Database : MEDLINE
Search on : globus and pallidus [Words]
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[PMID]: 29520331
[Au] Autor:Oterdoom DLM; van Egmond ME; Ascencao LC; van Dijk JMC; Saryyeva A; Beudel M; Runge J; de Koning TJ; Abdallat M; Eggink H; Tijssen MAJ; Krauss JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Reversal of Status Dystonicus after Relocation of Pallidal Electrodes in DYT6 Generalized Dystonia.
[So] Source:Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov (N Y);8:530, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2160-8288
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: DYT6 dystonia can have an unpredictable clinical course and the result of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal part of the globus pallidus (GPi) is known to be less robust than in other forms of autosomal dominant dystonia. Patients who had previous stereotactic surgery with insufficient clinical benefit form a particular challenge with very limited other treatment options available. Case Report: A pediatric DYT6 patient unexpectedly deteriorated to status dystonicus 1 year after GPi DBS implantation with good initial clinical response. After repositioning the DBS electrodes the status dystonicus resolved. Discussion: This case study demonstrates that medication-resistant status dystonicus in DYT6 dystonia can be reversed by relocation of pallidal electrodes. This case highlights that repositioning of DBS electrodes may be considered in patients with status dystonicus, especially when the electrode position is not optimal, even after an initial clinical response to DBS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.7916/D82F90DX

  2 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29481966
[Au] Autor:Fiore VG; Nolte T; Rigoli F; Smittenaar P; Gu X; Dolan RJ
[Ad] Address:School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 2200 West Mockingbird Lane, Dallas, TX 75235, USA; Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: vincenzo.fiore@utdallas.edu.
[Ti] Title:Value encoding in the globus pallidus: fMRI reveals an interaction effect between reward and dopamine drive.
[So] Source:Neuroimage;173:249-257, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9572
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The external part of the globus pallidus (GPe) is a core nucleus of the basal ganglia (BG) whose activity is disrupted under conditions of low dopamine release, as in Parkinson's disease. Current models assume decreased dopamine release in the dorsal striatum results in deactivation of dorsal GPe, which in turn affects motor expression via a regulatory effect on other nuclei of the BG. However, recent studies in healthy and pathological animal models have reported neural dynamics that do not match with this view of the GPe as a relay in the BG circuit. Thus, the computational role of the GPe in the BG is still to be determined. We previously proposed a neural model that revisits the functions of the nuclei of the BG, and this model predicts that GPe encodes values which are amplified under a condition of low striatal dopaminergic drive. To test this prediction, we used an fMRI paradigm involving a within-subject placebo-controlled design, using the dopamine antagonist risperidone, wherein healthy volunteers performed a motor selection and maintenance task under low and high reward conditions. ROI-based fMRI analysis revealed an interaction between reward and dopamine drive manipulations, with increased BOLD activity in GPe in a high compared to low reward condition, and under risperidone compared to placebo. These results confirm the core prediction of our computational model, and provide a new perspective on neural dynamics in the BG and their effects on motor selection and cognitive disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523896
[Au] Autor:Pullicino R; Radon M; Biswas S; Bhojak M; Das K
[Ad] Address:Neuroradiology Department, The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Lower Lane, L9 7LJ, Liverpool, UK. richard.pullicino@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A Review of the Current Evidence on Gadolinium Deposition in the Brain.
[So] Source:Clin Neuroradiol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1869-1447
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Over the past 3 years, gadolinium-based contrast agents have been linked to MRI signal changes in the brain, which have been found to be secondary to gadolinium deposition in the brain, particularly in the dentate nuclei and globus pallidus even in patients having an intact blood-brain barrier and a normal renal function. This tends to occur more in linear agents than with macrocyclic agents. Nonetheless, there has been no significant evidence that this has any clinical consequence. We reviewed the current evidence related to this new phenomenon and the precautionary approach taken by regulatory agencies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00062-018-0678-0

  4 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521584
[Au] Autor:Abode-Iyamah KO; Chiang HY; Woodroffe RW; Park B; Jareczek FJ; Nagahama Y; Winslow N; Herwaldt LA; Greenlee JDW
[Ad] Address:Departments of 1 Neurosurgery and.
[Ti] Title:Deep brain stimulation hardware-related infections: 10-year experience at a single institution.
[So] Source:J Neurosurg;:1-10, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1933-0693
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation is an effective surgical treatment for managing some neurological and psychiatric disorders. Infection related to the deep brain stimulator (DBS) hardware causes significant morbidity: hardware explantation may be required; initial disease symptoms such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia may recur; and the medication requirements for adequate disease management may increase. These morbidities are of particular concern given that published DBS-related infection rates have been as high as 23%. To date, however, the key risk factors for and the potential preventive measures against these infections remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, the authors endeavored to identify possible risk factors for DBS-related infection and analyze the efficacy of prophylactic intrawound vancomycin powder (VP). METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who had undergone primary DBS implantation at a single institution in the period from December 2005 through September 2015 to identify possible risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and to assess the impact of perioperative (before, during, and after surgery) prophylactic antibiotics on the SSI rate. They also evaluated the effect of a change in the National Healthcare Safety Network's definition of SSI on the number of infections detected. Statistical analyses were performed using the 2-sample t-test, the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, or logistic regression, as appropriate for the variables examined. RESULTS Four hundred sixty-four electrodes were placed in 242 adults during 245 primary procedures over approximately 10.5 years; most patients underwent bilateral electrode implantation. Among the 245 procedures, 9 SSIs (3.7%) occurred within 90 days and 16 (6.5%) occurred within 1 year of DBS placement. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common etiological agents. Most patient- and procedure-related characteristics did not differ between those who had acquired an SSI and those who had not. The rate of SSIs among patients who had received intrawound VP was only 3.3% compared with 9.7% among those who had not received topical VP (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.10-1.02, p = 0.04). After controlling for patient sex, the association between VP and decreased SSI risk did not reach the predetermined level of significance (adjusted OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.10-1.03, p = 0.06). The SSI rates were similar after staged and unstaged implantations. CONCLUSIONS While most patient-related and procedure-related factors assessed in this study were not associated with the risk for an SSI, the data did suggest that intrawound VP may help to reduce the SSI risk after DBS implantation. Furthermore, given the implications of SSI after DBS surgery and the frequency of infections occurring more than 90 days after implantation, continued follow-up for at least 1 year after such a procedure is prudent to establish the true burden of these infections and to properly treat them when they do occur.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3171/2017.9.JNS1780

  5 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29414819
[Au] Autor:Lauro PM; Lee S; Ahn M; Barborica A; Asaad WF
[Ad] Address:The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
[Ti] Title:DBStar: An Open-Source Tool Kit for Imaging Analysis with Patient-Customized Deep Brain Stimulation Platforms.
[So] Source:Stereotact Funct Neurosurg;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1423-0372
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: To create an open-source method for reconstructing microelectrode recording (MER) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode coordinates along multiple parallel trajectories with patient-specific DBS implantation platforms to facilitate DBS research. METHODS: We combined the surgical geometry (extracted from WayPoint Planner), pre-/intra-/postoperative computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) images, and integrated them into the Analysis of Functional NeuroImages (AFNI) neuroimaging analysis environment using functions written in Python. Electrode coordinates were calculated from image-based electrode surfaces and recording trajectory depth values. Coordinates were translated into appropriate trajectories, and were tested for proximity to patient-specific or atlas-based anatomical structures. Final DBS electrode coordinates for 3 patient populations (ventral intermediate nucleus [VIM], subthalamic nucleus [STN], and globus pallidus pars interna [GPi]) were calculated. For STN cases, MER site coordinates were then analyzed to see whether they were inside or outside the STN. RESULTS: Final DBS electrode coordinates were described for VIM, STN, and GPi patient populations. 115/169 (68%) STN MER sites were within 1 mm of the STN in AFNI's Talairach and Tournoux (TT) atlas. CONCLUSIONS: DBStar is a robust tool kit for understanding the anatomical location and context of electrode locations, and can easily be used for imaging, behavioral, or electrophysiological analyses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000486645

  6 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29517591
[Au] Autor:Bolzenius JD; Wade BSC; Velez CS; Drennon AM; Cooper DB; Kennedy JE; Reid MW; Bowles AO; Thompson PM; Gutman B; Lewis JD; Ritter JL; York GE; Bigler ED; Tate DF
[Ad] Address:Missouri Institute of Mental Health, University of Missouri-St Louis, Berkeley (Drs Bolzenius, Wade, and Tate and Ms Velez); Department of Neurology, Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles (Dr Wade); Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Texas (Ms Drennon and Drs Cooper, Kennedy, and Reid); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas (Dr Bowles); Imaging Genetics Center, University of Southern California, Marina del Rey (Drs Thompson and Gutman); Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Lewis); Department of Radiology, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas (Dr Ritter); TBI Imaging and Research, Alaska Radiology Associates, Anchorage (Dr York); and Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Center, Provo, Utah (Dr Bigler).
[Ti] Title:Relationships Between Subcortical Shape Measures and Subjective Symptom Reporting in US Service Members With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.
[So] Source:J Head Trauma Rehabil;33(2):113-122, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1550-509X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess interactions of subcortical structure with subjective symptom reporting associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), using advanced shape analysis derived from volumetric MRI. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-six cognitively symptomatic individuals with mTBI and 59 service members sustaining only orthopedic injury. DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional study. MAIN MEASURES: Self-report symptom measures included the PTSD Checklist-Military, Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. High-dimensional measures of shape characteristics were generated from volumetric MRI for 7 subcortical structures in addition to standard volume measures. RESULTS: Several significant interactions between group status and symptom measures were observed across the various shape measures. These interactions were revealed in the right thalamus and globus pallidus for each of the shape measures, indicating differences in structure thickness and expansion/contraction for these regions. No relationships with volume were observed. CONCLUSION: Results provide evidence for the sensitivity of shape measures in differentiating symptomatic mTBI individuals from controls, while volumetric measures did not exhibit this same sensitivity. Disruptions to thalamic nuclei identified here highlight the role of the thalamus in the spectrum of symptoms associated with mTBI. Additional work is needed to prospectively, and longitudinally, assess these measures along with cognitive performance and advanced multimodal imaging methods to extend the utility of shape analysis in relation to functional outcomes in this population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/HTR.0000000000000379

  7 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346639
[Au] Autor:Tateno A; Sakayori T; Kim WC; Honjo K; Nakayama H; Arakawa R; Okubo Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Neuropsychiatry, Nippon Medical School.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of dopamine D3 and D2 receptor occupancies by a single dose of blonanserin in healthy subjects: A positron emission tomography study with [11C]-(+)-PHNO.
[So] Source:Int J Neuropsychopharmacol;, 2018 Jan 13.
[Is] ISSN:1469-5111
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Blockade of D3 receptor, a member of the dopamine D2-like receptor family, has been suggested as a possible medication for schizophrenia. Blonanserin has high affinity in vitro for D3 as well as D2 receptors. We investigated whether a single dose of 12 mg blonanserin, which was within the daily clinical dose range (i.e., 8-24 mg) for the treatment of schizophrenia, occupies D3 as well as D2 receptors in healthy subjects. Methods: Six healthy males (mean 35.7±7.6 years) received two positron emission tomography scans, the first prior to taking blonanserin, and the second 2 hours after the administration of a single dose of 12 mg blonanserin. Dopamine receptor occupancies by blonanserin were evaluated by [11C]-(+)-PHNO. Results: Occupancy of each region by 12 mg blonanserin was: caudate (range 64.3-81.5%; mean±SD, 74.3±5.6%), putamen (range 60.4-84.3%; mean±SD, 73.3±8.2%), ventral striatum (range 40.1-88.2%; mean±SD, 60.8±17.1%), globus pallidus (range 65.8-87.6%; mean±SD, 75.7±8.6%), and substantia nigra (range 56.0-88.7%; mean±SD, 72.4±11.0%). Correlation analysis between plasma concentration of blonanserin and receptor occupancy in D2-rich (caudate and putamen) and D3-rich (globus pallidus and substantia nigra) regions showed that EC50 for D2-rich region was 0.39 ng/mL (r=0.43) and EC50 for D3-rich region was 0.40 ng/mL (r=0.79). Conclusions: A single dose of 12 mg blonanserin occupied D3 receptor to the same degree as D2 receptor in vivo. Our results were consistent with previous studies that reported that some of the pharmacological effect of blonanserin is mediated via D3 receptor antagonism.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ijnp/pyy004

  8 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508249
[Au] Autor:Ni RJ; Huang ZH; Shu YM; Wang Y; Li T; Zhou JN
[Ad] Address:Psychiatric Laboratory and Mental Health Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, China.
[Ti] Title:Atlas of the Striatum and Globus Pallidus in the Tree Shrew: Comparison with Rat and Mouse.
[So] Source:Neurosci Bull;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1995-8218
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The striatum and globus pallidus are principal nuclei of the basal ganglia. Nissl- and acetylcholinesterase-stained sections of the tree shrew brain showed the neuroanatomical features of the caudate nucleus (Cd), internal capsule (ic), putamen (Pu), accumbens, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus. The ic separated the dorsal striatum into the Cd and Pu in the tree shrew, but not in rats and mice. In addition, computer-based 3D images allowed a better understanding of the position and orientation of these structures. These data provided a large-scale atlas of the striatum and globus pallidus in the coronal, sagittal, and horizontal planes, the first detailed distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells in the tree shrew, and the differences in morphological characteristics and density of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons between tree shrew and rat. Our findings support the tree shrew as a potential model for human striatal disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12264-018-0212-z

  9 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506283
[Au] Autor:Downes AE; Pezeshkian P; Behnke E; Bordelon Y; Tagliati M; Mamelak A; Pouratian N
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida.
[Ti] Title:Acute Ischemic Stroke During Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery of Globus Pallidus Internus: Report of 5 Cases.
[So] Source:Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown);12(4):383-390, 2016 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:2332-4260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a potentially devastating complication of deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Although there are substantial data reporting the incidence and cause of hemorrhagic CVA, reports of acute ischemic infarctions during DBS implantation surgery are rare. OBJECTIVE: To present a series of 5 patients who experienced clinically significant ischemic CVA during microelectrode-guided globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS, and evaluate the potential risk factors and mechanisms. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of GPi DBS surgeries performed between June 2010 and February 2015 at UCLA Medical Center and June 2010 and February 2014 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Centers was performed to identify stroke risk factors. Statistical analysis was performed, comparing the stroke group with all patients undergoing GPi DBS. RESULTS: All 5 patients developed acute onset of lethargy, dysarthria, and contralateral facial and/or hemibody weakness intraoperatively. Computed tomographic scans in all cases were negative for hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance images obtained in 3 patients revealed infarction in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. During the time period analyzed, a total of 234 GPi leads were placed in 129 patients, yielding a 2.14% rate of ischemic stroke per lead. No statistically significant risk factors were identified in the stroke group. Given the variability of symptom onset during surgery, the mechanism is not clear, but it could be related to compression, compromise, or vasospasm of lenticulostriate arteries and/or anterior choroidal branches near the GPi target. CONCLUSION: Ischemic stroke in GPi DBS is a significant complication for clinicians to be aware of and discuss with their patients preoperatively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1227/NEU.0000000000001359

  10 / 10420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505786
[Au] Autor:Volle J; Bregman T; Scott B; Diwan M; Raymond R; Fletcher PJ; Nobrega JN; Hamani C
[Ad] Address:Behavioural Neurobiology Laboratory, Research Imaging Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Deep brain stimulation and fluoxetine exert different long-term changes in the serotonergic system.
[So] Source:Neuropharmacology;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7064
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) deep brain stimulation (DBS) modulate serotonergic activity. We compared the acute (1 day) and long-term (12 days) effects of vmPFC stimulation and fluoxetine on serotonin (5-HT) release and receptor expression in rats. Samples to measure serotonin levels were collected from the hippocampus using microdialysis. Serotonin transporter (SERT), 5-HT and 5-HT mRNA were measured using in situ hybridization. [ H]8-OH-DPAT and [ I]cyanopindolol autoradiography were used to measure 5-HT and 5-HT binding. Our results show that after fluoxetine injections serotonin levels were approximately 150% higher than at baseline. Twelve days later, pre-injection 5-HT extracellular concentration was substantially higher than on day 1. In contrast, serotonin levels following DBS were only 50% higher than at baseline. While pre-stimulation 5-HT on day 12 was significantly higher than on treatment day 1, no stimulation-induced 5-HT peak was recorded. SERT expression in the dorsal raphe was increased after acute fluoxetine and decreased following a single day of DBS. Neither fluoxetine not DBS administered acutely substantially changed 5-HT or 5-HT binding. Chronic fluoxetine treatment, however, was associated with a decrease in [ H]8-OH-DPAT prefrontal cortex and hippocampus expression. In contrast, chronic DBS induced a significant increase in [ I]cyanopindolol binding in the prefrontal cortex, globus pallidus, substantia nigra and raphe nuclei. mRNA expression of 5-HT and 5-HT in raphe nuclei was not altered by either treatment. These results suggest that fluoxetine and DBS modulate activity of the serotonergic system but likely exert their effects through different mechanisms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher


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