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[PMID]: 24131747
[Au] Autor:Donaldson D; Matas Riera M; Holloway A; Beltran E; Barnett KC
[Ad] Address:Unit of Comparative Ophthalmology, Animal Health Trust, Newmarket, UK.
[Ti] Title:Contralateral optic neuropathy and retinopathy associated with visual and afferent pupillomotor dysfunction following enucleation in six cats.
[So] Source:Vet Ophthalmol;17(5):373-84, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1463-5224
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To investigate contralateral optic neuropathy and retinopathy following enucleation in 6 cats. METHODS: Retrospective study. The medical records of cats with contralateral visual and afferent pupillomotor dysfunction following enucleation presented to the Animal Health Trust (AHT), Newmarket, UK, between January 1994 and January 2010 were reviewed. Information recorded included history, signalment, ophthalmic findings, electroretinography (ERG) (2/6) and MRI (3/6) findings and long-term outcome. Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare breed proportions (P < 0.05). RESULTS: Six cats aged 1.5 to 11 (median 5.5) years presented with mydriasis and/or visual deficits noted immediately following enucleation. Enucleation involved optic nerve (ON) ligation in all of the four cases for which this information was available. Ophthalmic findings included mydriasis with absent pupillary light reflex (PLR) (4/6), incomplete PLRs (2/6), absence of dazzle reflex (4/6) and absence of menace response (4/6). Funduscopy initially revealed multifocal peripapillary retinal lesions, with subsequent progressive optic nerve head (ONH) and retinal atrophy. ERG recordings revealed normal outer retinal function at 6 and 22 weeks (2/2). On MRI, the optic chiasm (OC) ipsilateral to the enucleation could not be identified and the contralateral OC was atrophied (3/3). CONCLUSIONS: The acute afferent ON deficits following enucleation, progressive ONH atrophy, normal outer retinal function and MRI demonstrating OC pathology are consistent with chiasmal injury due to traction on the ON during enucleation. Rostral traction on the globe to facilitate ON ligation is contraindicated in cats.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/vop.12104

  2 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25194198
[Au] Autor:Skow RJ; Tymko MM; MacKay CM; Steinback CD; Day TA
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Biology, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada....
[Ti] Title:The effects of head-up and head-down tilt on central respiratory chemoreflex loop gain tested by hyperoxic rebreathing.
[So] Source:Prog Brain Res;212:149-72, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1875-7855
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Central respiratory chemosensitivity is mediated via chemoreceptor neurons located throughout brain stem tissue. These receptors detect proximal CO2/[H(+)] (i.e., controller gain) and modulate breathing in a classic negative feedback loop. Loop gain (responsiveness) is the theoretical product of controller (chemoreceptors), mixing/feedback (cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems), and plant (pulmonary system) gains. The level of chemoreceptor stimulation is determined by interactions between mixing and plant gains. The extent to which steady-state changes in body position may affect central chemoreflex loop gain in response to CO2 is unclear. Because of the potential effects of tilt on pulmonary mechanics, we hypothesized that plant gain would be altered by head-up and head-down tilt (HUT, HDT) during hyperoxic rebreathing, which theoretically isolates plant gain by eliminating systemic arterial-tissue gradients. Sixteen subjects (eight females) underwent hyperoxic rebreathing tests on a tilt table to quantify central chemoreflex loop gain in five steady-state positions: 90° HUT, 45° HUT, supine, 45° HDT, and 90° HDT. Respiratory responses (tidal volume, VT; frequency, fR; minute ventilation, VE) were quantified during steady-state and increases in CO2 during rebreathing by linear regression above the ventilatory recruitment threshold (VRT). Using one-factor analysis of variance, we found that there were no differences in the respiratory responses between the five positions (VRT, P=0.711; VT, P=0.290; fR, P=0.748; VE, P=0.325). Our findings suggest that during steady-state orthostatic stress, the ability of subjects to mount a normal ventilatory response to increased CO2 was unaffected, despite any potential changes in pulmonary mechanics associated with positional challenges.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24907405
[Au] Autor:Sawada A; Niiyama Y; Ataka K; Nagaishi K; Yamakage M; Fujimiya M
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Sapporo Medical University, School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Suppression of bone marrow-derived microglia in the amygdala improves anxiety-like behavior induced by chronic partial sciatic nerve ligation in mice.
[So] Source:Pain;155(9):1762-72, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6623
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chronic neuropathic pain causes abnormal sensitivities such as hyperalgesia and allodynia, and emotional abnormalities such as anxiety and depression. Although spinal cord microglia are involved in abnormal sensitivity to neuropathic pain, no previous studies have examined the mechanism of neuropathic pain-induced anxiety. Here, we examined the involvement of bone marrow (BM)-derived microglia aggregated in the amygdalae of mice with chronic neuropathic pain in the development of anxiety-like behavior. We prepared partial sciatic nerve ligations (PSNL) in mice that received bone marrow transplantation from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Tg mice after irradiation with head protection, and examined GFP-positive microglia in the central nuclei of the amygdalae (CeA). On day 28 after PSNL, BM-derived microglia aggregated in the CeA concurrent with anxiety-like behavior. BM-derived microglia in the CeA highly expressed interleukin (IL)-1ß and C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2). In addition, neurons in the CeA highly expressed monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), a ligand for CCR2, in PSNL-treated mice compared to sham-operated mice, suggesting that the MCP-1/CCR2 axis is involved in the recruitment of BM-derived microglia. Oral administration of a CCR2 antagonist decreased the number of BM-derived microglia in the CeA, and successfully reversed the anxiety-like behavior and hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in PSNL-treated mice. Microinjections of an IL-1ß receptor antagonist directly into the CeA successfully reversed the anxiety-like behavior in the PSNL-treated mice even though the neuropathic pain persisted. These results suggest that the recruitment of BM-derived microglia to the CeA via the MCP-1/CCR2 axis and neuron-microglia interactions might be important in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain-induced anxiety.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25196404
[Au] Autor:Robinson LE; Webster EK; Whitt-Glover MC; Ceaser TG; Alhassan S
[Ad] Address:School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of pre-school- and school-based interventions to impact weight-related behaviours in African American children and youth: a literature review.
[So] Source:Obes Rev;15 Suppl 4:5-25, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1467-789X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This review assessed the effectiveness of pre-school- and school-based obesity prevention and/or treatment interventions targeting healthy eating, physical activity or obesity in African American children and adolescents. Systematic searches were conducted for English-printed research articles published between January 1980 and March 2013. Retained articles included experimental studies conducted in the United States that targeted ≥80% African American/black children and adolescents and/or studies whose results were stratified by race/ethnicity, and that were conducted in pre-schools/head start or schools (excluding after-school programmes). Of the 12,270 articles identified, 17 met the inclusion criteria (pre-school, n = 2; elementary school, n = 7; middle and secondary schools, n = 8). Thirteen studies found significant improvements in nutrition (pre-school, n = 1; elementary, n = 7; secondary, n = 5) and three found significant improvements in physical activity (pre-school, n = 1; elementary, n = 2) variables of interest. Two studies (pre-school, n = 1; secondary, n = 1) reported significant reductions in obesity in African American children. The evidence available suggests school-based interventions are effective in promoting healthy nutrition behaviours in African American children. Conclusions overall and, particularly, about effects on physical activity and obesity are limited due to the small number of studies, differences in assessment approaches and a lack of follow-up assessments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/obr.12208

  5 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25195964
[Au] Autor:Takashima S; Wato M; Inaba T; Mizukawa S; Izumikawa K; Ishikawa S; Miyoshi M; Kawai K
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Kagawa Prefectural Central Hospital.
[Ti] Title:A case of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm that enlarged during pregnancy and was resected after childbirth.
[So] Source:Nihon Shokakibyo Gakkai Zasshi;111(9):1789-97, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0446-6586
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 28-year-old pregnant woman presented with an abdominal mass at 12 weeks' gestation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 7 cm cystic lesion arising extrinsically from the pancreatic head, which was diagnosed as a mucinous cystic neoplasm. Although we recommended surgical excision during the second trimester, the patient refused the procedure and chose to continue her pregnancy. We monitored the lesion and noted that it gradually grew to 13 cm over the course of the pregnancy. Subsequently, we enucleated it after childbirth. Histopathological examination was compatible with high-grade dysplasia and confirmed the diagnosis of mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25196610
[Au] Autor:Tavanti F; Coppola V; Romano A; Beccia M; Giuliani G; Pierallini A; Bozzao A
[Ad] Address:NESMOS, Neuroradiology Department, S.Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University; Rome, Italy - e-mail:valeria.coppola.doc@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Diffuse axonal injury with selective involvement of the corticospinal tract. A diffusion tensor imaging case study.
[So] Source:Neuroradiol J;27(4):397-9, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1971-4009
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The identification of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) can be difficult, especially using conventional imaging (CT or MRI), which usually appears normal. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is useful in identifying white matter abnormalities in patients with DAI. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female with severe closed head injury and right-side hemiparesis, studied with DTI and MR-tractography. In this case, DTI was useful to detect focal and diffuse signs of DAI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.15274/NRJ-2014-10070

  7 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25196608
[Au] Autor:Choudhri AF; Chin EM; Klimo P; Boop FA
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Memphis, TN, USA - Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital; Memphis, TN, USA - achoudhri@uthsc.edu....
[Ti] Title:Spatial distortion due to field inhomogeneity in 3.0 tesla intraoperative MRI.
[So] Source:Neuroradiol J;27(4):387-92, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1971-4009
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We describe a 14-year-old boy with a pilocytic astrocytoma of the left caudate head. Preoperative localization MR imaging (MRI) was performed in the operating room, and spatial distortion was noted felt to be related to head positioning relative to the isocenter of the magnetic field. The distortion artifact was subtle enough to be difficult to detect, but large enough to change the location of the lesion potentially leading to a non-diagnostic stereotactic biopsy. Repeat imaging after changing the head position to allow scanning closer to the isocenter of the magnetic field showed decreased distortion, an improvement greater than that using the manufacturer's distortion correction algorithm on the initial images. Intraoperative MRI, and its requisite limitations in positioning, requires vigilance to detect possible distortion that could alter surgical outcomes if not identified and corrected prospectively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.15274/NRJ-2014-10081

  8 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24279479
[Au] Autor:Boccardi M; Bocchetta M; Apostolova LG; Preboske G; Robitaille N; Pasqualetti P; Collins LD; Duchesne S; Jack CR; Frisoni GB
[Ad] Address:LENITEM (Laboratory of Epidemiology, Neuroimaging and Telemedicine) IRCCS - S. Giovanni di Dio - Fatebenefratelli Brescia, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Establishing Magnetic Resonance Images Orientation for the EADC-ADNI Manual Hippocampal Segmentation Protocol.
[So] Source:J Neuroimaging;24(5):509-14, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: An effort to define and validate a Harmonized Protocol for standard hippocampal segmentation is being carried out. We wished to estimate the effect of magnetic resonance image (MRI) spatial orientation on manual hippocampal segmentations to define optimal standard orientation of MRIs for hippocampal volumetry. METHODS: Three expert tracers segmented twice the hippocampi of 10 ADNI subjects on MRI slices oriented perpendicular to the anterior-posterior commissure (AC-PC) line and the long hippocampal axes plane, following internationally harmonized landmarks. We computed intra and interrater reliability figures for total volumes and similarity coefficients. RESULTS: Total volume reliability was similar for both orientations. Similarity coefficients were significantly higher for the AC-PC orientation (exact P = 0.002). DISCUSSION: These data show that AC-PC orientation is slightly more reliable for manual segmentations, possibly due to better visualization of the cerebrospinal fluid spaces separating hippocampal head and amygdala. A Delphi panel of experts has used these data to decide on the optimal orientation for a Harmonized Protocol for hippocampal segmentation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jon.12065

  9 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24251954
[Au] Autor:Orman G; Tekes A; Poretti A; Robertson C; Huisman TA
[Ad] Address:Section of Pediatric Neuroradiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
[Ti] Title:Posttraumatic Carotid Artery Dissection in Children: Not to be missed!
[So] Source:J Neuroimaging;24(5):467-72, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Post-traumatic carotid artery dissection (PTCAD) may result in acute arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). Pediatric PTCAD is rarely diagnosed prior to onset of neurological symptoms. We report on neuroimaging findings in a series of children with PTCAD. METHODS: Five children with head or neck trauma were included in this study. Clinical histories were reviewed for mechanism of trauma, symptoms, complications, therapy, and outcome. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT/MR angiography (CTA, MRA) studies were retrospectively evaluated for signs and complications of PTCAD and presence and extent of skull base fractures. RESULTS: PTCAD was located at the level of the skull base in all children and was associated with a skull base fracture in two. The diagnosis was made in five children by combined MRI/MRA and in two by CTA. Air in the carotid canal suggested skull base injury with PTCAD in two children. PTCAD was complicated by AIS in three children. CONCLUSION: PTCAD may result from neck and head trauma. To avoid secondary AIS, radiologists should be familiar with neuroimaging findings in children, especially as acute PTCAD may initially be clinically silent. Consequently, pediatric neuroradiologists should actively exclude PTCAD in children with head and neck trauma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jon.12071

  10 / 333217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24251759
[Au] Autor:Lee BH; Hwang YJ; Choi CY
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Goyang, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Serial CT Findings of a Rapidly Calcified Epidural Hematoma in a Young Adult: A Case Report.
[So] Source:J Neuroimaging;24(5):531-2, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report serial computed tomography (CT) findings in a rare case of a rapidly calcified epidural hematoma. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital after being involved in a motor vehicle accident. An initial cranial CT revealed a right frontal bone fracture. She complained of right frontal headache, but showed no neurological deficit or tendency for bleeding. Therefore, she was treated conservatively without surgical intervention. Follow-up CT revealed an ossified epidural hematoma (EDH) 17 days after the head injury, and the ossification later thickened. However, a decrease in the width of the EDH was observed during the 9 months of follow-up during which serial CT images were acquired. The EDH resolved 9 months after the initial trauma, but the calcification layer remained thickened.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jon.12060


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