Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29138738
[Au] Autor:Subramanian VS; Cho MJ; Tan SZ; Fayzieva D; Sebaly C
[Ad] Address:Department of political and cultural change, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Spatial Distribution and Trends of Waterborne Diseases in Tashkent Province.
[So] Source:Cent Asian J Glob Health;6(1):277, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2166-7403
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: The cumulative effect of limited investment in public water systems, inadequate public health infrastructure, and gaps in infectious disease prevention increased the incidence of waterborne diseases in Uzbekistan. The objectives of this study were: (1) to spatially analyze the distribution of the diseases in Tashkent Province, (2) to identify the intensity of spatial trends in the province, (3) to identify urban-rural characteristics of the disease distribution, and (4) to identify the differences in disease incidence between pediatric and adult populations of the province. Methods: Data on four major waterborne diseases and socio-demographics factors were collected in Tashkent Province from 2011 to 2014. Descriptive epidemiological methods and spatial-temporal methods were used to investigate the distribution and trends, and to identify waterborne diseases hotspots and vulnerable population groups in the province. Results: Hepatitis A and enterobiasis had a high incidence in most of Tashkent Province, with higher incidences in the eastern and western districts. Residents of rural areas, including children, were found to be more vulnerable to the waterborne diseases compared to other populations living in the province. Conclusions: This pilot study calls for more scientific investigations of waterborne diseases and their effect on public health in the region, which could facilitate targeted public health interventions in vulnerable regions of Uzbekistan.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5195/cajgh.2017.277

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[PMID]: 29127616
[Au] Autor:Bharti B; Bharti S; Khurana S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatrics Center, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 160012, India. bhavneetsahul@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Worm Infestation: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention.
[So] Source:Indian J Pediatr;, 2017 Nov 11.
[Is] ISSN:0973-7693
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Worm infections continue to be among the most common diseases affecting children from low and middle income countries. Major worm infections of public health importance include Ascariasis, Trichuriasis, Hookworm, and Enterobiasis, which are transmitted through contaminated soil. In India, combined prevalence rates of worm infestation as per pooled data of 127 surveys is over 20%. Although most helminthic infections are mild and are often asymptomatic, but moderate to heavy worm infestations are generally associated with growth faltering, nutritional compromise, anemia and suboptimal academic performance among children from endemic regions. Migration of larval or adult worms also underpins pulmonary and gastrointestinal morbidity in affected children. Some of the distinctive life cycle and clinical features of various worms are discussed in the review. The gold standard diagnostic technique for evaluation of worm infestation includes stool microscopy for direct egg detection and species identification. Most of the community based surveys for detecting soil transmitted helminths (STH) use Kato-Katz technique. The drug armamentarium against worm infestation has evolved tremendously in last three to four decades with the availability of more efficacious and broad spectrum anthelminthics. The key strategies of a multi-component integrated management of worm infestation include individualized treatment, community management (mass drug administration) as well as preventive measures. Finally, barriers to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of worm infestations need to be identified and aggressively managed at individual, family and societal levels so that WHO's 75% coverage target can be achieved to eliminate soil transmitted helminthiasis in children by 2020.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171111
[Lr] Last revision date:171111
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12098-017-2505-z

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[PMID]: 28981601
[Au] Autor:Zheng L; Liu Y; Pan J
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China.
[Ti] Title:Inhibitory effect of pyrvinium pamoate on uveal melanoma cells involves blocking of Wnt/ß-catenin pathway.
[So] Source:Acta Biochim Biophys Sin (Shanghai);49(10):890-898, 2017 Oct 01.
[Is] ISSN:1745-7270
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults. And there is an absence of targeted agents for patients with uveal melanoma. Pyrvinium pamoate is an old anthelminthic medicine approved by FDA for the treatment of enterobiasis in 1955, which recently re-attracts attention as an anti-cancer drug due to its inhibition of Wnt/ß-catenin pathway in some types of cancer. But the role of pyrvinium pamoate in uveal melanoma and the potential underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we tested the anti-tumor effects of pyrvinium pamoate on four uveal melanoma cell lines (92.1, Mel270, Omm1, and Omm2.3) and evaluated the Wnt/ß-catenin signaling transduction, cell growth, cell death, cell migration, and invasion accordingly. The results revealed that pyrvinium pamoate treatment repressed the phosphorylation of GSK3ß at S9 which might be mediated by AKT, and decreased the protein levels of ß-catenin and its downstream targets (c-Myc, cyclin D1). Pyrvinium pamoate remarkably inhibited cell viability and colony formation ability. Treatment with pyrvinium pamoate induced intrinsic pathway-dependent apoptosis accompanied with a decline of anti-apoptotic XIAP and Survivin, and an overt increase of pro-apoptotic Bax. In addition, pyrvinium pamoate significantly inhibited the migration and invasion in vitro. Our studies suggest that pyrvinium pamoate may be a potential therapeutic agent for uveal melanoma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171005
[Lr] Last revision date:171005
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/abbs/gmx089

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[PMID]: 28945752
[Au] Autor:Yang CA; Liang C; Lin CL; Hsiao CT; Peng CT; Lin HC; Chang JG
[Ad] Address:Department of Laboratory Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Impact of Enterobius vermicularis infection and mebendazole treatment on intestinal microbiota and host immune response.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(9):e0005963, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Previous studies on the association of enterobiasis and chronic inflammatory diseases have revealed contradictory results. The interaction of Enterobius vermicularis infection in particular with gut microbiota and induced immune responses has never been thoroughly examined. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: In order to answer the question of whether exposure to pinworm and mebendazole can shift the intestinal microbial composition and immune responses, we recruited 109 (30 pinworm-negative, 79 pinworm-infected) first and fourth grade primary school children in Taichung, Taiwan, for a gut microbiome study and an intestinal cytokine and SIgA analysis. In the pinworm-infected individuals, fecal samples were collected again at 2 weeks after administration of 100 mg mebendazole. Gut microbiota diversity increased after Enterobius infection, and it peaked after administration of mebendazole. At the phylum level, pinworm infection and mebendazole deworming were associated with a decreased relative abundance of Fusobacteria and an increased proportion of Actinobacteria. At the genus level, the relative abundance of the probiotic Bifidobacterium increased after enterobiasis and mebendazole treatment. The intestinal SIgA level was found to be lower in the pinworm-infected group, and was elevated in half of the mebendazole-treated group. A higher proportion of pre-treatment Salmonella spp. was associated with a non-increase in SIgA after mebendazole deworming treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Childhood exposure to pinworm plus mebendazole is associated with increased bacterial diversity, an increased abundance of Actinobacteria including the probiotic Bifidobacterium, and a decreased proportion of Fusobacteria. The gut SIgA level was lower in the pinworm-infected group, and was increased in half of the individuals after mebendazole deworming treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cytokines/immunology
Enterobiasis/drug therapy
Enterobiasis/immunology
Enterobius/drug effects
Gastrointestinal Microbiome/drug effects
Mebendazole/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bifidobacterium/drug effects
Bifidobacterium/genetics
Bifidobacterium/growth & development
Bifidobacterium/isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
Computational Biology
Cytokines/biosynthesis
Enterobiasis/microbiology
Enterobiasis/parasitology
Enterobius/genetics
Enterobius/immunology
Feces/parasitology
Female
Fusobacteria/drug effects
Fusobacteria/genetics
Fusobacteria/growth & development
Fusobacteria/isolation & purification
Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics
Humans
Immunity/drug effects
Immunoglobulin A, Secretory/analysis
Immunoglobulin A, Secretory/immunology
Intestines/drug effects
Intestines/immunology
Intestines/microbiology
Intestines/parasitology
Male
Mebendazole/administration & dosage
Salmonella/drug effects
Salmonella/genetics
Salmonella/growth & development
Salmonella/isolation & purification
Taiwan/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cytokines); 0 (Immunoglobulin A, Secretory); 81G6I5V05I (Mebendazole)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171025
[Lr] Last revision date:171025
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170926
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005963

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[PMID]: 28905520
[Au] Autor:Tsai CY; Junod R; Jacot-Guillarmod M; Beniere C; Ziadi S; Bongiovanni M
[Ad] Address:Service of Clinical Pathology, Lausanne University Hospital, Institute of Pathology, Lausanne, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Vaginal Enterobius vermicularis diagnosed on liquid-based cytology during papanicolaou test cervical cancer screening: A report of two cases and a review of the literature.
[So] Source:Diagn Cytopathol;, 2017 Sep 14.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0339
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Enterobiasis is one of the most common human parasitic infections. It is considered an intestinal parasite, but cases of extra-intestinal affections exist, notably infections of the female genital tract. Enterobius vermicularis (EV) eggs (or ova) have been found in the cervical smears of two patients in our institute during the last 16 years. No gynaecological or gastrointestinal symptoms were reported, and there was no known intestinal infection in these two cases. A review of the available literature revealed rare cases of vaginal enterobiasis, with a wide range of clinical presentations, many patients being asymptomatic. The diagnosis may sometimes be difficult, mainly because of the lack of clinical suspicion. However, cytological identification of EV in cervico-vaginal smears is important, especially when considering the risk of ascending infections of the genital tract associated with severe complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170914
[Lr] Last revision date:170914
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/dc.23812

  6 / 751 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28903890
[Au] Autor:Rainova I; Harizanov R; Kaftandjiev I; Tsvetkova N; Mikov O; Kaneva E
[Ti] Title:Human Parasitic Diseases in Bulgaria 2013-2014.
[So] Source:Balkan Med J;, 2017 Sep 13.
[Is] ISSN:2146-3131
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In Bulgaria, more than 20 autochthonous human parasitic infections have been described and some of them are widespread. Over 50 imported protozoan and helminthic infections represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenge and pose epidemiological risk due to the possibility of local transmission. AIMS: To establish the distribution of autochthonous and imported parasitic diseases among the population of the country and to evaluate their significance for the public health system. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective epidemiological analysis of the prevalence of human parasitic diseases in Bulgaria over the two-year period: 2013 - 2014. METHODS: We used the annual reports by Regional Health Inspectorates and data from the National Reference Laboratory at the National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases on all individuals infected with parasitic diseases in the country. Prevalence was calculated for parasitic diseases with few or absent clinical manifestations (oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic infections), and incidence per 100 000 was calculated for diseases with overt clinical picture or requiring hospitalization and specialized medical interventions (i.e. surgery). RESULTS: During the research period parasitological studies were conducted on 1 441 244 persons, and parasitic infections were diagnosed in 22 039 individuals. Distribution of various parasitic pathogens among the population displayed statistically significant differences with higher prevalence for some intestinal parasites (enterobiasis 0.81%, giardiasis 0.34%, blastocystosis 0.22%). For certain zoonotic diseases such as cystic echinococcosis (average incidence of 3.99 per 100 000) and trichinellosis (average incidence of 0.8 per 100 000), the incidence exceeds several times the annual incidence recorded in the European Union. CONCLUSION: Parasitic diseases still pose a problem with social and medical significance for the country. It is essential to provide constantly the public health system with improved efficiency to deal with autochthonous and imported parasitic diseases. Attention should be directed to some imported vector-borne parasitic diseases (e.g. malaria and cutaneous leishmaniasis) for which the country is potentially endemic.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170914
[Lr] Last revision date:170914
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.4274/balkanmedj.2017.0167

  7 / 751 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28819532
[Au] Autor:Karamitros G; Kitsos N; Athanasopoulos F
[Ad] Address:Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
[Ti] Title:A case of enterobiasis presenting as post-traumatic-stress-disorder (PTSD): a curious case of the infection with predominant mental health symptoms, presenting for the first time in the settings of a refugee camp.
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;27:111, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Enterobiasis (oxyuriasis) is a common infection in human caused by  ( ), a human intestinal helminth. Because of the easy way of its transmission among people, it has an extremely high prevalence in overcrowded conditions, such as nurseries and primary schools. Oxyuriasis's symptoms are extremely diverse in children, ranging from nausea, diarrhea, insomnia, irritability, recurrent cellulitis, loss of appetite, nightmares and endometritis. Here we report a curious case of oxyuriasis in the settings of a refugee camp in Greece. The patient was a 10-year old Syrian female, who presented with unusual and vague symptoms like insomnia and irritability. Given the violent background of the Syrian warzone that the patient had escaped, she was firstly diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) before eventually getting correctly diagnosed with enterobiasis. This infection is the first documented case of enterobiasis in the settings of a refugee camp and can highlight the unsanitary living conditions that refugees have to endure in those camps.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Enterobiasis/diagnosis
Refugees/psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Child
Enterobiasis/psychology
Female
Humans
Irritable Mood
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/diagnosis
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/parasitology
Syria/ethnology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170904
[Lr] Last revision date:170904
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170819
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.27.111.12870

  8 / 751 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28738499
[Au] Autor:Lee SA; Moon SM; Choi YH; Han SH; Park BR; Choi MS; Kim JS; Kim YH; Kim DK; Kim CS
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Biochemistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju, 501-759, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Aqueous extract of Codium fragile suppressed inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and carrageenan-induced rats.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;93:1055-1064, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Codium fragile (Suringar) Hariot has been used in Oriental medicine for the treatment of enterobiasis, dropsy, and dysuria and has been shown to have various biological effects. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of aqueous extract of C. fragile (AECF) using in vitro and in vivo models. Nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E (PGE ), inflammatory-related mRNAs, and proteins were determined using the Griess assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and western blotting, respectively. Our results indicate that pretreatment of cells with AECF (50, 100 and 200µg/mL) significantly inhibited LPS-induced secretion of NO and PGE in RAW264.7 cells without cytotoxicity. We also found that AECF (100 and 200µg/mL) inhibited LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, pretreatment of cells with AECF (100 and 200µg/mL) inhibited LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1ß, and IL-6. It also prevented the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB)-α. Furthermore, AECF (100 and 200µg/mL) inhibited the phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. In addition, orally administered 50, 100, and 200mg/kg body weight of AECF dose-dependently suppressed carrageenan-induced rat paw edema thickness by 6%, 31%, and 50% respectively, after 4h. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory effect was comparable to that observed in animals treated with the standard drug diclofenac sodium (56%) in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that AECF exerts potential anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing NF-κB activation and MAPKs pathways in vitro, as well as inhibiting carrageenan-induced rat paw edema thickness in vivo. These findings indicate that AECF could be further developed as an anti-inflammatory drug.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170809
[Lr] Last revision date:170809
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 751 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28654741
[Au] Autor:Kasprzak J; Szaladzinska B; Smogula M; Ziuziakowski M
[Ad] Address:Voivodeship Sanitary-Epidemiological Station in Bydgoszcz
[Ti] Title:Intestinal parasites in stool samples and perianal swabs examined by The Voivodeship Sanitary-Epidemiological Station in Bydgoszcz between 2000-2014
[So] Source:Przegl Epidemiol;71(1):45-54, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0033-2100
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Epidemiological conditions are changing due to the modifications in human behavior and environment. Parasitic diseases are most often caused by intestinal parasites. The frequency of Echinococcus multilocularis and tropical diseases increases in Poland. AIM OF STUDY: Analysis of intestinal parasites' occurrence in stool samples and perianal swabs tested in Medical Diagnostics Department of The Voivodeship Sanitary-Epidemiological Station in Bydgoszcz between 2000-2014. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 24 609 fecal samples and perianal swabs were tested using microscopic method for intestinal parasites' presence and immunoenzymatic method (ELISA) for Giardia intestinalis presence. The study population was sorted into four groups according to age. RESULTS: Prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons tested over 2000-2014 period ranged between 2.15% - 7.04%. The most common invasive parasite was Enterobius vermicularis, especially among children between 3-7 years (64.58%). In the same time period the most prevalent pathogenic intestinal parasite in adults (>16 years) was Giardia intestinalis (65.81%). CONCLUSIONS: 1. The prevalence of intestinal parasites infection changes depending on the number of tests carried out. The number of infections may be underestimated given that the testing encompassed only a part of population. A need for more thorough examination exists. 2. Enterobius vermicularis infection was most often found in children between 3-7 years, mainly from specific communities (kindergartens, orphanages).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Enterobiasis/epidemiology
Enterobiasis/parasitology
Enterobius/isolation & purification
Feces/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Ascariasis/epidemiology
Ascariasis/parasitology
Child
Child, Preschool
Entamoeba/isolation & purification
Entamoebiasis/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Poland/epidemiology
Prevalence
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170628
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 751 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28333965
[Au] Autor:Ludvigsson J; Jones MP; Faresjö Å
[Ad] Address:Division of Pediatrics, Dept of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Worm infestations and development of autoimmunity in children - The ABIS study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(3):e0173988, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Worm infestations influence the immune system and may therefore decrease the risk for autoimmune diseases. The aim of the study was to determine whether children who have developed autoimmune disease were less likely to have had worm infestations in childhood. The ABIS-study is a prospective population-based cohort study of children born in southeast Sweden 1997/99. 17.055 children participated. As of June 2014 116 individuals had developed Type 1 diabetes, 181 celiac disease, and 53 Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. The parents answered questions on worm infestations when the children were 1, 5 and 8 years of age. The ABIS registry was connected to the National Registry of Drug Prescriptions, and national registries for diagnosis of the studied diseases. We found no differences in incidence of worm infestations at 1, 5 or 8 years of age between children who developed autoimmune disease(s) or healthy controls. At 8 years in total 20.0% of the general child population had experienced a worm infestation; children who developed Type 1 diabetes, 21,3%, celiac disease 19,5% and JRA 18,8%. There was no difference in prescriptions of drugs for treatment of worm infestations between those who had and who had not developed Type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. We found no associations indicating that worm infestations in childhood does not play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases in Sweden.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology
Helminthiasis/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Autoimmune Diseases/etiology
Autoimmunity/immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Enterobiasis/complications
Enterobiasis/epidemiology
Enterobiasis/immunology
Female
Helminthiasis/complications
Helminthiasis/immunology
Humans
Infant
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170825
[Lr] Last revision date:170825
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170324
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0173988


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