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[PMID]: 24062087
[Au] Autor:Aryal B; Komokata T; Kadono J; Motodaka H; Shimamoto Y; Kitazono I; Nakazono T; Motoi S; Furoi A; Imoto Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiovascular and Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima, 890-8520, Japan, drbibekaryal@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Middle-preserving pancreatectomy with reversed pancreaticogastrostomy: report of a case.
[So] Source:Surg Today;44(8):1584-7, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1436-2813
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Parenchyma-sparing pancreatic resections have been reported increasingly in recent years; however, for multifocal diseases involving the head and the tail of the pancreas, total pancreatectomy is still the preferred procedure. The possible consequence of this procedure is loss of normal pancreatic parenchyma, resulting in insufficiency of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine functions. Various types of limited resection have been introduced for isolated or multiple pancreatic lesions, depending on the location of the tumor. Even for multifocal diseases, if the pancreatic body is spared, a middle-preserving pancreatectomy (MPP) can be performed to assure maximal pancreatic function and uncompromised quality of life. Yet, few papers have introduced the feasibility of MPP for a better outcome. This report describes a new surgical technique for MPP using an alternative approach for the remnant pancreas anastomosis. We used this technique successfully to remove a bifocal neoplasm: adenocarcinoma of the distal bile duct and mucinous cyst adenoma in the tail of the pancreas.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00595-013-0692-4

  2 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024890
[Au] Autor:Azab WA; Shohoud SA; Alsheikh TM; Nasim K
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Ibn Sina Hospital, Kuwait City, PO Box 25427, Safat 13115, Kuwait....
[Ti] Title:John Edwin Scarff (1898-1978) and endoscopic choroid plexus coagulation: A historical vignette.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:90, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:John Edwin Scarff (1898-1978) was one of the pioneers of neuroendoscopy and the head of the Department of Neurological Surgery at Columbia University in New York from 1947 to 1949. In this article, we highlight the pioneering and longstanding efforts of John E. Scarff in support of endoscopic choroid plexus coagulation. These efforts represent an important part of the rich history of neuroendoscopy and a legacy to which the current procedure owes a great credit.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134106

  3 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024887
[Au] Autor:Plog BA; Pierre CA; Srinivasan V; Srinivasan K; Petraglia AL; Huang JH
[Ad] Address:University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642, USA....
[Ti] Title:Neurologic injury in snowmobiling.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:87, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Snowmobiles are increasingly popular recreational, all-terrain utility vehicles that require skill and physical strength to operate given their inherent maneuverability, acceleration, and top speed capabilities. These same characteristics increase the risk of injury with the operation of these vehicles, particularly neurological injury. We characterize our series of 107 patients involved in snowmobiling accidents. METHODS: From January 2004 to January 2012, all snowmobiling-related injuries referred to our regional trauma center were reviewed. Information had been recorded in the hospital's trauma registry and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for data pertaining to the injuries, with particular emphasis on neurological injuries and any associated details. RESULTS: A total of 107 patients were identified. Ninety percent of injured riders were male. The mean age was 34.4 years (range 10-70), with 7% younger than age 16. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 ± 0.69 (range 1-34). Although not documented in all patients, alcohol use was found in 7.5% of the patients and drug use found in one patient. Documentation of helmet use was available for only 31 of the patients; of which 13% were not helmeted. Causes included being thrown, flipped, or roll-over (33%), striking a stationary object (27%), being struck by a snowmobile (9%), striking another snowmobile (5.5%) or a car, train, or truck (5.5%), being injured by the machine itself (9%), other (2%) or unspecified (18%). Head injuries occurred in 35% patients, including concussion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, contusion, and facial/skull fracture. Spinal fractures occurred in 21% of the patients. Fractures to the thoracic spine were the most common (50%), followed by the cervical (41%) and lumbar (36%) spine. There were also three brachial plexus injuries, one tibial nerve injury, and one internal carotid artery dissection. Average length of stay was 4.98 ± 0.56 days. Disposition was home (78%), home with services (12%), rehabilitation placement (9%), and one death. Details regarding other systemic injuries will also be reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: Snowmobiles are a significant source of multi-trauma, particularly neurological injury. Neurosurgeons can play key roles in advocating for neurological safety in snowmobiling.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134074

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[PMID]: 25024898
[Au] Autor:Hayashi Y; Kita D; Furuta T; Oishi M; Hamada J
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, 13-1, Takara machi, Kanazawa, 920-8641, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic removal of subgaleal hematoma in a 7-year-old patient treated with anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:98, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Subgaleal hematomas frequently occur in children after head trauma and extend over the cranial sutures. Although conservative treatment suffices in most cases, surgical removal of a subgaleal hematoma is indicated when the patient presents with anemia and headache associated with its progressive enlargement. CASE DESCRIPTION: We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who was medicated with warfarin and aspirin due to a hypoplastic left ventricle and fell from a rock wherein he hit his head in the frontal region. Although a computed tomography scan of the head revealed no intracranial lesion, an extracranial hematoma was found to extend over the cranial sutures, leading to the diagnosis of subgaleal hematoma. The hematoma continued to grow gradually despite the cessation of warfarin and aspirin therapy immediately after the head trauma. Since the patient's headache and anemia were progressing as the hematoma enlarged, removal of the hematoma was performed 3 days after admission. Endoscopic hematoma removal was planned to enable accurate coagulation of the sites of bleeding and removal of the maximal amount of hematoma through minimal incision. The hematoma was completely removed, and the patient's postoperative course was excellent with alleviation of both the anemia and the headache. No sign of hematoma recurrence could be detected during 2 years follow-up. CONCLUSION: An angled endoscope can allow visualization of the deep subgaleal space, and this technique enabled direct visualization of the bleeding sites and accurate coagulation to prevent recurrence of hematoma. Endoscopic techniques, such as minimally invasive techniques, can allow sufficient removal of subgaleal hematoma with minimal morbidity, especially in patients such as ours.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134911

  5 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024891
[Au] Autor:Duenas M; Whyte G; Jandial R
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, City of Hope Cancer Center, Beckmann Research Institute, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010, USA.
[Ti] Title:Sideline concussion testing in high school football on Guam.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:91, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The risks of repeat concussions and returning to play (RTP) prior to the resolution of concussive symptoms are medically established. However, RTP guidelines for high school sports are varied and often notably absent. The island of Guam, a US territory, has a robust athletics program but lacks structure to reduce concussions or establish RTP protocols. Consequently, there is an opportunity to limit the incidence of "second-hit syndrome" and other harmful effects through education and testing. METHODS: We evaluated the feasibility of Sideline Concussion Testing SCT) as a novel feature of Guam high school athletics. Thirteen high school football players were observed over three consecutive football games. They were first given a questionnaire about concussion history, symptoms, medical evaluation, and RTP. Researchers used the King-Devick Test, a SCT tool, and baseline scores were recorded. If players were then observed to have significant head trauma or to show concussive symptoms, they were sidelined and tested. RESULTS: Five of 13 students had a previous concussion and limited awareness of RTP guidelines. Of those five, four received no medical consultation or stand down period before RTP. There was also a lack of understanding of what constitutes a concussion; five out of eight individuals who denied previous concussion confirmed having bell ringers, seeing stars, and other classic concussive symptoms. Over the course of the study the SCT identified three concussions, with significant deviations from baseline time on a test that measured visual and speech disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: The feasibility of SCT use in Guam high school football was established and our pilot study identified areas for improvement. Established definitions of concussion and RTP guidelines were lacking. Therefore, an opportunity exists through public health efforts that involve the entire community to increase concussion awareness and reduce injuries in high school sports on Guam.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134364

  6 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24925088
[Au] Autor:Koubuchi S; Takakura T; Nakamura M; Mizowaki T; Nakata M; Hiraoka M
[Ad] Address:Division of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Accuracy of positional correction for the floor-mounted kV X-ray IGRT system in angled couch positions.
[So] Source:Radiol Phys Technol;7(2):373-8, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1865-0341
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Stereotactic irradiation (STI) requires high geometric accuracy. We evaluated the positional correction accuracy after treatment couch rotation for non-coplanar STI with a frameless mask. A steel ball was embedded as a virtual target in a head phantom with a human cranial bone structure, and the head phantom was placed in the isocenter of the treatment-planning system with the image-guide system. The Winston-Lutz test at treatment couch angles of ±90°, ±45°, and 0° was performed, and the amount of displacement from the center position at the treatment couch angle of 0° was calculated. After treatment couch rotation through each treatment couch angle, the amount of center displacement was compared between cases with and without a positional correction by the image-guide system, and then the accuracy of the positional correction after treatment couch rotation was examined. The maximum amount of three-dimensional displacement without and with positional correction after treatment couch rotation was 0.52 mm at a treatment couch angle of -90° and 0.49 mm at a treatment couch angle of -45°. These results indicate that the image-guide system provides accuracy within about 0.50 mm regardless of the positional correction even after rotation of the treatment couch.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12194-014-0275-0

  7 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24796955
[Au] Autor:Tomiyama Y; Araki F; Oono T; Hioki K
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto, Japan, y.tomiyama.k.u@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Three-dimensional gamma analysis of dose distributions in individual structures for IMRT dose verification.
[So] Source:Radiol Phys Technol;7(2):303-9, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1865-0341
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Our purpose in this study was to implement three-dimensional (3D) gamma analysis for structures of interest such as the planning target volume (PTV) or clinical target volume (CTV), and organs at risk (OARs) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose verification. IMRT dose distributions for prostate and head and neck (HN) cancer patients were calculated with an analytical anisotropic algorithm in an Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) treatment planning system (TPS) and by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The MC dose distributions were calculated with EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc user codes under conditions identical to those for the TPS. The prescribed doses were 76 Gy/38 fractions with five-field IMRT for the prostate and 33 Gy/17 fractions with seven-field IMRT for the HN. TPS dose distributions were verified by the gamma passing rates for the whole calculated volume, PTV or CTV, and OARs by use of 3D gamma analysis with reference to MC dose distributions. The acceptance criteria for the 3D gamma analysis were 3/3 and 2 %/2 mm for a dose difference and a distance to agreement. The gamma passing rates in PTV and OARs for the prostate IMRT plan were close to 100 %. For the HN IMRT plan, the passing rates of 2 %/2 mm in CTV and OARs were substantially lower because inhomogeneous tissues such as bone and air in the HN are included in the calculation area. 3D gamma analysis for individual structures is useful for IMRT dose verification.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12194-014-0266-1

  8 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019438
[Au] Autor:Murphey MD; Foreman KL; Klassen-Fischer MK; Fox MG; Chung EM; Kransdorf MJ
[Ad] Address:From the Departments of Musculoskeletal Imaging (M.D.M., K.L.F., E.M.C.) and Pediatric Imaging (E.M.C.), American Institute for Radiologic Pathology, 1010 Wayne Ave, Suite 320, Silver Spring, MD 20910; Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Md (M.D.M., E.M.C.); Department of Radiology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Md (M.D.M., K.L.F., E.M.C.); Joint Pathology Center, Silver Spring, Md (M.K.K.F.); Department of Radiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va (M.G.F.); and Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz (M.J.K.).
[Ti] Title:From the radiologic pathology archives imaging of osteonecrosis: radiologic-pathologic correlation.
[So] Source:Radiographics;34(4):1003-28, 2014 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1527-1323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Osteonecrosis is common and represents loss of blood supply to a region of bone. Common sites affected include the femoral head, humeral head, knee, femoral/tibial metadiaphysis, scaphoid, lunate, and talus. Symptomatic femoral head osteonecrosis accounts for 10,000-20,000 new cases annually in the United States. In contradistinction, metadiaphyseal osteonecrosis is often occult and asymptomatic. There are numerous causes of osteonecrosis most commonly related to trauma, corticosteroids, and idiopathic. Imaging of osteonecrosis is frequently diagnostic with a serpentine rim of sclerosis on radiographs, photopenia in early disease at bone scintigraphy, and maintained yellow marrow at MR imaging with a serpentine rim of high signal intensity (double-line sign) on images obtained with long repetition time sequences. These radiologic features correspond to the underlying pathology of osseous response to wall off the osteonecrotic process and attempts at repair with vascularized granulation tissue at the reactive interface. The long-term clinical importance of epiphyseal osteonecrosis is almost exclusively based on the likelihood of overlying articular collapse. MR imaging is generally considered the most sensitive and specific imaging modality both for early diagnosis and identifying features that increase the possibility of this complication. Treatment subsequent to articular collapse and development of secondary osteoarthritis typically requires reconstructive surgery. Malignant transformation of osteonecrosis is rare and almost exclusively associated with metadiaphyseal lesions. Imaging features of this dire sequela include aggressive bone destruction about the lesion margin, cortical involvement, and an associated soft-tissue mass. Recognizing the appearance of osteonecrosis, which reflects the underlying pathology, improves radiologic assessment and is important to guide optimal patient management. ©RSNA, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1148/rg.344140019

  9 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019640
[Au] Autor:Seiwert TY; Wang X; Heitmann J; Villegas-Bergazzi V; Sprott K; Finn S; O'Regan E; Farrow AD; Weichselbaum RR; Lingen MW; Cohen EE; Stenson K; Weaver DT; Vokes EE
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America; The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America....
[Ti] Title:DNA Repair Biomarkers XPF and Phospho-MAPKAP Kinase 2 Correlate with Clinical Outcome in Advanced Head and Neck Cancer.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(7):e102112, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Induction chemotherapy is a common therapeutic option for patients with locoregionally-advanced head and neck cancer (HNC), but it remains unclear which patients will benefit. In this study, we searched for biomarkers predicting the response of patients with locoregionally-advanced HNC to induction chemotherapy by evaluating the expression pattern of DNA repair proteins. METHODS: Expression of a panel of DNA-repair proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded specimens from a cohort of 37 HNC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy prior to definitive chemoradiation were analyzed using quantitative immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: We found that XPF (an ERCC1 binding partner) and phospho-MAPKAP Kinase 2 (pMK2) are novel biomarkers for HNSCC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy. Low XPF expression in HNSCC patients is associated with better response to induction chemoradiotherapy, while high XPF expression correlates with a worse response (p = 0.02). Furthermore, low pMK2 expression was found to correlate significantly with overall survival after induction plus chemoradiation therapy (p = 0.01), suggesting that pMK2 may relate to chemoradiation therapy. CONCLUSIONS: We identified XPF and pMK2 as novel DNA-repair biomarkers for locoregionally-advanced HNC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy prior to definitive chemoradiation. Our study provides insights for the use of DNA repair biomarkers in personalized diagnostics strategies. Further validation in a larger cohort is indicated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0102112

  10 / 330479 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25023315
[Au] Autor:Lee AK; Epsztein J; Brecht M
[Ad] Address:Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 19700 Helix Drive, Ashburn, VA, 20147, USA, leea@janelia.hhmi.org.
[Ti] Title:Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in freely moving animals.
[So] Source:Methods Mol Biol;1183:263-76, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1940-6029
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The patch-clamp technique and the whole-cell measurements derived from it have greatly advanced our understanding of the coding properties of individual neurons by allowing for a detailed analysis of their excitatory/inhibitory synaptic inputs, intrinsic electrical properties, and morphology. Because such measurements require a high level of mechanical stability they have for a long time been limited to in vitro and anesthetized preparations. Recently, however, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted to extending these techniques to awake restrained/head-fixed preparations allowing for the study of the input-output functions of neurons during behavior. In this chapter we describe a technique extending patch-clamp recordings to awake animals free to explore their environments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/978-1-4939-1096-0_17


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