Database : MEDLINE
Search on : heart and murmurs [Words]
References found : 3348 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 335 go to page                         

  1 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29094542
[Au] Autor:Morgan S
[Ad] Address:University of South Wales, Pontypridd, Mid Glamorgan, Wales.
[Ti] Title:How to auscultate for heart sounds in adults.
[So] Source:Nurs Stand;32(5):41-43, 2017 Sep 27.
[Is] ISSN:2047-9018
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to improve nurses' knowledge and understanding of the procedure for auscultating heart sounds in adults, as part of a cardiovascular examination. It focuses on auscultating normal heart sounds; it is beyond the scope of this article to discuss the pathophysiology of abnormal findings. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: 'How to' articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence-based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.7748/ns.2017.e10965

  2 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28299882
[Au] Autor:Hoeting NM; McCracken CE; McConnell M; Sallee D; Iannucci GJ; Oster ME
[Ad] Address:Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
[Ti] Title:Systolic ejection click versus split first heart sound: Are our ears deceiving us?
[So] Source:Congenit Heart Dis;12(4):417-420, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1747-0803
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is associated with potential lifetime complications, but auscultation of a BAV click is commonly missed or mistaken for a benign split first heart sound. Our objective was to determine whether pediatric cardiologists could reliably distinguish between BAV clicks and benign split first heart sounds. DESIGN: Quality evaluation project using de-identified recordings from an outpatient pediatric cardiology clinic. OUTCOME MEASURES: Twenty-one cardiologists listened to five de-identified recordings of pediatric heart sounds (three with BAV clicks, two with mitral components of benign split first heart sounds) and indicated whether they believed each recording was a BAV or split first heart sound. The accuracy of diagnoses was determined using percent agreement and calculated kappa coefficients for the cohort and subgroups based on those with less than 10 years of experience versus those with ≥10 years. To assess precision, a kappa extension was used for multiple raters to assess interrater agreement. RESULTS: Among participants, diagnostic accuracy of BAV click was 38%, while accuracy of split first heart sound was 41%. No participant correctly diagnosed all sounds. No difference in agreement was observed when stratifying by experience. Kappa was -0.11 (CI 95% -0.31 to 0.08) for all raters, -0.03 (CI 95% -0.39 to 0.33) for those with less than 10 years' experience, and -0.15 (CI 95% -0.38 to 0.08) for those with ≥10 years' experience. The kappa statistic among the 21 raters was 0.01 (95% CI -0.03 to 0.04), indicating poor precision among the raters. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of pediatric cardiologists, the diagnostic accuracy of BAV clicks versus split first heart sounds was worse than chance. There was no association between years of experience and diagnostic accuracy. While further study is needed, these data suggest that an echocardiogram may be valuable when either a systolic ejection click or split first heart sound is heard.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aortic Valve/abnormalities
Cardiologists/standards
Clinical Competence
Heart Auscultation/methods
Heart Sounds
Heart Valve Diseases/diagnosis
Systolic Murmurs/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Humans
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170316
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/chd.12460

  3 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28718893
[Au] Autor:Riknagel D; Farlie R; Hedegaard M; Humaidan P; Struijk JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Association between maternal vascular murmur and the small-for-gestational-age fetus with abnormal umbilical artery Doppler flow.
[So] Source:Int J Gynaecol Obstet;139(2):211-216, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3479
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between maternal vascular murmurs (MVMs) and fetal growth restriction (defined as small-for-gestational-age [SGA] fetus) and abnormal Doppler pulsatility index (PI) of the uterine and/or umbilical arteries. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of women aged 18 years or older with a singleton pregnancy at 28-34 weeks was conducted at Regional Hospital Viborg, Denmark, between May 1 and August 1, 2013. Ultrasound fetal biometry was performed and the Doppler PI of the umbilical and uterine arteries was determined. An estimated fetal weight (EFW) at or below the 10th percentile was defined as SGA. Microphone recordings from the lower abdomen were divided into heart valve sounds and MVMs. RESULTS: The final analysis included 63 participants, with 25 classified as SGA and 38 as non-SGA. The mean pregnancy duration was 32.4 ± 1.4 weeks. In total, 17 participants had MVMs. There was a clear association between MVMs and a composite of SGA and an abnormal PI of the uterine and/or the umbilical artery (P<0.001), but not between MVMs and SGA only (P=0.154). CONCLUSION: Maternal vascular murmurs are significantly associated with fetal growth restriction, but not with SGA per se.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fetal Growth Retardation/physiopathology
Heart Murmurs/physiopathology
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/physiopathology
Umbilical Arteries/physiopathology
Uterus/blood supply
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation/diagnostic imaging
Humans
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Middle Aged
Predictive Value of Tests
Pregnancy
Pulsatile Flow
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170718
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijgo.12268

  4 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29077586
[Au] Autor:Fierro E; Sikachi RR; Agrawal A; Verma I; Ojrzanowski M; Sahni S
[Ad] Address:1Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, New York, NY; 2 Department of Anaesthesia, Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital & Research Center, Pune, Maharashtra, India; 3 Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine - Northwell Health System, New Hyde Park, NY; 4 Division of Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT; 5 Department of Cardiology, Bieganski Hospital - Medical University of Lodz, Lódz, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Aorto-Atrial Fistulas - A Contemporary Review.
[So] Source:Cardiol Rev;, 2017 Oct 25.
[Is] ISSN:1538-4683
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aorto-atrial fistulas are a relatively rare, but potentially life-threatening condition, where an anomalous connection forms between the aortic structures and the cardiac atria. Aorto-atrial fistulas are most often the result of an underlying condition concerning the cardiac structures. It may be congenital, secondary to conditions such as aortic dissection, infective endocarditis, or valve replacement, or iatrogenic in nature. Secondary causes incite local deterioration of cardiac wall integrity leading to formation of fistulous connections, while iatrogenic causes are more traumatic in nature. Signs and symptoms include those of volume overload and heart failure with patients often presenting with fever, regurgitative murmurs, cardiac chamber dilation, and pedal edema. The diagnosis of aorto-atrial fistulas requires a high degree of clinical suspicion necessitating imaging techniques such as echocardiography, computer tomography, and more invasive procedures. Management is dependent on underlying conditions, and include the use of antibiotics, percutaneous closure, and in many cases, open heart surgery. It is important for physicians to be aware of this pathological condition to aid in timely management and favorable outcomes. This review attempts to summarize the various causes and clinical presentations of aorto-atrial fistulas over the past decades.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/CRD.0000000000000182

  5 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28787352
[Au] Autor:Compostella L; Russo N; Compostella C; Setzu T; Iliceto S; Bellotto F
[Ad] Address:Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation, Istituto Codivilla-Putti, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy (Drs Compostella, Russo, Compostella, Setzu, and Bellotto); Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padua, Padova, Italy (Drs Compostella, Russo, Iliceto, and Bellotto); and Department of Medicine, School of Emergency Medicine, University of Padua, Padova, Italy (Dr Compostella).
[Ti] Title:Cardiac Auscultation for Noncardiologists: Application in Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs: PART II: ADULT PATIENTS AFTER HEART SURGERY.
[So] Source:J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev;37(6):397-403, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1932-751X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This clinical skills review describes the most common cardiac auscultatory findings in adults after heart surgery and correlates them with prognostic indicators. It was written for noncardiologist health care providers who work in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs.Mechanical prosthetic valves produce typical closing and opening clicks. Listening to their timing and features, as well as to presence and quality of murmurs, contributes to the awareness of potential prosthesis malfunction before other dramatic clinical signs or symptoms become evident. In patients with biological prostheses, murmurs should be carefully evaluated to rule out both valve malfunction and degeneration. Rubs of post-pericardiotomy pericarditis should prompt further investigation for early signs of cardiac tamponade. Third and fourth heart sounds and systolic murmurs in anemic patients should be differentiated from pathological conditions. Relatively new groups of heart surgery patients are those with chronic heart failure treated with continuous-flow left ventricle assist devices. These devices produce characteristic continuous noise that may suddenly disappear or vary in quality and intensity with device malfunction. After heart transplantation, a carefully performed and regularly repeated cardiac auscultation may contribute to suspicion of impending acute rejection. During cardiac rehabilitation, periodic cardiac auscultation may provide useful information regarding clinical-hemodynamic status and allow detection of heralding signs of possible complications in an efficient and low-cost manner.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/HCR.0000000000000272

  6 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28697825
[Au] Autor:Zhang L; An MY; Zhu B; Shen WD; Tan SJ; Ji XJ; Tian J; Liu XY
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University/Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders/Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics/China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing 400014, China. lxylxy65@163.com.
[Ti] Title:[Screening and follow-up for congenital heart disease in children aged 0-3 years in rural areas of Chongqing, China].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi;19(7):748-753, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1008-8830
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in children aged 0-3 years in the rural areas of Chongqing, and to determine the suitable "screening-diagnosis-follow-up" system and screening indicators for CHD in these areas. METHODS: Children aged 0-3 years from rural areas of the Fuling Disctrict of Chongqing were selected by cluster sampling. Using the "screening-diagnosis-evaluation system" employed at the levels of village/town, district/county, and province/city, the children were screened for seven indicators, i.e., family history of CHD, dyspnea, cyanosis, unique facial features, other congenital malformations, heart murmurs, and blood oxygen saturation (SpO <95%). Children who were positive for one or more indicators accepted echocardiography (ECG) for the diagnosis of CHD. CHD patients were evaluated for disease progression, given guided treatments, and followed-up by pediatric cardiologists. RESULTS: Screening was performed for 10 005 out of the 10 281 children enrolled in the study (97.32% response rate). Among the 175 children who were positive for the indicators, 166 underwent ECG and 60 (0.6‰) were diagnosed with CHD, including 46 cases of simple CHD (76.65%), 11 cases of combined CHD (18.33%), and 3 cases of complex CHD (5.00%). Of the 7 screening indicators, heart murmur had the largest area under the ROC curve for the diagnosis of CHD. In addition, a combination of screening indicators (heart murmur, unique facial features, and other congenital malformations) was most effective for screening out CHD. The CHD patients were given surgical or intervention treatments, and followed up for 6 to 18 months. Ten patients improved without treatment, 13 patients received interventional or surgical treatment, 1 patient died of non-cardiac reasons. The remaining 36 patients were subjected to further follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Heart murmur alone and in combination with unique facial features and other congenital malformations are valuable tools for CHD screening in children aged 0-3 years. The "village/town-district/county-province/city" screening-diagnosis-evaluation systems are useful for the early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of CHD in infants and young children from the rural areas of Chongqing.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Heart Defects, Congenital/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Murmurs/diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Oxygen/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:S88TT14065 (Oxygen)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170712
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28247307
[Au] Autor:Karar ME; El-Khafif SH; El-Brawany MA
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Electronic Engineering (FEE), Menoufia University, Menouf, 32952, Egypt. mekarar@ieee.org.
[Ti] Title:Automated Diagnosis of Heart Sounds Using Rule-Based Classification Tree.
[So] Source:J Med Syst;41(4):60, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1573-689X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In order to assist the diagnosis procedure of heart sound signals, this paper presents a new automated method for classifying the heart status using a rule-based classification tree into normal and three abnormal cases; namely the aortic valve stenosis, aortic insufficient, and ventricular septum defect. The developed method includes three main steps as follows. First, one cycle of the heart sound signals is automatically detected and segmented based on time properties of the heart signals. Second, the segmented cycle is preprocessed with the discrete wavelet transform and then largest Lyapunov exponents are calculated to generate the dynamical features of heart sound time series. Finally, a rule-based classification tree is fed by these Lyapunov exponents to give the final decision of the heart health status. The developed method has been tested successfully on twenty-two datasets of normal heart sounds and murmurs with success rate of 95.5%. The resulting error can be easily corrected by modifying the classification rules; consequently, the accuracy of automated heart sounds diagnosis is further improved.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aortic Valve Insufficiency/diagnosis
Aortic Valve Stenosis/diagnosis
Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular/diagnostic imaging
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted/instrumentation
Wavelet Analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Algorithms
Decision Trees
Heart Sounds/physiology
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170301
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10916-017-0704-9

  8 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29060468
[Au] Autor:Puri C; Singh R; Bandyopadhyay S; Ukil A; Mukherjee A
[Ti] Title:Analysis of phonocardiogram signals through proactive denoising using novel self-discriminant learner.
[So] Source:Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc;2017:2753-2756, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1557-170X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phonocardiogram (PCG) records heart sound and murmurs, which contains significant information of cardiac health. Analysis of PCG signal has the potential to detect abnormal cardiac condition. However, the presence of noise and motion artifacts in PCG hinders the accuracy of clinical event detection. Thus, noise detection and elimination are crucial to ensure accurate clinical analysis. In this paper, we present a robust denoising technique, Proclean that precisely detects the noisy PCG signal through pattern recognition, and statistical learning. We propose a novel self-discriminant learner that ensures to obtain distinct feature set to distinguish clean and noisy PCG signals without human-in-loop. We demonstrate that our proposed denoising leads to higher accuracy in subsequent clinical analytics for medical investigation. Our extensive experimentations with publicly available MIT-Physionet datasets show that we achieve more than 85% accuracy for noisy PCG signal detection. Further, we establish that physiological abnormality detection improves by more than 20%, when our proposed denoising mechanism is applied.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1109/EMBC.2017.8037427

  9 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28316101
[Au] Autor:Marinus SM; van Engelen H; Szatmári V
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Phonocardiography in Differentiating Innocent Cardiac Murmurs from Congenital Cardiac Anomalies in Asymptomatic Puppies.
[So] Source:J Vet Intern Med;31(3):661-667, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1676
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Differentiating innocent cardiac murmurs from murmurs caused by congenital cardiac anomalies can be challenging with auscultation alone in asymptomatic puppies. HYPOTHESIS: Plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and phonocardiograms recorded by an electronic stethoscope can differentiate innocent from pathologic cardiac murmurs. ANIMALS: A total of 186 client-owned asymptomatic dogs: 135 Cairn Terriers (age: 45-124 days), 20 adult Cairn Terriers (age: 7.5 months to 13.5 years), and 31 puppies of various breeds (age: 29-396 days). METHODS: Study design is a cross-sectional survey. Each dog was auscultated, and when a cardiac murmur was heard, a phonocardiogram was recorded and an echocardiogram was performed. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were measured by a single laboratory by an ELISA. RESULTS: No significant (P = .41) difference in plasma NT-proBNP levels was found between puppies without a murmur and puppies with an innocent murmur (median 300 versus 326 pmol/L), and between clinically healthy adult Cairn Terriers and Cairn Terrier puppies. Plasma NT-proBNP levels in puppies with a congenital heart disease were significantly (P < .001) higher than those in puppies with innocent murmurs (median 1,102 versus 326 pmol/L). However, some puppies with severe pulmonic stenosis did not have increased plasma NT-proBNP levels. On phonocardiograms, innocent murmurs had a significantly (P < .001) shorter "murmur-to-systole duration ratio" than the abnormal ones (median 66 versus 100%). The "murmur-to-S1 (first cardiac sound) amplitude ratio" was significantly (P < .001) lower of the innocent murmurs compared with that of the abnormal ones (median 16 versus 58 %). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations within the reference range do not rule out a congenital cardiac anomaly. Murmurs longer than 80% of the systole are most likely abnormal, whereas murmurs shorter than that could be either innocent or pathologic.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomarkers/blood
Dog Diseases/blood
Heart Defects, Congenital/veterinary
Heart Murmurs/veterinary
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood
Peptide Fragments/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Newborn
Dog Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Dogs
Echocardiography/veterinary
Female
Heart Auscultation/veterinary
Heart Defects, Congenital/blood
Heart Murmurs/blood
Male
Predictive Value of Tests
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Peptide Fragments); 0 (pro-brain natriuretic peptide (1-76)); 114471-18-0 (Natriuretic Peptide, Brain)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171023
[Lr] Last revision date:171023
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170319
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jvim.14667

  10 / 3348 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28295303
[Au] Autor:Riknagel D; Zimmermann H; Farlie R; Hammershøi D; Schmidt SE; Hedegaard M; Humaidan P; Struijk JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Separation and characterization of maternal cardiac and vascular sounds in the third trimester of pregnancy.
[So] Source:Int J Gynaecol Obstet;137(3):253-259, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3479
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To characterize the vascular sounds of the uteroplacental blood flow obtained by microphones. METHODS: The present retrospective study took place in an anechoic chamber facility at Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, in 2012, and included pregnant participants aged 18-40 years with a singleton pregnancy at 32-36 weeks and a parity of 0-2. Abdominal Doppler ultrasonography was performed bilaterally on the uterine arteries. Subsequently, in the same positions, sound recordings were performed with microphones. The derived raw sound signal was separated into two frequency ranges, and characterized accordingly. RESULTS: The mean pregnancy length among 25 participants was 33.6 ± 2.0 weeks. The pulsatility index of the uterine artery was 0.67 ± 0.24. All 50 recordings displayed the first and second maternal heart sounds (frequency 25-100 Hz), and in 17 of 50 recordings, maternal vascular murmurs (frequency 200-800 Hz) were present. The average pulse wave velocity between the maternal aortic valve and the uterine artery was estimated to be 6.6 ± 1.5 m/s. CONCLUSION: Maternal vascular murmurs in the frequency range of 200-800 Hz were identified as a possible marker of abnormal uteroplacental blood flow, and provide a means to measure the arterial pulse wave velocity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Heart Sounds/physiology
Placenta/blood supply
Pregnancy Trimester, Third/physiology
Uterine Artery/diagnostic imaging
Uterus/blood supply
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acoustics/instrumentation
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Female
Humans
Placenta/diagnostic imaging
Pregnancy
Pulse Wave Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Uterine Artery/physiology
Uterus/diagnostic imaging
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170315
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijgo.12151


page 1 of 335 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information