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[PMID]: 29515738
[Au] Autor:Nazeer A; Rai AA; Luck NH
[Ad] Address:Department of Hepatogastroenterology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi.
[Ti] Title:Factors leading to dyspepsia in renal transplant recipients.
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:120, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Renal transplantation is the definitive treatment for end stage renal disease. Patients subjected to transplantation require lifelong immunosuppression and are prone to several gastrointestinal disorders. Dyspepsia is a common disorder in these patients. The objective of this study was to determine factors leading to dyspepsia in renal (kidney) transplant recipients. Methods: It was a cross sectional study conducted at department of hepatogastroenterology and transplant sciences, SIUT Karachi, from 1-6-15 to 1-12-15 for six months. All renal transplanted patients having dyspeptic symptoms for more than 6 weeks. EGD was performed, biopsy specimens obtained from antrum and duodenum, these were sent for histopathological examination. Frequency and percentages were obtained for categorical variables, mean ± SD was calculated for continuous variables. Chi square test was used for categorical variable and student t-test for continuous variables. Results: Ninety patients were included in the study out of which 64 (71.1%) were males, mean age was 35.82 ± 10.04 years (range: 18-65 years). Gastritis (non associated) in 78 (78.6%), duodenitis in 35 (38.9%) and infection in 29 (32.2%), renal transplant recipients. Most of the patients belonged to Sindhi ethnicity, 27 (30%), followed by Punjabi. Hypertension was the most common co-morbid condition in our patients found in 29 (32.2%), while most of them don't have any co morbid condition. Duodenitis was found to be associated with tacrolimus use (p = 0.037). Conclusion: Gastritis is the most common factor accountable for this symptoms, followed by duodenitis and . Patients taking tacrolimus as immunosuppressant are more prone to develop duodenitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.120.12767

  2 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506517
[Au] Autor:Mosbah H; Chahdoura H; Kammoun J; Hlila MB; Louati H; Hammami S; Flamini G; Achour L; Selmi B
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Bioresources: Integrative Biology and Valorization, Higher Institute of Biotechnology of Monastir, Avenue Taher Hadded BP 74, 5000, Monastir, Tunisia. mosbah_habib@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:Rhaponticum acaule (L) DC essential oil: chemical composition, in vitro antioxidant and enzyme inhibition properties.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;18(1):79, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: α-glucosidase is a therapeutic target for diabetes mellitus (DM) and α-glucosidase inhibitors play a vital role in the treatments for the disease. Furthermore, xanthine oxidase (XO) is a key enzyme that catalyzes hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid which at high levels can lead to hyperuricemia which is an important cause of gout. Pancreatic lipase (PL) secreted into the duodenum plays a key role in the digestion and absorption of fats. For its importance in lipid digestion, PL represents an attractive target for obesity prevention. METHODS: The flowers essential oil of Rhaponticum acaule (L) DC (R. acaule) was characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The antioxidant activities of R. acaule essential oil (RaEO) were also determined using 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), reducing power, phosphomolybdenum, and DNA nicking assays. The inhibitory power of RaEO against α-glucosidase, xanthine oxidase and pancreatic lipase was evaluated. Enzyme kinetic studies using Michaelis-Menten and the derived Lineweaver-Burk (LB) plots were performed to understand the possible mechanism of inhibition exercised by the components of this essential oil. RESULTS: The result revealed the presence of 26 compounds (97.4%). The main constituents include germacrene D (49.2%), methyl eugenol (8.3%), (E)-ß-ionone (6.2%), ß-caryophyllene (5.7%), (E,E)-α-farnesene (4.2%), bicyclogermacrene (4.1%) and (Z)-α-bisabolene (3.7%). The kinetic inhibition study showed that the essential oil demonstrated a strong α-glucosidase inhibiton and it was a mixed inhibitor. On the other hand, our results evidenced that this oil exhibited important xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect, behaving as a non-competitive inhibitor. The essential oil inhibited the turkey pancreatic lipase, with maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 2 mg/mL. Furthermore, the inhibition of turkey pancreatic lipase by RaEO was an irreversible one. CONCLUSION: The results revealed that the RaEO is a new promising potential source of antioxidant compounds, endowed with good practical applications for human health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-018-2145-5

  3 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29427710
[Au] Autor:Khan A; Saleemi MK; Ali F; Abubakar M; Hussain R; Abbas RZ; Khan IA
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-38040, Pakistan. Electronic address: ahrar1122@uaf.edu.pk.
[Ti] Title:Pathophysiology of peste des petits ruminants in sheep (Dorper & Kajli) and goats (Boer & Beetal).
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:139-147, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), an economically important viral transboundary disease of small ruminants is not only prevalent in Pakistan but also in other countries where people rely on agriculture and animal products. The present study was aimed at describing the pathology and antigen localization in natural PPR infections in local (Kajli sheep; Beetal goats) as well as imported small ruminant breeds (Dorper sheep; Australian Boer goat). Morbidity and mortality rates were significantly (P < 0.001) higher in indigenous Kajli sheep (75.37 and 32.80%) and Beetal goats (81.10 and 37.24%) as compared to Dorper sheep (6.99 and 1.48%) and Australian Boer goat (5.01 and 2.23%). Affected animals exhibited high fever, severe diarrhea, abdominal pain, respiratory distress and nodular lesions on lips and nostrils. Thick mucous discharge was oozing out from nostrils. On necropsy, lungs were congested and pneumonic, with nodular and cystic appearance. Intestines were hemorrhagic with zebra stripping. Characteristic histopathological lesions of PPR were noted in intestines, lymphoid organs and lungs. In GI tract, stunting and blunting of villi, necrotic enteritis, and infiltration of mononuclear cells in duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Small intestines exhibited diffuse edema of the submucosa along with proliferation of fibrocytes leading to thickened submucosa which has not been reported previously. Lymphoid organs showed partial to complete destruction of lymphoid follicles. Lesions of the respiratory tract included depictive of bronchopneumonia, severe congestion of trachea and apical lobe of lungs with deposition of fibrinous materials. Histopathological lesions of respiratory tract were severe and characteristic of broncho-interstitial pneumonia, bronchopneumonia, interstitial pneumonia and fibrinous pneumonia. The alveoli were filled with edematous fluid mixed with fibrinous exudate, numerous alveolar macrophages, mononuclear cells along with thickened interalveolar septa and presence of intranuclear eosinophilic inclusion bodies. One-Step RT-PCR using NP3 and NP4 primers confirmed a PPR virus of 352 bp size in spleen, lungs and mesenteric and brachial lymph node samples. It was concluded that morbidity and mortality due to PPR were significantly higher in indigenous breeds of sheep and goat as compared to imported sheep and goat breeds. PPR has rendered various lesions in GI and respiratory tract which are characteristic in nature for the diagnosis of the disease under field condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29273999
[Au] Autor:Hofker TO; Kaijser MA; Nieuwenhuijs VB; Lange JFM; Hofker HS
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ, Groningen, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Distal Duodenogastrostomy or Proximal Jejunogastrostomy in the Management of Ultra-Short Bowel.
[So] Source:J Gastrointest Surg;22(3):538-543, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4626
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inflammatory bowel disease, vascular disease, volvulus, adhesions, or abdominal trauma may necessitate extensive small-bowel resection resulting in an ultra-short distal duodenal or jejunal stump. If this distal duodenal or short jejunal stump is too short for stoma creation and bowel continuity restoration is hazardous or not possible at all, a distal duodenogastrostomy or proximal jejunogastrostomy in combination with drainage of the stomach is an option to prevent stump leakage. Although successful, this distal duodenogastrostomy has been described only in very few patients and in older records. We reintroduced this technique and describe a recent series of patients that confirms its usefulness in certain conditions. The technique of the distal duodenogastrostomy or proximal jejunogastrostomy with gastric drainage was used for the management of the difficult distal duodenum stump in five critically ill patients undergoing extensive bowel resection. Four patients with small-bowel ischemia and one patient suffering from perforating Crohn's disease and small-bowel volvulus were treated  successfully. The gastrostomies were subsequently converted to a duodenotransversostomy (in two patients) or the patients underwent small-bowel transplantation (two patients). One patient still has a jejunogastrostomy just after the duodenal-jejunal transition. In all five patients, the distal duodenogastrostomy or proximal jejunogastrostomy in combination with gastric drainage functioned well up to restoration of bowel continuity. In one patient, distal duodenogastrostomy and transabdominal gastric drainage functioned well for 5 years. No anastomotic leakage occurred. This procedure provides a feasible solution for an ultra-short bowel at emergency laparotomy. It enhances the surgical armamentarium and provides treatment options for these patients that were perhaps previously deemed unsalvageable.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11605-017-3654-0

  5 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501492
[Au] Autor:Suyama Y; Handa O; Naito Y; Takayama S; Mukai R; Ushiroda C; Majima A; Yasuda-Onozawa Y; Higashimura Y; Fukui A; Dohi O; Okayama T; Yoshida N; Katada K; Kamada K; Uchiyama K; Ishikawa T; Takagi T; Konishi H; Itoh Y
[Ad] Address:Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Mucus reduction promotes acetyl salicylic acid-induced small intestinal mucosal injury in rats.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) is a useful drug for the secondary prevention of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, but it has adverse effects on the small intestinal mucosa. The pathogenesis and prophylaxis of ASA-induced small intestinal injury remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the intestinal mucus, as the gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus, which exhibits protective effects against various gastrointestinal diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ASA was injected into the duodenum of rats, and small intestinal mucosal injury was evaluated using Evans blue dye. To investigate the importance of mucus, Polysorbate 80 (P80), an emulsifier, was used before ASA injection. In addition, rebamipide, a mucus secretion inducer in the small intestine, was used to suppress mucus reduction in the small intestine of P80-administered rats. RESULTS: The addition of P80 reduced the mucus and exacerbated the ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Rebamipide significantly suppressed P80-reduced small intestinal mucus and P80-increased intestinal mucosal lesions in ASA-injected rats, demonstrating that mucus is important for the protection against ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. CONCLUSION: Mucus secretion-increasing therapy might be useful in preventing ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29383769
[Au] Autor:Oldenburger IB; Wolters VM; Kardol-Hoefnagel T; Houwen RHJ; Otten HG
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Serum intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in the noninvasive diagnosis of celiac disease.
[So] Source:APMIS;126(3):186-190, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0463
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Current diagnostic guidelines for celiac disease (CD) in pediatric patients require a duodenal biopsy if the IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is below 10x the upper limit of normal (ULN). Additional markers may enable a noninvasive diagnosis in this group. Serum intestinal-fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP), a marker for intestinal epithelial damage, could be useful in this respect. A total of 95 children with a clinical suspicion of CD and tTG 1-10x ULN were investigated. All had a duodenal biopsy and analysis of serum I-FABP. A control group of 161 children with familial short stature and normal tTG was included. I-FABP levels in the 71 patients with tTG 1-10x ULN and biopsy-proven CD (median 725 pg/mL) were not significantly different (p = 0.13) from the levels in the 24 patients with a tTG 1-10x ULN but a normal biopsy (median 497 pg/mL). However, when combining tTG and I-FABP levels, 11/24 patients could have been diagnosed noninvasively if tTG is ≥ 50 U/mL and I-FABP ≥880 pg/mL or in 12/19 patients if tTG is ≥ 60 U/mL and I-FABP ≥ 620 pg/mL. Therefore, addition of I-FABP to the diagnostic procedure of CD may provide a noninvasive diagnosis in patients with a tTG ≥ 50 U/mL.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Celiac Disease/diagnosis
Celiac Disease/pathology
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins/blood
GTP-Binding Proteins/immunology
Immunoglobulin A/blood
Transglutaminases/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Celiac Disease/blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Duodenum/pathology
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins/metabolism
Female
HLA-DQ Antigens/blood
Humans
Immunoglobulin A/immunology
Infant
Intestinal Mucosa/pathology
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (FABP2 protein, human); 0 (Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins); 0 (HLA-DQ Antigens); 0 (HLA-DQ2 antigen); 0 (HLA-DQ8 antigen); 0 (Immunoglobulin A); EC 2.3.2.- (transglutaminase 2); EC 2.3.2.13 (Transglutaminases); EC 2.3.2.13 (transglutaminase 1); EC 3.6.1.- (GTP-Binding Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/apm.12800

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[PMID]: 29372596
[Au] Autor:Villanacci V; Lorenzi L; Donato F; Auricchio R; Dziechciarz P; Gyimesi J; Koletzko S; Misak Z; Laguna VM; Polanco I; Ramos D; Shamir R; Troncone R; Vriezinga SL; Mearin ML
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pathology, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Histopathological evaluation of duodenal biopsy in the PreventCD project. An observational interobserver agreement study.
[So] Source:APMIS;126(3):208-214, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0463
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aim of the current study was to evaluate the inter-observer agreement between pathologists in the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD), in the qualified context of a multicenter study. Biopsies from the "PreventCD" study, a multinational- prospective- randomized study in children with at least one-first-degree relative with CD and positive for HLA-DQ2/HLA-DQ8. Ninety-eight biopsies were evaluated. Considering diagnostic samples with villous atrophy (VA), the agreement was satisfactory (κ = 0.84), but much less when assessing the severity of these lesions. The use of the recently proposed Corazza-Villanacci classification showed a moderately higher level of agreement (κ = 0.39) than using the Marsh-Oberhuber system (κ = 0.31). 57.1% of cases were considered correctly oriented. A number of >4 samples per patient was statistically associated to a better agreement; orientation did not impact on κ values. Agreement results in this study appear more satisfactory than in previous papers and this is justified by the involvement of centers with experience in CD diagnosis and by the well-controlled setting. Despite this, the reproducibility was far from optimal with a poor agreement in grading the severity of VA. Our results stress the need of a minimum of four samples to be assessed by the pathologist.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Celiac Disease/diagnosis
Celiac Disease/pathology
HLA-DQ Antigens/immunology
Intestinal Mucosa/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biopsy
Child
Child, Preschool
Duodenum/pathology
Humans
Infant
Observer Variation
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (HLA-DQ Antigens); 0 (HLA-DQ2 antigen); 0 (HLA-DQ8 antigen)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180127
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/apm.12812

  8 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29351303
[Au] Autor:Mihaylov IB; Mellon EA; Yechieli R; Portelance L
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami,Miami, FL, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Automated inverse optimization facilitates lower doses to normal tissue in pancreatic stereotactic body radiotherapy.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191036, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Inverse planning is trial-and-error iterative process. This work introduces a fully automated inverse optimization approach, where the treatment plan is closely tailored to the unique patient anatomy. The auto-optimization is applied to pancreatic stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The automation is based on stepwise reduction of dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Five uniformly spaced points, from 1% to 70% of the organ at risk (OAR) volumes, are used. Doses to those DVH points are iteratively decreased through multiple optimization runs. With each optimization run the doses to the OARs are decreased, while the dose homogeneity over the target is increased. The iterative process is terminated when a pre-specified dose heterogeneity over the target is reached. Twelve pancreatic cases were retrospectively studied. Doses to the target, maximum doses to duodenum, bowel, stomach, and spinal cord were evaluated. In addition, mean doses to liver and kidneys were tallied. The auto-optimized plans were compared to the actual treatment plans, which are based on national protocols. RESULTS: The prescription dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) is the same for the treatment and the auto-optimized plans. The average difference for maximum doses to duodenum, bowel, stomach, and spinal cord are -4.6 Gy, -1.8 Gy, -1.6 Gy, and -2.4 Gy respectively. The negative sign indicates lower doses with the auto-optimization. The average differences in the mean doses to liver and kidneys are -0.6 Gy, and -1.1 Gy to -1.5 Gy respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Automated inverse optimization holds great potential for personalization and tailoring of radiotherapy to particular patient anatomies. It can be utilized for normal tissue sparing or for an isotoxic dose escalation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Automation
Radiotherapy Dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Pancreas/radiation effects
Pancreatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191036

  9 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520646
[Au] Autor:Hosokawa Y; Nagakawa Y; Sahara Y; Takishita C; Nakajima T; Hijikata Y; Osakabe H; Shirota T; Saito K; Yamaguchi H; Inoue K; Katsumata K; Tsuchiya T; Sofuni A; Itoi T; Tsuchida A
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastrointestinal and Pediatric Surgery, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Surgical Outcomes of Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Pancreatic Cancer with Proximal Dorsal Jejunal Vein Involvement.
[So] Source:J Gastrointest Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4626
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The proximal jejunal vein which branches from the dorsal side of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) usually drains the inferior pancreatoduodenal veins (IPDVs) and contacts the uncinate process of the pancreas. We focused on this vein, termed the proximal dorsal jejunal vein (PDJV), and evaluated the anatomical classification of the PDJV and surgical outcomes in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with PDJV involvement (PDJVI). METHODS: The jejunal veins that branch from the dorsal side of the SMV above the inferior border of the duodenum are defined as PDJVs. We investigated 121 patients who underwent upfront pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC between 2011 and 2017; PDJVs were resected in all patients. The anatomical classification of PDJV was evaluated using multidetector computed tomography. Surgical and prognostic outcomes of pancreticoduodenectomy for PDAC with PDJVI were evaluated. RESULTS: The PDJVs were classified into seven types depending on the position of the first and second jejunal veins relative to the superior mesenteric artery. In all patients, the morbidity and mortality rates were 15.7 and 0.8%, respectively. The rates for parameters including SMV resection, presence of pathological T3-4, R0 resection, and 3-year survival were 46.2, 92.3, 92.3, and 61.1%, respectively, when there was PDJVI (n = 13). When there was no PDJVI (n = 108), the rates were 60.2, 93.5, 86.1, and 58.3%, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreaticoduodenectomy with PDJV resection is feasible for PDAC with PDJVI and satisfactory overall survival rates are achievable. It may be necessary to reconsider the resectability of PDAC with PDJVI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11605-018-3722-0

  10 / 52819 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519336
[Au] Autor:Bang JY; Varadarajulu S
[Ad] Address:Center for Interventional Endoscopy, Florida Hospital, 601 East Rollins Street, Orlando, FL 32803, USA.
[Ti] Title:How the Experts Do It: Step-by-Step Guide.
[So] Source:Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am;28(2):251-260, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1950
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lumen-apposing metal stents are integrated in a single-step delivery system for draining intra-abdominal fluid collections. The theoretic advantage of lumen-apposing stents is the ability to approximate the wall of the drained cavity or organ to the gastrointestinal tract lumen. The use of lumen-apposing stents now includes drainage of organs adjacent to the stomach/duodenum and creation of anastomosis between the stomach and jejunum. The lumen-apposing stents may also serve as a conduit for accessing the remnant stomach for performing biliary tract interventions. This article outlines the approach to placement of lumen-apposing metal stents, technical challenges, and measures to counter adverse events.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process


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