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[PMID]: 25789097
[Au] Autor:Dutta AK; Chacko A
[Ad] Address:Amit K Dutta, Department of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632 004, India.
[Ti] Title:Head mass in chronic pancreatitis: Inflammatory or malignant.
[So] Source:World J Gastrointest Endosc;7(3):258-64, 2015 Mar 16.
[Is] ISSN:1948-5190
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chronic pancreatitis increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. This often presents as a mass lesion in the head of pancreas. Mass lesion in the head of pancreas can also occur secondary to an inflammatory lesion. Recognising this is crucial to avoid unnecessary surgery. This is sometimes difficult as there is an overlap in clinical presentation and conventional computed tomography (CT) abdomen findings in inflammatory and malignant mass. Advances in imaging technologies like endoscopic ultrasound in conjunction with techniques like fine needle aspiration, contrast enhancement and elastography as well as multidetector row CT, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scanning have been shown to help in distinguishing inflammatory and malignant mass. Research is ongoing to develop molecular techniques to help characterise focal pancreatic mass lesions. This paper reviews the current status of imaging and molecular techniques in differentiating a benign mass lesion in chronic pancreatitis and from malignancy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150319
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4253/wjge.v7.i3.258

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[PMID]: 25789337
[Au] Autor:Somogyvári K; Gerlinger I; Lujber L; Burián A; Móricz P
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical School, University of Pécs, Munkácsy M. Street 2, Pécs 7621, Hungary....
[Ti] Title:Radiofrequency transoral microsurgical procedures in benign and malignant laryngeal and hypopharyngeal lesions (institutional experiences).
[So] Source:ScientificWorldJournal;2015:926319, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1537-744X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Besides cold-steel and laser instruments, the use of radiofrequency (RF) devices in transoral microsurgery is getting increasing popularity mainly due to its minimal thermal effect on the collateral soft tissue. Authors summarize their surgical technique, results, and experience gained with RF applied during laryngeal interventions at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at Medical School, University of Pécs. Transoral microsurgery using radiofrequency was carried out in 23 cases in total between 1 January 2011 and 1 March 2013. Fourteen histopathologically different benign lesions and 9 malignant planocellular carcinomas of the larynx were removed using different Micro-Larynx RF Probes powered by Surgitron Dual 4.0 MHz Frequency RF (Ellman International, Oceanside, NY, USA) device. No major bleeding event occurred during or after the procedures and neither laryngeal oedema nor significant postoperative pain was recorded. Authors also reviewed the international literature in this topic while detailing some of their most interesting cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1155/2015/926319

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[PMID]: 25269715
[Au] Autor:Heo SY; Seol JW; Lee HB
[Ad] Address:College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy.
[So] Source:J Vet Sci;16(1):131-4, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1976-555X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 25788740
[Au] Autor:Mhamane R; Dave N; Garasia M
[Ad] Address:Department of Anaesthesiology, T. N. M. C. and B. Y. L. Nair Charitable Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
[Ti] Title:Use of Microcuff(®) endotracheal tubes in paediatric laparoscopic surgeries.
[So] Source:Indian J Anaesth;59(2):85-8, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0019-5049
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Traditionally, uncuffed endotracheal tubes have been used in children. Cuffed tubes may be useful in special situations like laparoscopy. Microcuff(®) endotracheal tube is a specifically designed cuffed endotracheal tube for the paediatric airway. We studied the appropriateness of Microcuff(®) tube size selection, efficacy of ventilation, and complications, in children undergoing laparoscopy. METHODS: In a prospective, observational study, 100 children undergoing elective laparoscopy were intubated with Microcuff(®) tube as per recommended size. We studied appropriateness of size selection, sealing pressure, ability to ventilate with low flow, quality of capnography and post-extubation laryngospasm or stridor. RESULTS: Mean age of the patients was 5.44 years (range 8 months 5 days-9 years 11 months). There was no resistance for tube passage during intubation in any patient. Leak on intermittent positive pressure ventilation at airway pressure ≤20 cm H2O was present in all patients. Mean sealing pressure was 11.72 (1.9 standard deviation [SD]) cm H2 O. With the creation of pnemoperitoneum, mean intracuff pressure increased to 12.48 (3.12 SD) cm H2 O. With head low positioning, mean cuff pressure recorded was 13.32 (2.92 SD). Ventilation at low flow (mean flow 1 L/min), plateau-type capnography was noted in all patients. Mean duration of intubation was 83.50 min. Coughing at extubation occurred in 6 patients. Partial laryngospasm occurred in 4 patients, which responded to continuous positive airway pressure via face mask. Severe laryngospasm or stridor was not seen in any patient. CONCLUSION: Microcuff(®) tubes can be safely used in children if size selection recommendations are followed and cuff pressure is strictly monitored. Advantages are better airway seal and effective ventilation, permitting use of low flows.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150319
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0019-5049.151367

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[PMID]: 25538019
[Au] Autor:Herman JM; Chang DT; Goodman KA; Dholakia AS; Raman SP; Hacker-Prietz A; Iacobuzio-Donahue CA; Griffith ME; Pawlik TM; Pai JS; O'Reilly E; Fisher GA; Wild AT; Rosati LM; Zheng L; Wolfgang CL; Laheru DA; Columbo LA; Sugar EA; Koong AC
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology & Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
[Ti] Title:Phase 2 multi-institutional trial evaluating gemcitabine and stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.
[So] Source:Cancer;121(7):1128-37, 2015 Apr 1.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0142
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This phase 2 multi-institutional study was designed to determine whether gemcitabine (GEM) with fractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) results in acceptable late grade 2 to 4 gastrointestinal toxicity when compared with a prior trial of GEM with single-fraction SBRT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). METHODS: A total of 49 patients with LAPC received up to 3 doses of GEM (1000 mg/m(2) ) followed by a 1-week break and SBRT (33.0 gray [Gy] in 5 fractions). After SBRT, patients continued to receive GEM until disease progression or toxicity. Toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0] and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and pancreatic cancer-specific QLQ-PAN26 module before SBRT and at 4 weeks and 4 months after SBRT. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 13.9 months (range, 3.9-45.2 months). The median age of the patients was 67 years and 84% had tumors of the pancreatic head. Rates of acute and late (primary endpoint) grade ≥2 gastritis, fistula, enteritis, or ulcer toxicities were 2% and 11%, respectively. QLQ-C30 global quality of life scores remained stable from baseline to after SBRT (67 at baseline, median change of 0 at both follow-ups; P>.05 for both). Patients reported a significant improvement in pancreatic pain (P = .001) 4 weeks after SBRT on the QLQ-PAN26 questionnaire. The median plasma carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was reduced after SBRT (median time after SBRT, 4.2 weeks; 220 U/mL vs 62 U/mL [P<.001]). The median overall survival was 13.9 months (95% confidence interval, 10.2 months-16.7 months). Freedom from local disease progression at 1 year was 78%. Four patients (8%) underwent margin-negative and lymph node-negative surgical resections. CONCLUSIONS: Fractionated SBRT with GEM results in minimal acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity. Future studies should incorporate SBRT with more aggressive multiagent chemotherapy. Cancer 2015;121:1128-1137. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/cncr.29161

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[PMID]: 25789270
[Au] Autor:Sarvizadeh M; Hemati S; Meidani M; Ashouri M; Roayaei M; Shahsanai A
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran....
[Ti] Title:Morphine mouthwash for the management of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer.
[So] Source:Adv Biomed Res;4:44, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2277-9175
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Oral mucositis is a debilitating side effect of cancer treatment for which there is not much successful treatments at yet. We evaluated the effectiveness of topical morphine compared with a routine mouthwash in managing cancer treatment-induced mucositis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty head and neck cancer patients with severe mucositis (World Health Organization Grade III or IV) were randomized into the morphine and magic mouthwash groups. Patients received morphine sulfate 2% or magic solution (contained magnesium aluminum hydroxide, viscous lidocaine, and diphenhydramine), 10 ml for every 3 h, six times a day, for 6 days. Both groups received same dietary and oral hygiene instructions and care. Mucositis was graded at baseline and every 3 days after treatment. Patients' satisfaction and drug effect maintenance were also evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients (mean age of 49.5 ± 13.2 years, 63.3% female) completed the trial; 15 in the morphine group and 13 in the magic group. There was a decrease in mucositis severity in both of the morphine (P < 0.001) and magic (P = 0.049) groups. However, at the 6(th) day, more reduction was observed in mucositis severity in the morphine compared with magic group (P = 0.045). Drug effect maintenance was similar between the two groups, but patients in the morphine group were more satisfied by their treatments than those in the magic group (P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Topical morphine is more effective and more satisfactory to patients than the magic mouthwash in reducing severity of cancer treatment-induced oral mucositis. More studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up are required in this regard.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150319
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2277-9175.151254

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[PMID]: 25785097
[Au] Autor:Peng W; Wang L; Zhang J; Deng J; Gong Y; Li S; Hu Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Surgery, Guiyang Medical College Guiyang 550004, China....
[Ti] Title:A novel tissue-engineered bone in repairing femoral head defect and necrosis.
[So] Source:Int J Clin Exp Med;8(1):1087-93, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1940-5901
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of AACB/BMP/bFGF, a novel tissue-engineered bone, in repairing femoral head defect and necrosis in dog models. METHODS: Dog models of avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH) were established by liquid nitrogen freezing method. Group A was untreated; Groups B, C, and D were implanted with AACB, AACB/BMP, and AACB/BMP/bFGF complex, respectively; Group E was grafted with autologous cancellous bone. Samples were collected at 3 w, 6 w, and 12 w after operation. A series of examinations were carried out to investigate the effects of the materials in repairing femoral head defect, including anatomical observation, X-ray examination, histological analysis, and vascular immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: Our results indicated that, compared with AACB alone and AACB/BMP, AACB/BMP/bFGF complex could exert the most efficient therapeutic effects in dog ANFH models. X-ray examination further confirmed that AACB/BMP/bFGF complex could effectively repair the injuries in dog ANFH models, almost to a comparable level with cancellous bone autografts. Moreover, histological analysis indicated that AACB/BMP/bFGF complex greatly enhanced the new bone formation, which would contribute to the healing of ANFH. Furthermore, vascular immunohistochemical staining revealed that AACB/BMP/bFGF complex could significantly stimulate the revascularization in defect areas, reflecting the post-injury healing process in these models. CONCLUSION: AACB/BMP/bFGF complex has great potential in repairing femoral head defect by enhancing osteogenesis and revascularization. The novel tissue-engineered bone would be widely used in clinical applications for ANFH treatment, especially as an alternative for autografts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150318
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25785028
[Au] Autor:Wu M; Shao G; Zhang F; Ruan Z; Xu P; Ding H
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Ultrasound Division, Second Hospital of Shandong University Jinan, Shandong, China....
[Ti] Title:Estimation of fetal weight by ultrasonic examination.
[So] Source:Int J Clin Exp Med;8(1):540-5, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1940-5901
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical application of a new technique in the fetal weight estimation by ultrasound. METHODS: The fetal biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC) and femur length (FL) were measured by ultrasound examination within one week before delivery. Two different fetal abdominal sectors were measured for the assessment of abdominal circumference (AC). The fetal weight of 516 singleton fetuses was estimated according to above measurements and their actual birth weight was recorded after delivery. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the fetal AC or body weight evaluated before delivery and recorded after delivery. CONCLUSION: This new technique is more convenient and applicable for the evaluation of fetal AC as compared to standard method, and seems to be reliable and accurate for the assessment of fetal weight.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150318
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25784198
[Au] Autor:Martiniuk AL; Abimbola S; Zwarenstein M
[Ad] Address:School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia and the George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, 2006, NSW, Australia, amartiniuk@georgeinstitute.org.au.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation as evolution: a Darwinian proposal for health policy and systems research.
[So] Source:Health Res Policy Syst;13(1):7, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1478-4505
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Health systems are complex and health policies are political. While grand policies are set by politicians, the detailed implementation strategies which influence the shape and impact of these policies are delegated to technical personnel. This is an underappreciated opportunity for optimising health systems. We propose that selective 'breeding' through successive evaluations of and selection among implementation strategies is a metaphor that health system thinkers can use to improve health care. DISCUSSION: Similar to Darwinian evolution, the acceptance and accumulation of successful choices and the detection and discarding of unsuccessful ones would improve health systems in small and uncontroversial ways, over time. The effects of better implementation choices would be synergistic and cumulative, accumulating large impact (and lessons) from small changes. Just as with evolution of species, this means that even slight improvements over usual outcomes makes these numerous small choices as important a focus for system improvement as the overarching policy itself. Several alternative implementation approaches can be compared under real-world conditions in prospective head-to-head experimental and non-experimental explorations to understand whether and to what extent a strategy works and what works for whom, how, and under what circumstances in different locations. As in breeding or evolution, the best variants would spread to become the new, proven superior, implementation strategies for that policy in those settings. CONCLUSIONS: Evolution does not produce a new species whole, in a single transaction. Instead it gathers new parts and powers over time as different combinations are tested through competition with one another, to survive and spread or become extinct. Without necessarily changing or challenging grand policies, extending this idea to health systems innovation can facilitate thinking around how local, small - but cumulative - improvements in implementation potentially contribute to a pattern of successive adaptation spreading within its viable niche and ultimately providing locally-derived, long-term improvements in health systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12961-015-0007-x

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[PMID]: 25784407
[Au] Autor:Karstoft KI; Galatzer-Levy IR; Statnikov A; Li Z; Shalev AY; Jerusalem Trauma Outreach and Prevention Study (J-TOPS) group
[Ad] Address:Research and Knowledge Centre, Danish Veteran Centre, Garnisonen 1, 4100, Ringsted, Denmark, kikarstoft@health.sdu.dk.
[Ti] Title:Bridging a translational gap: using machine learning to improve the prediction of PTSD.
[So] Source:BMC Psychiatry;15(1):399, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1471-244X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Predicting Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a pre-requisite for targeted prevention. Current research has identified group-level risk-indicators, many of which (e.g., head trauma, receiving opiates) concern but a subset of survivors. Identifying interchangeable sets of risk indicators may increase the efficiency of early risk assessment. The study goal is to use supervised machine learning (ML) to uncover interchangeable, maximally predictive combinations of early risk indicators. METHODS: Data variables (features) reflecting event characteristics, emergency department (ED) records and early symptoms were collected in 957 trauma survivors within ten days of ED admission, and used to predict PTSD symptom trajectories during the following fifteen months. A Target Information Equivalence Algorithm (TIE*) identified all minimal sets of features (Markov Boundaries; MBs) that maximized the prediction of a non-remitting PTSD symptom trajectory when integrated in a support vector machine (SVM). The predictive accuracy of each set of predictors was evaluated in a repeated 10-fold cross-validation and expressed as average area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics curve (AUC) for all validation trials. RESULTS: The average number of MBs per cross validation was 800. MBs' mean AUC was 0.75 (95% range: 0.67-0.80). The average number of features per MB was 18 (range: 12-32) with 13 features present in over 75% of the sets. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the hypothesized existence of multiple and interchangeable sets of risk indicators that equally and exhaustively predict non-remitting PTSD. ML's ability to increase prediction versatility is a promising step towards developing algorithmic, knowledge-based, personalized prediction of post-traumatic psychopathology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12888-015-0399-8


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