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[PMID]: 29524307
[Au] Autor:Cowan AJ; Johnson CK; Libby EN
[Ad] Address:Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Plasma Cell Diseases and Organ Transplant: A Comprehensive Review.
[So] Source:Am J Transplant;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1600-6143
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plasma cell diseases are a class of hematologic diseases that are sometimes present as pre-existing diagnoses prior to organ transplantation, causative factors leading to a need for organ transplantation, or may occur post-transplant as part of the spectrum of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders. Herein, we review the most common plasma cell diseases, both as co-existing with other causes of organ failure, but also as a primary underlying cause for organ failure. In many cases, treatment of the underlying clonal disease may be indicated before proceeding with organ transplant. This review aims to provide current and relevant data regarding the management of these conditions in the organ transplant patient, for transplant providers and those who take care of these patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ajt.14731

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[PMID]: 29381772
[Au] Autor:Chen D; Zhou D; Guo D; Xu P; Chen B
[Ad] Address:Department of Hematology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of outcomes in hematological malignancies treated with haploidentical or HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following myeloablative conditioning: A meta-analysis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191955, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Haploidentical and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling hematopoietic stem transplantation are two main ways used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in haploidentical allo-HSCT (HID-SCT), and some institutions found HID-SCT had similar outcomes as HLA-identical sibling allo-HSCT (ISD-SCT). To clarify if HID-SCT has equal effects to ISD-SCT in hematologic malignancies, we performed this meta-analysis. METHODS: Relevant articles published prior to February 2017 were searched on PubMed. Two reviewers assessed the quality of the included studies and extracted data independently. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Seven studies including 1919 patients were included. The rate of platelet engraftment is significantly lower after HID-SCT versus ISD-SCT while there is no difference in neutrophil engraftment (OR = 2.58, 95% CI = 1.70-3.93, P < 0.00001). The risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is significantly higher after HID-SCT versus ISD-SCT (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.42-2.49, P < 0.00001), but the relapse rate is lower in HID-SCT group (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.55-0.90, P = 0.005). The incidence rates of overall survival (OS) and disease-free-survival/leukemia-free survival/relapse-free survival (DFS/LFS/RFS) after ISD-SCT are all significantly superior to HID-SCT (OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.08-1.62, P = 0.006; OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.03-1.52, P = 0.02). There is no significant difference in transplantation related mortality (TRM) rate after HID-SCT and ISD-SCT. CONCLUSION: After myeloablative conditioning, patients receiving ISD-SCT have a faster engraftment, lower acute GVHD and longer life expectancy compared to HID-SCT with GVHD prophylaxis (cyclosporine A, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and antithymoglobulin; CsA + MTX + MMF + ATG). Currently, HID-SCT with GVHD prophylaxis (CsA + MTX + MMF + ATG) may not replace ISD-SCT when HLA-identical sibling donor available.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hematologic Diseases/therapy
Transplantation Conditioning
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: HLA Antigens/immunology
Haplotypes
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Survival Analysis
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (HLA Antigens)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191955

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[PMID]: 29273489
[Au] Autor:Phillips GS; Freites-Martinez A; Hsu M; Skripnik Lucas A; Barrios DM; Ciccolini K; Marchetti MA; Deng L; Myskowski PL; Lee EH; Markova A; Lacouture ME
[Ad] Address:SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York; Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
[Ti] Title:Inflammatory dermatoses, infections, and drug eruptions are the most common skin conditions in hospitalized cancer patients.
[So] Source:J Am Acad Dermatol;, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6787
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Dermatologic conditions cause morbidity and mortality among hospitalized cancer patients. An improved understanding is critical for implementing clinical and research programs in inpatient oncodermatology. OBJECTIVE: To characterize inpatient dermatology consultations at a large comprehensive cancer center. METHODS: Retrospective database query of new admissions and medical record review of initial inpatient dermatology consultations comparing inpatients consulted and not consulted during January-December 2015. RESULTS: In total, 412 of 11,533 inpatients received 471 dermatology consultations (54% male, median age 59.5 years). Patients with hematologic cancers were 6 times more likely to receive dermatologic consultations compared with nonhematologic cancers (odds ratio 6.56, 95% confidence interval 5.35-8.05, P < .0001). Patients consulted by a dermatologist had a significantly longer length of stay than inpatients not consulted by dermatology (median 11 vs 5 days, P < .0001). Among the 645 dermatologic conditions diagnosed, the most common categories were inflammatory diseases, infections, and drug reactions; the most frequent conditions were contact dermatitis, herpes zoster, and chemotherapy-induced drug eruptions. LIMITATIONS: The study's retrospective nature and single-institution setting are potential limitations. CONCLUSION: Hematologic malignancies are a significant risk factor for dermatology inpatient consultations. A significantly longer length of stay was associated with dermatology consultations, suggesting high comorbidities in these patients. Increased dermatologic care of these inpatients might improve quality of life, dermatologic health, and ability to receive anticancer agents.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29506345
[Au] Autor:Cho SY; Lee HJ; Lee DG
[Ad] Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Infectious complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: current status and future perspectives in Korea.
[So] Source:Korean J Intern Med;33(2):256-276, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2005-6648
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a treatment for hematologic malignancies, immune deficiencies, or genetic diseases, ect. Recently, the number of HSCTs performed in Korea has increased and the outcomes have improved. However, infectious complications account for most of the morbidity and mortality after HSCT. Post-HSCT infectious complications are usually classified according to the time after HSCT: pre-engraftment, immediate post-engraftment, and late post-engraftment period. In addition, the types and risk factors of infectious complications differ according to the stem cell source, donor type, conditioning intensity, region, prophylaxis strategy, and comorbidities, such as graft-versushost disease and invasive fungal infection. In this review, we summarize infectious complications after HSCT, focusing on the Korean perspectives.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3904/kjim.2018.036

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[PMID]: 29441972
[Au] Autor:Sakurada H; Yasuhara K; Kato K; Asano S; Yoshida M; Yamamura M; Tachi T; Teramachi H
[Ti] Title:An investigation of visual hallucinations associated with voriconazole administration to patients with hematological malignancies.
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(11):660-664, 2016 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Voriconazole (VRCZ) is commonly administered to treat fungal infections in patients with hematological malignancies. Some of these patients experience VRCZ-associated visual hallucinations. We conducted a retrospective survey to investigate the characteristic features of this side effect. Patients with hematological malignancies who were treated with VRCZ for a fungal infection after hospitalization at Ichinomiya municipal hospital between 1 October 2005 and 31 December 2015 were included in this study (n = 103). Fifteen of these (14.6%) reported visual hallucinations that started on day 1-7. Seven of these 15 patients developed this symptom rapidly (day 1 or 2). Three patients had transient symptoms (lasting 2-12 days), 6 patients experienced hallucinations throughout the treatment, and the duration was unknown in 6 patients. Eleven patients experienced visual hallucinations when their eyes were closed (73 %) and these disappeared when they opened their eyes. One patient had visual hallucinations with open eyes, while the state of the eyes was unknown in 3 patients. The patients saw a range of images including people, animals, landscapes, and foods; several reported seeing images like those found in movies. In addition, 9 of 15 patients (60%) with visual hallucinations had visual disturbances. This was a higher proportion than that observed in patients who did not develop hallucinations (17 of 88; 19.3 %; P < 0.05). However, we found no significant difference between the blood VCRZ concentrations of patients who developed or did not develop visual hallucinations. This study indicated that most of these patients had visual hallucinations that manifested on eye closure, and they did not progress to serious mental illness. Our findings emphasized the importance of fully explaining the features of this symptom to each patient prior to starting VRCZ administration in order to reduce anxiety. In addition, since VRCZ discontinuation will compromise patient management, therapeutic drug monitoring should be used to increase the likelihood of successful therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/adverse effects
Hallucinations/chemically induced
Hematologic Neoplasms/complications
Hematologic Neoplasms/psychology
Voriconazole/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antifungal Agents/blood
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
Female
Hallucinations/epidemiology
Hallucinations/psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoses/complications
Mycoses/prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Vision Disorders/chemically induced
Vision Disorders/epidemiology
Voriconazole/blood
Voriconazole/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); JFU09I87TR (Voriconazole)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6725

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[PMID]: 29397528
[Au] Autor:Ma H; Davarifar A; Amengual JE
[Ad] Address:Center for Lymphoid Malignancies, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, 51 West 51st Street, Suite 200, New York, NY, 10019, USA.
[Ti] Title:The Future of Combination Therapies for Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma (PTCL).
[So] Source:Curr Hematol Malig Rep;13(1):13-24, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1558-822X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Peripheral T cell lymphoma is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases which are characterized by poor outcomes to treatment and short overall survival. In the past decade, several new therapies targeting T cell biology have been approved in the relapsed setting. These new therapies, such as pralatrexate, romidepsin, belinostat, and brentuximab vedotin, have begun to make their way into practice. Despite these advances, outcomes have not changed dramatically. In recent years, efforts have been made to incorporate these new therapies into combination strategies to treat this challenging disease entity. Herein we will review some of the latest developments. RECENT FINDINGS: With the new WHO classification, discrete entities of PTCL are now being identified by molecular and phenotypic markers. This new classification is critical to our ability to define disease entities which may respond to certain classes of targeted therapy. Some such mutations include genes controlling epigenetics (TET2, IDH2, DNMT3A, RHOA, CD28). As such, epigenetic therapies such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have become the platform to which other novel therapies or chemotherapy has been added. Early phase clinical studies have demonstrated that combination therapy with romidepsin plus other agents known to have activity in T cell lymphoma have enhanced clinical benefit for this group of diseases. In addition, the antibody drug conjugate, brentuximab vedotin has been shown to have potent activity in T cell lymphomas expressing CD30. This drug is being studied as well with other targeted therapies and chemotherapy in an effort to improve response rates and progression-free survival. Although T cell lymphomas remain a highly challenging group of diseases to treat, new efforts to leverage drugs that discretely target the biology that drives T cell lymphomagenesis in combination provide hope that improved outcomes may be realized in the near future.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11899-018-0432-3

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[PMID]: 29516991
[Au] Autor:Wang H; Ge W; Zhuang Y; Fu J; Li D; Ju X
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, China.
[Ti] Title:Fast recovery of platelet production in NOD/SCID mice after transplantation with expansion of megakaryocyte from cord blood CD34+ cells.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Ther;14(1):233-239, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1998-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Cord blood transplantation (CBT) can be a life-saving procedure in the treatment of a broad variety of disorders, including hematologic, immune, and genetic diseases. However, delayed platelet recovery hinders the application of CBT. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the optimal combination of cytokines to amplify megakaryocyte (Mk). Methods: CB CD34+ cells were obtained by immunomagnetic isolation and amplified under four different cytokine combinations. CD34+ cells of the group with thrombopoietin (TPO), stem cell factor (SCF), Flt-3 ligand (FL), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were collected on days 0, 3, 7, 10, and 14. Immunophenotype was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM). Polyploidic Mk cultured cells were collected on days 7 and 14 for colony-forming unit-Mk assay. The NOD/SCID mice were injected with expanded CD34+ cells, and the peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) were tested on 3, 7, and 14 days. Results: The group with TPO, SCF, FL, and IL-6 reached the maximal total expansion fold and Mk population at day 7, which was slightly reduced later. After transplantation into NOD/SCID mice with expanded CD34+ cells, the human CD41+ cells were detected in mice PB on day 3 and in BM on day 7, then disappeared after 14 days. The expressing of activated platelet CD 42b+/CD62P+ increased gradually after transplantation. Conclusion: Platelets can recover rapidly in vivo by means of expanded CD34+ cells with various cytokines. In our system, a group of TPO, SCF, FL, and IL-6 represents the best cytokine combination for expansion of Mk progenitor cells from CB CD34+ cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1482.193893

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[PMID]: 29442037
[Au] Autor:Seko T; Usami E; Kimura M; Nakao T; Matsuoka T; Yoshimura T; Kanamori N; Tachi T; Teramachi H
[Ti] Title:A comparative analysis of micafungin and caspofungin for empirical antifungal therapy in antibiotic-unresponsive febrile patients with hematologic malignancies.
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(8):484-488, 2016 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study was retrospectively carried out to compare the efficacy of echinocandins such as micafungin (MCFG) and caspofungin (CPFG) in the treatment of antibiotic-unresponsive febrile patients with hematologic malignancies. A total of 163 patients received either MCFG or CPFG. We evaluated the efficacy of echinocandin against fever decline in all patients. Fever decline, defined as a body temperature of less than 37.5 °C sustained for more than 48 h without scheduled antipyretic medication. Efficacy assessments showed that the incidence of fever decline was not significantly different between the MCFG and CPFG groups (P=0.599). The median number of days from the start of echinocandin administration to fever decline was 5 in both the MCFG and CPFG groups. Multivariate analysis showed that the use of anti-MRSA drugs (HR, 0.64; 95%CI, 0.45-0.90; P=0.011) and a change from echinocandins to voriconazole or liposomal-amphotericin B (HR, 0.50; 95%CI, 0.30-0.74; P<0.001) are significant risk factors for sustained fever. A significant difference (P=0.002) in incidence of fever decline was however associated with differences in the timing of anti-MRSA drug administration. The median number of days from the start of echinocandin administration to fever decline was 5 when administration of the anti-MRSA drug occurred "simultaneously or prior to echinocandin start" and 11 in the "next day or later of echinocandin start" group. In other words, starting anti-MRSA drug treatment after echinocandin treatment is a risk factor. In conclusion, MCFG and CPFG have similar efficacy as empirical antifungal agents in the treatment of antibioticunresponsive febrile patients with hematopoietic malignancies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
Echinocandins/therapeutic use
Fever/drug therapy
Fever/etiology
Hematologic Neoplasms/complications
Lipopeptides/therapeutic use
Mycoses/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Drug Resistance, Fungal
Female
Humans
Male
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects
Middle Aged
Mycoses/complications
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); 0 (Echinocandins); 0 (Lipopeptides); F0XDI6ZL63 (caspofungin); R10H71BSWG (micafungin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6612

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[PMID]: 29401557
[Au] Autor:Cho SY; Park YJ; Cho H; Park DJ; Yu JK; Oak HC; Lee DG
[Ad] Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Enterococcus faecium Bacteremic Isolates from Hematologic and Non-hematologic Patients: Differences in Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics.
[So] Source:Ann Lab Med;38(3):226-234, 2018 May.
[Is] ISSN:2234-3814
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Enterococcus faecium, especially vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREfm), is a major concern for patients with hematologic diseases. Exposure to antibiotics including fluoroquinolone, which is used as a routine prophylaxis for patients with hematologic (MH) diseases, has been reported to be a risk factor for infection with vancomycin-resistant eneterocci. We compared the characteristics of E. faecium isolates according to their vancomycin susceptibility and patient group (MH vs non-MH patients). METHODS: A total of 120 E. faecium bacteremic isolates (84 from MH and 36 from non-MH patients) were collected consecutively, and their characteristics (susceptibility, multilocus sequence type [MLST], Tn1546 type, and the presence of virulence genes and plasmids) were determined. RESULTS: Among the vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium (VSEfm) isolates, resistance to ampicillin (97.6% vs 61.1%) and high-level gentamicin (71.4% vs 38.9%) was significantly higher in isolates from MH patients than in those from non-MH patients. Notably, hyl, esp, and pEF1071 were present only in isolates with ampicillin resistance. Among the VREfm isolates, ST230 (33.3%) and ST17 (26.2%) were predominant in MH patients, while ST17 (61.1%) was predominant in non-MH patients. Plasmid pLG1 was more prevalent in E. faecium isolates from MH patients than in those from non-MH patients, regardless of vancomycin resistance. Transposon analysis revealed five types across all VREfm isolates. CONCLUSIONS: The antimicrobial resistance profiles and molecular characteristics of E. faecium isolates differed according to the underlying diseases of patients within the same hospital. We hypothesize that the prophylactic use of fluoroquinolone might have an effect on these differences.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3343/alm.2018.38.3.226

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[PMID]: 29346543
[Au] Autor:Huang KG; Cluzet V; Hamilton K; Fadugba O
[Ad] Address:Section of Allergy and Immunology, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:The Impact of Reported Beta-Lactam Allergy in Hospitalized Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Requiring Antibiotics.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Patients hospitalized with hematologic malignancy are particularly vulnerable to infection. The impact of reported beta-lactam (BL) allergy in this population remains unknown. Objective: To define the impact of reported BL-only allergy (BLOA) label on clinical outcomes compared to those with no BL allergy (NBLA) in hematologic malignancy inpatients requiring systemic antibiotics. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of adult inpatients with hematologic malignancy admitted at two tertiary care hospitals 2010-2015. The primary outcome was hospital length of stay (LOS) after first antibiotic. Secondary outcomes included re-admission, mortality, complications, total hospital charges, and antibiotic usage. Results: In our cohort (n=4671), 38.3% had leukemia, 4.9% had Hodgkin's lymphoma, 36.1% had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 20.7% had multiple myeloma. Among subjects, 35.1% reported antibiotic allergy, 14.1% (n=660) had BLOA (including 9.3% with penicillin-only allergy and 3.3% cephalosporin-only allergy). Subjects with BLOA had longer median LOS compared to NBLA (11.3 vs. 7.6 days, p<0.001), which remained significant after multivariable adjustment. Patients with BLOA also had significantly worse outcomes compared to NBLA in terms of mortality rate at 30-days (7.6% vs. 15.8%, p=0.017) and 180-days (15.8% compared to 12.2%, p=0.013), 30-day re-admission rate (19.2% vs. 15.1%, p=0.008), Clostridium difficile rate (17.7% vs. 11.6%, p<0.001), total hospital charges ($223046 vs. $173256, p<0.001), antibiotic classes used (median 3 vs. 2 classes/patient, p<0.001), and antibiotic duration (median 9.0 vs. 6.0 days, p<0.001). Conclusion: In hospitalized patients with hematologic malignancy requiring antibiotics, patients with reported BL allergy have worse clinical outcomes and higher healthcare cost than those without BL allergy label.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/ciy037


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