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[PMID]: 25130451
[Au] Autor:Wei H; Shi L; Zhang J; Xia Y; Cuan J; Zhang Y; Li W; Yan A; Jiang X; Lang MF; Sun J
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China. Electronic address: hongquanwei@163.com....
[Ti] Title:High-intensity focused ultrasound leads to histopathologic changes of the inferior turbinate mucosa with allergic inflammation.
[So] Source:Ultrasound Med Biol;40(10):2425-30, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1879-291X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study was aimed at understanding the histopathologic changes that occur in the nasal mucosa of patients with perennial allergic rhinitis after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. Biopsy specimens of the inferior turbinate mucosa were taken from 11 PAR patients before, immediately after and 1 y after HIFU treatment. Morphometric analysis revealed that the density of eosinophils and other inflammatory cells increased immediately after treatment and then were decreased significantly 1 y post-treatment. Submucosal glands were swollen and venous sinusoids were dilated, but there was no statistically significant change in their density, immediately after treatment. However, both glands and venous sinusoids significantly decreased in number 1 y after HIFU treatment. The ciliated epithelium or basement membrane of the nasal mucosa was well preserved at all stages. In conclusion, HIFU is a tolerable and effective treatment to reduce inflammation of the inferior turbinate mucosa in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24942390
[Au] Autor:Shaw G; Renfree MB
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
[Ti] Title:Wolffian duct development.
[So] Source:Sex Dev;8(5):273-80, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1661-5433
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Wolffian ducts (WDs) are the progenitors of the epididymis, vas deferens and seminal vesicles. They form initially as nephric ducts that acquire connection to the developing testis as the mesonephros regresses. The development of the WDs is dependent on androgens. Conventionally, the active androgen is believed to be testosterone delivered locally rather than via the systemic circulation. However, recent studies in marsupials show that 5α-reduced steroids are essential and that these can induce virilisation even when they are delivered via the systemic circulation. The development of the WDs involves an interplay between the duct epithelium and underlying mesenchyme; androgen receptors in both the epithelium and mesenchyme are needed. The epidermal growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor may play a role, possibly via activation of androgen receptor. The formation of the epididymis involves a complex morphogenetic program to achieve the normal pattern of coiling, formation of septae, and regional functional differentiation. In part, this process may be mediated by inhibin beta A as well as by genes from the HOX cluster. Whilst the development of the WD is androgen dependent, it is clear that there is a complex interplay between androgens, genes and growth factors in the tissues that leads to the formation of the complex anatomy of the male reproductive duct system in the adult. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1159/000363432

  3 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25139990
[Au] Autor:Mass T; Drake JL; Peters EC; Jiang W; Falkowski PG
[Ad] Address:Environmental Biophysics and Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901;...
[Ti] Title:Immunolocalization of skeletal matrix proteins in tissue and mineral of the coral Stylophora pistillata.
[So] Source:Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A;111(35):12728-33, 2014 Sep 2.
[Is] ISSN:1091-6490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The precipitation and assembly of calcium carbonate skeletons by stony corals is a precisely controlled process regulated by the secretion of an ECM. Recently, it has been reported that the proteome of the skeletal organic matrix (SOM) contains a group of coral acid-rich proteins as well as an assemblage of adhesion and structural proteins, which together, create a framework for the precipitation of aragonite. To date, we are aware of no report that has investigated the localization of individual SOM proteins in the skeleton. In particular, no data are available on the ultrastructural mapping of these proteins in the calcification site or the skeleton. This information is crucial to assessing the role of these proteins in biomineralization. Immunological techniques represent a valuable approach to localize a single component within a calcified skeleton. By using immunogold labeling and immunohistochemical assays, here we show the spatial arrangement of key matrix proteins in tissue and skeleton of the common zooxanthellate coral, Stylophora pistillata. To our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time that, at the nanoscale, skeletal proteins are embedded within the aragonite crystals in a highly ordered arrangement consistent with a diel calcification pattern. In the tissue, these proteins are not restricted to the calcifying epithelium, suggesting that they also play other roles in the coral's metabolic pathways.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1073/pnas.1408621111

  4 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25136113
[Au] Autor:Tadokoro T; Wang Y; Barak LS; Bai Y; Randell SH; Hogan BL
[Ad] Address:Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710; and....
[Ti] Title:IL-6/STAT3 promotes regeneration of airway ciliated cells from basal stem cells.
[So] Source:Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A;111(35):E3641-9, 2014 Sep 2.
[Is] ISSN:1091-6490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The pseudostratified airway epithelium of the lung contains a balanced proportion of multiciliated and secretory luminal cells that are maintained and regenerated by a population of basal stem cells. However, little is known about how these processes are modulated in vivo, and about the potential role of cytokine signaling between stem and progenitor cells and their niche. Using a clonal 3D organoid assay, we found that IL-6 stimulated, and Stat3 inhibitors reduced, the generation of ciliated vs. secretory cells from basal cells. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies with cultured mouse and human basal cells suggest that IL-6/Stat3 signaling promotes ciliogenesis at multiple levels, including increases in multicilin gene and forkhead box protein J1 expression and inhibition of the Notch pathway. To test the role of IL-6 in vivo genetically, we followed the regeneration of mouse tracheal epithelium after ablation of luminal cells by inhaled SO2. Stat3 is activated in basal cells and their daughters early in the repair process, correlating with an increase in Il-6 expression in platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha(+) mesenchymal cells in the stroma. Conditional deletion in basal cells of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, encoding a negative regulator of the Stat3 pathway, results in an increase in multiciliated cells at the expense of secretory and basal cells. By contrast, Il-6 null mice regenerate fewer ciliated cells and an increased number of secretory cells after injury. The results support a model in which IL-6, produced in the reparative niche, functions to enhance the differentiation of basal cells, and thereby acts as a "friend" to promote airway repair rather than a "foe."
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1073/pnas.1409781111

  5 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25194539
[Au] Autor:Soh WM; Yeong ML; Wong KP
[Ad] Address:Diagnostic Medlab, 10 Harrison Road, Ellerslie, Auckland 1060, New Zealand. ming017@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Malignant granular cell tumour of the mediastinum.
[So] Source:Malays J Pathol;36(2):149-51, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0126-8635
[Cp] Country of publication:Malaysia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This report describes a case of malignant granular cell tumour arising in the mediastinum, detailing the investigations undertaken to reach this rare diagnosis. A 63-year-old man was referred from the Pacific Islands for investigation of a 8cm mediastinal mass extending into the left pleura and associated with pleural nodules and pleural effusion. Needle aspiration via bronchoscopy yielded insufficient material for cytological interpretation and needle biopsy showed normal respiratory epithelium. CT-guided FNA revealed scattered large polygonal to spindle cells with granular cytoplasm and indistinct borders. The needle core biopsy yielded scanty cells with abundant granular cytoplasm, oval and regular nuclei which were moderately positive for CD68, vimentin and S100 and negative for CKMNF116, CK5/6, CK7, CK20, TTF-1, chromogranin and synaptophysin. In view of the benign morphology, these cells were interpreted to be histiocytes. The incisional biopsy revealed cords and trabeculae of cells identical to the CT samples. These cells were polygonal with abundant granular cytoplasm. Some cells showed large eosinophilic cytoplasmic globules not seen in the FNA sample. The tumour was however, heterogeneous in appearance with some areas exhibiting criteria of malignancy: necrosis, vesicular nuclei with large nucleoli, high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio and nuclei pleomorphism. In addition, p53 expression in 10% of tumour nuclei, a high Ki67 proliferative rate (>10%), the deep seated location and extension of the tumour into adjacent organs favoured a diagnosis of malignancy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25194538
[Au] Autor:Prakash MR; Vijayalaxmi SV; Maitreyee R; Ranjit KP
[Ad] Address:JN Medical College, Belgaum-590010, Karnataka, India. madhudhori@rediffmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Complex mucinous cystadenoma of undetermined malignant potential of the urachus: a rare case with review of the literature.
[So] Source:Malays J Pathol;36(2):145-8, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0126-8635
[Cp] Country of publication:Malaysia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Urachal carcinoma is an uncommon neoplasm. Benign urachal tumours are extremely rare. All urachal mucinous tumours, regardless of tumour type, have the potential to behave in an aggressive clinical manner that includes the development of pseudomyxoma peritonei. We report a 58-year-old man who presented with lower abdominal pain. Ultrasound and CT imaging defined a large lobulated cystic mass superior to the urinary bladder. At laparotomy, the multiloculated cystic mass, 10 x 8 x 6 cm, could be completely separated from the bladder and was excised. It was smooth-walled and filled with thick mucinous fluid. Histology revealed a complex mucinous cystadenoma of undetermined malignant potential of the urachus. The cystic spaces were lined by mucin-secreting columnar epithelium that showed focal areas of mild atypia. The epithelium lacked architectural features of villous adenoma. There was no stromal invasion to support an invasive neoplastic process. No pseudomyxoma peritonei was present. The patient was well, with no tumour recurrence, at 6 months follow-up.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25197559
[Au] Autor:Taneri S; Oehler S; Lytle G; Dick HB
[Ad] Address:Center for Refractive Surgery, Eye Department at St. Franziskus Hospital, Muenster, Hohenzollernring 70, 48145 Muenster, Germany ; Eye Clinic, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of epithelial integrity with various transepithelial corneal cross-linking protocols for treatment of keratoconus.
[So] Source:J Ophthalmol;2014:614380, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2090-004X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) has been demonstrated to stiffen cornea and halt progression of ectasia. The original protocol requires debridement of central corneal epithelium to facilitate diffusion of a riboflavin solution to stroma. Recently, transepithelial CXL has been proposed to reduce risk of complications associated with epithelial removal. Aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of various transepithelial riboflavin delivery protocols on corneal epithelium in regard to pain and epithelial integrity in the early postoperative period. Methods. One hundred and sixty six eyes of 104 subjects affected by progressive keratoconus underwent transepithelial CXL using 6 different riboflavin application protocols. Postoperatively, epithelial integrity was evaluated at slit lamp and patients were queried regarding their ocular pain level. Results. One eye had a corneal infection associated with an epithelial defect. No other adverse event including endothelial decompensation or endothelial damage was observed, except for epithelial damages. Incidence of epithelial defects varied from 0 to 63%. Incidence of reported pain varied from 0 to 83%. Conclusion. Different transepithelial cross-linking protocols have varying impacts on epithelial integrity. At present, it seems impossible to have sufficient riboflavin penetration without any epithelial disruption. A compromise between efficacy and epithelial integrity has to be found.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140908
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/614380

  8 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24729378
[Au] Autor:Dihlmann S; Tao S; Echterdiek F; Herpel E; Jansen L; Chang-Claude J; Brenner H; Hoffmeister M; Kloor M
[Ad] Address:Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Lack of Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2) expression in tumor cells is closely associated with poor survival in colorectal cancer patients.
[So] Source:Int J Cancer;135(10):2387-96, 2014 Nov 15.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0215
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Functional studies on colorectal cancer cells indicated a protective role of the interferon-inducible dsDNA sensor Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2) in cancer progression. Given that a high mutation rate and lack of AIM2 expression was previously detected in a subset of colorectal cancers, we here investigated the association of AIM2 expression in tumor cells and patient prognosis (5-year follow-up). A tissue microarray analysis of 476 matched tissue pairs (colorectal tumor and adjacent normal colon epithelium) was performed by two independent observers. Samples from 62 patients were excluded because of missing follow-up information or due to neo-adjuvant therapy before tissue sampling. Out of the remaining 414 tissue pairs, 279 (67.4%) displayed reduced AIM2 expression in cancer cells when compared to epithelial cells of their normal counterpart. Thirty-eight patients (9.18%) had completely lost AIM2 expression in tumor cells. After adjustment for sex, age, cancer stage, tumor site, tumor grade and chemotherapy, complete lack of AIM2 expression was associated with an up to 3-fold increase in overall mortality (HR = 2.40; 95% CI = 1.44-3.99) and disease specific mortality (HR = 3.14; 95% CI = 1.75-5.65) in comparison to AIM2-positive tumor samples. Our results demonstrate that lack of AIM2 expression is closely associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer. The data thus strongly substantiate a protective role of AIM2 against progression of colorectal tumors. Further studies are required to assess whether lack of AIM2 expression may be used as a biomarker for the identification of colorectal cancer patients with poor prognosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijc.28891

  9 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25150160
[Au] Autor:Borhani Dizaji N; Basseri HR; Naddaf SR; Heidari M
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Entomology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Parasitology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran....
[Ti] Title:Molecular characterization of calreticulin from Anopheles stephensi midgut cells and functional assay of the recombinant calreticulin with Plasmodium berghei ookinetes.
[So] Source:Gene;550(2):245-52, 2014 Oct 25.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0038
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Transmission blocking vaccines (TBVs) that target the antigens on the midgut epithelium of Anopheles mosquitoes are among the promising tools for the elimination of the malaria parasite. Characterization and analysis of effective antigens is the first step to design TBVs. Calreticulin (CRT), a lectin-like protein, from Anopheles albimanus midgut, has shown antigenic features, suggesting a promising and novel TBV target. CRT is a highly conserved protein with similar features in vertebrates and invertebrates including anopheline. We cloned the full-length crt gene from malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi (AsCrt) and explored the interaction of recombinant AsCrt protein, expressed in a prokaryotic system (pGEX-6p-1), with surface proteins of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes by immunofluorescence assay. The cellular localization of AsCrt was determined using the baculovirus expression system. Sequence analysis of the whole cDNA of AsCrt revealed that AsCrt contains an ORF of 1221bp. The amino acid sequence of AsCrt protein obtained in this study showed 64% homology with similar protein in human. The AsCrt shares the most common features of CRTs from other species. This gene encodes a 406 amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 46kDa, which contains a predicted 16 amino-acid signal peptides, conserved cysteine residues, a proline-rich region, and highly acidic C-terminal domain with endoplasmic reticulum retrieval sequence HDEL. The production of GST-AsCrt recombinant protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody against the GST protein. The FITC-labeled GST-AsCrt exhibited a significant interaction with P. berghei ookinete surface proteins. Purified recombinant GST-AsCrt, labeled with FITC, displayed specific binding to the surface of P. berghei ookinetes in comparison with control. Moreover, the expression of AsCrt in baculovirus expression system indicated that AsCrt was localized on the surface of Sf9 cells. Our results suggest that AsCrt could be utilized as a potential target for future studies in TBV area for malaria control.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 250225 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25110325
[Au] Autor:Oliva M; Gravato C; Guilhermino L; Galindo-Riaño MD; Perales JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Environmental and Marine Science Faculty, University of Cadiz, Puerto Real, Cadiz, Spain. Electronic address: milagrosa.oliva@uca.es....
[Ti] Title:EROD activity and cytochrome P4501A induction in liver and gills of Senegal sole Solea senegalensis from a polluted Huelva Estuary (SW Spain).
[So] Source:Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol;166:134-44, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0456
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:EROD activity and induction cytochrome P4501A in liver and gills of Senegal sole, Solea senegalensis, from a heavy metal and PAH polluted estuary, was studied. Liver and gill CYP1A catalytic activity was assessed at the enzyme activity level-measured as 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase and cellular localization of CYP1A in the liver was studied using immunohistochemistry. Liver EROD was correlated with phenanthrene-type metabolites in liver and copper concentrations in water. Strong CYP1A occurrence was observed in acinar pancreatic cells, pancreatic duct epithelium and vascular system endothelium and negative/rare induction were observed in hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelium. In gills, EROD activity showed a significant correlation with different fractions of heavy metals in sediment but no correlation was observed between EROD activity and PAHs. Strongly positive CYP1A associated staining of the vascular system endothelia and primary filament cells and a moderate staining of pillar cells in gills were observed. The results substantiated the utility of EROD activity and CYP1A induction measurement as biomarkers for use by aquatic toxicologists and indicate that catalytic assays and immunohistochemical assays appear to be sensitive to different kinds of pollutants being the use of both methods recommended for monitoring programs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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