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[PMID]: 25300860
[Au] Autor:Murray JC; Aldeghaither D; Wang S; Nasto RE; Jablonski SA; Tang Y; Weiner LM
[Ad] Address:Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC....
[Ti] Title:c-Abl Modulates Tumor Cell Sensitivity to Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity.
[So] Source:Cancer Immunol Res;2(12):1186-98, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2326-6074
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) can modulate cancer cell signal transduction and recruit antitumor immune effector mechanisms-including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Although several clinically effective antibodies can promote ADCC, therapeutic resistance is common. We hypothesized that oncogenic signaling networks within tumor cells affect their sensitivity to ADCC. We developed a screening platform and targeted 60 genes derived from an EGFR gene network using RNAi in an in vitro ADCC model system. Knockdown of GRB7, PRKCE, and ABL1 enhanced ADCC by primary and secondary screens. ABL1 knockdown also reduced cell proliferation, independent of its ADCC enhancement effects. c-Abl overexpression decreased ADCC sensitivity and rescued the effects of ABL1 knockdown. Imatinib inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity also enhanced ADCC-phenocopying ABL1 knockdown-against several EGFR-expressing head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines by ex vivo primary natural killer cells. Our findings suggest that combining c-Abl inhibition with ADCC-promoting antibodies, such as cetuximab, could translate into increased therapeutic efficacy of mAbs. Cancer Immunol Res; 2(12); 1186-98. ©2014 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-14-0083

  2 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24832392
[Au] Autor:Girard MJ; Dupps WJ; Baskaran M; Scarcelli G; Yun SH; Quigley HA; Sigal IA; Strouthidis NG
[Ad] Address:In Vivo Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore , Singapore .
[Ti] Title:Translating ocular biomechanics into clinical practice: current state and future prospects.
[So] Source:Curr Eye Res;40(1):1-18, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2202
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Abstract Biomechanics is the study of the relationship between forces and function in living organisms and is thought to play a critical role in a significant number of ophthalmic disorders. This is not surprising, as the eye is a pressure vessel that requires a delicate balance of forces to maintain its homeostasis. Over the past few decades, basic science research in ophthalmology mostly confirmed that ocular biomechanics could explain in part the mechanisms involved in almost all major ophthalmic disorders such as optic nerve head neuropathies, angle closure, ametropia, presbyopia, cataract, corneal pathologies, retinal detachment and macular degeneration. Translational biomechanics in ophthalmology, however, is still in its infancy. It is believed that its use could make significant advances in diagnosis and treatment. Several translational biomechanics strategies are already emerging, such as corneal stiffening for the treatment of keratoconus, and more are likely to follow. This review aims to cultivate the idea that biomechanics plays a major role in ophthalmology and that the clinical translation, lead by collaborative teams of clinicians and biomedical engineers, will benefit our patients. Specifically, recent advances and future prospects in corneal, iris, trabecular meshwork, crystalline lens, scleral and lamina cribrosa biomechanics are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3109/02713683.2014.914543

  3 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25143048
[Au] Autor:Spencer CR; Gay HA; Haughey BH; Nussenbaum B; Adkins DR; Wildes TM; DeWees TA; Lewis JS; Thorstad WL
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
[Ti] Title:Eliminating radiotherapy to the contralateral retropharyngeal and high level II lymph nodes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is safe and improves quality of life.
[So] Source:Cancer;120(24):3994-4002, 2014 Dec 15.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0142
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Radiation treatment volumes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are controversial. The authors report the outcomes, patterns of failure, and quality of life (QOL) of patients who received treatment for HNSCC using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that eliminated the treatment of contralateral retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RPLNs) in the clinically uninvolved neck. METHODS: A prospective institutional database was used to identify patients who had primary oral cavity, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, laryngeal, and unknown primary HNSCC for which they received IMRT. There were 3 temporal groups (generations 1-3). Generation 1 received comprehensive neck IMRT with parotid sparing, generation 2 eliminated the contralateral high level II (HLII) lymph nodes, and generation 3 further eliminated the contralateral RPLNs in the clinically uninvolved neck. Patterns of failure and survival analyses were completed, and QOL data measured using the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory were compared in a subset of patients from generations 1 and 3. RESULTS: In total, 748 patients were identified. Of the 488 patients who received treatment in generation 2 or 3, 406 had a clinically uninvolved contralateral neck. There were no failures in the spared RPLNs (95% confidence interval, 0%-1.3%) or in the high contralateral neck (95% confidence interval, 0%-0.7%). QOL data were compared between 44 patients in generation 1 and 51 patients in generation 3. QOL improved both globally and in all domains assessed for generation 3, in which reduced radiotherapy volumes were used (P < .007). CONCLUSIONS: For patients with locally advanced HNSCC, eliminating coverage to the contralateral HLII lymph nodes and contralateral RPLNs in the clinically uninvolved side of the neck is associated with minimal risk of failure in these regions and significantly improved patient-reported QOL. Cancer 2014;120:3994-4002. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/cncr.28938

  4 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25471948
[Au] Autor:Kim Y; Li R; Na YH; Lee R; Xing L
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 and Center for Bionics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791, South Korea....
[Ti] Title:Accuracy of surface registration compared to conventional volumetric registration in patient positioning for head-and-neck radiotherapy: A simulation study using patient data.
[So] Source:Med Phys;41(12):121701, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0094-2405
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: 3D optical surface imaging has been applied to patient positioning in radiation therapy (RT). The optical patient positioning system is advantageous over conventional method using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in that it is radiation free, frameless, and is capable of real-time monitoring. While the conventional radiographic method uses volumetric registration, the optical system uses surface matching for patient alignment. The relative accuracy of these two methods has not yet been sufficiently investigated. This study aims to investigate the theoretical accuracy of the surface registration based on a simulation study using patient data. METHODS: This study compares the relative accuracy of surface and volumetric registration in head-and-neck RT. The authors examined 26 patient data sets, each consisting of planning CT data acquired before treatment and patient setup CBCT data acquired at the time of treatment. As input data of surface registration, patient's skin surfaces were created by contouring patient skin from planning CT and treatment CBCT. Surface registration was performed using the iterative closest points algorithm by point-plane closest, which minimizes the normal distance between source points and target surfaces. Six degrees of freedom (three translations and three rotations) were used in both surface and volumetric registrations and the results were compared. The accuracy of each method was estimated by digital phantom tests. RESULTS: Based on the results of 26 patients, the authors found that the average and maximum root-mean-square translation deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations were 2.7 and 5.2 mm, respectively. The residual error of the surface registration was calculated to have an average of 0.9 mm and a maximum of 1.7 mm. CONCLUSIONS: Surface registration may lead to results different from those of the conventional volumetric registration. Only limited accuracy can be achieved for patient positioning with an approach based solely on surface information.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1118/1.4898103

  5 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25472554
[Au] Autor:Cano I; Lluch-Ariet M; Gomez-Cabrero D; Maier D; Kalko S; Cascante M; Tegnér J; Miralles F; Herrera D; Roca J; Synergy-COPD consortium
[Ti] Title:Biomedical research in a Digital Health Framework.
[So] Source:J Transl Med;12 Suppl 2:S10, 2014 Nov 28.
[Is] ISSN:1479-5876
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This article describes a Digital Health Framework (DHF), benefitting from the lessons learnt during the three-year life span of the FP7 Synergy-COPD project. The DHF aims to embrace the emerging requirements - data and tools - of applying systems medicine into healthcare with a three-tier strategy articulating formal healthcare, informal care and biomedical research. Accordingly, it has been constructed based on three key building blocks, namely, novel integrated care services with the support of information and communication technologies, a personal health folder (PHF) and a biomedical research environment (DHF-research). Details on the functional requirements and necessary components of the DHF-research are extensively presented. Finally, the specifics of the building blocks strategy for deployment of the DHF, as well as the steps toward adoption are analyzed. The proposed architectural solutions and implementation steps constitute a pivotal strategy to foster and enable 4P medicine (Predictive, Preventive, Personalized and Participatory) in practice and should provide a head start to any community and institution currently considering to implement a biomedical research platform.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/1479-5876-12-S2-S10

  6 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25472866
[Au] Autor:Sagri E; Reczko M; Tsoumani KT; Gregoriou ME; Harokopos V; Mavridou AM; Tastsoglou S; Athanasiadis K; Ragoussis J; Mathiopoulos KD
[Ti] Title:The molecular biology of the olive fly comes of age.
[So] Source:BMC Genet;15 Suppl 2:S8, 2014 Dec 1.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2156
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Olive cultivation blends with the history of the Mediterranean countries since ancient times. Even today, activities around the olive tree constitute major engagements of several people in the countryside of both sides of the Mediterranean basin. The olive fly is, beyond doubt, the most destructive pest of cultivated olives. The female fly leaves its eggs in the olive fruit. Upon emergence, the larvae feed on the olive sap, thus destroying the fruit. If untreated, practically all olives get infected. The use of chemical insecticides constitutes the principal olive fly control approach. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), an environmentally friendly alternative control method, had been tried in pilot field applications in the 1970's, albeit with no practical success. This was mainly attributed to the low, non-antagonistic quality of the mixed-sex released insects. Many years of experience from successful SIT applications in related species, primarily the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, demonstrated that efficient SIT protocols require the availability of fundamental genetic and molecular information. RESULTS: Among the primary systems whose understanding can contribute towards novel SIT approaches (or its recently developed alternative RIDL: Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal) is the reproductive, since the ability to manipulate the reproductive system would directly affect the insect's fertility. In addition, the analysis of early embryonic promoters and apoptotic genes would provide tools that confer dominant early-embryonic lethality during mass-rearing. Here we report the identification of several genes involved in these systems through whole transcriptome analysis of female accessory glands (FAGs) and spermathecae, as well as male testes. Indeed, analysis of differentially expressed genes in these tissues revealed higher metabolic activity in testes than in FAGs/spermathecae. Furthermore, at least five olfactory-related genes were shown to be differentially expressed in the female and male reproductive systems analyzed. Finally, the expression profile of the embryonic serendipity-α locus and the pre-apoptotic head involution defective gene were analyzed during embryonic developmental stages. CONCLUSIONS: Several years of molecular studies on the olive fly can now be combined with new information from whole transcriptome analyses and lead to a deep understanding of the biology of this notorious insect pest. This is a prerequisite for the development of novel embryonic lethality female sexing strains for successful SIT efforts which, combined with improved mass-reared conditions, give new hope for efficient SIT applications for the olive fly.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/1471-2156-15-S2-S8

  7 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25464516
[Au] Autor:Lubnow M; Philipp A; Foltan M; Bull Enger T; Lunz D; Bein T; Haneya A; Schmid C; Riegger G; Müller T; Lehle K
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine II, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Technical Complications during Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Their Relevance Predicting a System-Exchange - Retrospective Analysis of 265 Cases.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(12):e112316, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Technical complications are a known hazard in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO). Identifying these complications and predictive factors indicating a developing system-exchange was the goal of the study. METHODS: Retrospective study on prospectively collected data of technical complications including 265 adult patients (Regensburg ECMO Registry, 2009-2013) with acute respiratory failure treated with vvECMO. Alterations in blood flow resistance, gas transfer capability, hemolysis, coagulation and hemostasis parameters were evaluated in conjunction with a system-exchange in all patients with at least one exchange (n = 83). RESULTS: Values presented as median (interquartile range). Patient age was 50(36-60) years, the SOFA score 11(8-14.3) and the Murray lung injury Score 3.33(3.3-3.7). Cumulative ECMO support time 3411 days, 9(6-15) days per patient. Mechanical failure of the blood pump (n = 5), MO (n = 2) or cannula (n = 1) accounted for 10% of the exchanges. Acute clot formation within the pump head (visible clots, increase in plasma free hemoglobin (frHb), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), n = 13) and MO (increase in pressure drop across the MO, n = 16) required an urgent system-exchange, of which nearly 50% could be foreseen by measuring the parameters mentioned below. Reasons for an elective system-exchange were worsening of gas transfer capability (n = 10) and device-related coagulation disorders (n = 32), either local fibrinolysis in the MO due to clot formation (increased D-dimers [DD]), decreased platelet count; n = 24), or device-induced hyperfibrinolysis (increased DD, decreased fibrinogen [FG], decreased platelet count, diffuse bleeding tendency; n = 8), which could be reversed after system-exchange. Four MOs were exchanged due to suspicion of infection. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of ECMO system-exchanges could be predicted by regular inspection of the complete ECMO circuit, evaluation of gas exchange, pressure drop across the MO and laboratory parameters (DD, FG, platelets, LDH, frHb). These parameters should be monitored in the daily routine to reduce the risk of unexpected ECMO failure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0112316

  8 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25461599
[Au] Autor:Jauniaux T; Garigliany MM; Loos P; Bourgain JL; Bouveroux T; Coignoul F; Haelters J; Karpouzopoulos J; Pezeril S; Desmecht D
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Pathology, Fundamental and Applied Research for Animals & Health (FARAH), University of Liege, Sart Tilman B43, B-4000, Liege, Belgium....
[Ti] Title:Bite Injuries of Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) on Harbour Porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(12):e108993, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bite-like skin lesions on harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) have been suspected to be caused by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus), and a few field observations have been reported. Bite-like skin lesions observed on stranded animals were characterized by two main components: large flaps of loose or missing skin and blubber with frayed edges and puncture lesions. Definitive demonstration of predation by a grey seal was not reported so far in those stranded animals. In this study, five stranded porpoises with bite-like skin lesions were swabbed for genetic investigations. In addition, the head of a recently dead grey seal was used to mimic bite-like skin injuries on a porpoise carcass. Subsequently, the artificial skin injuries were swabbed, along with the gum of the seal used for inflicting them (positive controls). Total DNA was extracted from the swabs and was used to retrieve a fragment of mitochondrial DNA by PCR. Primers were designed to amplify a specific stretch of mitochondrial DNA known to differ between grey seals and porpoises. The amplicon targeted was successfully amplified from the positive control and from two of the stranded porpoises, and grey seal-specific mitochondrial DNA was retrieved from all those samples. We conclude that (1) it is possible to detect grey seal DNA from dead porpoises even after several days in seawater and (2) bite-like skin lesions found on dead porpoises definitively result from grey seals attacks. The attacks are most likely linked with predation although, in a number of cases, scavenging and aggressive behaviour cannot be excluded.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0108993

  9 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25135308
[Au] Autor:Chai PR; Wu RY; Ranney ML; Porter PS; Babu KM; Boyer EW
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School at Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, 55 Claverick St., Providence, RI, 02903, USA, peter.chai@umassmemorial.org.
[Ti] Title:The virtual toxicology service: wearable head-mounted devices for medical toxicology.
[So] Source:J Med Toxicol;10(4):382-7, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1937-6995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13181-014-0420-5

  10 / 337718 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25453352
[Au] Autor:Lundsberg LS; Illuzzi JL; Belanger K; Triche EW; Bracken MB
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT....
[Ti] Title:Low-to-moderate prenatal alcohol consumption and the risk of selected birth outcomes: a prospective cohort study.
[So] Source:Ann Epidemiol;25(1):46-54.e3, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2585
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To estimate whether low-to-moderate prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with selected birth outcomes. METHODS: Low-to-moderate prenatal alcohol drinking and effects on low birthweight, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, and selected neonatal outcomes were evaluated among 4496 women and singleton infants. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression, controlling for confounding variables. RESULTS: Early pregnancy drinking was associated with reduced odds of low birthweight, OR, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.46-0.96) and birth length less than 10th percentile, OR, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.56-0.97). Drinking during the first 3 months showed lower odds for birth length and head circumference less than 10th percentile, OR, 0.56 (95% CI, 0.36-0.87) and OR, 0.69 (95% CI, 0.50-0.96), respectively. Third trimester drinking was associated with lower odds for low birthweight, OR, 0.56 (95% CI, 0.34-0.94) and preterm delivery, OR, 0.60 (95% CI, 0.42-0.87). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest low-to-moderate alcohol exposure during early and late gestation is not associated with increased risk of low birthweight, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, and most selected perinatal outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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