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[PMID]: 25374767
[Au] Autor:Aicua I; Verhagen O; Arenaza N; Cubo E
[Ad] Address:Neurology Department, Hospital Universitario BurgosBurgos, Spain....
[Ti] Title:Head and Arm Tremor in X-linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.
[So] Source:Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov (N Y);4:265, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2160-8288
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare adult-onset neuronopathy. Although tremor is known to occur in this disease, the number of reported cases of SBMA with tremor is rare, and the number with videotaped documentation is exceedingly rare. Our aim was to describe/document the characteristic signs of tremor in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a 58-year-old male with a positive family history of tremor. On examination, the patient had jaw and hand tremors but he also exhibited gynecomastia, progressive bulbar paresis, and wasting and weakness primarily in the proximal limb muscles. The laboratory tests revealed an elevated creatine phosphokinase. Genetic testing was positive for X-SBMA, with 42 CAG repeats. DISCUSSION: Essential tremor is one of the most common movement disorders, yet it is important for clinicians to be aware of the presence of other distinguishing features that point to alternative diagnoses. The presence of action tremor associated with muscle atrophy and gynecomastia should lead to a suspicion of SBMA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141106
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7916/D8959FVJ

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[PMID]: 25374953
[Au] Autor:Chan RC; Chan JY
[Ad] Address:Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong.
[Ti] Title:Deltopectoral flap in the era of microsurgery.
[So] Source:Surg Res Pract;2014:420892, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2356-7759
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background. Our study aimed to review the role of deltopectoral (DP) flap as a reconstructive option for defects in the head and neck region in the microvascular era. Methods. All patients who received DP flap reconstruction surgery at the Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, between 1999 and 2011 were recruited. Demographic data, indications for surgery, defect for reconstruction, and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results. Fifty-four patients were included. All but two patients were operated for reconstruction after tumour resection. The remaining two patients were operated for necrotizing fasciitis and osteoradionecrosis. The majority of DP flaps were used to cover neck skin defect (63.0%). Other reconstructed defects included posterior pharyngeal wall (22.2%), facial skin defect (11.1%), and tracheal wall (3.7%). All donor sites were covered with partial thickness skin graft. Two patients developed partial flap necrosis at the tip and were managed conservatively. The overall flap survival rate was 96.3%. Conclusions. Albeit the technical advancements in microvascular surgery, DP still possesses multiple advantages (technical simplicity, reliable axial blood supply, large size, thinness, and pliability) which allows it to remain as a useful, reliable, and versatile surgical option for head and neck reconstruction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141106
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/420892

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[PMID]: 25374947
[Au] Autor:Chan RC; Chan YW
[Ad] Address:Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong.
[Ti] Title:PET/CT Is Complementary to Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology in Assessment of Irradiated Neck in Head and Neck Cancers.
[So] Source:Surg Res Pract;2014:191267, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2356-7759
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background. Accurate assessment of irradiated neck in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is essential. Fine-needle aspiration cytology is often performed for suspicious lesions but it is limited by its low negative predictive value (NPV). We postulated that F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) can overcome this limitation by its high NPV value and allow for a more accurate assessment of irradiated neck in HNSCC. Methods. Fifty-four HNSCC patients were included for the study. They all received previous irradiation to the neck. Clinical characteristics, details of radiotherapy, PET/CT results, follow-up findings, and final histological diagnosis were analyzed. Results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and NPV were 95.8%, 96.7%, 95.8%, and 96.7%, respectively. Age, sex, radiation dose, interval between PET/CT and radiotherapy completion, nature of radiotherapy, and use of second course of radiotherapy were not found to affect diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT. A new algorithm for investigation of masses in irradiated neck is proposed. Conclusions. PET/CT is an effective diagnostic tool and has a complementary role to FNAC in the management of irradiated neck in head and neck cancers, particularly in cases where suspicious lesions were identified but FNAC showed negative results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141106
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/191267

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[PMID]: 25372518
[Au] Autor:Takakura A; Stewart PJ; Johnson RN; Cunningham ET
[Ad] Address:*Department of Ophthalmology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California; †West Coast Retina Medical Group, San Francisco, California; and ‡Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
[Ti] Title:Purtscher-like retinopathy after prostate surgery.
[So] Source:Retin Cases Brief Rep;8(4):245-6, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1937-1578
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To describe a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy after uncomplicated radical prostatectomy. METHODS: Observational case report. RESULTS: Purtscher retinopathy is named after the Austrian ophthalmologist Othmar Purtscher (1852-1927) who first fully described the syndrome of "traumatic retinal angiopathy" in 1912 as patches of retinal whitening, retinal hemorrhages, and disk edema after compression injury to the head. Since that time, similar findings, often called Purtscher-like retinopathy, have been described in association with a number of conditions, including, among others, acute pancreatitis, chest compression injury, childbirth, and fat embolism syndrome, after long-bone fracture or surgery. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of Purtscher-like changes after nonorthopedic surgery seems, however, to be rare. The authors describe a single case of Purtscher-like retinopathy after uncomplicated radical prostatectomy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICB.0000000000000111

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[PMID]: 25372322
[Au] Autor:Dai Y; Jonas JB; Ling Z; Sun X
[Ad] Address:*Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, Eye & ENT Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; †Department of Ophthalmology, Medical Faculty Mannheim of the Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg, Germany; and ‡State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Institutes of Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Temporal inferior vein submerging into intrachoroidal cavitation and gamma zone.
[So] Source:Retin Cases Brief Rep;8(2):110-2, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1937-1578
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To describe the appearance of the temporal inferior vein submerging into the parapapillary region with characteristics of parapapillary gamma zone and parapapillary beta zone. METHODS: Ophthalmoscopy in a 28-year-old man showed a sagittally rotated optic nerve head with marked temporal inferior parapapillary atrophy, in which the temporal inferior vein appeared to partially disappear. RESULTS: Serial optical coherence tomography images showed from inferior to superior, an intrachoroidal cavitation covered by intact Bruch membrane with retinal pigment epithelium (fulfilling the criteria of parapapillary beta zone). The intrachoroidal cavitation continued into an area with opened Bruch membrane (fulfilling the definition of parapapillary gamma zone) and a lamellar defect of the deep scleral layer. The lamellar defect became perforated leading to an apparent herniation of the retinal tissue into the almost extraocular space. From this herniation site, the inferior temporal vessel trunk submerged into an intrascleral or extrascleral pathway in the direction to the optic disk while the defect in the deep scleral layer was closed. Finally, more superior, the intrachoroidal cavitation decreased in volume and extent while Bruch membrane was absent (gamma zone). CONCLUSION: This report describes an unusual course of the inferior temporal vessel trunk and an associated unusual anatomy of the parapapillary region with beta zone and gamma zone, and an additional defect in the deep scleral layer allowing the exit of the temporal inferior vessel trunk into the extrascleral space. The illustration may also show the usefulness of the differentiation between beta zone and gamma zone in the parapapillary region.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICB.0000000000000016

  6 / 336325 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25372210
[Au] Autor:Pakzad-Vaezi KL; Maberley DA
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Infantile refsum disease in a young adult: case presentation and brief review.
[So] Source:Retin Cases Brief Rep;8(1):56-9, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1937-1578
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To review and describe findings, pathophysiology, and management of infantile Refsum disease in a young adult, and to compare with those of classic Refsum Disease. METHODS: Retrospective chart and digital photography review. RESULTS: A 25-year-old woman with a diagnosis of infantile Refsum disease presented with progressively decreasing vision. Findings included a noncorpuscular pigmentary degeneration of both fundi, optic nerve head drusen, attenuated retinal vasculature, cataract, myopia, and esotropia. She was treated with a low phytanic acid diet, resulting in improved metabolic values on laboratory testing. CONCLUSION: Infantile Refsum disease has clinical features and a pathophysiology distinct from classic Refsum disease, despite occasionally presenting for examination later in life. Ophthalmic and systemic distinctions between the two are important to consider for the ophthalmologist, who may be involved in the initial diagnosis of the patient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICB.0000000000000004

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[PMID]: 25372208
[Au] Autor:Ch'ng SW; Brent A; Banerjee S
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Cytomegalovirus retinitis: an unusual presentation as vitreous hemorrhage.
[So] Source:Retin Cases Brief Rep;8(1):50-1, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1937-1578
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The purpose of this report is to describe an unusual presentation of vitreous hemorrhage (VH) in a patient with an immunosuppressive condition. METHODS: Retrospective case report. RESULTS: A 72-year-old woman with known T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia treated with a course of alemtuzumab presented to our department with a VH in her left eye after a fall. An initial diagnosis of hemorrhagic posterior vitreous detachment was made. However, as the VH was resolving, she was found to have underlying vitritis, occlusive vasculitis, and a pale optic nerve head. Vitreous biopsy confirmed cytomegalovirus retinitis. Despite treatment with intravenous foscarnet and oral valganciclovir, her vision continued to remain poor because of the severe damage from the retinal vasculitis and residual VH. CONCLUSION: As indications for immunosuppression increase, the incidence of cytomegalovirus retinitis in non-HIV-immunosuppressed patients is expected to rise. Therefore, in this subgroup of patients, we should be aware of any underlying retinitis especially in cases with an unusual presentation of VH.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICB.0000000000000002

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[PMID]: 25374643
[Au] Autor:Atarraf K; Arroud M; Chater L; Afifi MA
[Ad] Address:Service de Traumatologie Orthopédie Pédiatrique, CHU Hassan II, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Université sidi Mohammed ben Abdullah, Fès, Maroc....
[Ti] Title:Les fractures de la tête radiale chez l'enfant: à propos de 66 cas. [Fractures of the radial head in children: about 66 cases].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;17:138, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2014.17.138.3775

  9 / 336325 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25372486
[Au] Autor:Kacik M; Oliván-Viguera A; Köhler R
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg & Medical Center I, Clemenshospital/University Hospital of University Münster, 48153 Münster, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Modulation of KCa3.1 Channels by Eicosanoids, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Molecular Determinants.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(11):e112081, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cytochrome P450- and ω-hydrolase products (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), hydroxyeicosatetraeonic acid (20-HETE)), natural omega-3 fatty acids (ω3), and pentacyclic triterpenes have been proposed to contribute to a wide range of vaso-protective and anti-fibrotic/anti-cancer signaling pathways including the modula-tion of membrane ion channels. Here we studied the modulation of intermediate-conductance Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated K+ channels (KCa3.1) by EETs, 20-HETE, ω3, and pentacyclic triterpenes and the structural requirements of these fatty acids to exert channel blockade. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied modulation of cloned human hKCa3.1 and the mutant hKCa3.1V275A in HEK-293 cells, of rKCa3.1 in aortic endothelial cells, and of mKCa3.1 in 3T3-fibroblasts by inside-out and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments, respectively. In inside-out patches, Ca2+-activated hKCa3.1 were inhibited by the ω3, DHA and α-LA, and the ω6, AA, in the lower µmolar range and with similar potencies. 5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 5,6-DiHETE, and saturated arachidic acid, had no appreciable effects. In contrast, 14,15-EET, its stable derivative, 14,15-EEZE, and 20-HETE produced channel inhibition. 11,12-EET displayed less inhibitory activity. The KCa3.1V275A mutant channel was insensitive to any of the blocking EETs. Non-blocking 5,6-EET antagonized the inhibition caused by AA and augmented cloned hKCa3.1 and rKCa3.1 whole-cell currents. Pentacyclic triterpenes did not modulate KCa3.1 currents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Inhibition of KCa3.1 by EETs (14,15-EET), 20-HETE, and ω3 critically depended on the presence of electron double bonds and hydrophobicity within the 10 carbons preceding the carboxyl-head of the molecules. From the physiological perspective, metabolism of AA to non-blocking 5,6,- and 8,9-EET may cause AA-de-blockade and contribute to cellular signal transduction processes influenced by these fatty acids.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0112081

  10 / 336325 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25372405
[Au] Autor:Harper NS; Scott BH; Semple MN; McAlpine D
[Ad] Address:UCL Ear Institute, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience, University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States of America....
[Ti] Title:The neural code for auditory space depends on sound frequency and head size in an optimal manner.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(11):e108154, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A major cue to the location of a sound source is the interaural time difference (ITD)-the difference in sound arrival time at the two ears. The neural representation of this auditory cue is unresolved. The classic model of ITD coding, dominant for a half-century, posits that the distribution of best ITDs (the ITD evoking a neuron's maximal response) is unimodal and largely within the range of ITDs permitted by head-size. This is often interpreted as a place code for source location. An alternative model, based on neurophysiology in small mammals, posits a bimodal distribution of best ITDs with exquisite sensitivity to ITDs generated by means of relative firing rates between the distributions. Recently, an optimal-coding model was proposed, unifying the disparate features of these two models under the framework of efficient coding by neural populations. The optimal-coding model predicts that distributions of best ITDs depend on head size and sound frequency: for high frequencies and large heads it resembles the classic model, for low frequencies and small head sizes it resembles the bimodal model. The optimal-coding model makes key, yet unobserved, predictions: for many species, including humans, both forms of neural representation are employed, depending on sound frequency. Furthermore, novel representations are predicted for intermediate frequencies. Here, we examine these predictions in neurophysiological data from five mammalian species: macaque, guinea pig, cat, gerbil and kangaroo rat. We present the first evidence supporting these untested predictions, and demonstrate that different representations appear to be employed at different sound frequencies in the same species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0108154


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