therapy. This impairment may reflect damage to the autonomic system per se and/or the absence of any vasoactive effect of AVP on vascular smooth muscle. In our opinion, patients with central DI should be educated on how to prevent orthostatic hypotension, and pharmacological treatment should be considered for patients with a more marked impairment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171029
[Lr] Last revision date:171029
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11102-017-0846-2

  6 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28070828
[Au] Autor:Chon H; Yoon K; Kwon DH; Kim CJ; Kim MS; Cho YH
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for pituitary metastases.
[So] Source:J Neurooncol;132(1):127-133, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1573-7373
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pituitary metastases (PMs) are uncommon, representing only 1% of pituitary lesions. The diagnosis of PMs can be challenging and an optimal management remains to be determined. Here, we present a pilot clinical study on the efficacy and safety of hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with an optimized dosimetric plan in treating PMs. Between June 2013 and December 2014, seven consecutive patients (4 men and 3 women; median age 62 years) had been diagnosed with PMs based on their characteristic clinical and radiological features and subsequently treated using hypofractionated SRS. Primary cancers originated from the lung (n = 5) or the breast (n = 2). All patients presented with diabetes insipidus (DI). Anterior pituitary and visual dysfunction were combined in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), PMs involved the pituitary stalk and/or the posterior lobe in all patients. SRS of a cumulative marginal dose 31 Gy with dose-volume constraints for the optic apparatus was delivered in 5 daily fractions. As results, tumor was locally controlled in all patients with substantial responses on MRI (including complete remission in 4 patients). The median survival time was 14 months (range, 6-24 months) after SRS. DI and visual dysfunction improved in all patients, although anterior pituitary dysfunction did not recover. No patients experienced any deterioration in visual, pituitary, or other cranial nerve functions. These results suggest a promising role of hypofractionated SRS in treating PMs in terms of both tumor control and functional outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11060-016-2346-z

  7 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28989176
[Au] Autor:Allison SJ
[Ti] Title:Renal physiology: ER-associated degradation in diabetes insipidus.
[So] Source:Nat Rev Nephrol;, 2017 Oct 09.
[Is] ISSN:1759-507X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/nrneph.2017.144

  8 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28917091
[Au] Autor:Ogawa Y; Niizuma K; Tominaga T
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Kohnan Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan. Electronic address: yogawa@kohnan-sendai.or.jp.
[Ti] Title:Recovery from diabetes insipidus and preservation of thyroid function after craniopharyngioma removal and pituitary stalk sectioning.
[So] Source:Clin Neurol Neurosurg;162:36-40, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6968
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Craniopharyngioma is a slow-growing tumor, but long-term tumor control with maintenance of quality of life is sometimes very difficult to achieve, and hypothalamic disturbance should be strictly avoided in the treatment. However, management of the pituitary gland and/or pituitary stalk varies among surgeons and institutions. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective review identified 44 patients, 24 males and 20 females with craniopharyngiomas who were initially treated by surgery through the extended transsphenoidal approach with pituitary stalk sectioning at a single institute. If the tumor bed involved the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, pituitary stalk, anterior and/or mid portion of the third ventricle floor, these structures were removed en-bloc together with the tumor. The closest attention was paid to preserve fine arteries running along the surface of optic chiasm and the lateral walls of the third ventricle. Surgical outcome and changes in postoperative endocrinological status were investigated. RESULTS: Gross total removal was achieved in 40 of 44 patients (91%), and all patients could discharge without autonomic and/or thermal disturbances. Tumor remnants were identified with tight adhesion to the perforating arteries in 2 cases, tight adhesion to mammillary bodies in 1, and optic chiasm in 1. Administration of anti-diuretic hormone could be discontinued in 23 of 44 patients (52.3%) with improved diabetes insipidus (DI), although no patient could discontinue glucocorticoid administration. Preservation of thyroid function was achieved in another 23 of 44 patients (52.3%), and recovery from DI was correlated with preservation of thyroid function (p=0.016). CONCLUSION: Pituitary dysfunction is partially reversible even with pituitary stalk sectioning. Regrowth of tumor in the anterior and/or mid portion of the third ventricle floor including pituitary stalk can possibly be prevented by aggressive tumor removal, and co-achievement of long-term tumor control with maintenance of quality of life could be possible to preserve the lateral wall of the third ventricle.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171029
[Lr] Last revision date:171029
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28139295
[Au] Autor:Khositseth S; Charngkaew K; Boonkrai C; Somparn P; Uawithya P; Chomanee N; Payne DM; Fenton RA; Pisitkun T
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathumthani, Thailand. Electronic address: Sookkasem@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Hypercalcemia induces targeted autophagic degradation of aquaporin-2 at the onset of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.
[So] Source:Kidney Int;91(5):1070-1087, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1523-1755
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypercalcemia can cause renal dysfunction such as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), but the mechanisms underlying hypercalcemia-induced NDI are not well understood. To elucidate the early molecular changes responsible for this disorder, we employed mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) isolated from parathyroid hormone-treated rats at onset of hypercalcemia-induced NDI. Forty-one proteins, including the water channel aquaporin-2, exhibited significant changes in abundance, most of which were decreased. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that many of the downregulated proteins were associated with cytoskeletal protein binding, regulation of actin filament polymerization, and cell-cell junctions. Targeted LC-MS/MS and immunoblot studies confirmed the downregulation of 16 proteins identified in the initial proteomic analysis and in additional experiments using a vitamin D treatment model of hypercalcemia-induced NDI. Evaluation of transcript levels and estimated half-life of the downregulated proteins suggested enhanced protein degradation as the possible regulatory mechanism. Electron microscopy showed defective intercellular junctions and autophagy in the IMCD cells from both vitamin D- and parathyroid hormone-treated rats. A significant increase in the number of autophagosomes was confirmed by immunofluorescence labeling of LC3. Colocalization of LC3 and Lamp1 with aquaporin-2 and other downregulated proteins was found in both models. Immunogold electron microscopy revealed aquaporin-2 in autophagosomes in IMCD cells from both hypercalcemia models. Finally, parathyroid hormone withdrawal reversed the NDI phenotype, accompanied by termination of aquaporin-2 autophagic degradation and normalization of both nonphoshorylated and S256-phosphorylated aquaporin-2 levels. Thus, enhanced autophagic degradation of proteins plays an important role in the initial mechanism of hypercalcemic-induced NDI.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aquaporin 2/metabolism
Autophagy
Diabetes Insipidus, Nephrogenic/physiopathology
Hypercalcemia/complications
Kidney Tubules, Collecting/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Chromatography, Liquid
Diabetes Insipidus, Nephrogenic/etiology
Diabetes Insipidus, Nephrogenic/metabolism
Dihydrotachysterol/toxicity
Disease Models, Animal
Down-Regulation
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Half-Life
Humans
Hypercalcemia/chemically induced
Intercellular Junctions/metabolism
Intercellular Junctions/ultrastructure
Kidney Tubules, Collecting/metabolism
Lysosome-Associated Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism
Male
Microscopy, Immunoelectron
Microtubule-Associated Proteins/metabolism
Parathyroid Hormone/pharmacology
Phosphorylation
Proteolysis
Proteomics/methods
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Aqp2 protein, rat); 0 (Aquaporin 2); 0 (LC3 protein, rat); 0 (Lamp1 protein, rat); 0 (Lysosome-Associated Membrane Glycoproteins); 0 (Microtubule-Associated Proteins); 0 (Parathyroid Hormone); R5LM3H112R (Dihydrotachysterol)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170131
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 8861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29073294
[Au] Autor:Akturk Md HK; Yasa MSc S
[Ad] Address:Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA.
[Ti] Title:Previously unreported abnormalities in Wolfram Syndrome Type 2.
[So] Source:Pediatr Endocrinol Diabetes Metab;23(2):107-110, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2083-8441
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with non-autoimmune childhood onset insulin dependent diabetes and optic atrophy. WFS type 2 (WFS2) differs from WFS type 1 (WFS1) with upper intestinal ulcers, bleeding tendency and the lack ofdiabetes insipidus. Li-fespan is short due to related comorbidities. Only a few familieshave been reported with this syndrome with the CISD2 mutation. Here we report two siblings with a clinical diagnosis of WFS2, previously misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy-related blindness. We report possible additional clinical and laboratory findings that have not been pre-viously reported, such as asymptomatic hypoparathyroidism, osteomalacia, growth hormone (GH) deficiency and hepatomegaly. Even though not a requirement for the diagnosis of WFS2 currently, our case series confirm hypogonadotropic hypogonadism to be also a feature of this syndrome, as reported before.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.18544/PEDM-23.02.0081


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