Database : MEDLINE
Search on : dissociative and disorders [Words]
References found : 13608 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1361 go to page                         

  1 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29441972
[Au] Autor:Sakurada H; Yasuhara K; Kato K; Asano S; Yoshida M; Yamamura M; Tachi T; Teramachi H
[Ti] Title:An investigation of visual hallucinations associated with voriconazole administration to patients with hematological malignancies.
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(11):660-664, 2016 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Voriconazole (VRCZ) is commonly administered to treat fungal infections in patients with hematological malignancies. Some of these patients experience VRCZ-associated visual hallucinations. We conducted a retrospective survey to investigate the characteristic features of this side effect. Patients with hematological malignancies who were treated with VRCZ for a fungal infection after hospitalization at Ichinomiya municipal hospital between 1 October 2005 and 31 December 2015 were included in this study (n = 103). Fifteen of these (14.6%) reported visual hallucinations that started on day 1-7. Seven of these 15 patients developed this symptom rapidly (day 1 or 2). Three patients had transient symptoms (lasting 2-12 days), 6 patients experienced hallucinations throughout the treatment, and the duration was unknown in 6 patients. Eleven patients experienced visual hallucinations when their eyes were closed (73 %) and these disappeared when they opened their eyes. One patient had visual hallucinations with open eyes, while the state of the eyes was unknown in 3 patients. The patients saw a range of images including people, animals, landscapes, and foods; several reported seeing images like those found in movies. In addition, 9 of 15 patients (60%) with visual hallucinations had visual disturbances. This was a higher proportion than that observed in patients who did not develop hallucinations (17 of 88; 19.3 %; P < 0.05). However, we found no significant difference between the blood VCRZ concentrations of patients who developed or did not develop visual hallucinations. This study indicated that most of these patients had visual hallucinations that manifested on eye closure, and they did not progress to serious mental illness. Our findings emphasized the importance of fully explaining the features of this symptom to each patient prior to starting VRCZ administration in order to reduce anxiety. In addition, since VRCZ discontinuation will compromise patient management, therapeutic drug monitoring should be used to increase the likelihood of successful therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/adverse effects
Hallucinations/chemically induced
Hematologic Neoplasms/complications
Hematologic Neoplasms/psychology
Voriconazole/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antifungal Agents/blood
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
Female
Hallucinations/epidemiology
Hallucinations/psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoses/complications
Mycoses/prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Vision Disorders/chemically induced
Vision Disorders/epidemiology
Voriconazole/blood
Voriconazole/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); JFU09I87TR (Voriconazole)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6725

  2 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29242985
[Au] Autor:Dybdal D; Tolstrup JS; Sildorf SM; Boisen KA; Svensson J; Skovgaard AM; Teilmann GK
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Nordsjællands Hospital, Dyrehavevej 29, DK 3400, Hillerød, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Increasing risk of psychiatric morbidity after childhood onset type 1 diabetes: a population-based cohort study.
[So] Source:Diabetologia;61(4):831-838, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to investigate psychiatric morbidity following childhood onset of type 1 diabetes. METHODS: In a matched, population-based cohort study based on Danish national registers, we identified children and adolescents who had been diagnosed as an in- or outpatient with type 1 diabetes before the age of 18, and afterwards diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder (n = 5084). Control individuals were matched according to sex and date of birth (n = 35,588). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess associations between type 1 diabetes and the incidence of psychiatric disorders as well as the effects of age at onset and duration of type 1 diabetes on the risk of subsequently developing psychiatric morbidities. RESULTS: An increased risk of being diagnosed with mood disorders and anxiety, dissociative, eating, stress-related and somatoform disorders was observed in both sexes in the years following type 1 diabetes onset, with the highest risk observed five years or more after onset (HR 1.55 [95% CI 1.38, 1.74]). The risk of psychoactive substance-misuse disorders increased significantly only in boys, and the risk of personality disorders increased only in girls. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In the years following type 1 diabetes onset, an increased risk of eating disorders, anxiety and mood disorders, substance misuse, and personality disorders was found. These findings highlight a clinical need to monitor the mental health of children and adolescents in the years following type 1 diabetes onset to identify and treat psychiatric problems associated with type 1 diabetes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00125-017-4517-7

  3 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28459763
[Au] Autor:Pappas D; Fogler J; Sargado S; Welchons L; Augustyn M
[Ad] Address:*Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; †Children's Physicians of South Texas, Driscoll Children's Hospital, Corpus Christi, Texas; ‡The Kelberman Center, Utica, NY; §Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Title:International/Institutional Trauma in Developmental Pediatric Practice.
[So] Source:J Dev Behav Pediatr;38(4):292-293, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-7312
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CASE: "Aabis" is a school-aged boy from a predominantly conservative Muslim nation who presented to a tertiary developmental-behavioral pediatric (DBP) clinic to seek "expert opinion" for significant social and learning difficulties in the context of a history of frequent falling and "clumsiness." He was seen by a psychiatrist in his home country, who ordered an electroencephalogram and "brain map" (both normal), and received occupational and physical therapies. Frequent tantrums and intense emotional reactions to minor events-revealed to be related to a history of repeated physical beatings from groups of his "friends"-prompted referral to the DBP clinic. When asked why he did not fight back, Aabis said that he did not want to lose his friends. He and his parents further explained that this kind of organized aggression is considered part of normative development in their country and that Aabis needed to "toughen up."Aabis was described by his parents as being very "sensitive" when others raised their voices, shivering when reprimanded and profusely apologizing for real and imagined mistakes. He bit his nails until they bled, washed his hands repetitively, and changed his clothes several times per day. On witnessing his parents arguing, Aabis threatened to harm himself with a decorative knife.The assessment presented with several procedural complications specifically the use of an interpreter and the cultural differences regarding many of the topics discussed. Aabis spoke very little English, and an interpreter was not available in person on the initial day of the assessment. Telephonic phone translation services were attempted, but there were concerns that Aabis would not feel comfortable with sharing his emotions over the phone with an unidentified individual. As feared, Aabis was resistant to discuss emotionally charged topics (e.g., feeling sad, being bullied, hearing or seeing things) and grew impatient and irritated with the phone interpreter. After some unsuccessful experimentation with a Google-based translation system (implemented at Aabi's request to help build comfort and rapport), a second telephonic interpreter was brought into the session, who Aabis later described to his parents as "mean." (Aabis clarified that the second interpreter had been brusque and insensitive to his tentative attempts to express his feelings, e.g., by telling him to "Speak up. Spit it out.")Toward the end of the interview, Aabis seemed to dissociate and insisted anxiously that he did not want to relay certain information without his parents present in the room. What would you do next in this situation?Details about this case, including name and age, have been altered to protect the child's identity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arabs/psychology
Bullying
Dissociative Disorders/diagnosis
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Culture
Dissociative Disorders/ethnology
Dissociative Disorders/psychology
Humans
Male
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/ethnology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/DBP.0000000000000443

  4 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28471335
[Au] Autor:Gobin RL; Freyd J
[Ad] Address:a Department of Psychology , University of Oregon , Eugene , Oregon , USA.
[Ti] Title:Do Participants Detect Sexual Abuse Depicted in a Drawing? Investigating the Impact of Betrayal Trauma Exposure on State Dissociation and Betrayal Awareness.
[So] Source:J Child Sex Abus;26(3):233-245, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1547-0679
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An inability to identify betrayal may increase risk for victimization. Harm perpetrated by close others early in life may impair the ability to identify betrayal and develop trust. Dissociation may facilitate impaired betrayal awareness. The present study examined the impact of high betrayal trauma on state dissociation and betrayal awareness in a college sample (N = 216). Self-report measures were used to assess trauma history and state dissociation. Awareness for betrayal was measured using a drawing depicting an ambiguous interpersonal interaction between an adult and a child. We hypothesized that high betrayal trauma would be associated with both more state dissociation and lower awareness for betrayal. Participants with histories of high betrayal trauma reported high levels of state dissociation. Contrary to our second hypothesis, high betrayal trauma did not directly predict impaired betrayal awareness. State dissociation contributed significantly to betrayal awareness. Implications of findings for theory and practice are discussed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events/psychology
Awareness
Child Abuse, Sexual/psychology
Trust/psychology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Dissociative Disorders/psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/10538712.2017.1283650

  5 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29384611
[Au] Autor:Hiromitsu K; Midorikawa A
[Ti] Title:Downward and Parallel Perspectives in an Experimental Study of Out-of-Body Experiences.
[So] Source:Multisens Res;29(4-5):439-51, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2213-4794
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Out-of-body experiences (OBEs) have been reported in patients with neurological or psychiatric disorders. According to these reports, the patients looked down on their body from overhead. Based on this phenomenon, we adopted a downward perspective in an experimentally induced OBE paradigm and compared responses to an OBE questionnaire (sensations of OBE) with self-location mapping (feelings of body drift). The results revealed a correlation between the sensation of an OBE and self-location under the downward-perspective condition but not under the parallel-perspective condition; however, no significant difference was observed between the two conditions. Thus, the effect of perspective on OBE illusion that has been reported in clinical research of OBE did not affect the results obtained in previous studies inducing OBE.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Body Image/psychology
Depersonalization/psychology
Self Concept
Visual Perception/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Hallucinations/psychology
Humans
Imagination
Male
Sensation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29501990
[Au] Autor:Niciu MJ; Shovestul BJ; Jaso BA; Farmer C; Luckenbaugh DA; Brutsche NE; Park LT; Ballard ED; Zarate CA
[Ad] Address:National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health, Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, Building 10/CRC, 10 Center Dr., Unit 7 Southeast, Room 7-5342, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
[Ti] Title:Features of dissociation differentially predict antidepressant response to ketamine in treatment-resistant depression.
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;232:310-315, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Ketamine induces rapid and robust antidepressant effects, and many patients also describe dissociation, which is associated with antidepressant response. This follow-up study investigated whether antidepressant efficacy is uniquely related to dissociative symptom clusters. METHODS: Treatment-resistant patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) or bipolar disorder (BD) (n = 126) drawn from three studies received a single subanesthetic (0.5 mg/kg) ketamine infusion. Dissociative effects were measured using the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS). Antidepressant response was measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). A confirmatory factor analysis established the validity of CADSS subscales (derealization, depersonalization, amnesia), and a general linear model with repeated measures was fitted to test whether subscale scores were associated with antidepressant response. RESULTS: Factor validity was supported, with a root mean square error of approximation of .06, a comparative fit index of .97, and a Tucker-Lewis index of .96. Across all studies and timepoints, the depersonalization subscale was positively related to HAM-D percent change. A significant effect of derealization on HAM-D percent change was observed at one timepoint (Day 7) in one study. The amnesia subscale was unrelated to HAM-D percent change. LIMITATIONS: Possible inadequate blinding; combined MDD/BD datasets might have underrepresented ketamine's antidepressant efficacy; the possibility of Type I errors in secondary analyses. CONCLUSIONS: From a psychometric perspective, researchers may elect to administer only the CADSS depersonalization subscale, given that it was most closely related to antidepressant response. From a neurobiological perspective, mechanistic similarities may exist between ketamine-induced depersonalization and antidepressant response, although off-target effects cannot be excluded.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29463456
[Au] Autor:Gibson LE; Reeves LE; Cooper S; Olino TM; Ellman LM
[Ad] Address:Psychology Department, Temple University, 1701 North 13th St., Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA. Electronic address: lauren.gibson@temple.edu.
[Ti] Title:Traumatic life event exposure and psychotic-like experiences: A multiple mediation model of cognitive-based mechanisms.
[So] Source:Schizophr Res;, 2018 Feb 18.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2509
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Several cognitive mechanisms have been proposed to account for the relationship between exposure to traumatic life events (TLEs) and the entire psychosis spectrum. However, only few of these mechanisms have been empirically tested and those that have been tested have not considered multiple mechanisms simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to examine whether perceived stress, dissociation, negative self-schemas, negative other-schemas, and/or external locus of control mediated the association between TLEs and psychotic-like experiences (PLEs). An undergraduate sample of 945 individuals completed a battery of self-report questionnaires. We found significant indirect effects from TLE exposure to PLEs through perceived stress, dissociation, external locus of control, negative self-schemas, and negative other-schemas. When controlling for comorbid psychological symptoms, only the indirect effect from TLE exposure to PLEs through dissociation continued to be significant. Targeting stress sensitivity, maladaptive schemas, dissociative tendencies, and externalizing attributional styles may prove useful in the amelioration of risk for various psychopathologies (e.g., mood, psychosis) in the aftermath of TLE exposure. Findings underscore the importance of targeting trauma-related cognitions in the prevention or reduction of psychotic-like experiences or disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29309770
[Au] Autor:Dakwar E; Nunes EV; Hart CL; Hu MC; Foltin RW; Levin FR
[Ad] Address:New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA. Electronic address: dakware@nyspi.columbia.edu.
[Ti] Title:A sub-set of psychoactive effects may be critical to the behavioral impact of ketamine on cocaine use disorder: Results from a randomized, controlled laboratory study.
[So] Source:Neuropharmacology;, 2018 Jan 05.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7064
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Efforts to translate sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions into widespread clinical use have centered around developing medications with comparable neurobiological activity, but with attenuated psychoactive effects so as to minimize the risk of behavioral toxicity and abuse liability. Converging lines of research, however, suggest that some of the psychoactive effects of sub-anesthetic ketamine may have therapeutic potential. Here, we assess whether a subset of these effects - the so-called mystical-type experience - mediates the effect of ketamine on craving and cocaine use in cocaine dependent research volunteers. We found that ketamine leads to significantly greater acute mystical-type effects (by Hood Mysticism Scale: HMS), dissociation (by Clinician Administered Dissociative States Scale: CADSS), and near-death experience phenomena (by the Near-Death Experience Scale: NDES), relative to the active control midazolam. HMS score, but not the CADSS or NDES score, was found to mediate the effect of ketamine on global improvement (decreased cocaine use and craving) over the post-infusion period. This is the first controlled study to show that mystical-type phenomena, long considered to have therapeutic potential, may work to impact decision-making and behavior in a sustained manner. These data suggest that an important direction for medication development is the identification of ketamine-like pharmacotherapy that is selectively psychoactive (as opposed to free of experiential effects entirely), so that mystical-type perspectival shifts are more reliably produced and factors lending to abuse or behavioral impairment are minimized. Future research can further clarify the relationship between medication-occasioned mystical-type effects and clinical benefit for different disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28449364
[Au] Autor:Thompson-Hollands J; Jun JJ; Sloan DM
[Ad] Address:National Center for PTSD, Behavioral Science Division, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Title:The Association Between Peritraumatic Dissociation and PTSD Symptoms: The Mediating Role of Negative Beliefs About the Self.
[So] Source:J Trauma Stress;30(2):190-194, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Peritraumatic dissociation, a term used to describe a complex array of reactions to trauma, including depersonalization, derealization, and emotional numbness, has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms across a number of studies. Cognitive theory suggests that interpretations of traumatic events and reactions underlie the persistence of PTSD. The present study examined the associations among peritraumatic dissociation, posttraumatic cognitions, and PTSD symptoms in a group of trauma-exposed adults (N = 169). Results indicated that, after accounting for overall symptom severity and current dissociative tendencies, peritraumatic dissociation was significantly predictive of negative beliefs about the self (R = .06, p < .001). Other categories of maladaptive posttraumatic cognitions did not show a similar relationship (R = .01 to .02, nonsignificant). Negative thoughts about the self partially mediated the association between peritraumatic dissociation and PTSD severity (completely standardized indirect effect = .25). These findings lend support to cognitive theories of PTSD and point to an important area for clinical intervention.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dissociative Disorders/psychology
Self Concept
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
Veterans/psychology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Dissociative Disorders/complications
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170428
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/jts.22179

  10 / 13608 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29386450
[Au] Autor:Sawaguchi T
[Ad] Address:National Institute of Public Health, Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare.
[Ti] Title:[Approach to the Development of Mind and Persona].
[So] Source:Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi;73(1):67-74, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1882-6482
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To access medical specialists by health specialists working in the regional health field, the possibility of utilizing the voice approach for dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients as a health assessment for medical access (HAMA) was investigated. The first step is to investigate whether the plural personae in a single DID patient can be discriminated by voice analysis. METHODS: Voices of DID patients including these with different personae were extracted from YouTube and were analysed using the software PRAAT with basic frequency, oral factors, chin factors and tongue factors. In addition, RAKUGO story teller voices made artificially and dramatically were analysed in the same manner. Quantitive and qualitative analysis method were carried out and nested logistic regression and a nested generalized linear model was developed. RESULTS: The voice from different personae in one DID patient could be visually and easily distinquished using basic frequency curve, cluster analysis and factor analysis. In the canonical analysis, only Roy's maximum root was <0.01. In the nested generalized linear model, the model using a standard deviation (SD) indicator fit best and some other possibilities are shown here. CONCLUSIONS: In DID patients, the short transition time among plural personae could guide to the risky situation such as suicide. So if the voice approach can show the time threshold of changes between the different personae, it would be useful as an Access Assessment in the form of a simple HAMA.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Multiple Personality Disorder/diagnosis
Multiple Personality Disorder/psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality
Voice
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cluster Analysis
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1265/jjh.73.67


page 1 of 1361 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information