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[PMID]: 25855885
[Au] Autor:Wirtz ED; Hoshino D; Maldonado AT; Tyson DR; Weaver AM
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii....
[Ti] Title:Response of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells Carrying PIK3CA Mutations to Selected Targeted Therapies.
[So] Source:JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;141(6):543-9, 2015 Jun 1.
[Is] ISSN:2168-619X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:IMPORTANCE: The PIK3CA mutation is one of the most common mutations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Through this research we attempt to elicit the role of oncogene dependence and effects of targeted therapy on this PIK3CA mutation. OBJECTIVES: (1) To determine the role of oncogene dependence on PIK3CA-one of the more common and targetable oncogenes in HNSCC, and (2) to evaluate the consequence of this oncogene on the effectiveness of newly developed targeted therapies. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This was a cell culture-based, in vitro study performed at an academic research laboratory assessing the viability of PIK3CA-mutated head and neck cell lines when treated with targeted therapy. EXPOSURES: PIK3CA-mutated head and neck cell lines were treated with 17-AAG, GDC-0941, trametinib, and BEZ-235. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Assessment of cell viability of HNSCC cell lines characterized for PIK3CA mutations or SCC25 cells engineered to express the PIK3CA hotspot mutations E545K or H1047R. RESULTS: Surprisingly, in engineered cell lines, the hotspot E545K and H1047R mutations conferred increased, rather than reduced, IC50 assay measurements when treated with the respective HSP90, PI3K, and MEK inhibitors, 17-AAG, GDC-0941, and trametinib, compared with the SCC25 control cell lines. When treated with BEZ-235, H1047R-expressing cell lines showed increased sensitivity to inhibition compared with control, whereas those expressing E545K showed slightly increased sensitivity of unclear significance. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: (1) The PIK3CA mutations within our engineered cell model did not lead to enhanced oncogene-dependent cell death when treated with direct inhibition of the PI3K enzyme yet did show increased sensitivity compared with control with dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition. (2) Oncogene addiction to PIK3CA hotspot mutations, if it occurs, is likely to evolve in vivo in the context of additional molecular changes that remain to be identified. Additional study is required to develop new model systems and approaches to determine the role of targeted therapy in the treatment of PI3K-overactive HNSCC tumors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaoto.2015.0471

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[PMID]: 26086513
[Au] Autor:Mark LJ; Herzer KR; Cover R; Pandian V; Bhatti NI; Berkow LC; Haut ER; Hillel AT; Miller CR; Feller-Kopman DJ; Schiavi AJ; Xie YJ; Lim C; Holzmueller C; Ahmad M; Thomas P; Flint PW; Mirski MA
[Ad] Address:From the *Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; †Medical Scientist Training Program, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; ‡Legal Department, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland; §Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; ¶Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; ‖Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; #MD Program, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; **MD Program, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; ††Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and ‡‡Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.
[Ti] Title:Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies.
[So] Source:Anesth Analg;121(1):127-39, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1526-7598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. METHODS: We developed a quality improvement program-the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)-to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had 3 core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a Web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. RESULTS: Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index >40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous or current tracheostomy. Twenty-three patients (6%) required emergent surgical airways. Sixty-two patients (17%) were stabilized and transported to the operating room for definitive airway management. There were no airway management-related deaths, sentinel events, or malpractice claims in adult patients managed by DART. Five in situ simulations conducted in the first program year improved DART's teamwork, communication, and response times and increased the functionality of the difficult airway carts. Over the 5-year period, we conducted 18 airway courses, through which >200 providers were trained. CONCLUSIONS: DART is a comprehensive program for improving difficult airway management. Future studies will examine the comparative effectiveness of the DART program and evaluate how DART has impacted patient outcomes, operational efficiency, and costs of care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1213/ANE.0000000000000691

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[PMID]: 26085984
[Au] Autor:Garcia GH; Liu JN; Dines DM; Dines JS
[Ad] Address:Grant H Garcia, Joseph N Liu, David M Dines, Joshua S Dines, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 10021, United States....
[Ti] Title:Effect of bone loss in anterior shoulder instability.
[So] Source:World J Orthop;6(5):421-33, 2015 Jun 18.
[Is] ISSN:2218-5836
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anterior shoulder instability with bone loss can be a difficult problem to treat. It usually involves a component of either glenoid deficiency or a Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent data shows that soft tissue procedures alone are typically not adequate to provide stability to the shoulder. As such, numerous surgical procedures have been described to directly address these bony deficits. For glenoid defects, coracoid transfer and iliac crest bone block procedures are popular and effective. For humeral head defects, both remplissage and osteochondral allografts have decreased the rates of recurrent instability. Our review provides an overview of current literature addressing these treatment options and others for addressing bone loss complicating anterior glenohumeral instability.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150618
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5312/wjo.v6.i5.421

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[PMID]: 25277484
[Au] Autor:Agarwalla A; Small AJ; Mendelson AH; Scott FI; Kochman ML
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Risk of recurrent or refractory strictures and outcome of endoscopic dilation for radiation-induced esophageal strictures.
[So] Source:Surg Endosc;29(7):1903-12, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2218
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy for head, neck, and esophageal cancer can result in esophageal strictures that may be difficult to manage. Radiation-induced esophageal strictures often require repeat dilation to obtain relief of dysphagia. This study aimed to determine the long-term clinical success and rates of recurrent and refractory stenosis in patients with radiation-induced strictures undergoing dilation. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of patients with radiation-induced strictures who underwent endoscopic dilation by a single provider from October 2007-October 2012. Outcomes measured included long-term clinical efficacy, interval between sessions, number of dilations, and proportion of radiation strictures that were recurrent or refractory. Risk factors for refractory strictures were assessed. RESULTS: 63 patients underwent 303 dilations. All presented with a stricture >30 days after last radiation session. Clinical success to target diameter was achieved in 52 patients (83 %). A mean of 3.3 (±2.6) dilations over a median period of 4 weeks was needed to achieve initial patency. Recurrence occurred in 17 (33 %) at a median of 22 weeks. Twenty-seven strictures (43 %) were refractory to dilation therapy. Fluoroscopy during dilation (OR 22.88; 95 % CI 3.19-164.07), severe esophageal stenosis (lumen <9 mm) (OR 10.51; 95 % CI 1.94-56.88), and proximal location with prior malignancy extrinsic to the lumen (OR 6.96; 95 % CI 1.33-36.29) were independent predictors of refractory strictures in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: (1) Radiation-induced strictures have a delayed onset (>30 days) from time of radiation injury. (2) Endoscopic dilation can achieve medium-term luminal remediation but the strictures have a high long-term recurrence rate of up to 33 %. (3) Remediation of radiation strictures following laryngectomy can be achieved but require frequent dilations. (4) Clinical and procedural predictors may identify patients at high risk of refractory strictures. (5) The optimal strategy in highly selected refractory patients is not clear.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00464-014-3883-1

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[PMID]: 26053297
[Au] Autor:Yang F; Xiao X; Cheng W; Yang W; Yu P; Song Z; Yarov-Yarovoy V; Zheng J
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology and Membrane Biology, University of California, Davis, California, USA....
[Ti] Title:Structural mechanism underlying capsaicin binding and activation of the TRPV1 ion channel.
[So] Source:Nat Chem Biol;11(7):518-24, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1552-4469
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Capsaicin bestows spiciness by activating TRPV1 channel with exquisite potency and selectivity. Although a capsaicin-bound channel structure was previously resolved by cryo-EM at 4.2- to 4.5-Å resolution, capsaicin was registered as a small electron density, reflecting neither its chemical structure nor specific ligand-channel interactions-important details required for mechanistic understanding. We obtained the missing atomic-level details by iterative computation and confirmed them by systematic site-specific functional tests. We observed that the bound capsaicin takes a 'tail-up, head-down' configuration. The vanillyl and amide groups form specific interactions to anchor its bound position, while the aliphatic tail may sample a range of conformations, making it invisible in cryo-EM images. Capsaicin stabilizes TRPV1's open state by 'pull-and-contact' interactions between the vanillyl group and the S4-S5 linker. Our study provides a structural mechanism for the agonistic function of capsaicin and its analogs, and demonstrates an effective approach to obtain atomic-level information from cryo-EM structures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/nchembio.1835

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[PMID]: 25712380
[Au] Autor:Waisbren SE; Rohr F; Anastasoaie V; Brown M; Harris D; Ozonoff A; Petrides S; Wessel A; Levy HL
[Ad] Address:Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, 1 Autumn Street #525, Boston, MA, 02115, USA, susan.waisbren@childrens.harvard.edu.
[Ti] Title:Maternal Phenylketonuria: Long-term Outcomes in Offspring and Post-pregnancy Maternal Characteristics.
[So] Source:JIMD Rep;21:23-33, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2192-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) is a well-recognized complication of PKU and one of the most potent teratogenic syndromes of pregnancy. Virtually all offspring from untreated pregnancies in women with classic PKU have intellectual disabilities and microcephaly. Congenital heart disease and intrauterine growth retardation occur many times more often than expected in the general population. Control of maternal blood phenylalanine during pregnancy prevents most if not all of these complications. Previous studies demonstrated the benefits of treatment in terms of birth parameters and early development. In this study, physical examinations, a medical history, and neuropsychological evaluation were obtained in 47 children from 24 mothers with PKU who received treatment during pregnancy. Mothers were interviewed and administered an abbreviated IQ test. Associations between maternal factors and offspring outcomes were also analyzed.The 21 male and 26 female offspring ranged in age from 1 month to 26 years with 21 (62%) over 6 years. Results indicated mean intercanthal distances above the 70th percentile. Microcephaly was present in 19% of offspring, with head circumference below the third percentile. None of the offspring had cardiac anomalies. Mean offspring IQ was 94 ± 19, with 12% performing in the range of intellectual disability (IQ < 70). Among children >5 years of age, 25% had learning disabilities, 31% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 22% were on ADHD medication, and 34% had a diagnosis of anxiety and/or depression. Among the 24 mothers, 12 reported following the diet for PKU. Only one woman on diet had a blood phenylalanine concentration <360 µmol/L (recommended range) and the majority had indications of poor nutritional status. Mean maternal Full Scale IQ was 94 ± 16 (range = 61-117), with 25% performing in the borderline intellectual range (IQ < 85). Verbal IQ was significantly lower than Performance IQ (p = 0.01, CI 2.7, 16.1). On the self-report Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition, 25% received scores indicating mild to moderate depression, and on the Beck Anxiety Inventory, 46% reported mild to moderate anxiety. Offspring IQ correlated with maternal metabolic control during pregnancy (r = 0.51), maternal IQ (r = -0.62), and socioeconomic position (r = -0.48). Offspring with ADHD, learning disabilities, or emotional disturbances were more likely to have mothers with anxiety and/or depression. To ensure optimal offspring outcomes, healthcare providers need to assess maternal nutrition, blood phenylalanine concentrations, cognitive abilities, and socioeconomic position. Interventions can then be initiated that reduce psychosocial stressors and enhance adherence to diet and positive parenting, which in turn can lead to better cognitive functioning, behavior, and emotional well-being in their children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150618
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/8904_2014_365

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[PMID]: 26086010
[Au] Autor:Lee J; Suh SY; Choung HK; Kim SJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Inferior oblique weakening surgery on ocular torsion in congenital superior oblique palsy.
[So] Source:Int J Ophthalmol;8(3):569-73, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2222-3959
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To investigate changes in fundus excyclotorsion after inferior oblique myectomy or myotomy. METHODS: The records of 21 patients undergoing strabismus surgery by a single surgeon between 2009 and 2012 were examined. Only patients who had undergone an inferior oblique myectomy or myotomy, with or without horizontal rectus muscle surgery, were evaluated. Digital fundus photographs were obtained, and the angle formed by a horizontal line passing through the optic disc center and a reference line connecting the foveola and optic disc center was measured. Associated clinical factors examined include age at the time of surgery, presence or absence of a head tilt, degree of preoperative vertical deviation, torsional angle, inferior oblique muscle overaction/superior oblique muscle underaction, and surgery laterality. Whether the procedure was performed alone or in combination with a horizontal rectus muscle surgery was also examined. RESULTS: Mean preoperative torsional angle was 12.0±6.4°, which decreased to 6.9±5.7° after surgery (P<0.001, paired t-test). Torsional angle also decreased from 15.1±7.0° to 6.2±4.3° in the myectomy group (P<0.001, paired t-test) but there were no significant changes in the myotomy group (P=0.093, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that preoperative torsional angle, degree of inferior oblique overaction, and age at surgery independently and significantly affected postoperative torsional angle. CONCLUSION: Mean torsional angle decreased after inferior oblique myectomy. Degree of preoperative torsional angle, inferior oblique overaction, and age at surgery influence postoperative torsional angle.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150618
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3980/j.issn.2222-3959.2015.03.24

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[PMID]: 26085896
[Au] Autor:Lue K; Emtage JB; Pariñas MA; Dhillon J; Pow-Sang J
[Ad] Address:University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, FL;...
[Ti] Title:An extramedullary plasmacytoma in the testicle: A case report and review of the literature.
[So] Source:Can Urol Assoc J;9(3-4):E240-2, 2015 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1911-6470
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We present a rare case of testicular extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) in a 43-year-old man with multiple myeloma and diffuse systemic involvement refractory to chemotherapy. Multiple myeloma is typically found within the bone marrow and rarely involves other organs and sites. EMPs are most frequently associated with the head and neck region, but in rare cases testicular involvement have been seen. These mimic other causes of testicular swelling and therefore require a full diagnostic workup and management similar to that of any scrotal pathology. Radical inguinal orchiectomy is the treatment of choice with the addition of adjunct or salvage radiation therapy if necessary. The prognosis with these lesions is poor and in cases of primary testicular plasmacytoma, progression to multiple myeloma is likely.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150618
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5489/cuaj.2531

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[PMID]: 26084397
[Au] Autor:Persson HC; Alt Murphy M; Danielsson A; Lundgren-Nilsson Å; Sunnerhagen KS
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. hanna.persson@neuro.gu.se....
[Ti] Title:A cohort study investigating a simple, early assessment to predict upper extremity function after stroke - a part of the SALGOT study.
[So] Source:BMC Neurol;15:92, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2377
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: For early prediction of upper extremity function, there is a need for short clinical measurements suitable for acute settings. Previous studies demonstrate correct prediction of function, but have ether included a complex assessment procedure or have an outcome that does not automatically correspond to motor function required to be useful in daily activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a sub-set of items from the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 3 days and 1 month post-stroke could predict the level of upper extremity motor function required for a drinking task at three later stages during the first year post-stroke. METHODS: The level of motor function required for a drinking task was identified with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity (FMA-UE). A structured process was used to select ARAT items not requiring special equipment and to find a cut-off level of the items' sum score. The early prognostic values of the selected items, aimed to determine the level of motor function required for a drinking task at 10 days and 1 and 12 months, were investigated in a cohort of 112 patients. The patients had a first time stroke and impaired upper extremity function at day 3 after stroke onset, were ≥18 years and received care in a stroke unit. RESULTS: Two items, "Pour water from glass to glass" and "Place hand on top of head", called ARAT-2, met the requirements to predict upper extremity motor function. ARAT-2 is a sum score (0-6) with a cut-off at 2 points, where >2 is considered an improvement. At the different time points, the sensitivity varied between 98 % and 100 %, specificity between 73 % and 94 %. Correctly classified patients varied between 81 % and 96 %. CONCLUSIONS: Using ARAT-2, 3 days post-stroke could predict the level of motor function (assessed with FMA-UE) required for a drinking task during the first year after a stroke. ARAT-2 demonstrates high predictive values, is easily performed and has the potential to be clinically feasible. TRAIL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01115348.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12883-015-0349-6

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[PMID]: 25792354
[Au] Autor:Gamboa A; Paranjape SY; Black BK; Arnold AC; Figueroa R; Okamoto LE; Nwazue VC; Diedrich A; Plummer WD; Dupont WD; Robertson D; Raj SR
[Ad] Address:From the Division of Clinical Pharmacology (A.G., S.Y.P., B.K.B., A.C.A., R.F., L.E.O., V.C.N., A.D., D.R., S.R.R.), Departments of Medicine (A.G., S.Y.P., B.K.B., A.C.A., R.F., L.E.O., V.C.N., A.D., D.R., S.R.R.), Pharmacology (D.R., S.R.R.), Biostatistics (W.D.P., W.D.D.), and Neurology (D.R.), Va...
[Ti] Title:Inspiratory Resistance Improves Postural Tachycardia: A Randomized Study.
[So] Source:Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol;8(3):651-8, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1941-3084
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inspiratory resistance through an impedance threshold device (ITD) on orthostatic tolerance in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome. We hypothesized that the ITD would result in a greater negative intrathoracic pressure to enhance cardiac venous return, improve stroke volume, and reduce heart rate in these patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: We compared the effect of a sham device (sham, no resistance) versus an ITD (increased inspiratory resistance) in 26 patients with postural tachycardia syndrome in a randomized, single-blind, crossover study. Hemodynamic assessments were performed at baseline while supine and during head-up tilt to 70° for 10 minutes. We did not find differences in baseline hemodynamic parameters between the ITD and the sham devices. After 10 minutes of head-up tilt, the heart rate was lower with the ITD versus sham device (102±4 versus 109±4 beat/min, respectively; P=0.003). The ITD also improved stroke volume compared with the sham device (35±2 versus 26±1 mL; P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that increasing negative intrathoracic pressure with ITD breathing improves heart rate control in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome during upright posture. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov; Unique Identifier: NCT00962728.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1161/CIRCEP.114.002605


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