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[PMID]: 29524911
[Au] Autor:Nzayisenga JC; Eriksson K; Sellstedt A
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Physiology, UPSC, Umea University, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Mixotrophic and heterotrophic production of lipids and carbohydrates by a locally isolated microalga using wastewater as a growth medium.
[So] Source:Bioresour Technol;257:260-265, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2976
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The biomass production and changes in biochemical composition of a locally isolated microalga (Chlorella sp.) were investigated in autotrophic, mixotrophic and heterotrophic conditions, using glucose or glycerol as carbon sources and municipal wastewater as the growth medium. Both standard methods and Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) analysis of data acquired by Fourier-transform IR (FTIR) spectrometry showed that autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions promoted carbohydrate accumulation, while heterotrophic conditions with glycerol resulted in the highest lipid content and lowest carbohydrate content. Heterotrophic conditions with glycerol as a carbon source also resulted in high oleic acid (18:1) contents and low linolenic acid (18:3) contents, and thus increasing biodiesel quality. The results also show the utility of MCR-ALS for analyzing changes in microalgal biochemical composition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524884
[Au] Autor:Noitem R; Yuajit C; Soodvilai S; Muanprasat C; Chatsudthipong V
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Steviol slows renal cyst growth by reducing AQP2 expression and promoting AQP2 degradation.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;101:754-762, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Overexpression of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) was observed and suggested to be involved in fluid secretion leading to cyst enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The cyst expansion deteriorates the renal function and, therefore, therapies targeting cyst enlargement are of clinical interest. Of note, inhibition of vasopressin function using vasopressin 2 receptor (V2R) antagonist which decreased cAMP production along with AQP2 production and function can slow cyst growth in ADPKD. This finding supports the role of AQP2 in cyst enlargement. Steviol, a major metabolite of the sweetening compound stevioside, was reported to retard MDCK cyst growth and enlargement by inhibiting CFTR activity. Interestingly, its efficacy was found to be higher than that of CFTR -172. Since steviol was also found to produce diuresis in rodent, it is likely that steviol might have an additional effect in retarding cyst progression, such as inhibition of AQP2 expression and function. Here, we investigated the effect of steviol on AQP2 function and on cyst growth using an in vitro cyst model (MDCK and Pkd1 cells). We found that steviol could markedly inhibit cyst growth by reducing AQP2 expression in both Pkd1 and MDCK cells. Real-time PCR also revealed that steviol decreased AQP2 mRNA expression level as well. Moreover, a proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, and the lysosomotropic agent, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) were found to abolish the inhibitory effect of steviol in Pkd1 cells. Increased lysosomal enzyme marker (LAMP2) expression following steviol treatment clearly confirmed the involvement of lysosomes in steviol action. In conclusion, our finding showed for the first time that steviol slowed cyst growth, in part, by reducing AQP2 transcription, promoted proteasome, and lysosome-mediated AQP2 degradation. Due to its multiple actions, steviol is a promising compound for further development in the treatment of PKD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524883
[Au] Autor:Luo L; Gao Y; Yang C; Shao Z; Wu X; Li S; Xiong L; Chen C
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China.
[Ti] Title:Halofuginone attenuates intervertebral discs degeneration by suppressing collagen I production and inactivating TGFß and NF-кB pathway.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;101:745-753, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Most low back pain is caused by intervertebral discs (IVD) degeneration, a disease that prevalence is increasing with age. Halofuginone, an analog of ferbrifugine isolated from plant Dichroa febrifuga, has drawn much attention in recent years for the wide range of bioactivities in malaria, cancer, fibrotic and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the benefit effects of halofuginone in IVD degeneration treatment in a validated rabbit puncture model. Halofuginone treatment could attenuate disc degeneration by suppressing the decrease of discs height and nucleus pulposus signal strength. Besides, halofuginone treatment could suppress mRNA and protein expression of collagen I in nucleus pulposus. This might possibly due to the inactivation of transform growth factor-ß (TGFß) signal pathway by down-regulating p-Samd3 and up-regulating inhibitory Smad7. Then, we evaluated the effects of halofuginone treatment on nuclear factor of kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway and its downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines. The level of p-p65 and p-IκBα was down-regulated in halofuginone treated group, indicating the inactivation of NF-κB signal pathway. The mRNA expression of interleukin 1ß (IL-1ß), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) was decreased in nucleus pulposus too, indicating the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, halofuginone treatment could attenuate IVD degeneration and this was possibly due to suppressing of collagen I production and inactivation of TGFß and NF-κB signal pathway in nucleus pulposus of degenerated discs. These results suggest that halofuginone has the potential for IVD degeneration treatment, but more research is needed to validate this.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524875
[Au] Autor:Jang HN; Back SK; Sung JH; Kang YS; Jurng J; Seo YC
[Ad] Address:Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, 220-710, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:The simultaneous capture of mercury and fine particles by hybrid filter with powder activated carbon injection.
[So] Source:Environ Pollut;237:531-540, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6424
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The hybrid filter (HF) was newly designed and operated with powder activated carbon (PAC) injection to capture mercury and fine particulate matter in the coal power plant. With PAC injection in HF operation, the capture efficiency of elemental mercury was clearly enhanced. When the injection rate of PAC increased from 0 to 20 mg/m , the speciation fraction of elemental mercury significantly decreased from 85.19% to 3.76% at the inlet of the hybrid filter. The speciation fraction of oxidized mercury did not vary greatly, whereas the particulate mercury increased from 1.31% to 94.04%. It was clearly observed that the HF played a role in the capture of mercury and fine PM by leading the conversion of elemental mercury as particulate mercury and the growth of PM via electrode discharge in the HF operation with PAC injection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524867
[Au] Autor:Pike IL; Hilton C; Österle M; Olungah O
[Ad] Address:School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, PO Box 20031, Tucson, AZ 85721, United States. Electronic address: ilpike@email.arizona.edu.
[Ti] Title:Low-intensity violence and the social determinants of adolescent health among three East African pastoralist communities.
[So] Source:Soc Sci Med;202:117-127, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5347
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recently, strong pleas have emerged to place the health of adolescents on the global health agenda. To reposition adolescence front and center, scholars argue that we must work toward a richly contextualized approach that considers the role that social environments play in shaping the final stages of growth and development. We aim to contribute to this deeper understanding of the social determinants of global adolescent health by offering a case study of three nomadic pastoralist communities from northern Kenya. In addition to noteworthy political and economic marginalization, East African pastoralist communities also contend with chronic, low intensity intercommunity conflict. Data collected over five extensive visits from 2008 to 2011, include the 10-19 year olds from 215 randomly sampled Pokot, Samburu, and Turkana households. Using a case/control design, we sampled two sites per ethnic community: one directly affected and one less affected by intercommunity violence. Our nutritional findings indicate that teens ages 15-19 years old had significantly higher anthropometric values compared to younger teens. Living in a wealthier household is associated with greater height, body mass indices, and summed skinfolds for boys but not for girls. Anthropometric measures were influenced by household and community variation in the mixed-effects, multi-level regression models. The Self-Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20) was used to assess psychosocial health, with higher scores associated with living in a community directly affected by violence and having lost a loved one due to violence. Our findings highlight the unique nature of adolescent health challenges but also the central role even subtle differences across communities and households play in shaping young people's experiences. With few studies to document the lived experience of pastoralist youth as they move toward adulthood, examining how such challenging socioeconomic environment shapes health seems long overdue.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524850
[Au] Autor:Chouchane K; Pignot-Paintrand I; Bruckert F; Weidenhaupt M
[Ad] Address:Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble INP, Institute of Engineering Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble, France.
[Ti] Title:Visible light-induced insulin aggregation on surfaces via photoexcitation of bound thioflavin T.
[So] Source:J Photochem Photobiol B;181:89-97, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2682
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Insulin is known to form amyloid aggregates when agitated in a hydrophobic container. Amyloid aggregation is routinely measured by the fluorescence of the conformational dye thioflavin T, which, when incorporated into amyloid fibers, fluoresces at 480 nm. The kinetics of amyloid aggregation in general is characterized by an initial lag-phase, during which aggregative nuclei form on the hydrophobic surface. These nuclei then lead to the formation of fibrils presenting a rapid growth during the elongation phase. Here we describe a novel mechanism of insulin amyloid aggregation which is surprisingly devoid of a lag-time for nucleation. The excitation of thioflavin T by visible light at 440 nm induces the aggregation of thioflavin T-positive insulin fibrils on hydrophobic surfaces in the presence of strong agitation and at physiological pH. This process is material surface-induced and depends on the fact that surface-adsorbed insulin can bind thioflavin T. Light-induced insulin aggregation kinetics is thioflavin T-mediated and is based on an energy transfer from visible light to the protein via thioflavin T. It relies on a constant supply of thioflavin T and insulin from the solution to the aggregate. The growth rate increases with the irradiance and with the concentration of thioflavin T. The supply of insulin seems to be the limiting factor of aggregate growth. This light-induced aggregation process allows the formation of local surface-bound aggregation patterns.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524814
[Au] Autor:Liu X; Lv Y; Xu K; Xiao X; Xi B; Lu S
[Ad] Address:School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People's Republic of China; State Environmental Protection Scientific Observation and Research Station for Lake Dongtinghu (SEPSORSLD), National Engineering Laboratory for LakePollution Control and Ecological Restoration, Chinese Research A
[Ti] Title:Response of ginger growth to a tetracycline-contaminated environment and residues of antibiotic and antibiotic resistance genes.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;201:137-143, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The presence of antibiotic residues in vegetables has been highlighted as a risk to human health; antibiotics not only cause toxic effects to plants but can also induce antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) expression. Using a soil-free approach, this study aimed to explore the response of ginger growth to tetracycline (TC) pollution and to assess the levels of antibiotic residues in different plant organs and the presence of ARGs in the rhizome. Ginger growth in a highly TC-contaminated environment was remarkably inhibited. Photosynthetic parameters, fluorescence parameters, and some physiological indicators (oxidative substances, photosynthetic pigments, enzyme activity, etc.) were negatively influenced by TC contamination. Although the superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activity levels significantly increased, their effects appear to be limited. The accumulation of TC in the rhizome (28.1 mg kg ) was greater than that in the roots, stem, or leaves. All tested antibiotic resistance genes except for tetL were detectable in the rhizome, and their relative abundance was in the order integron1>tetG > tetA > tetC > tetB > tetM. The level of TC in ginger rhizomes was much higher than the maximum residue limits. The potential dose of TC acquired from the consumption of ginger grown in a highly TC-contaminated environment poses no obvious risk to adults but may be a threat to children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524811
[Au] Autor:Acciai F
[Ad] Address:School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, 425 N. 5th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004, United States. Electronic address: facciai@asu.edu.
[Ti] Title:The age pattern of social inequalities in health at older ages: are common measures of socio-economic status interchangeable?
[So] Source:Public Health;157:135-141, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5616
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Social inequalities in health have been largely documented in social science research. Members of the most disadvantaged groups experience worse health and higher mortality from birth throughout adulthood. However, it is not clear whether this association persists at older ages. Some studies have found a narrowing of the social gradient in health, at least when 'traditional' measures of socio-economic status (SES)-income, education, and occupation-are used. The main goal of the article is to highlight similarities and discrepancies in the age trend of social inequalities in health that arise when multiple measures of SES are considered. STUDY DESIGN: The present study uses a longitudinal sample of over 7000 individuals age 50+ from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe to examine the age trend of social inequalities in health. METHODS: By using growth curve models, individual trajectories of self-rated health and physical functioning were analyzed. SES is measured through wealth, income, and education. RESULTS: The findings show that for both health outcomes, the choice of the indicator of SES is very consequential, as the age trend of social inequalities in health is substantially different for different measures of SES. CONCLUSION: Using multiple measures of SES is recommended, as using only one measure would give only a partial account of the age trend of social inequalities in health. In particular, wealth seems to better capture individual's socio-economic position, as it is able to detect health gradients even where education and income fail to do so.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524802
[Au] Autor:Ferreira PAA; Marchezan C; Ceretta CA; Tarouco CP; Lourenzi CR; Silva LS; Soriani HH; Nicoloso FT; Cesco S; Mimmo T; Brunetto G
[Ad] Address:Department of Soil Science, Federal University of Santa Maria, CEP 97105-900, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Soil amendment as a strategy for the growth of young vines when replanting vineyards in soils with high copper content.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol Biochem;126:152-162, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Soil contamination with copper (Cu)-based agrochemicals used in vineyards for pest control is a growing problem. In this context, the application of soil amendment to limit Cu toxicity, especially for young plants after the replanting of vineyards, has been a concern for winemakers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how different amendments can contribute to the decrease in Cu availability in areas vocated to viticulture. Furthermore, the aim was to evaluate to the effect of Cu on the biochemical and physiological changes in the development of the young vine plants, both at the shoot and the root level. Vine plants were grown in a greenhouse using a Typic Hapludalf soil characterized by 87.5 mg of Cu kg (control). Three different amendments were applied to the soil: limestone (3 Mg ha ), calcium silicate (3 Mg ha ) and vermicompost (30 g of C kg ). The amendment with vermicompost and calcium silicate caused a significant alkalization of the soil solution. Moreover, specifically for the treatment with vermicompost, the levels of Cu in the soil solution were consistently diminished with a clear benefit for plants (+89% biomass accumulation at the shoot level). In addition, this soil amendment led to a higher photosynthetic rate, lower superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and guaiacol peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) activity and a higher percentage of fine roots with diameter between 0 < L ≥ 0.2 mm (particularly active in water and nutrient acquisition). In conclusion, results showed that vermicompost effectively reduced Cu phytotoxicityin young vines grown in soils with high Cu contents. Furthermore, this amendment might be an asset in enhancing the availability of other important micronutrients such as iron.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 2025167 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524801
[Au] Autor:Rossini Oliva S; Mingorance MD; Sanhueza D; Fry SC; Leidi EO
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, University of Seville, Av Reina Mercedes, POB 1095, 41080 Seville, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Active proton efflux, nutrient retention and boron-bridging of pectin are related to greater tolerance of proton toxicity in the roots of two Erica species.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol Biochem;126:142-151, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Tolerance to soil acidity was studied in two species of Ericaceae that grow in mine-contaminated soils (S Portugal, SW Spain) to find out if there are interspecific variations in H tolerance which might be related to their particular location. METHODS: Tolerance to H toxicity was tested in nutrient solutions using seeds collected in SW Spain. Plant growth and nutrient contents in leaves, stems and roots were determined. Viability tests and proton exchange were studied in roots exposed, short-term, to acidic conditions. Membrane ATPase activity and the cell-wall pectic polysaccharide domain rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) were analysed to find out interspecific differences. RESULTS: Variation in survival, growth and mineral composition was found between species. The H -tolerant species (Erica andevalensis) showed greater concentration of nutrients than E. australis. Very low pH (pH 2) produced a significant loss of root nutrients (K, P, Mg) in the sensitive species. Root ATPase activity was slightly higher in the tolerant species with a correspondingly greater H efflux capacity. In both species, the great majority of the RG-II domains were in their boron-bridged dimeric form. However, shifting to a medium of pH 2 caused some of the boron bridges to break in the sensitive species. CONCLUSIONS: Variation in elements linked to the cell wall-membrane complex and the stability of their components (RG-II, H -ATPases) are crucial for acid stress tolerance. Thus, by maintaining root cell structure, active proton efflux avoided toxic H build-up in the cytoplasm and supported greater nutrient acquisition in H -tolerant species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


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