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[PMID]: 29524707
[Au] Autor:Nishimura F; Park YS; Motoyama Y; Nakagawa I; Yamada S; Nakase H
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan. Electronic address: fnishi@naramed-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Pediatric case of xanthogranuloma in sellar region presenting visual disturbance successfully treated by endoscopic endonasal surgery.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Xanthomatous pituitary diseases rarely occur in childhood. We report a rare pediatric case of a xanthogranuloma that developed in the sellar region resulting in visual disturbance that was successfully treated by endoscopic endonasal surgery. CASE DESCRIPTIONS: A 13-year-old boy came to us with a headache and visual disturbance that had occurred 1 month prior. Clinical examination findings showed that he was alert with signs of bitemporal hemianopsia, an endocrinological examination showed partial hypopituitarism, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cystic mass in the sellar turcica compressing the optic apparatus. Endoscopic endonasal surgery was performed to decompress the optic apparatus and the mass was removed. Histopathological analysis of the tumor demonstrated granulomatous tissue with cholesterol clefts, foamy macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells, with no epithelial component. The diagnosis was xanthogranuloma of the sellar region. The patient gradually recovered from visual disturbance and was free from any neurological symptom 6 months after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Xanthogranuloma, although rare, should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a sellar/suprasellar lesion even in children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524026
[Au] Autor:Lorenz J; Kubesch A; Al-Maawi S; Schwarz F; Sader RA; Schlee M; Ghanaati S
[Ad] Address:FORM-Lab, Department for Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Allogeneic bone block for challenging augmentation-a clinical, histological, and histomorphometrical investigation of tissue reaction and new bone formation.
[So] Source:Clin Oral Investig;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1436-3771
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was the histological investigation of an allogeneic spongious bone block for horizontal and vertical ridge augmentation in humans. The amount of new bone, soft tissue, and residual bone substitute were histomorphometrically assessed after a mean healing period of 6 months. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients received augmentation with an allogeneic spongious bone block (Tutobone , Tutogen Medical, Neunkirchen, Germany). After 6 months of healing, 28 implants were placed with simultaneous harvesting of bone biopsies for histological and histomorphometrical analysis. Moreover, samples from the bone blocks were collected as blanks and analyzed histologically. The formation of new bone, connective tissue, and remaining bone substitute material as well as vascularization and formation of multinucleated giant cells (MNCGs) within the augmentation bed were analyzed. RESULTS: New bone formation could be observed primarily in close proximity to the bone block. Histomorphometrical analyses showed 18.65 ± 12.20% newly formed bone, 25.93 ± 12.36% allogeneic spongious bone block, and 53.45 ± 10.34% connective tissue. MNCGs were observed on the biomaterial surface. Furthermore, organic residues were evident, as donor-related cellular remnants within the osteocyte lacunae were found in the blank bone blocks and in the analyzed biopsies. CONCLUSION: Despite the presence of donor-related organic remnants, the bone block shows the ability to serve as a scaffold for new bone formation. Within the limits of the present study, the detect organic remnants seemed not to affect the bone formation or influence the host in the long term. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Clinicians have to make a conscious choice of the applied biomaterials with regard to their components and structure to support tissue regeneration and maintain patient safety.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00784-018-2407-0

  3 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523959
[Au] Autor:Steinberg M; Gaut JP; Hmiel SP; Kakajiwala A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, USA.
[Ti] Title:The light at the end of the tunnel: an unusual case of acute kidney injury in a pediatric patient: Answers.
[So] Source:Pediatr Nephrol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-198X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Monoclonal gammopathies are a rare diagnosis in pediatric patients. A 19-year-old female patient with past medical history of hypogammaglobulinemia and natural killer cell deficiency and stage III follicular lymphoma, in remission, presented with a right-sided pneumonia, noted to have acute kidney injury and proteinuria. Complement C3 and C4 levels were normal. Anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were negative. A renal biopsy showed numerous fractured tubular casts that were periodic acid-Schiff and silver-stain negative and fuchsinophilic on trichrome stain, with associated giant cells, tubulitis, acute tubular injury, and tubular rupture. The tubular casts had 3+ staining for lambda light chains and 0-1+ staining for kappa light chains. These findings were consistent with light chain cast nephropathy (LCCN). Serum free light chains, serum immunofixation, urine protein electrophoresis, and urine immunofixation studies supported the renal biopsy diagnosis of LCCN. A bone marrow biopsy showed normal trilineage hematopoiesis and also revealed an atypical B cell population detected by flow cytometry. Pathology specimens from lesions in the distal small bowel were characteristic of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Chemoreduction therapy followed by chemotherapy was initiated for the DLBCL. Three months after initiation of chemotherapy, the patient's creatinine has improved by > 50%. The likely cause of her LCCN was the new diagnosis of a DLBCL. Other risk factors include her history of hypogammaglobulinemia, natural killer (NK) cell deficiency, community-acquired pneumonia, and prior follicular lymphoma. Our patient may be the youngest reported case of LCCN. Treatment of LCCN is based on treating the underlying clonal plasma cell or B cell proliferation, typically with chemotherapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00467-018-3930-6

  4 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523934
[Au] Autor:Islam MZ; Sharmin S; Moniruzzaman M; Yamazaki M
[Ad] Address:Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, 1342, Bangladesh.
[Ti] Title:Elementary processes for the entry of cell-penetrating peptides into lipid bilayer vesicles and bacterial cells.
[So] Source:Appl Microbiol Biotechnol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0614
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can translocate across the plasma membrane of living eukaryotic cells and enter the cytosol without significantly affecting cell viability. Consequently, CPPs have been used for the intracellular delivery of biological cargo such as proteins and oligonucleotides. However, the mechanisms underlying the translocation of CPPs across the plasma membrane remain unclear. In this mini-review, we summarize the experimental results regarding the entry of CPPs into lipid bilayer vesicles obtained using three methods: the large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) suspension method, the giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) suspension method, and the single GUV method. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are also discussed. Experimental results to date clearly indicate that CPPs can translocate across lipid bilayers and enter the vesicle lumen. Three models for the mechanisms and pathways by which CPPs translocate across lipid bilayers are described: (A) through pores induced by CPPs, (B) through transient prepores, and (C) via formation of inverted micelles. Both the pathway of translocation and the efficiency of entry of CPPs depend on the lipid composition of the bilayer and the type of CPP. We also describe the interaction of CPPs with bacterial cells. Some CPPs have strong antimicrobial activities. There are two modes of action of CPPs on bacterial cells: CPPs can induce damage to the plasma membrane and thus increase permeability, or CPPs enter the cytosol of bacterial cells without damaging the plasma membrane. The information currently available on the elementary processes by which CPPs enter lipid bilayer vesicles and bacterial cells is valuable for elucidating the mechanisms of entry of CPPs into the cytosol of various eukaryotic cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00253-018-8889-5

  5 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522754
[Au] Autor:Sedgwick A; Olivia Balmert M; D'Souza-Schorey C
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-0369, USA.
[Ti] Title:The formation of giant plasma membrane vesicles enable new insights into the regulation of cholesterol efflux.
[So] Source:Exp Cell Res;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2422
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aberrant cellular cholesterol accumulation contributes to the pathophysiology of many diseases including neurodegenerative disorders such as Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) and Alzheimer's Disease . Many aspects of cholesterol efflux from cells remain elusive. Here we describe the utility of cholesterol-rich giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) as a means to monitor cholesterol that is translocated to the plasma membrane for secretion. We demonstrate that small molecules known to enhance lipid efflux, including those in clinical trials for lipid storage disorders, enhance this GPMV formation. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of cholesterol efflux blocks GPMV formation. We show that microtubule stabilization via paclitaxel treatment and increased tubulin acetylation via HDAC6 inhibition promotes the formation of GPMVs with concomitant reduction in cellular cholesterol in a cell model of NPC disease. The pan-deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat, which has been shown to reduce the severity of cholesterol storage in NPC, elicited a similar response. Further, the disruption of actin polymerization inhibits the formation of GPMVs, whereas the small GTP-binding protein Arl4c promotes actin remodeling at sites overlapping with GPMV formation. Thus, monitoring the formation of GPMVs provides a new avenue to better understand diseases whose pathology may be sensitive to alterations in cellular cholesterol.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29391123
[Au] Autor:Elanskaya IV; Zlenko DV; Lukashev EP; Suzina NE; Kononova IA; Stadnichuk IN
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Biology, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Phycobilisomes from the mutant cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 missing chromophore domain of ApcE.
[So] Source:Biochim Biophys Acta;1859(4):280-291, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phycobilisome (PBS) is a giant photosynthetic antenna associated with the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria and red algae. PBS consists of two domains: central core and peripheral rods assembled of disc-shaped phycobiliprotein aggregates and linker polypeptides. The study of the PBS architecture is hindered due to the lack of the data on the structure of the large ApcE-linker also called L . ApcE participates in the PBS core stabilization, PBS anchoring to the photosynthetic membrane, transfer of the light energy to chlorophyll, and, very probably, the interaction with the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) during the non-photochemical PBS quenching. We have constructed the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutant lacking 235 N-terminal amino acids of the chromophorylated PBL domain of ApcE. The altered fluorescence characteristics of the mutant PBSs indicate that the energy transfer to the terminal emitters within the mutant PBS is largely disturbed. The PBSs of the mutant become unable to attach to the thylakoid membrane, which correlates with the identified absence of the energy transfer from the PBSs to the photosystem II. At the same time, the energy transfer from the PBS to the photosystem I was registered in the mutant cells and seems to occur due to the small cylindrical CpcG2-PBSs formation in addition to the conventional PBSs. In contrast to the wild type Synechocystis, the OCP-mediated non-photochemical PBS quenching was not registered in the mutant cells. Thus, the PBL domain takes part in formation of the OCP binding site in the PBS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29247857
[Au] Autor:Yin L; Li H; Liu W; Yao Z; Cheng Z; Zhang H; Zou H
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China.
[Ti] Title:A highly potent CDK4/6 inhibitor was rationally designed to overcome blood brain barrier in gliobastoma therapy.
[So] Source:Eur J Med Chem;144:1-28, 2018 Jan 20.
[Is] ISSN:1768-3254
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest of malignant brain tumors in adults. Disease development is associated with dysregulation of the cyclin D-CDK4/6-INK4-Rb pathway, resulting in increased proliferation; thus, CDK4/6 kinase inhibitors are promising candidates for GBM treatment. The recently developed CDK4/6 inhibitors, palbociclib, ribociclib, and abemaciclib, are effective in subcutaneous glioma models, but their blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is poor, limiting drug delivery to the central nervous system. Here, we designed and synthesized a series of novel CDK4/6 inhibitors with favorable BBB permeability for the treatment of GBM. Compound 11 exhibited a favorable pharmacological profile and significant penetration of the BBB with the K value of 4.10 and the K value of 0.23 in mice after an oral dose of 10 mg/kg. IC values for CDK4/cyclin D1 and CDK6/cyclin D3 were 3 nM and 1 nM, respectively. In vivo studies with an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of GBM showed that 11 had tumor growth inhibition values ranging from 62% to 99% for doses ranging from 3.125 to 50 mg/kg, and no significant body weight loss was observed. The increase in life span based on the median survival time of vehicle-treated animals in mice administered a dose of 50 mg/kg was significant at 162% (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that compound 11 is a promising candidate for further investigation as an effective drug for the treatment of GBM.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/antagonists & inhibitors
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6/antagonists & inhibitors
Drug Design
Glioblastoma/drug therapy
Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics
Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism
Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology
Brain Neoplasms/metabolism
Brain Neoplasms/pathology
Cell Line, Tumor
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/metabolism
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6/metabolism
Dogs
Glioblastoma/metabolism
Glioblastoma/pathology
Humans
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Male
Mice
Protein Kinase Inhibitors/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Protein Kinase Inhibitors); EC 2.7.11.22 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4); EC 2.7.11.22 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171217
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518300
[Au] Autor:Carriedo-Rico EG; García-Morato-Jorreto P
[Ad] Address:Hospital Ángeles Lomas y Hospital Ángeles Metropolitano. Ciudad de México. México.
[Ti] Title:Lipoma gigante de muslo. Reporte de un caso. [Giant lipoma of the thigh. Case report].
[So] Source:Acta Ortop Mex;31(5):248-251, 2017 Sep-Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2306-4102
[Cp] Country of publication:Mexico
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Lipoma is a tumor of adipose tissue cells that can develop in any part of the body; We present the case of an 86-year-old woman with a lesion of the left thigh as well as her diagnostic approach, specific surgical treatment and histopathological analysis. Three years after its resection, the function of the lower extremity was preserved.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518254
[Au] Autor:Díaz Á; Sagasti C; Casaravilla C
[Ad] Address:Área/Cátedra de Inmunología, Departamento de Biociencias (Facultad de Química) e Instituto de Química Biológica (Facultad de Ciencias), Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.
[Ti] Title:Granulomatous responses in larval taeniid infections.
[So] Source:Parasite Immunol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3024
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Granulomas are responses to persistent nonliving bodies or pathogens, centrally featuring specialized macrophage forms called epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells. The larval stages of the cestode parasites of the taeniidae family (Taenia, Echinococcus) develop for years in fixed tissue sites in mammals. In consequence, they are targets of granulomatous responses. The information on tissue responses to larval taeniids is fragmented among host and parasite species, and scattered over many decades. We attempt to draw an integrated picture of these responses in solid tissues. The intensity of inflammation around live parasites spans a spectrum from minimal to high, parasite vitality correlating with low inflammation. The low end of the inflammatory spectrum features collagen capsules proximal to the parasites and moderate distal infiltration. The middle of the spectrum is dominated by classical granulomatous responses, whereas the high end features massive eosinophil invasions. Across the range of parasite species, much observational evidence suggests that eosinophils are highly effective at killing larval taeniids in solid tissues, before and during chronic granulomatous responses. The evidence available also suggests that these parasites are adapted to inhibit host granulomatous responses, in part through the exacerbation of host regulatory mechanisms including regulatory T cells and TGF-beta. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pim.12523

  10 / 42777 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458182
[Au] Autor:Steringer JP; Nickel W
[Ad] Address:Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 328, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:A direct gateway into the extracellular space: Unconventional secretion of FGF2 through self-sustained plasma membrane pores.
[So] Source:Semin Cell Dev Biol;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1096-3634
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:As illustrated by a diverse set of examples in this special issue, multiple mechanisms of protein secretion have been identified in eukaryotes that do not involve the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus. Here we focus on the type I pathway with Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) being the most prominent example. Unconventional secretion of FGF2 from cells is mediated by direct protein translocation across the plasma membrane. A unique feature of this process is the ability of FGF2 to form its own membrane translocation intermediate through oligomerization and membrane insertion. This process depends on the phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P at the inner leaflet and results in the formation of lipidic membrane pores in the plasma membrane. Various lines of evidence suggest that these pores are characterized by a toroidal architecture with FGF2 oligomers being accommodated in the center of these structures. At the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, membrane proximal heparan sulfate proteoglycans are required for the final step of FGF2 translocation into the extracellular space. Based upon mutually exclusive interactions of FGF2 with PI(4,5)P versus heparan sulfates, an assembly/disassembly pathway has been proposed to be the underlying principle of directional transport of FGF2 across the plasma membrane. Thus, the core mechanism of unconventional secretion of FGF2 is based upon three discrete steps with (i) PI(4,5)P dependent oligomerization of FGF2 at the inner leaflet, (ii) insertion of membrane spanning FGF2 oligomers into the plasma membrane and (iii) disassembly at the outer leaflet mediated by heparan sulfates that subsequently retain FGF2 on cell surfaces. This process has recently been reconstituted with an inside-out membrane model system using giant unilamellar vesicles providing a compelling explanation of how FGF2 reaches the extracellular space in an ER/Golgi independent manner. This review is part of a Special Issue of SCDB on "unconventional protein secretion" edited by Walter Nickel and Catherine Rabouille.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


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