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[PMID]: 26826203
[Au] Autor:Thomas C; Sill M; Ruland V; Witten A; Hartung S; Kordes U; Jeibmann A; Beschorner R; Keyvani K; Bergmann M; Mittelbronn M; Pietsch T; Felsberg J; Monoranu CM; Varlet P; Hauser P; Olar A; Grundy RG; Wolff JE; Korshunov A; Jones DT; Bewerunge-Hudler M; Hovestadt V; von Deimling A; Pfister SM; Paulus W; Capper D; Hasselblatt M
[Ad] Address:Institute of Neuropathology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany (C.T., V.R., A.J., W.P., M.H.); Division of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany (M.S.); Core Facility Genomics of the Medical Faculty Münster, Münster, Germany (A.W.); Department of Pediat...
[Ti] Title:Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 clinically distinct subgroups.
[So] Source:Neuro Oncol;18(6):790-6, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1523-5866
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Choroid plexus tumors are intraventricular neoplasms derived from the choroid plexus epithelium. A better knowledge of molecular factors involved in choroid plexus tumor biology may aid in identifying patients at risk for recurrence. METHODS: Methylation profiles were examined in 29 choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs, WHO grade I), 32 atypical choroid plexus papillomas (aCPPs, WHO grade II), and 31 choroid plexus carcinomas (CPCs, WHO grade III) by Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Bead Chip Array. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified 3 subgroups: methylation cluster 1 (pediatric CPP and aCPP of mainly supratentorial location), methylation cluster 2 (adult CPP and aCPP of mainly infratentorial location), and methylation cluster 3 (pediatric CPP, aCPP, and CPC of supratentorial location). In methylation cluster 3, progression-free survival (PFS) accounted for a mean of 72 months (CI, 55-89 mo), whereas only 1 of 42 tumors of methylation clusters 1 and 2 progressed (P< .001). On stratification of outcome data according to WHO grade, all CPCs clustered within cluster 3 and were associated with shorter overall survival (mean, 105 mo [CI, 81-128 mo]) and PFS (mean, 55 mo [CI, 36-73 mo]). The aCPP of methylation cluster 3 also progressed frequently (mean, 69 mo [CI, 44-93 mo]), whereas no tumor progression was observed in aCPP of methylation clusters 1 and 2 (P< .05). Only 1 of 29 CPPs recurred. CONCLUSIONS: Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 distinct subgroups (ie, pediatric low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 1], adult low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 2], and pediatric high-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 3]) and may provide useful prognostic information in addition to histopathology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/neuonc/nov322

  2 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27159323
[Au] Autor:Dupont A; Sommer F; Zhang K; Repnik U; Basic M; Bleich A; Kühnel M; Bäckhed F; Litvak Y; Fulde M; Rosenshine I; Hornef MW
[Ad] Address:Institute for Medical Microbiology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Aachen, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) Infection in Mice.
[So] Source:PLoS Pathog;12(5):e1005616, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7374
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) represents a major causative agent of infant diarrhea associated with significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although studied extensively in vitro, the investigation of the host-pathogen interaction in vivo has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Using RT-PCR and global transcriptome analysis, high throughput 16S rDNA sequencing as well as immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we characterize the EPEC-host interaction following oral challenge of newborn mice. Spontaneous colonization of the small intestine and colon of neonate mice that lasted until weaning was observed. Intimate attachment to the epithelial plasma membrane and microcolony formation were visualized only in the presence of a functional bundle forming pili (BFP) and type III secretion system (T3SS). Similarly, a T3SS-dependent EPEC-induced innate immune response, mediated via MyD88, TLR5 and TLR9 led to the induction of a distinct set of genes in infected intestinal epithelial cells. Infection-induced alterations of the microbiota composition remained restricted to the postnatal period. Although EPEC colonized the adult intestine in the absence of a competing microbiota, no microcolonies were observed at the small intestinal epithelium. Here, we introduce the first suitable mouse infection model and describe an age-dependent, virulence factor-dependent attachment of EPEC to enterocytes in vivo.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.ppat.1005616

  3 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26674309
[Au] Autor:Nagy N; Barad C; Graham HK; Hotta R; Cheng LS; Fejszak N; Goldstein AM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA Department of Human Morphology and Developmental Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest 1094, Hungary nagy.nandor@med.semmelweis-univ.hu....
[Ti] Title:Sonic hedgehog controls enteric nervous system development by patterning the extracellular matrix.
[So] Source:Development;143(2):264-75, 2016 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1477-9129
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The enteric nervous system (ENS) develops from neural crest cells that migrate along the intestine, differentiate into neurons and glia, and pattern into two plexuses within the gut wall. Inductive interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme regulate gut development, but the influence of these interactions on ENS development is unknown. Epithelial-mesenchymal recombinations were constructed using avian hindgut mesenchyme and non-intestinal epithelium from the bursa of Fabricius. These recombinations led to abnormally large and ectopically positioned ganglia. We hypothesized that sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted intestinal epithelial protein not expressed in the bursa, mediates this effect. Inhibition of Shh signaling, by addition of cyclopamine or a function-blocking antibody, resulted in large, ectopic ganglia adjacent to the epithelium. Shh overexpression, achieved in ovo using Shh-encoding retrovirus and in organ culture using recombinant protein, led to intestinal aganglionosis. Shh strongly induced the expression of versican and collagen type IX, whereas cyclopamine reduced expression of these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that are known to be inhibitory to neural crest cell migration. Shh also inhibited enteric neural crest-derived cell (ENCC) proliferation, promoted neuronal differentiation, and reduced expression of Gdnf, a key regulator of ENS formation. Ptc1 and Ptc2 were not expressed by ENCCs, and migration of isolated ENCCs was not inhibited by Shh protein. These results suggest that epithelial-derived Shh acts indirectly on the developing ENS by regulating the composition of the intestinal microenvironment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Cu] Class update date: 160209
[Lr] Last revision date:160209
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1242/dev.128132

  4 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26427032
[Au] Autor:Froidure A; Shen C; Pilette C
[Ad] Address:Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université Catholique de Louvain and Walloon Institute for Excellence in Lifesciences and Biotechnology, Brussels, Belgium....
[Ti] Title:Dendritic cells revisited in human allergic rhinitis and asthma.
[So] Source:Allergy;71(2):137-48, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1398-9995
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in airway allergy has been studied for 15 years; recent data has highlighted the cross talk with airway epithelial cells and environmental factors (allergens, virus) during the inception and exacerbation of allergic asthma. Although murine models have provided key information, it remains uncertain to what extent these basic mechanisms take place in human allergic disease, notably with regard to different clinical phenotypes. In the present review, we discuss new evidence regarding mechanisms of DC regulation in the mouse which could be important in human asthma. Finally, after discussing the effects of current therapies on DC biology, we focus on pathways that could represent targets for future therapies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/all.12770

  5 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25971253
[Au] Autor:de Matos Simoes R; Dalleau S; Williamson KE; Emmert-Streib F
[Ad] Address:Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB), Queens University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK. r.dematossimoes@qub.ac.uk....
[Ti] Title:Urothelial cancer gene regulatory networks inferred from large-scale RNAseq, Bead and Oligo gene expression data.
[So] Source:BMC Syst Biol;9:21, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1752-0509
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Urothelial pathogenesis is a complex process driven by an underlying network of interconnected genes. The identification of novel genomic target regions and gene targets that drive urothelial carcinogenesis is crucial in order to improve our current limited understanding of urothelial cancer (UC) on the molecular level. The inference of genome-wide gene regulatory networks (GRN) from large-scale gene expression data provides a promising approach for a detailed investigation of the underlying network structure associated to urothelial carcinogenesis. METHODS: In our study we inferred and compared three GRNs by the application of the BC3Net inference algorithm to large-scale transitional cell carcinoma gene expression data sets from Illumina RNAseq (179 samples), Illumina Bead arrays (165 samples) and Affymetrix Oligo microarrays (188 samples). We investigated the structural and functional properties of GRNs for the identification of molecular targets associated to urothelial cancer. RESULTS: We found that the urothelial cancer (UC) GRNs show a significant enrichment of subnetworks that are associated with known cancer hallmarks including cell cycle, immune response, signaling, differentiation and translation. Interestingly, the most prominent subnetworks of co-located genes were found on chromosome regions 5q31.3 (RNAseq), 8q24.3 (Oligo) and 1q23.3 (Bead), which all represent known genomic regions frequently deregulated or aberated in urothelial cancer and other cancer types. Furthermore, the identified hub genes of the individual GRNs, e.g., HID1/DMC1 (tumor development), RNF17/TDRD4 (cancer antigen) and CYP4A11 (angiogenesis/ metastasis) are known cancer associated markers. The GRNs were highly dataset specific on the interaction level between individual genes, but showed large similarities on the biological function level represented by subnetworks. Remarkably, the RNAseq UC GRN showed twice the proportion of significant functional subnetworks. Based on our analysis of inferential and experimental networks the Bead UC GRN showed the lowest performance compared to the RNAseq and Oligo UC GRNs. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating genome-scale UC GRNs. RNAseq based gene expression data is the data platform of choice for a GRN inference. Our study offers new avenues for the identification of novel putative diagnostic targets for subsequent studies in bladder tumors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Computational Biology
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Regulatory Networks
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/genetics
Urothelium/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Signal Transduction/genetics
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology
Urothelium/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150610
[Lr] Last revision date:150610
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150609
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12918-015-0165-z

  6 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25407308
[Au] Autor:Zubor P; Hatok J; Moricova P; Kajo K; Kapustova I; Mendelova A; Racay P; Danko J
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Kollarova 2 Martin, 036 01, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, Slovakia, zubor@jfmed.uniba.sk.
[Ti] Title:Gene expression abnormalities in histologically normal breast epithelium from patients with luminal type of breast cancer.
[So] Source:Mol Biol Rep;42(5):977-88, 2015 May.
[Is] ISSN:1573-4978
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The gene expression profile of breast cancer has been described as a great breakthrough on the way to comprehend differences in cancer origin, behavior and therapy. However, gene expression profile in histologically normal epithelium (HNEpi) which could harbor genetic abnormalities predisposing breast tissue to develop malignancy was minor scope for scientists in the past. Thus, we aimed to analyze gene expressions in HNEpi and breast cancer tissue (BCTis) in order to establish its value as potential diagnostic marker for cancer development. We evaluated a panel of disease-specific genes in luminal type (A/B) of breast cancer and tumor surrounding HNEpi by qRT-PCR Array in 32 microdissected samples. There was 20.2 and 2.4% deregulation rate in genes with at least 2-fold or 5-fold over-expression between luminal (A/B) type breast carcinomas and tumor surrounding HNEpi, respectively. The high-grade luminal carcinomas showed higher number of deregulated genes compared to low-grade cases (50.6 vs. 23.8% with at least 2-fold deregulation rate). The main overexpressed genes in HNEpi were KLK5, SCGB1D2, GSN, EGFR and NGFR. The significant differences in gene expression between BCTis and HNEpi samples were revealed for BAG1, C3, CCNA2, CD44, FGF1, FOSL1, ID2, IL6R, NGFB, NGFR, PAPPA, PLAU, SERPINB5, THBS1 and TP53 gene (p < 0.05) and BCL2L2, CTSB, ITGB4, JUN, KIT, KLF5, SCGB1D2, SCGB2A1, SERPINE1 (p < 0.01), and EGFR, GABRP, GSN, MAP2K7 and THBS2 (p < 0.001), and GSN, KLK5 (p < 0.0001). The ontological gene analyses revealed high deregulations in gene group directly associated with breast cancer prognosis and origin.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Breast Neoplasms/genetics
Breast/metabolism
Genes, Neoplasm
Transcriptome
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biomarkers, Tumor
Breast/pathology
Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis
Breast Neoplasms/metabolism
Breast Neoplasms/pathology
Epithelium/metabolism
Epithelium/pathology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Kallikreins/genetics
Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics
Prognosis
Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor/genetics
Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor/genetics
Secretoglobins/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers, Tumor); 0 (NGFR protein, human); 0 (Nerve Tissue Proteins); 0 (Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor); 0 (SCGB1D2 protein, human); 0 (Secretoglobins); EC 2.7.10.1 (EGFR protein, human); EC 2.7.10.1 (Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor); EC 3.4.21.- (KLK5 protein, human); EC 3.4.21.- (Kallikreins)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150411
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11033-014-3834-x

  7 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25313850
[Au] Autor:Aly H; Soliman RM; El-Dib M; Said RN; Abdellatif MA; Sibaii H; Elwakkad A
[Ad] Address:*Department of Neonatology, Children's National Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington, DC †Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University ‡National Research Center, Cairo, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Does positioning affect tracheal aspiration of gastric content in ventilated infants?
[So] Source:J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr;60(3):327-31, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4801
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Gastroesophageal reflux and aspiration can occur in premature infants who are supported with mechanical ventilation. The relation between physical positioning and gastric aspiration in ventilated infants has not been studied. Pepsin measured in tracheal aspirate (TA) emerged as a specific marker for aspiration. The objective of our study was to assess pepsin in TA of ventilated infants at 2 different positions: supine and right lateral. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial on premature infants who were enterally fed and supported with mechanical ventilation. Patients were randomized into intervention and control groups. In the intervention group, infants were placed supine for 6 hours before a sample of TA was obtained. A second sample was collected 6 hours later while lying in the right lateral position. In the control group, the 2 samples of TA were obtained while infants remained in the supine position during the entire study time. Pepsin in TA was measured while blinded to the group assignment. RESULTS: A total of 34 patients were enrolled and randomized to intervention (n = 17) and control (n = 17) groups. Gestational age was 32.7 ± 2.7 weeks, and birth weight was 1617 ± 526 g; both groups had similar demographic and clinical characteristics. Pepsin concentration did not differ between groups at baseline. In the intervention group, pepsin concentration significantly declined from 13 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR] 11.9-38.7) to 10 ng/mL (IQR 7-12; P < 0.001), whereas it did not change in the control group (P = 0.42). CONCLUSIONS: The right lateral positioning is associated with decreased TA pepsin. The implications of the present study on hospital practice and clinical outcomes need further investigations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Infant, Premature, Diseases/prevention & control
Patient Positioning/adverse effects
Positive-Pressure Respiration/adverse effects
Respiratory Aspiration of Gastric Contents/prevention & control
Respiratory Mucosa/immunology
Trachea/immunology
Tracheitis/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biomarkers
Body Fluids/chemistry
Body Fluids/secretion
Egypt/epidemiology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases/epidemiology
Infant, Premature, Diseases/immunology
Infant, Premature, Diseases/physiopathology
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Pepsin A/analysis
Referral and Consultation
Respiratory Aspiration of Gastric Contents/epidemiology
Respiratory Aspiration of Gastric Contents/immunology
Respiratory Aspiration of Gastric Contents/physiopathology
Respiratory Mucosa/secretion
Risk
Supine Position
Trachea/secretion
Tracheitis/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); EC 3.4.23.1 (Pepsin A)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150225
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MPG.0000000000000601

  8 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25313849
[Au] Autor:Houghteling PD; Walker WA
[Ad] Address:Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Charlestown.
[Ti] Title:Why is initial bacterial colonization of the intestine important to infants' and children's health?
[So] Source:J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr;60(3):294-307, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4801
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Microbial colonization of the infant occurs during a critical time window for immune and gastrointestinal development. Infant colonization sets the stage for the adult microbiome. This review is a broad survey of the factors affecting infant colonization and the downstream effects on gastrointestinal health and disease. Major topics affecting colonization include initial inoculation dependent on birth mode, the impact of breast-feeding, and inside-out modulation of the developing microbiome by the immune system. Major outcomes of colonization include the timing-dependent education of the neonatal immune system, which is interconnected with barrier function and metabolism. These all engage in further continuing cross-talk with the microbiome, genetics, and nutrition. This review also briefly examines mechanisms of disease resulting from disrupted colonization as well as nutritional and microbial therapies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adaptive Immunity
Child Development
Immunity, Innate
Intestinal Mucosa/microbiology
Intestines/microbiology
Microbiota
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Intestinal Mucosa/growth & development
Intestinal Mucosa/immunology
Intestines/growth & development
Intestines/immunology
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160301
[Lr] Last revision date:160301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150225
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MPG.0000000000000597

  9 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23969534
[Au] Autor:Jimbo K; Arai K; Kobayashi I; Matsuoka K; Shimizu H; Yanagi T; Kubota M; Ohtsuka Y; Shimizu T; Nakazawa A
[Ad] Address:*Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine †Division of Gastroenterology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo ‡Department of Pediatrics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo §Department of Pathology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo ||Division of General Pediatrics, Saitama Children's Medical Center, Saitama, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Isolated autoimmune enteropathy associated with autoantibodies to a novel 28-kDa duodenal antigen.
[So] Source:J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr;60(3):e17-9, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4801
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Autoantibodies/analysis
Duodenitis/etiology
Duodenum/immunology
Intestinal Mucosa/immunology
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use
Antigens/chemistry
Antigens/metabolism
Colitis/etiology
Colon/immunology
Colon/metabolism
Colon/pathology
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea, Infantile/etiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Duodenum/metabolism
Duodenum/pathology
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use
Infant
Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism
Intestinal Mucosa/pathology
Male
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/drug therapy
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/immunology
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/physiopathology
Sepsis/etiology
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Antigens); 0 (Autoantibodies); 0 (Immunosuppressive Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150225
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MPG.0b013e3182a936dc

  10 / 265335 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25673902
[Au] Autor:Haq K; Wootton SK; Barjesteh N; Golovan S; Bendall A; Sharif S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Haq, Wootton, Barjesteh, Sharif); Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, 19716 USA (Golovan); Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, College of B...
[Ti] Title:Effects of interferon-γ knockdown on vaccine-induced immunity against Marek's disease in chickens.
[So] Source:Can J Vet Res;79(1):1-7, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1928-9022
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Interferon (IFN)-γ has been shown to be associated with immunity to Marek's disease virus (MDV). The overall objective of this study was to investigate the causal relationship between IFN-γ and vaccine-conferred immunity against MDV in chickens. To this end, 3 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting chicken IFN-γ, which had previously been shown to reduce IFN-γ expression in vitro, and a control siRNA were selected to generate recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV) expressing short-hairpin small interfering RNAs (shRNAs). An MDV challenge trial was then conducted: chickens were vaccinated with herpesvirus of turkey (HVT), administered the rAAAV expressing shRNA, and then challenged with MDV. Tumors were observed in 4 out of 10 birds that were vaccinated with HVT and challenged but did not receive any rAAAV, 5 out of 9 birds that were administered the rAAAV containing IFN-γ shRNA, and 2 out of 10 birds that were administered a control enhanced green fluorescent protein siRNA. There was no significant difference in MDV genome load in the feather follicle epithelium of the birds that were cotreated with the vaccine and the rAAAV compared with the vaccinated MDV-infected birds. These results suggest that AAAV-based vectors can be used for the delivery of shRNA into chicken cells. However, administration of the rAAAV expressing shRNA targeting chicken IFN-γ did not seem to fully abrogate vaccine-induced protection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chickens/immunology
Interferon-gamma/immunology
Marek Disease/immunology
Poultry Diseases/immunology
Viral Vaccines/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biomarkers
Gene Knockdown Techniques
Interferon-gamma/genetics
Marek Disease/prevention & control
Poultry Diseases/prevention & control
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
[Pt] Publication type:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Viral Vaccines); 82115-62-6 (Interferon-gamma)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150701
[Lr] Last revision date:150701
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150212
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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