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[PMID]: 24966347
[Au] Autor:Marek LA; Hinz TK; von Mässenhausen A; Olszewski KA; Kleczko EK; Boehm D; Weiser-Evans MC; Nemenoff RA; Hoffmann H; Warth A; Gozgit JM; Perner S; Heasley LE
[Ad] Address:Department of Craniofacial Biology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado....
[Ti] Title:Nonamplified FGFR1 Is a Growth Driver in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.
[So] Source:Mol Cancer Res;12(10):1460-9, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1557-3125
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is associated with asbestos exposure and is a cancer that has not been significantly affected by small molecule-based targeted therapeutics. Previously, we demonstrated the existence of functional subsets of lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in which fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) autocrine signaling functions as a nonmutated growth pathway. In a panel of pleural mesothelioma cell lines, FGFR1 and FGF2 were coexpressed in three of seven cell lines and were significantly associated with sensitivity to the FGFR-active tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), ponatinib, both in vitro and in vivo using orthotopically propagated xenografts. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated silencing confirmed the requirement for FGFR1 in specific mesothelioma cells and sensitivity to the FGF ligand trap, FP-1039, validated the requirement for autocrine FGFs. None of the FGFR1-dependent mesothelioma cells exhibited increased FGFR1 gene copy number, based on a FISH assay, indicating that increased FGFR1 transcript and protein expression were not mediated by gene amplification. Elevated FGFR1 mRNA was detected in a subset of primary MPM clinical specimens and like MPM cells; none harbored increased FGFR1 gene copy number. These results indicate that autocrine signaling through FGFR1 represents a targetable therapeutic pathway in MPM and that biomarkers distinct from increased FGFR1 gene copy number such as FGFR1 mRNA would be required to identify patients with MPM bearing tumors driven by FGFR1 activity. IMPLICATIONS: FGFR1 is a viable therapeutic target in a subset of MPMs, but FGFR TKI-responsive tumors will need to be selected by a biomarker distinct from increased FGFR1 gene copy number, possibly FGFR1 mRNA or protein levels. Mol Cancer Res; 12(10); 1460-9. ©2014 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-14-0038

  2 / 335458 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25098961
[Au] Autor:Luo W; Xie Y
[Ad] Address:a Fudan University.
[Ti] Title:Socio-economic disparities in mortality among the elderly in China.
[So] Source:Popul Stud (Camb);68(3):305-20, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1477-4747
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This longitudinal study of mortality among the elderly (65 and over) in China used a large representative sample to examine the association between mortality and three different socio-economic status (SES) indicators-education, economic independence, and household income per head. The results, while varying depending on the measures used, show that there is strong evidence of a negative association between SES and overall mortality. A cause-specific analysis shows that SES is more strongly related to the reduction of mortality from more preventable causes, such as circulatory disease and respiratory disease, than from less preventable causes such as cancer. We also investigated the effects of three sets of factors that may mediate the observed SES-mortality relationship: support networks, health-related behaviours, and access to health care. The results show that for both overall and cause-specific mortality, access to health care is the most important of the three.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/00324728.2014.934908

  3 / 335458 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24123531
[Au] Autor:Hah JH; Zhao M; Pickering CR; Frederick MJ; Andrews GA; Jasser SA; Fooshee DR; Milas ZL; Galer C; Sano D; William WN; Kim E; Heymach J; Byers LA; Papadimitrakopoulou V; Myers JN
[Ad] Address:Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:HRAS mutations and resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.
[So] Source:Head Neck;36(11):1547-54, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0347
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to identify mechanisms of innate resistance to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erlotinib, in a panel of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. Specifically, we analyzed the role of HRAS mutations in erlotinib resistance. METHODS: Erlotinib sensitivity was determined by methyl thiazolyl-tetrazolium (MTT) assays. Molecular signaling pathways and somatic mutations were examined. Changes in sensitivity after modulation of HRAS expression were evaluated. RESULTS: All 7 cell lines were wild-type for EGFR and KRAS regardless of erlotinib sensitivity; however, 1 erlotinib-resistant cell line (HN31) harbored an HRAS G12D mutation. Downregulation of HRAS expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in HN31 led to increased erlotinib sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Transfection of activating HRAS-mutant (G12D and G12V) constructs into erlotinib-sensitive cell lines made them more resistant to erlotinib. CONCLUSION: Activating HRAS mutations can confer erlotinib resistance in an HRAS mutant HNSCC cell line. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 36: 1547-1554, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/hed.23499

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[PMID]: 24115092
[Au] Autor:Kurisetty VV; Heiber J; Myers R; Pereira GS; Goodwin JW; Federspiel MJ; Russell SJ; Peng KW; Barber G; Merchan JR
[Ad] Address:Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Miami/Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.
[Ti] Title:Preclinical safety and activity of recombinant VSV-IFN-ß in an immunocompetent model of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
[So] Source:Head Neck;36(11):1619-27, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0347
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-ß (VSV-IFN-ß) has demonstrated antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. In preparation for clinical testing in human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck, we conducted preclinical studies of VSV-IFN-ß in syngeneic SCC models. METHODS: In vitro, VSV-IFN-ß (expressing rat or mouse interferon [IFN]-ß)-induced cytotoxicity and propagated in rat (FAT-7) or mouse (SCC-VII) SCC cells during normoxia and hypoxia. In vivo, intratumoral administration of VSV-rat-IFN-ß or VSV-human-IFN-ß in FAT-7 bearing or non-tumor bearing immunocompetent rats did not result in acute organ toxicity or death. RESULTS: VSV-r-IFN-ß replicated predominantly in tumors and a dose dependent anti-VSV antibody response was observed. Intratumoral or intravenous administration of VSV-IFN-ß resulted in growth delay and improved survival compared with controls. CONCLUSION: The above data confirm safety and feasibility of VSV-IFN-ß administration in immunocompetent animals and support its clinical evaluation in advanced human head and neck cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 36: 1619-1627, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/hed.23502

  5 / 335458 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24115017
[Au] Autor:Szaniszlo P; Fennewald SM; Qiu S; Kantara C; Shilagard T; Vargas G; Resto VA
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, UTMB Health Cancer Center, Galveston, Texas; UTMB Health Cancer Center, Galveston, Texas.
[Ti] Title:Temporal characterization of lymphatic metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of oral cancer.
[So] Source:Head Neck;36(11):1638-47, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0347
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The overall mortality rate in cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved over the past 30 years, mostly because of the high treatment failure rate among patients with regionally metastatic disease. To better understand the pathobiologic processes leading to lymphatic metastasis development, there is an urgent need for relevant animal models. METHODS: HNSCC cell lines were implanted into the tongues of athymic nude mice. Histology, immunohistochemistry, and ex vivo 2-photon microscopy were used to evaluate tumor progress and spread. RESULTS: Orthotopic xenografts of different HNSCC cell lines produced distinct patterns of survival, tumor histology, disease progression rate, and lymph node metastasis development. Remarkably, all injected cell types reached the lymph nodes within 24 hours after injection, but not all developed metastasis. CONCLUSION: This orthotopic xenograft model closely mimics several characteristics of human cancer and could be extremely valuable for translational studies focusing on lymphatic metastasis development and pathobiology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 36: 1638-1647, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/hed.23500

  6 / 335458 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25176500
[Au] Autor:Frisdal A; Trainor PA
[Ad] Address:Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO, USA; University Pierre and Marie Curie, Paris, France.
[Ti] Title:Development and evolution of the pharyngeal apparatus.
[So] Source:Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biol;3(6):403-18, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1759-7692
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The oral or pharyngeal apparatus facilitates the dual functions of respiration and feeding. It develops during embryogenesis from transient structures called pharyngeal arches (PAs), which comprise a reiterated series of outgrowths on the lateral side of the head. The PAs and their segmental arrangement are highly conserved throughout evolution from invertebrate chordates such as amphioxus, through to vertebrate agnathans including avians, squamates, and mammals. The structural organization of the PAs is also highly conserved and involves contributions from each of the three primary endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm germ layers. The endoderm is particularly important for PA formation and segmentation and also plays a critical role in tissue-specific differentiation. The ectoderm gives rise to neural crest cells (NCC) which provide an additional layer of complexity to PA development and differentiation in vertebrates compared to invertebrate chordates that do not possess NCC. Collectively, the PAs give rise to much of the neurovasculature and musculoskeletal systems in the head and neck. The complexity of development renders the pharyngeal apparatus prone to perturbation and subsequently the pathogenesis of birth defects. Hence it is important to understand the signals and mechanisms that govern the development and evolution of the pharyngeal complex. WIREs Dev Biol 2014, 3:403-418. doi: 10.1002/wdev.147 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/wdev.147

  7 / 335458 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320691
[Au] Autor:Al-Zahrani O; Eldali A; Al-Shahri MZ
[Ad] Address:Palliative Care, Prince Sultan Oncology Centre, North West Armed Forces Hospital, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and severity of pain in cancer patients in an outpatient palliative care setting in Saudi Arabia.
[So] Source:Qatar Med J;2014(1):38-45, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:0253-8253
[Cp] Country of publication:Qatar
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The prevalence and severity of cancer pain in the outpatient palliative care (PC) setting have not been explored previously in Saudi Arabia (SA). Exploration of this basic information may help in evaluating pain severity in patients new to PC as compared to those with previous PC exposure. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to determine the prevalence and severity of cancer pain among new and follow-up patients attending a PC outpatient clinic. METHODS: In a PC outpatient setting in a major tertiary hospital in SA, we interviewed adult patients with cancer during their attendance to the clinic. Patients were requested to score the severity of their pain on a 0 to 10 numerical scale. RESULTS: A total of 124 patients were interviewed, of whom 73 (59%) were females. The majority of patients (82.3%) had metastatic disease. The most common cancers were breast (27.4%) and head and neck (15.3%). The majority of patients (85.5%) reported pain, with a median intensity score of 5 and a mean of 4.6. Of those who reported pain, 54 (51%) scored above 4. The mean pain score did not differ between groups of patients according to various characteristics such as age, sex, performance status, type of cancer or encounter type. CONCLUSION: Pain is a prevalent symptom in new and follow-up cancer patients seen in a PC outpatient setting in SA. Further research on a larger scale is needed to evaluate the magnitude of the problem more comprehensively with emphasis on detailed pain assessment and exploration of the adopted management approaches.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141016
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5339/qmj.2014.6

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[PMID]: 25320687
[Au] Autor:Mirza S; Fadl S; Napaki S; Abualruz A
[Ad] Address:Radiology Department, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar....
[Ti] Title:Case report of complicated epidermoid cyst of the floor of the mouth: Radiology-histopathology correlation.
[So] Source:Qatar Med J;2014(1):12-6, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:0253-8253
[Cp] Country of publication:Qatar
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Epidermoid cysts, true dermoid cysts and teratoid cysts compose the spectrum of cystic teratomas, which are defined as neoplasms whose tissue are derivatives of more than one germ layer, foreign to that part of the body from which the tumor arises. Epidermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth are rare lesions and are much less common than dermoid cysts in the head and neck. This case reports a 43-year-old male patient who presented with a longstanding midline swelling in the submental region. Initial imaging was done using ultrasound followed by computed tomography (CT) scan. Biopsy was taken and revealed a cyst wall lined with epidermal squamous epithelium along with areas of focal ulceration suggesting chronic inflammatory changes of the wall of the epidermoid cyst. There are characteristic and even pathognomonic imaging features of epidermoid cysts at the floor of the mouth in ultrasound and CT scan. Imaging has an important role in the surgical management plan according to the size and location of the cyst in relation to geniohyoid and mylohyoid muscles.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141016
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5339/qmj.2014.2

  9 / 335458 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320704
[Au] Autor:Lotfi AR; Zarrintan S; Naderpour M; Sokhandan M; Fakhrjou A; Bayat A; Salehpour F; Djalilian H
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Imam Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran....
[Ti] Title:Primary hydatid cyst of the right maxillary sinus: a case report.
[So] Source:Iran J Otorhinolaryngol;26(77):257-61, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2251-7251
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: A hydatid cyst of the head and neck is a very rare condition, even in areas where Echinococcus infestation is endemic. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of primary hydatid cyst of the right maxillary sinus in a 40-year-old man. The initial diagnosis of the presence of a cystic mass was the result of physical examination and computed tomography (CT) scan. We resected the cystic mass using the Caldwell-Luc procedure. A definitive diagnosis was confirmed by postoperative histopathologic examination. CONCLUSION: Hydatid cyst of the maxillary sinus is an extremely rare presentation. However, this condition should be considered in differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of the maxillary sinus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141016
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  10 / 335458 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320698
[Au] Autor:Jalali MM; Gerami H; Rahimi A; Jafari M
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Amiralmomenin Hospital, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Guilan, Iran....
[Ti] Title:Assessment of olfactory threshold in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies.
[So] Source:Iran J Otorhinolaryngol;26(77):211-7, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2251-7251
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Radiotherapy is a common treatment modality for patients with head and neck malignancies. As the nose lies within the field of radiotherapy of the head and neck, the olfactory fibers and olfactory receptors may be affected by radiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in olfactory threshold in patients with head and neck malignancies who have received radiation to the head and neck. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The olfactory threshold of patients with head and neck malignancies was assessed prospectively before radiation therapy and serially for up to 6 months after radiotherapy using sniff bottles. In vivo dosimetry was performed using 82 LiF (MCP) chips and a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were recruited before radiotherapy was commenced. Seven patients did not return for evaluation after radiation. Fifty-four patients were available for follow-up assessment (28 women, 26 men; age, 22-86 years; median, 49 years). Total radiation dose was 50.1 Gy (range, 30-66 Gy). Mean olfactory threshold scores were found to deteriorate significantly at various timepoints after radiotherapy (11.7 before radiotherapy versus 4.0 at Month 6, general linear model, P<0.0001). With in vivo dosimetry, we found that the median measured dose to the olfactory area was 334 µC. We also identified a cutoff point according to the dose to the olfactory epithelium. Olfactory threshold was significantly decreased 2-6 weeks after initiation of therapy, with cumulative local radiation >135 µC (Mann-Whitney U test, P=0.01). CONCLUSION: Deterioration in olfactory threshold scores was found at 6 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Provided that these results are reproducible, an evaluation of olfactory functioning in patients with head and neck malignancies using in vivo dosimetry may be useful for determining the optimal dose for patients treated with conformal radiotherapy techniques while avoiding the side effects of radiation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141016
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE


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