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[PMID]: 29524917
[Au] Autor:Cardona M; Lewis ET; Turner RM; Alkhouri H; Asha S; Mackenzie J; Perkins M; Suri S; Holdgate A; Winoto L; Chang CW; Gallego-Luxan B; McCarthy S; Kristensen MR; O'Sullivan M; Skjøt-Arkil H; Ekmann AA; Nygaard HH; Jensen JJ; Jensen RO; Pedersen JL; Breen D; Petersen JA; Jensen BN; Mogensen CB; Hillman K; Brabrand M
[Ad] Address:The Simpson Centre for Health Services Research, South Western Sydney Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, PO Box 6087, UNSW, NSW, 1466 Australia. Electronic address: magnolia.cardona@unsw.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of a tool to predict short-term mortality in older people presenting at emergency departments: Protocol for a multi-centre cohort study.
[So] Source:Arch Gerontol Geriatr;76:169-174, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6976
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Prognostic uncertainty inhibits clinicians from initiating timely end-of-life discussions and advance care planning. This study evaluates the efficacy of the CriSTAL (Criteria for Screening and Triaging to Appropriate aLternative care) checklist in emergency departments. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of patients aged ≥65 years with any diagnosis admitted via emergency departments in ten hospitals in Australia, Denmark and Ireland. Electronic and paper clinical records will be used to extract risk factors such as nursing home residency, physiological deterioration warranting a rapid response call, personal history of active chronic disease, history of hospitalisations or intensive care unit admission in the past year, evidence of proteinuria or ECG abnormalities, and evidence of frailty to be concurrently measured with Fried Score and Clinical Frailty Scale. Patients or their informal caregivers will be contacted by telephone around three months after initial assessment to ascertain survival, self-reported health, post-discharge frailty and health service utilisation since discharge. Logistic regression and bootstrapping techniques and AUROC curves will be used to test the predictive accuracy of CriSTAL for death within 90 days of admission and in-hospital death. DISCUSSION: The CriSTAL checklist is an objective and practical tool for use in emergency departments among older patients to determine individual probability of death in the short-term. Its validation in this cohort is expected to reduce clinicians' prognostic uncertainty on the time to patients' death and encourage timely end-of-life conversations to support clinical decisions with older frail patients and their families about their imminent or future care choices.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524886
[Au] Autor:Shan Z; An N; Qin J; Yang J; Sun H; Yang W
[Ad] Address:Clinical Laboratory, Children's Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University, Henan Children's Hospital, Zhengzhou Children's Hospital, Zhengzhou City, Henan Province, China.
[Ti] Title:Long non-coding RNA Linc00675 suppresses cell proliferation and metastasis in colorectal cancer via acting on miR-942 and Wnt/ß-catenin signaling.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;101:769-776, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Substantial evidence has demonstrated the involvement of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) via their regulation on cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis pathways. The current study aimed to understand the role of lncRNA Linc00675 in the progression and metastasis of CRC and to identify the potential lncRNA-miRNA interactions and signaling pathways underlying the mechanisms of action of Linc00675 in CRC. Our data firstly demonstrated the down-regulation of Linc00675 in both CRC cells and clinical CRC tissues. Expression of Linc00675 was also relatively low in metastatic tumors and advanced tumors. Further studies also showed that overexpression of Linc00675 inhibited the proliferation, invasion and migration of CRC cells. In addition, our data also revealed the negative regulation of miR-942 by Linc00675 and the relatively higher expression of miR-942 in clinical CRC tissues. More importantly, the inhibitory effect of Linc00675 on proliferation, invasion and migration of HCT116 cells was also significantly attenuated in the presence of miR-942 mimic, suggesting that down-regulation of miR-942 represented one of the mechanisms by which Linc00675 inhibited the proliferation and metastasis of CRC. Furthermore, we also demonstrated the inhibition of Wnt/ß-catenin signaling in the Linc00675/miR-942 regulated pathway in CRC cells. Taken together, our findings suggested Linc00675 as a potential molecular marker and target for the diagnosis and treatment of CRC and enhanced the current understanding on the mechanisms of action of Linc00675 in CRC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524856
[Au] Autor:Kawaida H; Kimura A; Watanabe M; Akaike H; Hosomura N; Kawaguchi Y; Amemiya H; Sudo M; Kono H; Matsuda M; Fujii H; Ichikawa D; Fukasawa M; Takahashi E; Sano K; Inoue T
[Ad] Address:First Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Japan. Electronic address: kawaidah@yamanashi.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Successful laparoscopic partial gastrectomy and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy for gastric duplication cyst connecting with the pancreatic tail.
[So] Source:Int J Surg Case Rep;44:176-180, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:2210-2612
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Gastrointestinal duplication cyst is a congenital rare disease that may occur in any region from mouth to anus. Among them, gastric duplication cysts are very rare. CASE REPORT: Here we report A 23-year-old Japanese man who visited our hospital to evaluate an abdominal tumor. Abdominal computed tomography showed a well-circumscribed homogenous low-density mass measuring 6.2 × 6.0 cm between the pancreatic tail and the upper posterior wall on the gastric greater curvature, and the mass seemed to originate from the pancreatic tail. We found intraoperatively that the mass adhered to the stomach and pancreatic tail strongly, so we performed laparoscopic partial gastrectomy and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. Pathological findings showed that the lining epithelium of the cystic mass consisted of the gastric foveolar epithelium with fundic glands. Furthermore, the pancreatic tissue of the pancreatic tail and the muscular layer of the cystic mass were intermingled. DISCUSSION: GDCs are usually diagnosed at a younger age and in adults, they are very rare. Therefore, surgical resection is considered to be the best treatment due to the difficulty of diagnosis, and also that it mimics a pancreatic cystic tumor, and malignant transformation. Complete resection of the cyst is the ideal technique and laparoscopic surgery should be selected whenever possible. CONCLUSION: We experienced a case of GDC continuous to both stomach and pancreatic tail. Laparoscopic surgery is safety and useful even if GDC is continuous with both the stomach and the pancreas.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524832
[Au] Autor:Jonsson S; Oda H; Lundin E; Olsson J; Idahl A
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Science, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydial Heat Shock Protein 60 and Anti-Chlamydial Antibodies in Women with Epithelial Ovarian Tumors.
[So] Source:Transl Oncol;11(2):546-551, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1936-5233
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) infection has been suggested to promote epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) development. This study sought to explore the presence of C. trachomatis DNA and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (chsp60) in ovarian tissue, as well as anti-chlamydial IgG antibodies in plasma, in relation to subtypes of EOC. METHODS: This cross-sectional cohort consisted of 69 women who underwent surgery due to suspected ovarian pathology. Ovarian tissue and corresponding blood samples were collected at the time of diagnosis. In ovarian tumor tissue, p53, p16, Ki67 and chsp60 were analyzed immunohistochemically, and PCR was used to detect C. trachomatis DNA. Plasma C. trachomatis IgG and cHSP60 IgG were analyzed with a commercial MIF-test and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Eight out of 69 women had C. trachomatis DNA in their ovarian tissue, all were invasive ovarian cancer cases (16.7% of invasive EOC). The prevalence of the chsp60 protein, C. trachomatis IgG and cHSP60 IgG in HGSC, compared to other ovarian tumors, was 56.0% vs. 37.2% P = .13, 15.4% vs. 9.3% P = .46 and 63.6% vs. 45.5% P = .33 respectively. None of the markers of C. trachomatis infection were associated with p53, p16 or Ki67. CONCLUSIONS: C. trachomatis was detected in invasive ovarian cancer, supporting a possible role in carcinogenesis of EOC. However, there were no statistically significant associations of chsp60 in ovarian tissue, or plasma anti-chlamydial IgG antibodies, with any of the subtypes of ovarian tumors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524759
[Au] Autor:Cohan SL; Moses H; Calkwood J; Tornatore C; LaGanke C; Smoot KE; Meka V; Okwuokenye M; Hotermans C; Mendoza JP; Mann MK; Meltzer LA
[Ad] Address:Providence Multiple Sclerosis Center, Providence Health & Services, 9427 SW Barnes Road, Portland, OR 97225, USA; Providence Brain and Spine Institute, Providence Health & Services, 9135 SW Barnes Road, Suite 461, Portland, OR 97225, USA. Electronic address: stanley.cohan@providence.org.
[Ti] Title:Clinical outcomes in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who switch from natalizumab to delayed-release dimethyl fumarate: A multicenter retrospective observational study (STRATEGY).
[So] Source:Mult Scler Relat Disord;22:27-34, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:2211-0356
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF) may be a therapeutic option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who are treated with natalizumab and require a change in therapy. However, there is limited information regarding predictors of favorable treatment outcomes in patients switching from natalizumab to DMF. Clinical practices and sequencing protocols vary. Herein, we present the clinical results, including annualized relapse rate (ARR) and risk of relapse, of a phase 4 retrospective observational study of patients with RRMS who switched from natalizumab to DMF in a community practice setting (STRATEGY). METHODS: STRATEGY was performed through a single time point medical record abstraction; no study visits or procedures were required. Key inclusion criteria included age ≥ 18 years, RRMS diagnosis (McDonald criteria, 2010 revised), ≥ 12 months of continuous treatment with natalizumab monotherapy before DMF initiation, and initiation of DMF ≥ 12 months before enrollment. Patients were eligible to enroll regardless of current DMF use. RESULTS: A total of 530 patients at 45 US sites enrolled, and 506 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the modified evaluable population for analysis. Mean (SD) age at DMF initiation was 47.0 (10.9) years, with a mean (SD) of 12.7 (7.2) years since MS diagnosis. The mean (SD) duration of natalizumab treatment was 3.4 (1.9) years, and the mean (SD) washout from natalizumab discontinuation to DMF initiation (n = 502) was 101.6 (164.0) days. Overall risk of relapse 12 months after DMF initiation was 19.6%. Overall unadjusted ARR was higher during the 12 months following initiation of DMF treatment compared with the 12 months following initiation of natalizumab treatment (rate ratio, 2.32 [95% CI, 1.69-3.18]; p < 0.0001), but was lower compared with that observed in the year before initiation of natalizumab (rate ratio, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.40-0.64]; p < 0.0001). At 1 year following initiation of DMF treatment, the relapse rate was lower for patients who did not experience a relapse during 1 year following initiation of natalizumab treatment than for those who did (rate ratio for relapse rate, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.16-1.38]; p = 0.1664). The relapse rate for patients who did not relapse during natalizumab treatment was significantly lower with a washout period of ≤ 90 days as compared with a washout period of > 90 days (rate ratio for relapse rate, 0.49 [95% CI, 0.26-0.90]; p = 0.0216). A total of 42 (8%) patients reported ≥ 1 adverse event leading to DMF discontinuation during the study; the most commonly reported events were gastrointestinal disorders (n = 21; 4%). CONCLUSIONS: Results from this multicenter retrospective observational study suggest that DMF may be an effective treatment option for patients who discontinue natalizumab in routine clinical practice. ARR was lower in patients who initiated DMF within 90 days of natalizumab discontinuation compared with patients who initiated DMF after 90 days of natalizumab discontinuation. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02159573.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524760
[Au] Autor:Di Pauli F; Reindl M; Berger T
[Ad] Address:Clinical Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria. Electronic address: franziska.dipauli@i-med.ac.at.
[Ti] Title:New clinical implications of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies in children with CNS demyelinating diseases.
[So] Source:Mult Scler Relat Disord;22:35-37, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:2211-0356
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acquired demyelinating CNS syndromes include a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes and different entities can overlap. Therefore, differential diagnosis is still challenging. A humoral immune reaction against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is present in a subgroup of these patients, particularly in children. Anti-MOG antibodies indicate a non-multiple sclerosis disease course. Indeed, early publications have suggested that anti-MOG antibodies argue for a monophasic course; recently an association with a high risk for recurrent non-MS disease has been shown. According new data, antibody analysis was included in a diagnostic algorithm for the diagnosis of acquired demyelinating CNS syndromes in children. Here, recent data from the implementation of anti-MOG antibodies in daily clinical practice are reviewed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524751
[Au] Autor:Yu W; Singh SS; Calhoun S; Zhang H; Zhao X; Yang F
[Ad] Address:School of Health Management and Education, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Medical Affairs, Pfizer Investment Co., Ltd, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Generalized anxiety disorder in urban China: Prevalence, awareness, and disease burden.
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;234:89-96, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Limited published research has quantified the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) prevalence and its burden in China. This study aimed to fill in the knowledge gap and to evaluate the burden of GAD among adults in urban China. METHODS: This study utilized existing data from the China National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS) 2012-2013. Prevalence of self-reported diagnosed and undiagnosed GAD was estimated. Diagnosed and undiagnosed GAD respondents were compared with non-anxious respondents in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), resource utilization, and work productivity and activity impairment using multivariate generalized linear models. A multivariate logistic model assessed the risk factors for GAD. RESULTS: The prevalence of undiagnosed/diagnosed GAD was 5.3% in urban China with only 0.5% of GAD respondents reporting a diagnosis. Compared with non-anxious respondents, both diagnosed and undiagnosed GAD respondents had significantly lower HRQoL, more work productivity and activity impairment, and greater healthcare resource utilization in the past six months. Age, gender, marital status, income level, insurance status, smoking, drinking and exercise behaviors, and comorbidity burdens were significantly associated with GAD. LIMITATIONS: This was a patient-reported study; data are therefore subject to recall bias. The survey was limited to respondents in urban China; therefore, these results focused on urban China and may be under- or over-estimating GAD prevalence in China. Causal inferences cannot be made given the cross-sectional nature of the study. CONCLUSIONS: GAD may be substantially under-diagnosed in urban China. More healthcare resources should be invested to alleviate the burden of GAD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524750
[Au] Autor:Araya R; Zitko P; Markkula N; Rai D; Jones K
[Ad] Address:Health Service & Population Research Department, IoPPN, King's College, London, UK. Electronic address: ricardo.araya@kcl.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Determinants of access to health care for depression in 49 countries: A multilevel analysis.
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;234:80-88, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The relative importance of individual and country-level factors influencing access to diagnosis and treatment for depression across the world is fairly unknown. METHODS: We analysed cross-national data from the WHO World Health Surveys. Depression diagnosis and access to health care were ascertained using a structured interview. Logistic Bayesian Multilevel analyses were performed to establish individual and country level factors associated with: (1) receiving a diagnosis and (2) accessing treatment for depression if a diagnosis was ascertained. RESULTS: The sample included 7870 individuals from 49 countries who met ICD-10 criteria for depressive episode in the past 12 months. A third (32%) of these individuals had ever been diagnosed with depression in their lifetime. Among those diagnosed with depression, 66% reported to have ever received treatment for depression. Although individual factors were more important determinants of access to treatment for depression, country-level factors explained 27.6% of the variance in access to diagnosis and 24.1% in access to treatment. Access to treatment for depression improved with increasing country income. Female gender, better education, the presence of physical co-morbidity, more material assets, and living in urban areas were individual level determinants of better access. LIMITATIONS: Data on other contextual factors was not available. Unmet need was likely underestimated, since only lifetime treatment data was available. CONCLUSION: This study highlights major inequalities in access to a diagnosis and treatment of depression. Unlike the prevalence of depression, where contextual factors have shown to have less importance, a significant proportion of the variance in access to depression care was explained by country-level income.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524723
[Au] Autor:Sedrati A; Drizi A; van Herendael B; Djokovic D
[Ad] Address:Independent consultant in Obstetrics & Gynecology, Constantine, Algeria.
[Ti] Title:Hysteroscopic Diagnosis of Omentum Incarceration Subsequent to an Iatrogenic Uterine Perforation.
[So] Source:J Minim Invasive Gynecol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1553-4669
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVE: To present and discuss the hysteroscopic aspects of incarcerated omentum through uterine perforation caused by previous dilatation and curettage (D&C) for incomplete first-trimester abortion. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Constantine University Hospital, Constantine, Algeria. PATIENT: A 40-year-old, G3P2 patient, with a history of an incomplete first-trimester spontaneous abortion, treated 6 months before by D&C, requiring medical assistance due to moderate, chronic pelvic pain. No other clinical or biological alteration was found. The ultrasound showed intracavitary hyperechogenic formation, infiltrating the myometrium posteriorly. INTERVENTION: Hysteroscopy revealed a fat-like lesion, arousing suspicion of residual trophoblast while differential diagnosis included intramyometrial fat metaplasia as well. A mechanical cold loop resection was initiated. Instrumental manipulation of the mass released yellow drops, probably of lipid nature, subsequently leading to the discovery of an uterine perforation, giving passage to omentum. Histological examination confirmed fat tissue. There was immediate resolution of symptoms. Laparoscopic repair was subsequently performed and consisted of suturing the defect. There were no further complications. MAIN RESULT: Few cases of omentum incarceration in perforated uterus, diagnosed during laparotomy or by magnetic resonance, have previously been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first case revealed through hysteroscopy. CONCLUSION: In women with a history of intracavitary interventions such as D&C, omentum incarceration should be considered when hysteroscopy demonstrates a fat-like formation and yellow droplets released by pressing or mobilizing the formation. Surgeons should be cautious, never using electrosurgery on formations whose origin arouses suspicion.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524707
[Au] Autor:Nishimura F; Park YS; Motoyama Y; Nakagawa I; Yamada S; Nakase H
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan. Electronic address: fnishi@naramed-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Pediatric case of xanthogranuloma in sellar region presenting visual disturbance successfully treated by endoscopic endonasal surgery.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Xanthomatous pituitary diseases rarely occur in childhood. We report a rare pediatric case of a xanthogranuloma that developed in the sellar region resulting in visual disturbance that was successfully treated by endoscopic endonasal surgery. CASE DESCRIPTIONS: A 13-year-old boy came to us with a headache and visual disturbance that had occurred 1 month prior. Clinical examination findings showed that he was alert with signs of bitemporal hemianopsia, an endocrinological examination showed partial hypopituitarism, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cystic mass in the sellar turcica compressing the optic apparatus. Endoscopic endonasal surgery was performed to decompress the optic apparatus and the mass was removed. Histopathological analysis of the tumor demonstrated granulomatous tissue with cholesterol clefts, foamy macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells, with no epithelial component. The diagnosis was xanthogranuloma of the sellar region. The patient gradually recovered from visual disturbance and was free from any neurological symptom 6 months after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Xanthogranuloma, although rare, should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a sellar/suprasellar lesion even in children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


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