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[PMID]: 29524399
[Au] Autor:Souza RF; Rubenstein J; Kao J; Hirano I
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Center for Esophageal Diseases, Baylor University Medical Center and Center for Esophageal Research, Baylor Scott and White Research Institute, Dallas, Texas.
[Ti] Title:Contributions From Gastroenterology: Acid Peptic Disorders, Barrett's Esophagus and Eosinophilic Esophagitis.
[So] Source:Gastroenterology;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1528-0012
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29510131
[Au] Autor:Everson MA; Ragunath K; Bhandari P; Lovat L; Haidry R
[Ad] Address:Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK; Department of Gastroenterology, University College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:How to Perform a High-Quality Examination in Patients With Barrett's Esophagus.
[So] Source:Gastroenterology;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1528-0012
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506575
[Au] Autor:Segev G; Rojas A; Lavy E; Yaffe M; Aroch I; Baneth G
[Ad] Address:Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, 7610001, Rehovot, Israel. gilad.segev@mail.huji.ac.il.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of a spot-on imidacloprid-moxidectin formulation (Advocate®) for the treatment of naturally occurring esophageal spirocercosis in dogs: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):127, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Dogs are the definitive hosts of Spirocerca lupi. Spirocercosis is treated by prolonged avermectin administration by injection or daily oral doses. In this prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, the efficacy of imidacloprid and moxidectin spot-on formulation (Advocate®) was compared to injectable doramectin (Dectomax®). Dogs diagnosed with benign esophageal spirocercosis were divided randomly into doramectin (400 µg/kg IM) or moxidectin and imidacloprid spot-on (2.5-6.25 mg/kg and 10-25 mg/kg, respectively) groups and treated weekly for 12 consecutive weeks. Dogs were followed for 20 weeks by physical examination, owners' questionnaire, blood work, fecal floatation, PCR and endoscopy. RESULTS: All the doramectin group dogs (n = 10) completed the treatment and follow-up, and the disease had completely resolved in all by week 12. Of the Advocate® group (n = 10), four had complete resolution at week 12, four had partial resolution, one dog did not respond to treatment, and one dog was switched to the doramectin protocol on week 5 due to persistent severe clinical signs. PCR analysis was more sensitive in detecting S. lupi eggs compared to fecal floatation. Discrepancies were detected on 22 occasions, of which on 20 occasions, the PCR was positive while fecal floatation was negative, and only on two occasions the PCR results were negative while fecal flotation was positive. CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicate that weekly Advocate® spot-on administration may be effective for treating benign esophageal spirocercosis, but is less effective than the currently used injectable doramectin therapy at the dose and duration used herein.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2731-x

  4 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524301
[Au] Autor:Zhang X; Rong Y; Morrill S; Fang J; Narayanasamy G; Galhardo E; Maraboyina S; Croft C; Xia F; Penagaricano J
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Little Rock, AR, USA.
[Ti] Title:Robust optimization in lung treatment plans accounting for geometric uncertainty.
[So] Source:J Appl Clin Med Phys;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1526-9914
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Robust optimization generates scenario-based plans by a minimax optimization method to find optimal scenario for the trade-off between target coverage robustness and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. In this study, 20 lung cancer patients with tumors located at various anatomical regions within the lungs were selected and robust optimization photon treatment plans including intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were generated. The plan robustness was analyzed using perturbed doses with setup error boundary of ±3 mm in anterior/posterior (AP), ±3 mm in left/right (LR), and ±5 mm in inferior/superior (IS) directions from isocenter. Perturbed doses for D , D , and D were computed from six shifted isocenter plans to evaluate plan robustness. Dosimetric study was performed to compare the internal target volume-based robust optimization plans (ITV-IMRT and ITV-VMAT) and conventional PTV margin-based plans (PTV-IMRT and PTV-VMAT). The dosimetric comparison parameters were: ITV target mean dose (D ), R (D /D ), Paddick's conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), monitor unit (MU), and OAR doses including lung (D , V and V ), chest wall, heart, esophagus, and maximum cord doses. A comparison of optimization results showed the robust optimization plan had better ITV dose coverage, better CI, worse HI, and lower OAR doses than conventional PTV margin-based plans. Plan robustness evaluation showed that the perturbed doses of D , D , and D were all satisfied at least 99% of the ITV to received 95% of prescription doses. It was also observed that PTV margin-based plans had higher MU than robust optimization plans. The results also showed robust optimization can generate plans that offer increased OAR sparing, especially for normal lungs and OARs near or abutting the target. Weak correlation was found between normal lung dose and target size, and no other correlation was observed in this study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/acm2.12291

  5 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524114
[Au] Autor:Thota PN; Arora Z; Dumot JA; Falk G; Benjamin T; Goldblum J; Jang S; Lopez R; Vargo JJ
[Ad] Address:Center of Excellence for Barrett's Esophagus, Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. thotap@ccf.org.
[Ti] Title:Cryotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Eradication of Barrett's Esophagus with Dysplasia or Intramucosal Cancer.
[So] Source:Dig Dis Sci;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2568
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Endoscopic ablation therapy has become the mainstay of treatment of Barrett's associated dysplasia and intramucosal cancer (IMC). The widely available techniques for ablation are radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryotherapy. Our aim was to compare eradication rates of metaplasia and dysplasia with both these modalities. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of prospectively collected database of patients who underwent endoscopic therapy for Barrett's dysplasia or IMC from 2006 to 2011 was performed. Demographic features, comorbidities, and endoscopic data including length of Barrett's segment, hiatal hernia size, interventions during the endoscopy and histological results were reviewed. RESULTS: Among 154 patients included, 73 patients were in the RFA and 81 patients were in the cryotherapy group. There was complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia (CE-IM) in 81 (52.6%), complete eradication of dysplasia (CE-D) in 133 (86.4%), and persistent dysplasia or cancer in 19 patients (12.3%). Compared to RFA, cryotherapy patients were found to be older and less likely to have undergone endoscopic mucosal resection. On multivariate analysis, patients who underwent RFA had a threefold higher odds of having CE-IM than those who underwent cryotherapy (odds ratio [OR] 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-6.0, p = 0.004), but CE-D were similar between the two groups (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.66-4.3, p = 0.28). CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic therapy is highly effective in eradication of Barrett's associated neoplasia. Patients who underwent cryotherapy were equally likely to achieve CE-D but not CE-IM than patients who underwent RFA. Patient characteristics and preferences may effect choice of treatment selection and outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10620-018-5009-4

  6 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505522
[Au] Autor:Zhang BJ; Tian HT; Li HO; Meng J
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesia, Jining No. 1 People's Hospital, Jining City, Shandong Province, China.
[Ti] Title:The effects of one-lung ventilation mode on lung function in elderly patients undergoing esophageal cancer surgery.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9500, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objective of the present study was to explore the effects of different one-lung ventilation (OLV) modes on lung function in elderly patients undergoing esophageal cancer surgery. A total of 180 consecutive elderly patients (ASA Grades I-II, with OLV indications) undergoing elective surgery were recruited in the study. Patients were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 45). In Group A, patients received low tidal volume (VT < 8 mL/kg) + pressure controlled ventilation (PCV), low tidal volume (VT < 8 mL/kg) + volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in Group B, high tidal volume (VT ≥ 8 mL/kg) + PCV in Group C and high tidal volume (VT ≥ 8 mL/kg) + VCV in Group D. Two-lung ventilation involved routine tidal volume (8-10 mL/kg) at a frequency of 12 to 18 times/min, and VCV mode. Clinical efficacy among 4 groups was compared. The partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) did not significantly differ among 4 groups (all P > .05), and the oxygenation index and SO2 in Group A were significantly higher than in the other groups (P < .05). The PetCO2, peak airway pressure (Ppeak), platform airway pressure (Pplat), and mean airway pressure (Pmean) in Group A were significantly lower than those in the other groups (all P < .05). However, airway resistance (Raw) among 4 groups did not significantly differ (all P > .05). The incidence of pulmonary infection, anastomotic fistula, ventilator-induced lung injury, lung dysfunction, difficulty weaning from mechanical ventilation, and multiple organ dysfunction in Groups A and B were lower than that in Groups C and D (all P < .05). The expression levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein in lavage fluid in Group A were significantly lower than those in the other groups (all P < .05). OLV with low tidal volume (VT < 8 mL/kg) + PCV (5 cmH2O PEEP) improved lung function and mitigated inflammatory responses in elderly patients undergoing esophageal cancer surgery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Esophageal Neoplasms/surgery
One-Lung Ventilation/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry
C-Reactive Protein/analysis
Female
Humans
Interleukin-6/analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (IL6 protein, human); 0 (Interleukin-6); 0 (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009500

  7 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480761
[Au] Autor:Nicholson AG; Tsao MS; Travis WD; Patil DT; Galateau-Salle F; Marino M; Dacic S; Beasley MB; Butnor KJ; Yatabe Y; Pass HI; Rusch VW; Detterbeck FC; Asamura H; Rice TW; Rami-Porta R
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Histopathology, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom (Dr Nicholson); the Department of Pathology, The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Tsao); the Department of Pathology (Dr Travis) and the Thoracic Service, Department of Surgery (Dr Rusch), Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; the Departments of Pathology (Dr Patil) and Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Dr Rice), Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; the Departement de Biopathologie, Cancer Center Leon Bernard, Lyon, France (Dr Galateau-Salle); the Department of Pathology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy (Dr Marino); the Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Dacic); the Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (Dr Beasley); the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington (Dr Butnor); the Department of Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya, Japan (Dr Yatabe); the Department of Thoracic Surgery, New York University, New York, New York (Dr Pass); the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (Dr Detterbeck); the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan (Dr Asamura); and the Thoracic Surgery Service, Hospital Universitari Mutua Terrassa, University of Barcelona, and CIBERES Lung Cancer Group, Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain (Dr Rami-Porta).
[Ti] Title:Eighth Edition Staging of Thoracic Malignancies: Implications for the Reporting Pathologist.
[So] Source:Arch Pathol Lab Med;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1543-2165
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: - The Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, in conjunction with the International Mesothelioma Interest Group, the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group, and the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration, developed proposals for the 8th edition of their respective tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) staging classification systems. OBJECTIVE: - To review these changes and discuss issues for the reporting pathologist. DATA SOURCES: - Proposals were based on international databases of lung (N = 94 708), with an external validation using the US National Cancer Database; mesothelioma (N = 3519); thymic epithelial tumors (10 808); and epithelial cancers of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction (N = 22 654). CONCLUSIONS: - These proposals have been mostly accepted by the Union for International Cancer Control and the American Joint Committee on Cancer and incorporated into their respective staging manuals (2017). The Union for International Cancer Control recommended implementation beginning in January 2017; however, the American Joint Committee on Cancer has deferred deployment of the eighth TNM until January 1, 2018, to ensure appropriate infrastructure for data collection. This manuscript summarizes the updated staging of thoracic malignancies, specifically highlighting changes from the 7th edition that are relevant to pathologic staging. Histopathologists should become familiar with, and start to incorporate, the 8th edition staging in their daily reporting of thoracic cancers henceforth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.5858/arpa.2017-0245-RA

  8 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29248734
[Au] Autor:Wechsler JB; Bolton S; Amsden K; Wershil BK; Hirano I; Kagalwalla AF
[Ad] Address:Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases Program, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
[Ti] Title:Eosinophilic Esophagitis Reference Score Accurately Identifies Disease Activity and Treatment Effects in Children.
[So] Source:Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol;, 2017 Dec 15.
[Is] ISSN:1542-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND & AIMS: The endoscopic reference score (EREFS) is used to determine severity of 5 endoscopic findings: edema, rings, exudates, furrows, and strictures. Little is known about the relationship between EREFSs and histologic markers of disease activity in children with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). We aimed to determine whether the EREFS can be used to identify children with EoE and how it changes with treatment. METHODS: We performed a prospective study of consecutive children (ages 2-17 years) undergoing diagnostic or post-treatment endoscopy scored real-time with EREFS from December 2012 through 2016. Findings from 192 diagnostic endoscopies and 229 post-treatment endoscopies were evaluated, from 371 children. Incident EoE cases were diagnosed based on 2011 consensus guidelines. Patients were treated with either elimination diet or topical steroids. Subjects who underwent endoscopy for symptoms of esophageal dysfunction but had normal esophageal findings from histology analysis were used as controls. EREFS and receiver operating characteristic curves were determined for incident EoE cases (n = 77) vs controls (n = 115), patients with active EoE (n = 101) vs inactive EoE after treatment (n = 128), and paired pre- and post-treatment cases of EoE (n = 85). Component and composite scores were correlated with eosinophilia. RESULTS: Visual detection of more than 1 esophageal abnormality during the diagnostic endoscopy identified children with EoE with 89.6% sensitivity and 87.9% specificity. EREFS correlated with peak level of eosinophilia (P < .001) at all esophageal levels. Children who responded to therapy had mean EREFSs of 0.5 compared to 2.4 in non-responders. In comparing pre-treatment vs post-treatment data from 85 patients, we found a significant reduction in the composite EREFS (from 2.4 to 0.7) (P < .001) among patients who responded to treatment; 92% of responders had a reduced EREFSs after treatment. EREFSs identified children with EoE with an area under the curve value (AUC) of 0.93. EREFSs identified children with active EoE following treatment with an AUC of 0.81 before treatment and an AUC of 0.79 after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In a prospective study of children undergoing diagnostic or post-treatment endoscopy, we found the EREFS to accurately identify those with EoE. Children who responded to therapy had lower EREFS scores than non-responders. EREFSs can be used to measure outcomes of pediatric patients, in conjunction with histology findings, and assess treatments for children with EoE.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28465312
[Au] Autor:Noorani A; Bornschein J; Lynch AG; Secrier M; Achilleos A; Eldridge M; Bower L; Weaver JMJ; Crawte J; Ong CA; Shannon N; MacRae S; Grehan N; Nutzinger B; O'Donovan M; Hardwick R; Tavaré S; Fitzgerald RC; Oesophageal Cancer Clinical and Molecular Stratification (OCCAMS) Consortium
[Ad] Address:Medical Research Council Cancer Unit, Hutchison/Medical Research Council Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XZ, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:A comparative analysis of whole genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma pre- and post-chemotherapy.
[So] Source:Genome Res;27(6):902-912, 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:1549-5469
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The scientific community has avoided using tissue samples from patients that have been exposed to systemic chemotherapy to infer the genomic landscape of a given cancer. Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a heterogeneous, chemoresistant tumor for which the availability and size of pretreatment endoscopic samples are limiting. This study compares whole-genome sequencing data obtained from chemo-naive and chemo-treated samples. The quality of whole-genomic sequencing data is comparable across all samples regardless of chemotherapy status. Inclusion of samples collected post-chemotherapy increased the proportion of late-stage tumors. When comparing matched pre- and post-chemotherapy samples from 10 cases, the mutational signatures, copy number, and SNV mutational profiles reflect the expected heterogeneity in this disease. Analysis of SNVs in relation to allele-specific copy-number changes pinpoints the common ancestor to a point prior to chemotherapy. For cases in which pre- and post-chemotherapy samples do show substantial differences, the timing of the divergence is near-synchronous with endoreduplication. Comparison across a large prospective cohort (62 treatment-naive, 58 chemotherapy-treated samples) reveals no significant differences in the overall mutation rate, mutation signatures, specific recurrent point mutations, or copy-number events in respect to chemotherapy status. In conclusion, whole-genome sequencing of samples obtained following neoadjuvant chemotherapy is representative of the genomic landscape of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Excluding these samples reduces the material available for cataloging and introduces a bias toward the earlier stages of cancer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenocarcinoma/genetics
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use
Esophageal Neoplasms/genetics
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Genome, Human
Mutation Rate
Neoplasm Proteins/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenocarcinoma/drug therapy
Adenocarcinoma/metabolism
Adenocarcinoma/pathology
Aged
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/metabolism
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/pathology
Computational Biology
DNA Copy Number Variations
Esophageal Neoplasms/drug therapy
Esophageal Neoplasms/metabolism
Esophageal Neoplasms/pathology
Esophagus/metabolism
Esophagus/pathology
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods
Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Neoplasm Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1101/gr.214296.116

  10 / 93387 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521727
[Au] Autor:Sloan JA; Mulki R; Sandhu N; Samuel S; Katz PO
[Ad] Address:Einstein Medical Center, Klein Professional Building.
[Ti] Title:Jackhammer Esophagus: Symptom Presentation, Associated Distal Contractile Integral, and Assessment of Bolus Transit.
[So] Source:J Clin Gastroenterol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1539-2031
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:GOALS: The aim of our study was to characterize jackhammer esophagus symptoms and their relationship with the distal contractile integral (DCI) and bolus transit. BACKGROUND: Jackhammer esophagus is defined by the Chicago Classification version 3.0. This diagnosis is relatively new, with the most current definition being established in 2014. The forerunners of this diagnosis, nutcracker (or hypercontractile) esophagus, have been associated with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). STUDY: A retrospective chart review was performed of motility studies from 2011 to 2016. Studies with a diagnosis of jackhammer esophagus, hypercontractile esophagus, nutcracker, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, or hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter were reread using Chicago Classification version 3.0, and were included if they met criteria for jackhammer esophagus. Unpaired t-tests were used for analysis (P≤0.05). RESULTS: In total, 142 studies were identified with the above diagnoses. After excluding 84 studies, 58 remained for analysis and 17 were found to have jackhammer esophagus (29%). The mean age was 54 (28 to 75), 5 (29%) were males and 12 (71%) were females. The primary indications were NCCP (5), dysphagia (8), and other causes (4) (cough, heartburn, or regurgitation). The mean DCIs were 17,245 mm Hg×s×cm (NCCP), 14,669 mm Hg×s×cm (dysphagia), and 11,264 mm Hg×s×cm (other causes). The mean DCIs were compared: NCCP versus dysphagia (P=0.41), and NCCP versus other causes (P=0.05). Fifteen (88%) had normal bolus transit for both liquid and viscous swallows. CONCLUSIONS: In our small sample size, dysphagia was frequently the presenting symptom followed by NCCP. Those with NCCP have a trend toward a higher DCI. Bolus transit appeared to be normal in this patient population. More data are needed to further elucidate the genesis of symptoms and how they relate to the degree of contractility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/MCG.0000000000001021


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