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[PMID]: 25135641
[Au] Autor:Jia N; Barclay WS; Roberts K; Yen HL; Chan RW; Lam AK; Air G; Peiris JS; Dell A; Nicholls JM; Haslam SM
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom....
[Ti] Title:Glycomic Characterization of Respiratory Tract Tissues of Ferrets: IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS USE IN INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION STUDIES.
[So] Source:J Biol Chem;289(41):28489-504, 2014 Oct 10.
[Is] ISSN:1083-351X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The initial recognition between influenza virus and the host cell is mediated by interactions between the viral surface protein hemagglutinin and sialic acid-terminated glycoconjugates on the host cell surface. The sialic acid residues can be linked to the adjacent monosaccharide by α2-3- or α2-6-type glycosidic bonds. It is this linkage difference that primarily defines the species barrier of the influenza virus infection with α2-3 binding being associated with avian influenza viruses and α2-6 binding being associated with human strains. The ferret has been extensively used as an animal model to study the transmission of influenza. To better understand the validity of this model system, we undertook glycomic characterization of respiratory tissues of ferret, which allows a comparison of potential viral receptors to be made between humans and ferrets. To complement the structural analysis, lectin staining experiments were performed to characterize the regional distributions of glycans along the respiratory tract of ferrets. Finally, the binding between the glycans identified and the hemagglutinins of different strains of influenza viruses was assessed by glycan array experiments. Our data indicated that the respiratory tissues of ferret heterogeneously express both α2-3- and α2-6-linked sialic acids. However, the respiratory tissues of ferret also expressed the Sda epitope (NeuAcα2-3(GalNAc1-4)Gal1-4GlcNAc) and sialylated N,N'-diacetyllactosamine (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc1-4GlcNAc), which have not been observed in the human respiratory tract surface epithelium. The presence of the Sda epitope reduces potential binding sites for avian viruses and thus may have implications for the usefulness of the ferret in the study of influenza virus infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1074/jbc.M114.588541

  2 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24261459
[Au] Autor:Suliman NM; Astrm AN; Ali RW; Salman H; Johannessen AC
[Ti] Title:Clinical and histological characterization of oral pemphigus lesions in patients with skin diseases: a cross sectional study from Sudan.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;13(1):66, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pemphigus is a rare group of life-threatening mucocutaneous autoimmune blistering diseases. Frequently, oral lesions precede the cutaneous ones. This study aimed to describe clinical and histological features of oral pemphigus lesions in patients aged 18 years and above, attending outpatient's facility of Khartoum Teaching Hospital - Dermatology Clinic, Sudan. In addition, the study aimed to assess the diagnostic significance of routine histolopathology along with immunohistochemical (IHC) examination of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens in patients with oral pemphigus. METHODS: A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2008 to January 2009. A total of 588 patients with confirmed disease diagnosis completed an oral examination and a personal interview. Clinical evaluations supported with histopathology were the methods of diagnosis. IHC was used to confirm the diagnosis. Location, size, and pain of oral lesions were used to measure the oral disease activity. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), 19 of them (mean age: 43.0; range: 20-72yrs) presented with oral manifestations. Pemphigus foliaceus was diagnosed in one patient. In PV, female: male ratio was 1.1:1.0. Buccal mucosa was the most commonly affected site. Exclusive oral lesions were detected in 14.2% (3/21). In patients who experienced both skin and oral lesion during their life time, 50.0% (9/18) had oral mucosa as the initial site of involvement, 33.3% (6/18) had skin as the primary site, and simultaneous involvement of both skin and oral mucosa was reported by 5.5% (1/18). Two patients did not provide information regarding the initial site of involvement. Oral lesion activity score was higher in those who reported to live outside Khartoum state, were outdoor workers, had lower education and belonged to Central and Western tribes compared with their counterparts. Histologically, all tissues except one had suprabasal cleft and acantholytic cells. IHC revealed IgG and C3 intercellularly in the epithelium. CONCLUSIONS: PV was the predominating subtype of pemphigus in this study. The majority of patients with PV presented with oral lesions. Clinical and histological pictures of oral PV are in good agreement with the literature. IHC confirmed all diagnoses of PV.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/1472-6831-13-66

  3 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25297496
[Au] Autor:Li Y; Zhang R; Pan D; Huang B; Weng M; Nie X
[Ti] Title:KRAS mutation in adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal type arising from a mature cystic teratoma of the ovary.
[So] Source:J Ovarian Res;7:85, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1757-2215
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mature cystic teratomas (MCT) in the ovary rarely undergo malignant transformation. Moreover, adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal type is much rarer. We present two cases of perimenopausal female pateints with mature cystic teratoma of single ovary, while local adenocarcinoma arising in the MCT. The malignancies showed immunohistochemical features of intestinal differentiation, such as strong positivity for CDX-2, villin and CK-20, and negativity for CK-7. Furthermore, the mutation analysis of molecular alteration revealed a KRAS gene mutation in the intestinal adenocarcinoma part, extending into benign intestinal-type epithelium linings. Yet the mutation was not present in the epidermal component of the teratoma. We present these as two unique cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the intestinal type arising from mature cystic teratoma. Moreover, we also submit that this KRAS mutation might contribute to identify malignant transformation of a MCT and suggest possible effect on targeted treatment decisions for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in metastasized patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13048-014-0085-3

  4 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25295526
[Au] Autor:He X; Korytr T; Zhu Y; Pikula J; Bandouchova H; Zukal J; Kllner B
[Ad] Address:Institute of Immunology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute (FLI), Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Greifswald- Insel Riems, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Establishment of Myotis myotis Cell Lines - Model for Investigation of Host-Pathogen Interaction in a Natural Host for Emerging Viruses.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(10):e109795, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bats are found to be the natural reservoirs for many emerging viruses. In most cases, severe clinical signs caused by such virus infections are normally not seen in bats. This indicates differences in the virus-host interactions and underlines the necessity to develop natural host related models to study these phenomena. Due to the strict protection of European bat species, immortalized cell lines are the only alternative to investigate the innate anti-virus immune mechanisms. Here, we report about the establishment and functional characterization of Myotis myotis derived cell lines from different tissues: brain (MmBr), tonsil (MmTo), peritoneal cavity (MmPca), nasal epithelium (MmNep) and nervus olfactorius (MmNol) after immortalization by SV 40 large T antigen. The usefulness of these cell lines to study antiviral responses has been confirmed by analysis of their susceptibility to lyssavirus infection and the mRNA patterns of immune-relevant genes after poly I:C stimulation. Performed experiments indicated varying susceptibility to lyssavirus infection with MmBr being considerably less susceptible than the other cell lines. Further investigation demonstrated a strong activation of interferon mediated antiviral response in MmBr contributing to its resistance. The pattern recognition receptors: RIG-I and MDA5 were highly up-regulated during rabies virus infection in MmBr, suggesting their involvement in promotion of antiviral responses. The presence of CD14 and CD68 in MmBr suggested MmBr cells are microglia-like cells which play a key role in host defense against infections in the central nervous system (CNS). Thus the expression pattern of MmBr combined with the observed limitation of lyssavirus replication underpin a protective mechanism of the CNS controlling the lyssavirus infection. Overall, the established cell lines are important tools to analyze antiviral innate immunity in M. myotis against neurotropic virus infections and present a valuable tool for a broad spectrum of future investigations in cellular biology of M. myotis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0109795

  5 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298726
[Au] Autor:Krishnamurthy A; Ramshanker V
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgical Oncology, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:A Type I first branchial cleft cyst masquerading as a parotid tumor.
[So] Source:Natl J Maxillofac Surg;5(1):84-5, 2014 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0975-5950
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Branchial cleft anomalies are caused by incomplete regression of the cervical sinus of "His" during the 6(th) and 7(th) weeks of embryologic development. Although congenital in origin, first branchial cleft cysts (FBCCs) can present later in life. FBCCs are rare causes of parotid swellings, accounting for <1% of all the branchial cleft abnormalities. The diagnosis of FBCCs is a clinical challenge; the condition is often overlooked and mismanaged. We report a case of Type 1 FBCC in a 22-year-old female with an asymptomatic 3.5 cm 2.5 cm sized cystic mass. It was removed completely under the impression of a cystic tumor of the parotid. On histopathology, the cyst had a squamous epithelium-lined wall with lymphoid aggregation which was characteristic of a branchial cleft cyst. A good understanding of the regional anatomy and embryology can lead to an early diagnosis and thereby effective management of FBCC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0975-5950.140189

  6 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298926
[Au] Autor:Jahromi MK; Kafieh R; Rabbani H; Dehnavi AM; Peyman A; Hajizadeh F; Ommani M
[Ad] Address:Department of Advanced Medical Technologies, Medical Image and Signal Processing Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran....
[Ti] Title:An Automatic Algorithm for Segmentation of the Boundaries of Corneal Layers in Optical Coherence Tomography Images using Gaussian Mixture Model.
[So] Source:J Med Signals Sens;4(3):171-80, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2228-7477
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diagnosis of corneal diseases is possible by measuring and evaluation of corneal thickness in different layers. Thus, the need for precise segmentation of corneal layer boundaries is inevitable. Obviously, manual segmentation is time-consuming and imprecise. In this paper, the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is used for automatic segmentation of three clinically important corneal boundaries on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. For this purpose, we apply the GMM method in two consequent steps. In the first step, the GMM is applied on the original image to localize the first and the last boundaries. In the next step, gradient response of a contrast enhanced version of the image is fed into another GMM algorithm to obtain a more clear result around the second boundary. Finally, the first boundary is traced toward down to localize the exact location of the second boundary. We tested the performance of the algorithm on images taken from a Heidelberg OCT imaging system. To evaluate our approach, the automatic boundary results are compared with the boundaries that have been segmented manually by two corneal specialists. The quantitative results show that the proposed method segments the desired boundaries with a great accuracy. Unsigned mean errors between the results of the proposed method and the manual segmentation are 0.332, 0.421, and 0.795 for detection of epithelium, Bowman, and endothelium boundaries, respectively. Unsigned mean errors of the inter-observer between two corneal specialists have also a comparable unsigned value of 0.330, 0.398, and 0.534, respectively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  7 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298949
[Au] Autor:Hasan S; Ahmed SA; Reddy LB
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Dentigerous cyst in association with impacted inverted mesiodens: Report of a rare case with a brief review of literature.
[So] Source:Int J Appl Basic Med Res;4(Suppl 1):S61-4, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2229-516X
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dentigerous cyst is a developmental odontogenic cyst, which develops due to fluid accumulation between the reduced enamel epithelium and unerupted tooth crown. The condition is frequently seen with the permanent dentition, usually associated with impacted mandibular third molars and maxillary canines. Rarely, dentigerous cyst occurs in association with a supernumerary tooth. Pain, swelling, and facial asymmetry are occasionally seen; however, they are usually asymptomatic and observed during radiographic examination. Early diagnosis and treatment planning entails thorough history taking, clinical and radiographic examination coupled with histopathology. This article reports an unusual occurrence of dentigerous cyst of anterior maxillary region seen with an inverted impacted mesiodens cyst enucleation along with extraction of the mesiodens was carried out and no complications were observed during the follow-up.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2229-516X.140748

  8 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24989814
[Au] Autor:Puppo A; Cesi G; Marrocco E; Piccolo P; Jacca S; Shayakhmetov DM; Parks RJ; Davidson BL; Colloca S; Brunetti-Pierri N; Ng P; Donofrio G; Auricchio A
[Ad] Address:Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine (TIGEM), Naples, Italy....
[Ti] Title:Retinal transduction profiles by high-capacity viral vectors.
[So] Source:Gene Ther;21(10):855-65, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5462
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, the limited cargo capacity of AAV prevents their use for therapy of those inherited retinopathies (IRs) due to mutations in large (>5 kb) genes. Viral vectors derived from adenovirus (Ad), lentivirus (LV) and herpes virus (HV) can package large DNA sequences, but do not target efficiently retinal photoreceptors (PRs) where the majority of genes responsible for IRs are expressed. Here, we have evaluated the mouse retinal transduction profiles of vectors derived from 16 different Ad serotypes, 7 LV pseudotypes and from a bovine HV. Most of the vectors tested transduced efficiently the retinal pigment epithelium. We found that LV-GP64 tends to transduce more PRs than the canonical LV-VSVG, albeit this was restricted to a narrow region. We observed more extensive PR transduction with HdAd1, 2 and 5/F35++ than with LV, although none of them outperformed the canonical HdAd5 or matched the extension of PR transduction achieved with AAV2/8.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/gt.2014.57

  9 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25220211
[Au] Autor:Van Kaer L; Algood HM; Singh K; Parekh VV; Greer MJ; Piazuelo MB; Weitkamp JH; Matta P; Chaturvedi R; Wilson KT; Olivares-Villagmez D
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. Electronic address: luc.van.kaer@vanderbilt.edu....
[Ti] Title:CD8αα(+) Innate-Type Lymphocytes in the Intestinal Epithelium Mediate Mucosal Immunity.
[So] Source:Immunity;41(3):451-64, 2014 Sep 18.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4180
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Innate immune responses are critical for mucosal immunity. Here we describe an innate lymphocyte population, iCD8α cells, characterized by expression of CD8α homodimers. iCD8α cells exhibit innate functional characteristics such as the capacity to engulf and kill bacteria. Development of iCD8α cells depends on expression of interleukin-2 receptor γ chain (IL-2Rγc), IL-15, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib protein H2-T3, also known as the thymus leukemia antigen or TL. While lineage tracking experiments indicated that iCD8α cells have a lymphoid origin, their development was independent of the transcriptional suppressor Id2, suggesting that these cells do not belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells. Finally, we identified cells with a similar phenotype in humans, which were profoundly depleted in newborns with necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings suggest a critical role of iCD8α cells in immune responses associated with the intestinal epithelium.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 251063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24805256
[Au] Autor:Altshuler AE; Lamadrid I; Li D; Ma SR; Kurre L; Schmid-Schnbein GW; Penn AH
[Ad] Address:Department of Bioengineering, The Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University Of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America....
[Ti] Title:Transmural intestinal wall permeability in severe ischemia after enteral protease inhibition.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(5):e96655, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In intestinal ischemia, inflammatory mediators in the small intestine's lumen such as food byproducts, bacteria, and digestive enzymes leak into the peritoneal space, lymph, and circulation, but the mechanisms by which the intestinal wall permeability initially increases are not well defined. We hypothesize that wall protease activity (independent of luminal proteases) and apoptosis contribute to the increased transmural permeability of the intestine's wall in an acutely ischemic small intestine. To model intestinal ischemia, the proximal jejunum to the distal ileum in the rat was excised, the lumen was rapidly flushed with saline to remove luminal contents, sectioned into equal length segments, and filled with a tracer (fluorescein) in saline, glucose, or protease inhibitors. The transmural fluorescein transport was determined over 2 hours. Villi structure and epithelial junctional proteins were analyzed. After ischemia, there was increased transmural permeability, loss of villi structure, and destruction of epithelial proteins. Supplementation with luminal glucose preserved the epithelium and significantly attenuated permeability and villi damage. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors (doxycycline, GM 6001), and serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid) in the lumen, significantly reduced the fluorescein transport compared to saline for 90 min of ischemia. Based on these results, we tested in an in-vivo model of hemorrhagic shock (90 min 30 mmHg, 3 hours observation) for intestinal lesion formation. Single enteral interventions (saline, glucose, tranexamic acid) did not prevent intestinal lesions, while the combination of enteral glucose and tranexamic acid prevented lesion formation after hemorrhagic shock. The results suggest that apoptotic and protease mediated breakdown cause increased permeability and damage to the intestinal wall. Metabolic support in the lumen of an ischemic intestine with glucose reduces the transport from the lumen across the wall and enteral proteolytic inhibition attenuates tissue breakdown. These combined interventions ameliorate lesion formation in the small intestine after hemorrhagic shock.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1405
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0096655


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