Database : MEDLINE
Search on : hemorrhagic and fever and with and renal and syndrome [Words]
References found : 2831 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 284 go to page                         

  1 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29281106
[Au] Autor:Resman Rus K; Korva M; Bogovic P; Pal E; Strle F; Avsic-Zupanc T
[Ad] Address:Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
[Ti] Title:Delayed Interferon Type 1-Induced Antiviral State Is a Potential Factor for Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome Severity.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;217(6):926-932, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Europe and Asia. Interferon (IFN) responses play an important role in HFRS pathogenesis and early IFN-ß response is delayed by pathogenic hantaviruses. The severity of HFRS caused by Dobrava virus (DOBV) and Puumala virus (PUUV) varies. Our aim was to determine whether differences in early activation of IFN type 1-induced antiviral state influence HFRS severity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors and HFRS patients were stimulated with DOBV or PUUV and expression of selected genes was measured. PUUV, but not DOBV, activated IFN type 1-induced antiviral state in stimulated PBMCs, and IFNß, STAT-1, and MxA were highly upregulated. Upregulation of MxA was earlier in acute-phase PBMCs and higher in convalescent-phase PBMCs from patients with mild compared with severe PUUV infection. Our study showed that delayed IFN type 1-induced antiviral state could contribute to HFRS severity, particularly in PUUV infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix650

  2 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29512853
[Au] Autor:Subbiah A; Bagchi S; Bhowmik D; Mahajan S; Yadav RK; Chhabra Y; Agarwal S
[Ad] Address:Department of Nephrology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Dengue fever in renal allograft recipients: clinical course and outcome.
[So] Source:Transpl Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1399-3062
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There are annual outbreaks of Dengue infection in tropical and subtropical countries. This retrospective study aimed to assess the clinical manifestation of dengue and outcome in renal transplant recipients. METHODS: Renal transplant recipients diagnosed with dengue in the nephrology department during the outbreak from August 2015 to December 2015 were included in the study. RESULTS: Twenty patients developed dengue presenting during the outbreak. Mean age was 31.9 ± 8.8 year and all were males. Two patients had severe dengue (Dengue Hemorrhagic fever (DHF), Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS)). Clinical presentation included febrile illness (95%), myalgia (65%), headache (30%), retro-orbital pain (10%) and mucocutaneous bleeding manifestations (10%). Three (15%) had third space fluid accumulation and 2 (10%) had hypotension. 90% patients had thrombocytopenia, with 4 requiring platelet transfusion. Leucopenia (WBC < 4000/mm3) developed in 50% patients. 60% had transient transaminitis. One patient with severed dengue expired and one recovered with IV immunoglobulin therapy. 40% patients had rise in serum creatinine, with complete recovery in all patients. CONCLUSION: Clinical manifestations of dengue infection in renal transplant recipients were similar to that in general population. However, leucopenia necessitating temporary withdrawal of immunosuppression was common. Renal dysfunction was frequent but completely reversible. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tid.12875

  3 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29490629
[Au] Autor:Li J; Du H; Bai XF; Wang XY; Zhang Y; Jiang H; Wang PZ
[Ad] Address:Center of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Air-force Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Rd, Baqiao District, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710038, China.
[Ti] Title:Study on expression of plasma sCD138 in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;18(1):100, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Until now, there is non-specific treatment, and exploring early and novel biomarkers to determine the disease severity and prognosis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) would be of importance for clinician to take systematic and timely intervention. This study observed the expression of plasma sCD138, a soluble component shedding from the glycocalyx (GCX) to the circulating blood, and evaluated its predictive value on disease severity and prognosis of HFRS. METHODS: One hundred and seventy-six patients with HFRS who were treated at our center between January 2011 and December 2013 were randomly enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into a mild-type group, a moderate-type group, a severe-type group and a critical-type group according to the HFRS criteria for clinical classification. Thirty-five blood samples from healthy subjects were obtained as the controls. The concentrations of sCD138 were detected using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (Fib), albumin (ALB), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), white blood cells (WBC), platelets (PLT), glucose (GLU), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr) in the samples were routinely tested. The levels of sCD138 among the different types were compared; the correlation among sCD138 and the laboratory parameters mentioned above were analyzed. The predictive effectiveness for prognosis of sCD138 was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. RESULTS: Except for the mild-type, the levels of sCD138 in the moderate-, severe- and critical-type patients during the acute stage were significantly higher than that of the convalescent stage and the control (P<0.05). With the aggravation of the disease, the levels of sCD138 during the acute stage had an increasing tendency, while demonstrated no significant difference among the moderate-, severe- and critical-type patients (P>0.05). sCD138 was negatively correlated with Fib, PLT and ALB, and was positively correlated with WBC and AST (P<0.05). sCD138 demonstrated predictive effectiveness for prognosis with the area under the curve (AUC) of 0.778 (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Dynamic detection of plasma sCD138 might be benefit to evaluating the disease severity and prognosis of the patients with HFRS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-018-3005-0

  4 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29508304
[Au] Autor:Ahn HJ; Chung JH; Kim DM; Yoon NR; Kim CM
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chosun University, 588 Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju, 61453, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome accompanied by panhypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus: a case report.
[So] Source:J Neurovirol;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1538-2443
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Central diabetes insipidus (DI) was detected in a patient with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) who had been molecularly and serologically diagnosed with Hantaan virus infection. We recommend that clinicians differentiate central DI in HFRS patients with a persistent diuretic phase even when pituitary MRI findings are normal.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13365-018-0624-6

  5 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29488118
[Au] Autor:Shimizu K; Yoshimatsu K; Taruishi M; Tsuda Y; Arikawa J
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita-15, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-8638, Japan. kshimizu@med.hokudai.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Involvement of CD8 T cells in the development of renal hemorrhage in a mouse model of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.
[So] Source:Arch Virol;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1432-8798
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is caused by hantavirus infection. Although host immunity is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of HFRS, the mechanism remains to be elucidated. A mouse model of HFRS, which showed renal hemorrhage similar to that seen in patients, has been developed previously. In this study, we aimed to clarify whether CD4 and CD8 T cells are involved in the development of renal hemorrhage in the mouse model. At 2 days before virus inoculation, CD4 or CD8 T cells in 6-week-old BALB/c mice were depleted by administration of antibodies. The CD4 T cell-depleted mice developed signs of disease such as transient weight loss, ruffled fur and renal hemorrhage as in non-depleted mice. In contrast, the CD8 T cell-depleted mice showed no signs of disease. After determination of CTL epitopes on the viral glycoprotein in BALB/c mice, the quantity of virus-specific CTLs was analyzed using an MHC tetramer. The quantity of virus-specific CTLs markedly increased in spleens and kidneys of virus-infected mice. However, the quantity in high-pathogenic clone-infected mice was comparable to that in low-pathogenic clone-infected mice. We previously reported that the high-pathogenic clone propagated more efficiently than the low-pathogenic clone in kidneys of mice during the course of infection. Therefore, there is a possibility that the balance between quantities of the target and effector is important for disease outcome. In conclusion, this study showed that CD8 T cells are involved in the development of renal hemorrhage in a mouse model of HFRS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00705-018-3786-x

  6 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29364099
[Au] Autor:Kilit TP; Kilit C; Erarslan S
[Ti] Title:A rare cause of acute pancreatitis: Hantavirus infection.
[So] Source:Acta Gastroenterol Belg;80(1):59-61, 2017 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1784-3227
[Cp] Country of publication:Belgium
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hantaviruses cause potentially fatal two different systemic infectious diseases in humans named as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The clinical features of HFRS are hemorrhage, fever, thrombocytopenia and acute renal insufficiency frequently observed. HFRS shows distinctive clinical manifestations throughout from acute influenza-like febrile illness to shock. Although a large portion of HRFS patients present with a complaint of abdominal pain, acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of HFRS. No specific treatment protocol has been described for HRFS and supportive treatment is the basic approach. The rate of success enhanced with early diagnosis and intensive care support. Clinicians should be alert to the HFRS in patients with acute pancreatitis associated with systemic viral infection. We describe a case with HFRS who has presented with acute kidney injury, thrombocytopenia and acute pancreatitis. The patient was treated by supportive management successfully.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29393924
[Au] Autor:Kerins JL; Koske SE; Kazmierczak J; Austin C; Gowdy K; Dibernardo A; Seoul Virus Working Group; Canadian Seoul Virus Investigation Group (Federal); Canadian Seoul Virus Investigation Group (Provincial); Contributors
[Ti] Title:Outbreak of Seoul Virus Among Rats and Rat Owners - United States and Canada, 2017.
[So] Source:MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep;67(4):131-134, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1545-861X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In December 2016, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (WDHS) notified CDC of a patient hospitalized with fever, leukopenia, elevated transaminases, and proteinuria. The patient owned and operated an in-home rattery, or rat-breeding facility, with approximately 100 Norway rats, primarily bred as pets. A family member developed similar symptoms 4 weeks later, but was not hospitalized. Because both patients were known to have rodent contact, they were tested for hantavirus infections. In January 2017, CDC confirmed recent, acute Seoul virus infection in both patients. An investigation was conducted to identify additional human and rat infections and prevent further transmission. Ultimately, the investigation identified 31 facilities in 11 states with human and/or rat Seoul virus infections; six facilities also reported exchanging rats with Canadian ratteries. Testing of serum samples from 183 persons in the United States and Canada identified 24 (13.1%) with Seoul virus antibodies; three (12.5%) were hospitalized and no deaths occurred. This investigation, including cases described in a previously published report from Tennessee (1), identified the first known transmission of Seoul virus from pet rats to humans in the United States and Canada. Pet rat owners should practice safe rodent handling to prevent Seoul virus infection (2).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Disease Outbreaks
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/epidemiology
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/veterinary
Rodent Diseases/epidemiology
Seoul virus/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Canada/epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks/veterinary
Humans
Ownership
Rats
Rodent Diseases/virology
United States/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm6704a5

  8 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29378098
[Au] Autor:Khasanova GM; Tutelyan AV; Khasanova AN
[Ti] Title:[Actual nutrition of patients suffered from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome].
[So] Source:Vopr Pitan;84(6):58-62, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0042-8833
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of the article is to study actual ration of patients suffered from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and its interaction with the development of arterial hypertension (AH). 296 men aged 20­59 suffered from HFRS were under the care of physician within the period of 1 to 6 years. Among this group 49 cases of arterial hypertension have been registered after HFRS. Frequency method of food product consumption was used to define nutrition. A Russian questionnaire published by Institute of Nutrition (1997) was used. Actual nutrition in men suffered from HFRS is marked by basic nutrients unbalance that is: excessive cholesterol and fat consumption (due to saturated fatty acid), polyunsaturated fatty acid deficiency, sugar overuse and animal protein prevalence over vegetable proteins in patient ration. Atherogenic shift in a ration of patients with AH and suffered from HRFS has been exposed more strongly in all aged group but mostly evident in patients aged 40 and after. Alcohol consumption in men with AH and suffered from HFRS is higher than in healthy peers. Interaction between atherogenic unbalance on the main nutrients in patients with HFRS and arterial hypertension has been defined. Consumatory behavior correction is to be taken to prevent arterial hypertension in recovered patients suffered from HFRS.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dietary Fats
Food Preferences
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/physiopathology
Hypertension/physiopathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Dietary Fats/administration & dosage
Dietary Fats/adverse effects
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/blood
Humans
Hypertension/blood
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Dietary Fats)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29329512
[Au] Autor:Xiao H; Tong X; Huang R; Gao L; Hu S; Li Y; Gao H; Zheng P; Yang H; Huang ZYX; Tan H; Tian H
[Ad] Address:College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, 410081, China. xiaohong.hnnu@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Landscape and rodent community composition are associated with risk of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in two cities in China, 2006-2013.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;18(1):37, 2018 01 12.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a rodent-borne disease caused by hantaviruses. Landscape can influence the risk of hantavirus infection for humans, mainly through its effect on rodent community composition and distribution. It is important to understand how landscapes influence population dynamics for different rodent species and the subsequent effect on HFRS risk. METHODS: To determine how rodent community composition influenced human hantavirus infection, we monitored rodent communities in the prefecture-level cities of Loudi and Shaoyang, China, from 2006 to 2013. Land use data were extracted from satellite images and rodent community diversity was analyzed in 45 trapping sites, in different environments. Potential contact matrices, determining how rodent community composition influence HFRS infection among different land use types, were estimated based on rodent community composition and environment type for geo-located HFRS cases. RESULTS: Apodemus agrarius and Rattus norvegicus were the predominant species in Loudi and Shaoyang, respectively. The major risk of HFRS infection was concentrated in areas with cultivated land and was associated with A. agrarius, R. norvegicus, and Rattus flavipectus. In urban areas in Shaoyang, Mus musculus was related to risk of hantavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: Landscape features and rodent community dynamics may affect the risk of human hantavirus infection. Results of this study may be useful for the development of HFRS prevention initiatives that are customized for regions with different geographical environments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-017-2827-5

  10 / 2831 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29273568
[Au] Autor:Jiang DB; Zhang JP; Cheng LF; Zhang GW; Li Y; Li ZC; Lu ZH; Zhang ZX; Lu YC; Zheng LH; Zhang FL; Yang K
[Ad] Address:Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.
[Ti] Title:Hantavirus Gc induces long-term immune protection via LAMP-targeting DNA vaccine strategy.
[So] Source:Antiviral Res;150:174-182, 2018 02.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9096
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) occurs widely throughout Eurasia. Unfortunately, there is no effective treatment, and prophylaxis remains the best option against the major pathogenic agent, hantaan virus (HTNV), which is an Old World hantavirus. However, the absence of cellular immune responses and immunological memory hampers acceptance of the current inactivated HFRS vaccine. Previous studies revealed that a lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1)-targeting strategy involving a DNA vaccine based on the HTNV glycoprotein Gn successfully conferred long-term immunity, and indicated that further research on Gc, another HTNV antigen, was warranted. Plasmids encoding Gc and lysosome-targeted Gc, designated pVAX-Gc and pVAX-LAMP/Gc, respectively, were constructed. Proteins of interest were identified by fluorescence microscopy following cell line transfection. Five groups of 20 female BALB/c mice were subjected to the following inoculations: inactivated HTNV vaccine, pVAX-LAMP/Gc, pVAX-Gc, and, as the negative controls, pVAX-LAMP or the blank vector pVAX1. Humoral and cellular immunity were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and 15-mer peptide enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) epitope mapping assays. Repeated immunization with pVAX-LAMP/Gc enhanced adaptive immune responses, as demonstrated by the specific and neutralizing antibody titers and increased IFN-γ production. The inactivated vaccine induced a comparable humoral reaction, but the negative controls only elicited insignificant responses. Using a mouse model of HTNV challenge, the in vivo protection conferred by the inactivated vaccine and Gc-based constructs (with/without LAMP recombination) was confirmed. Evidence of pan-epitope reactions highlighted the long-term cellular response to the LAMP-targeting strategy, and histological observations indicated the safety of the LAMP-targeting vaccines. The long-term protective immune responses induced by pVAX-LAMP/Gc may be due to the advantage afforded by lysosomal targeting after exogenous antigen processing initiation and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation trafficking. MHC II-restricted antigen recognition effectively primes HTNV-specific CD4 T-cells, leading to the promotion of significant immune responses and immunological memory. An epitope-spreading phenomenon was observed, which mirrors the previous result from the Gn study, in which the dominant IFN-γ-responsive hot-spot epitopes were shared between HLA-II and H2 . Importantly, the pan-epitope reaction to Gc indicated that Gc should be with potential for use in further hantavirus DNA vaccine investigations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Process


page 1 of 284 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information