Database : MEDLINE
Search on : endometrial and ablation and techniques [Words]
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[PMID]: 29384976
[Au] Autor:Wangping Z; Hanbing W
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology.
[Ti] Title:Radiofrequency-induced endometrial ablation for the treatment of postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal delivery: Case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(52):e9564, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Postpartum hemorrhage is a common complication and difficult problem in obstetrics. Radiofrequency-induced endometrial ablation (RFIEA) widely used in abnormal uterine bleeding and achieved good effects. This article will investigate the effect of RFIEA for treatment of postpartum hemorrhage. PATIENTS CONCERNS: A 26-year-old healthy full-term parturient woman presented with postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal delivery for 11 hours, who was ready to emergency surgery (hysterectomy) 7 hours after inserting an intrauterine balloon into uterine cavity. DIAGNOSES: Blood loss after vaginal delivery was more than 500 mL during 11 hours in the full-term parturient woman. INTERVENTION: We applied RFIEA to treatment of postpartum hemorrhage. With the patient in dorsal lithotomy position, we advanced the disposable device according to the instruction and operated the Novasure system in semi-automatic mode. OUTCOMES: There was no obvious endometrial bleeding found with hysteroscopy at the end of surgery. No complications (such as thermal injury to adjacent tissue, uterine perforation, bowel perforation) were observed. LESSONS: It is safe and effective to treat postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal delivery using RFIEA.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Endometrial Ablation Techniques/methods
Postpartum Hemorrhage/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009564

  2 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29368658
[Au] Autor:Cooper K; McCormack K; Breeman S; Wood J; Scott NW; Clark J; Hawe J; Hawthorn R; Phillips K; Hyde A; McDonald A; Forrest M; Wileman S; Scotland G; Norrie J; Bhattacharya S; HEALTH Study Group
[Ad] Address:NHS Grampian, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZN, UK. kevin.cooper@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:HEALTH: laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy versus second-generation endometrial ablation for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.
[So] Source:Trials;19(1):63, 2018 Jan 24.
[Is] ISSN:1745-6215
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common problem affecting approximately 1.5 million women in England and Wales with a major impact on their physical, emotional, social and material quality of life. It is the fourth most common reason why women attend gynaecology outpatient clinics and accounts for one-fifth of all gynaecology outpatient referrals. Initial treatment in primary care is medical - either by means of oral or injected medication or the levonorgestrel-intrauterine system (Mirena). If medical treatment fails then surgical treatment can be offered, either endometrial ablation (EA), which destroys the lining of the cavity of the uterus (endometrium), or hysterectomy, i.e. surgical removal of the uterus. While effective, conventional hysterectomy is invasive and carries a risk of complications due to injury to other pelvic structures. The procedure can be simplified and complications minimised by undertaking a 'supracervical' hysterectomy where the cervix is left in situ and only the body of the uterus removed. Recent advances in endoscopic technologies have facilitated increased use of laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LASH) which can be performed as a day-case procedure and is relatively easy for the surgeon to learn. HEALTH (Hysterectomy or Endometrial AbLation Trial for Heavy menstrual bleeding) aims to address the question 'Is LASH superior to second generation EA for the treatment of HMB in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness?' METHODS/DESIGN: Women aged < 50years, with HMB, in whom medical treatment has failed and who are eligible for EA will be considered for trial entry. We aim to recruit women from approximately 30 active secondary care centres in the UK NHS who carry out both surgical procedures. All women who consent will complete a diary of pain symptoms from day 1 to day 14 after surgery, postal questionnaires at six weeks and six months after surgery and 15months post randomisation. Healthcare utilisation questions will also be completed at the six-week, six-month and 15-month time-points. DISCUSSION: Measuring the comparative effectiveness of LASH vs EA will provide the robust evidence required to determine whether the new technique should be adopted widely in the NHS. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials, ISRCTN49013893 . Registered on 28 January 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13063-017-2374-9

  3 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28456617
[Au] Autor:Pundir J; Omanwa K; Kovoor E; Pundir V; Lancaster G; Barton-Smith P
[Ad] Address:Centre for Reproductive Medicine, St Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: jyotsnapundir@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Laparoscopic Excision Versus Ablation for Endometriosis-associated Pain: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
[So] Source:J Minim Invasive Gynecol;24(5):747-756, 2017 Jul - Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1553-4669
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Theaim of this study was to update the evidence on the surgical management of endometriosis-associated pain. Does laparoscopic excision offer any benefits over laparoscopic ablation? This is a systematic review and meta-analysis in which we searched MEDLINE, Embase, Institute for Scientific Informationconference proceedings, the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry, the Register and Meta-register for randomized controlled trials, the World Health Organization trials search portal, the Cochrane Library, and the British Library of electronic theses. Three randomized controlled trials were included, which enrolled 335 participants with a sample size per study ranging from 24 to 178 participants. Of these 3 studies, data from 2 could be pooled for meta-analysis. The primary outcome measure was the reduction in the visual analog scale score for dysmenorrhea. The secondary outcome measures included the reduction in the visual analog scale score for dyspareunia, dyschezia, and chronic pelvic pain and the reduction in Endometriosis Health Profile-30 core pain scores. The meta-analysis showed that the excision group had a significantly greater reduction in symptoms of dysmenorrhea (mean difference [MD]=0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.02 to 2.00; p=.05) and dyschezia (MD=1.31; 95% CI, 0.33-2.29; p=.009) compared with ablation. The symptoms of dyspareunia showed a nonsignificant benefit with excision (MD=0.96; 95% CI, -0.07 to 1.99; p=.07). Data from 1 study showed a significant reduction in chronic pelvic pain (MD=2.57; 95% CI, 1.27-3.87; p=.0001) and Endometriosis Health Profile-30 core pain scores (MD=13.20; 95% CI, 3.70-22.70; p=.006) with the excision group compared with the ablation group. The limited available evidence shows that at 12months postsurgery, symptoms of dysmenorrhea, dyschezia, and chronic pelvic pain secondary to endometriosis showed a significantly greater improvement with laparoscopic excision compared with ablation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Endometrial Ablation Techniques/methods
Endometriosis/surgery
Laparoscopy/methods
Pelvic Floor Disorders/surgery
Pelvic Pain/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chronic Pain/etiology
Chronic Pain/surgery
Dysmenorrhea/etiology
Dysmenorrhea/surgery
Dyspareunia/etiology
Dyspareunia/surgery
Endometrial Ablation Techniques/adverse effects
Endometriosis/complications
Female
Humans
Laparoscopy/adverse effects
Laser Therapy/adverse effects
Laser Therapy/methods
Pelvic Floor Disorders/complications
Pelvic Pain/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29128205
[Au] Autor:Munro MG
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Director of Gynecologic Services, Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States. Electronic address: mmunro@ucla.edu.
[Ti] Title:Endometrial ablation.
[So] Source:Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol;, 2017 Oct 20.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1932
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Endometrial ablation (EA) includes a spectrum of procedures performed with or without hysteroscopic direction, designed to destroy the endometrium for the treatment of the symptom of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) secondary to a spectrum of causes, but most commonly those that are endometrial in origin (AUB-E) or ovulatory disorders (AUB-O). Resectoscopic endometrial ablation (REA) is often mistakenly referred to as the "first generation" technique, while proprietary devices that do not use the resectoscope (nonresectoscopic EA or NREA) are often misperceived as "second generation" devices. Indeed, the origins of NREA date back to the late 19th century with the use of steam, and the early and mid 20th century, when radiofrequency and cryotherapy based NREA techniques were published - long before the resectoscope was used and reported. The NREA devices have also been mislabeled as "global", a misleading term borrowed from the marketing departments of device manufacturers - there is no device that predictably treats the entire endometrium. Consequently, none can be construed as being "global". Instead, EA is a procedure designed for women as an alternative to hysterectomy, or, perhaps, medical therapy, when future fertility is no longer desired. Women who select EA should anticipate a relatively low risk procedure that will likely reduce their HMB to normal levels or less. This paper will review the spectrum of EA techniques and devices, their clinical outcomes and adverse events, and explore their value compared to hysterectomy and selected medical therapies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171112
[Lr] Last revision date:171112
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29046244
[Au] Autor:Leathersich SJ; McGurgan PM
[Ad] Address:King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women, 374 Bagot Road, Subiaco, WA 6008, Australia. Electronic address: sebastian.leathersich@health.wa.gov.au.
[Ti] Title:Endometrial resection and global ablation in the normal uterus.
[So] Source:Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol;, 2017 Sep 28.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1932
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There are various methods that can be used to destroy the endometrium as a treatment for menorrhagia. This chapter reviews the history, rationale, evidence, indications and long-term safety and efficacy of the current techniques. It also discusses endometrial ablation in the context of its clinical utility in comparison with existing alternative treatments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28888699
[Au] Autor:Famuyide A
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: famuyide.abimbola@mayo.edu.
[Ti] Title:Endometrial Ablation.
[So] Source:J Minim Invasive Gynecol;, 2017 Sep 06.
[Is] ISSN:1553-4669
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The destruction of the endometrium in women with heavy menstrual bleeding has been used for well over a century, and the various techniques of delivering forms of thermal energy have been modified over the years to ensure a safe and effective treatment approach. Today, 6 nonresectoscopic devices are approved for use in the United States in addition to resectoscopic techniques that rely on the skillful use of the operative hysteroscope. Regardless of the technique used, endometrial ablation uniformly reduces menstrual blood loss, improves general and menstrual-related quality of life, and prevents hysterectomy in 4 of 5 women who undergo the procedure. When patients are appropriately selected, outcomes are optimized, and risks of serious complications are minimized. This article reviews the literature with singular reference to nonresectoscopic endometrial ablation procedures including historical background, appropriate patient selection, clinical outcomes data, complications, and special or unique considerations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171009
[Lr] Last revision date:171009
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28852646
[Au] Autor:Di Spiezio Sardo A; Calagna G; Santangelo F; Zizolfi B; Tanos V; Perino A; De Wilde RL
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy.
[Ti] Title:The Role of Hysteroscopy in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Adenomyosis.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2017:2518396, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Uterine adenomyosis is a common gynecologic disorder in women of reproductive age, characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial glands and stroma within the myometrium. Dysmenorrhea, abnormal uterine bleeding, chronic pelvic pain, and deep dyspareunia are common symptoms of this pathological condition. However, adenomyosis is often an incidental finding in specimens obtained from hysterectomy or uterine biopsies. The recent evolution of diagnostic imaging techniques, such as transvaginal sonography, hysterosalpingography, and magnetic resonance imaging, has contributed to improving accuracy in the identification of this pathology. Hysteroscopy offers the advantage of direct visualization of the uterine cavity while giving the option of collecting histological biopsy samples under visual control. Hysteroscopy is not a first-line treatment approach for adenomyosis and it represents a viable option only in selected cases of focal or diffuse "superficial" forms. During office hysteroscopy, it is possible to enucleate superficial focal adenomyomas or to evacuate cystic haemorrhagic lesions of less than 1.5 cm in diameter. Instead, resectoscopic treatment is indicated in cases of superficial adenomyotic nodules > 1.5 cm in size and for diffuse superficial adenomyosis. Finally, endometrial ablation may be performed with the additional removal of the underlying myometrium.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170902
[Lr] Last revision date:170902
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/2518396

  8 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28843713
[Au] Autor:Cramer SF; Heller DS
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Rochester General Hospital, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, 14621, NY.
[Ti] Title:Postablation neuroma of the myometrium-a report of 5 cases.
[So] Source:Hum Pathol;67:211-216, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8392
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:When hysterectomy is performed for chronic pelvic pain, routine pathology examination often provides no explanation. However, analysis of small uterine nerves using immunostains may help to address this deficiency. Small uterine nerves tend to be sparse or absent in wide areas of normal myometrium. Some studies of uterine nerves have suggested that endometriosis, adenomyosis, and fibroids are not inherently painful, with increased small nerves in the inner uterine wall associated with the history of pelvic pain. Although such areas may appear normal on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), we have found a subtle inner wall lesion termed inner myometrial elastosis, best detected with trichrome or elastic stains, which may be a reaction to microscopic tears of inner myometrium. Such tears may induce increased inner wall innervation via the generation of nerve growth factor in granulation tissue. In the course of studying uterine nerves with immunostains, we found 5 cases with florid nerve proliferation, after deep endometrial ablation for abnormal uterine bleeding led to increased pelvic pain. We suggest that immunostains for postablation neuromas should be done in hysterectomies when pelvic pain increases after endometrial ablation. This may offer gynecologists and their patients an objective finding with a rational, scientific explanation for the pelvic pain.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Endometrial Ablation Techniques/adverse effects
Endometrial Neoplasms/etiology
Myometrium/surgery
Neuroma/etiology
Neurons/pathology
Uterine Hemorrhage/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Biopsy
Chronic Pain/etiology
Chronic Pain/surgery
Endometrial Neoplasms/pathology
Endometrial Neoplasms/surgery
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Myometrium/innervation
Neuroma/pathology
Neuroma/surgery
Neurons/chemistry
Pain, Postoperative/etiology
Pain, Postoperative/surgery
Pelvic Pain/etiology
Pelvic Pain/surgery
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171016
[Lr] Last revision date:171016
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170828
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28796898
[Au] Autor:Louie M; Spencer J; Wheeler S; Ellis V; Toubia T; Schiff LD; Siedhoff MT; Moulder JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, hysterectomy, and endometrial ablation for heavy menstrual bleeding in a decision analysis model.
[So] Source:Int J Gynaecol Obstet;139(2):121-129, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3479
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the relative risks and benefits of common treatment options for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) can help providers and patients to make balanced, evidence-based decisions. OBJECTIVES: To provide comparative estimates of clinical outcomes after placement of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), ablation, or hysterectomy for AUB. SEARCH STRATEGY: A PubMED search was done using combinations of search terms related to abnormal uterine bleeding, LNG-IUS, hysterectomy, endometrial ablation, cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness, and quality-adjusted life years. SELECTION CRITERIA: Full articles published in 2006-2016 available in English comparing at least two treatment modalities of interest among women of reproductive age with AUB were included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: A decision tree was generated to compare clinical outcomes in a hypothetical cohort of 100000 premenopausal women with nonmalignant AUB. We evaluated complications, mortality, and treatment outcomes over a 5-year period, calculated cumulative quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and conducted probabilistic sensitivity analysis. MAIN RESULTS: Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system had the highest number of QALYs (406920), followed by hysterectomy (403466), non-resectoscopic ablation (399244), and resectoscopic ablation (395827). Ablation had more treatment failures and complications than LNG-IUS and hysterectomy. Findings were robust in probabilistic sensitivity analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and hysterectomy outperformed endometrial ablation for treatment of AUB.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Decision Support Techniques
Menorrhagia/therapy
Models, Theoretical
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Endometrial Ablation Techniques
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy
Levonorgestrel/administration & dosage
Menorrhagia/surgery
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:5W7SIA7YZW (Levonorgestrel)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170811
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijgo.12293

  10 / 870 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28796675
[Au] Autor:Soini T; Rantanen M; Paavonen J; Grnman S; Menp J; Pukkala E; Gissler M; Hurskainen R
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hyvink Hospital, Hyvink, the Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Hospital, and the University of Helsinki, Helsinki, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Turku University Hospital, and the University of Turku, Turku, the Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tampere University Hospital, and the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, and the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Information Services, Helsinki, Finland; and the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Long-term Follow-up After Endometrial Ablation in Finland: Cancer Risks and Later Hysterectomies.
[So] Source:Obstet Gynecol;130(3):554-560, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-233X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To study the risk of endometrial cancer and breast cancer and the hysterectomy rate after endometrial ablation. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, records of all women with endometrial ablation at ages 30-49 years in Finland (1997-2014) were extracted from the Hospital Discharge Register and linked to the Cancer Registry and Finnish Central Population Register. The primary outcome was cancer incidences in the endometrial ablation cohort compared with those in the background population of the same age. Secondarily, the postablation hysterectomy rate was compared with that of a control cohort of similar-aged women extracted from the Finnish Central Population Register. Multivariate regression models with adjustment for age, parity, number of cesarean deliveries, history of sterilization, and the duration of follow-up were evaluated as risk factors for postablation hysterectomy. RESULTS: In total, 154 cancers (standardized incidence ratio [observed-to-expected ratio] 0.96, 95% CI 0.82-1.13) were diagnosed among 5,484 women treated with endometrial ablation during the follow-up of 39,892 women-years. The standardized incidence ratio for endometrial cancer was 0.56 (95% CI 0.12-1.64) and for breast cancer 0.86 (95% CI 0.67-1.09). A total of 1,086 (19.8%) women had postablation hysterectomy. Risk of hysterectomy was almost fourfold in the endometrial ablation cohort compared with 26,938 women in a control group (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.63, 95% CI 3.32-3.96). Factors predisposing to postablation hysterectomy were leiomyomas (adjusted HR 1.78, 95% CI 1.03-3.10), age younger than 35 years (adjusted HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.15-1.81), at least two prior cesarean deliveries (adjusted HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.04-1.55), and history of sterilization (adjusted HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.32). CONCLUSION: Endometrial ablation was not associated with an elevated endometrial cancer or breast cancer risk in Finland. Leiomyomas, young age, and history of prior cesarean deliveries or sterilization were associated with an increased risk of postablation hysterectomy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Endometrial Ablation Techniques/adverse effects
Hysterectomy/statistics & numerical data
Uterine Hemorrhage/surgery
Uterine Neoplasms/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland/epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
Postoperative Complications/etiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Uterine Neoplasms/etiology
Women's Health Services
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170908
[Lr] Last revision date:170908
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170811
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/AOG.0000000000002166


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