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[PMID]: 29477891
[Au] Autor:Khan Z; Al-Thabaiti SA
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: zkkhan@kau.edu.sa.
[Ti] Title:Green synthesis of zero-valent Fe-nanoparticles: Catalytic degradation of rhodamine B, interactions with bovine serum albumin and their enhanced antimicrobial activities.
[So] Source:J Photochem Photobiol B;180:259-267, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2682
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biomimetic method was used for the synthesis of Fe-nanoparticles (FeNPs). FeCl and Hibiscus sabdariffa, Roselle flower aqueous extract (HBS) were employed in the present studies. The FeNPs have been characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope (TEM), and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The average particles diameter was found to be 18 nm. The as prepared FeNPs were used as a catalyst to the oxidative degradation of rhodamine B (RB) in presence of NaBH . The effects of various quencher on the degradation rates were examined by employing ammonium oxalate (AO), benzoquinone (BQ), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), and potassium iodide (KI). The interactions of FeNPs with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been determined and discussed. Adsorption of FeNPs into the core of BSA changes the tryptophan environment from hydrophobic to hydrophilic (from folding to partially folded and/or unfolded). Tryptophan residues, indole moieties of BSA were responsible to complex formation with FeNPs in excited states via electrostatic, van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions with static quenching. The antimicrobial activities of FeNPs have been determined against human pathogens. Hibiscus sabdariffa flower extract shows mild antimicrobial activities against all target pathogenic organisms. FeNPs have potential antimicrobial activity against both bacterial strains and candida fungus even at low concentration, and retains potential application in biomedical industries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29493487
[Au] Autor:Chuah LO; Yap KP; Shamila-Syuhada AK; Thong KL; Ahmad R; Liong MT; Rusul G
[Ad] Address:1​Food Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden, Penang, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Corrigendum: Floricoccus tropicus gen. nov., sp. nov. and Floricoccus penangensis sp. nov. isolated from fresh flowers of durian tree and hibiscus.
[So] Source:Int J Syst Evol Microbiol;68(3):974, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1466-5034
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1099/ijsem.0.002582

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[PMID]: 29407472
[Au] Autor:Maciel LG; do Carmo MAV; Azevedo L; Daguer H; Molognoni L; de Almeida MM; Granato D; Rosso ND
[Ad] Address:State University of Ponta Grossa, Laboratory of Chemistry, Av. Carlos Cavalcanti, 4748, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Hibiscus sabdariffa anthocyanins-rich extract: Chemical stability, in vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities.
[So] Source:Food Chem Toxicol;113:187-197, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6351
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx is a rich source of anthocyanins and other bioactive compounds but no study reported the effects of experimental conditions on the extraction of these chemical compounds. Therefore, the effects of time and extraction temperature on the bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx were evaluated. In addition, the effects of copigmentation and pH on the stability of anthocyanins were assessed and the cytotoxic effects (LC , IC , and GC ) of the extracts were determined in relation to tumor cell lines - Caco-2, HepG-2, HCT8, and A549. The temperature significantly influenced the total anthocyanins and flavonoids contents. The interaction between time/temperature influenced the total phenolic content and ascorbic acid. The t and the percentage of colour retention decreased markedly at temperatures above 80 C. Variations in pH conserved the antioxidant activity of the anthocyanins, and the protonation-deprotonation process of the extract was reversible. The treatment of cells with purified anthocyanin extract or crude extracts at 5-800 g mL did not show significant cytotoxic effects on the cell lines, corroborating the chemical antioxidant effect of the extracts (DPPH assay). Cyanidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-sambubioside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, and cyanidin-3-sambubioside were identified in the extracts by LC-ESI-MS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29468962
[Au] Autor:Olivares-Vicente M; Barrajon-Catalan E; Herranz-Lopez M; Segura-Carretero A; Joven J; Encinar JA; Micol V
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular (IBMC). Universidad Miguel Hernandez (UMH). Avda. Universidad s/n, Edificio Torregaitan. Elche-03202, Alicante. Spain.
[Ti] Title:Plant-derived polyphenols in human health: biological activity, metabolites and putative molecular targets.
[So] Source:Curr Drug Metab;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1875-5453
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Edible plants such as Hibiscus sabdariffa, Lippia citriodora, Rosmarinus officinalis and Olea europaea, are rich in bioactive compounds that represent most of the phenolic compounds families and have exhibited potential benefits in human health. These plants have been commonly used in folk medicine for their potential therapeutic properties in human chronic diseases. Recent evidence on these plants leads to postulate that polyphenols may account for such effects. Nevertheless, the compounds or metabolites that are responsible for reaching the molecular targets are still unknown. Data based on studies that directly use complex extracts on cellular models, without considering metabolic aspects, have limited applicability. In contrast, studies exploring the absorption process, metabolites in the blood circulation and tissues have become essential to identify the intracellular final effectors that are responsible for extracts bioactivity. Once the cellular metabolites are identified, computational molecular docking techniques suppose a unique tool for virtually screening a large number of compounds on selected protein targets in order to elucidate their potential mechanisms. In this review, we provide an updated overview of the in vitro and in vivo studies on the toxicity, absorption, permeability, pharmacokinetics and cellular metabolism of bioactive compounds derived from the abovementioned plants to identify the potential compounds that are responsible for the observed health effects. We also propose the use of in silico studies to virtually screen metabolites on selected protein targets, in combination with targeted metabolomics with high resolution mass spectrometry and using the candidate metabolites in cellular models, as the method of choice for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of these compounds. .
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1389200219666180220095236

  5 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29466882
[Au] Autor:Cheong AM; Tan CP; Nyam KL
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Faculty of Applied Sciences, 125743 UCSI University , Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Emulsifying conditions and processing parameters optimisation of kenaf seed oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilised by ternary emulsifier mixtures.
[So] Source:Food Sci Technol Int;:1082013218760882, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1738
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Kenaf ( Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed oil has been proven for its multi-pharmacological benefits; however, its poor water solubility and stability have limited its industrial applications. This study was aimed to further improve the stability of pre-developed kenaf seed oil-in-water nanoemulsions by using food-grade ternary emulsifiers. The effects of emulsifier concentration (1, 5, 10, 15% w/w), homogenisation pressure (16,000, 22,000, 28,000 psi), and homogenisation cycles (three, four, five cycles) were studied to produce high stability of kenaf seed oil-in-water nanoemulsions using high pressure homogeniser. Generally, results showed that the emulsifier concentration and homogenisation conditions had great effect ( p < 0.05) on the particle sizes, polydispersity index and hence the physical stability of nanoemulsions. Homogenisation parameters at 28,000 psi for three cycles produced the most stable homogeneous nanoemulsions that were below 130 nm, below 0.16, and above -40 mV of particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential, respectively. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrograph showed that the optimised nanoemulsions had a good distribution within nano-range. The optimised nanoemulsions were proved to be physically stable for up to six weeks of storage at room temperature. The results from this study also provided valuable information in producing stable kenaf seed oil nanoemulsions for the future application in food and nutraceutical industries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1082013218760882

  6 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29313544
[Au] Autor:Chan KW; Ismail M; Mohd Esa N; Imam MU; Ooi J; Khong NMH
[Ad] Address:Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. chankim@upm.edu.my chankw_antioxidant@yahoo.com myhome.e@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Dietary supplementation of defatted kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed meal and its phenolics-saponins rich extract effectively attenuates diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats.
[So] Source:Food Funct;9(2):925-936, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:2042-650X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Kenaf is one of the important commercial fiber crops worldwide and defatted kenaf seed meal (DKSM) is a secondary by-product from the kenaf industry. Thus, efforts to turn this low-cost agricultural waste into value-added functional food ingredients will definitely bring advantageous impacts to the community health, environment and economy. The present study was aimed to investigate the cardioprotective properties of DKSM and its phenolics-saponins rich extract (PSRE) in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rat model. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats via atherogenic diet feeding and dietary interventions were conducted by incorporating DKSM (15% and 30%) and equivalent levels of PSRE (2.3% and 4.6%, respectively, equivalent to the total content of phenolics and saponins in DKSM groups) into the atherogenic diets. After 10 weeks of DKSM and PSRE supplementation, the hepatosomatic index, hepatosteatosis, serum lipid profile, Castelli risk indexes as well as hepatic and renal functions of hypercholesterolemic rats were significantly improved (p < 0.05). Besides, the levels of hepatic Hmgcr and serum Pcsk9 were lowered, along with transcriptional upregulations of hepatic Cyp7a1, Abca1, Lcat, ApoA2 and ApoE (p < 0.05). The gene expression of hepatic Ldlr was marginally enhanced by DKSM supplementation (p > 0.05), but superiorly upregulated by PSRE (p < 0.05). The combined results showed that hypercholesterolemia and the atherogenic risk in rats were effectively attenuated by DKSM and PSRE supplementation, possibly via modulations of multiple vital processes in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. Furthermore, phenolics and saponins may be the bioactives conferring DKSM and PSRE with their anti-hypercholesterolemic properties. In conclusion, DKSM and PSRE are prospective cardioprotective functional food ingredients for hypercholesterolemic individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1039/c7fo01109a

  7 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29439462
[Au] Autor:Juhari NH; Petersen MA
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Science, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 26, Frederiksberg C, DK-1958, 1165 Kbenhavn, Denmark. nurulhanisah.juhari@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Physicochemical Properties and Oxidative Storage Stability of Milled Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) Seeds.
[So] Source:Molecules;23(2), 2018 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Milled Roselle ( L.) seeds of the UMKL cultivar were analyzed for proximate composition, water and oil absorption capacity, and the influence of storage conditions on storage stability. The storage stability was determined under four types of conditions: light/oxygen (air) (LO), light/nitrogen (LN), darkness/oxygen (air) (DO), and darkness/nitrogen (DN) while monitoring for seven consecutive months. During the storage period, the formation of volatiles was determined using dynamic headspace sampling and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. In total, 85 volatiles were identified, mainly aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, furans, and acids indicating lipid oxidation. It is recommended that milled Roselle seeds should be flushed with nitrogen and stored in darkness. Under these conditions, the seeds can be stored for at least three months without changes in volatile profile. This is important to ensure the good quality of milled Roselle seeds for further commercialization.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29433251
[Au] Autor:Seung TW; Park SK; Kang JY; Kim JM; Park SH; Kwon BS; Lee CJ; Kang JE; Kim DO; Lee U; Heo HJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Applied Life Science(BK21 plus), Institute of Agricultural and Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: twseung@naver.com.
[Ti] Title:Ethyl acetate fraction from Hibiscus sabdariffa L. attenuates diabetes-associated cognitive impairment in mice.
[So] Source:Food Res Int;105:589-598, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7145
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The ameliorating effects of the ethyl acetate fraction from Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (EFHS) against diabetes mellitus (DM) and DM-induced cognitive impairment were investigated on streptozotocin (STZ) -induced DM mice. The EFHS groups showed improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared to the STZ group. Furthermore, their liver and kidney function and lipid metabolic imbalance in the blood serum were effectively recovered. The EFHS groups significantly ameliorated STZ-induced cognitive impairment in Y-maze, passive avoidance, and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. The EFHS groups showed significant improvement in the antioxidant and cholinergic systems of the brain tissue. In addition, EFHS had an excellent ameliorating effect on protein expression levels from the tau hyperphosphorylation pathways, such as phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK), phospho-tau (p-tau), and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (c-PARP). The main compounds of EFHS were identified as various phenolic compounds, including hibiscus acid, caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) isomers, and quercetin derivates. Therefore, EFHS containing various physiologically active materials can potentially be used for improving DM-induced cognitive impairment via its antioxidant activity, improvement of the cholinergic system, and hyperphosphorylation tau signaling.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29388549
[Au] Autor:Yan ZF; Lin P; Won KH; Li CT; Park G; Chin B; Kook M; Wang QJ; Yi TH
[Ad] Address:1​College of Life Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus, 1732 Deokyoungdae-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Sphingomonas rhizophila sp. nov., isolated from rhizosphere of Hibiscus syriacus.
[So] Source:Int J Syst Evol Microbiol;68(2):681-686, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1466-5034
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped, catalase-positive and oxidase-positive bacteria (THG-T61 ), was isolated from rhizosphere of Hibiscus syriacus. Growth occurred at 10-37 C (optimum 25-30 C), at pH 5.0-9.0 (optimum 7.0) and in the presence of 0-2.0 % NaCl (optimum without NaCl supplement). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the nearest phylogenetic neighbours of strain THG-T61 were identified as Sphingomonas ginsengisoli KCTC 12630 (97.9 %), Sphingomonas jaspsi DSM 18422 (97.8 %), Sphingomonas astaxanthinifaciens NBRC 102146 (97.4 %), Sphingomonassediminicola KCTC 12629 (97.2 %), 'Sphingomonas swuensis' KCTC 12336 (97.1 %) and Sphingomonas daechungensis KCTC 23718 (96.9 %). The isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-10 (Q-10). The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C17 : 1ω6c, summed feature 4 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1ω7c) and summed feature 7 (C18 : 1ω7c, C18 : 1ω9t and/or C18 : 1ω12t). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingoglycolipid, one unidentified lipid, one unidentified phospholipid, one unidentified glycolipid and one unidentified phosphoglycolipid. The polyamine was homospermidine. The DNA G+C content of strain THG-T61 was 65.6 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain THG-T61 and its closest reference strains were less than 49.2 %, which is lower than the threshold value of 70 %. Therefore, strain THG-T61 represents a novel species of the genus Sphingomonas, for which the name Sphingomonas rhizophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is THG-T61 (=KACC 19189 =CCTCC AB 2016245 ).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hibiscus/microbiology
Phylogeny
Rhizosphere
Soil Microbiology
Sphingomonas/classification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
DNA, Bacterial/genetics
Fatty Acids/chemistry
Glycolipids/chemistry
Phospholipids/chemistry
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics
Republic of Korea
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Spermidine/chemistry
Sphingomonas/genetics
Sphingomonas/isolation & purification
Ubiquinone/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Bacterial); 0 (Fatty Acids); 0 (Glycolipids); 0 (Phospholipids); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S); 1339-63-5 (Ubiquinone); I7T5V2W47R (Ubiquinone Q2); U87FK77H25 (Spermidine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/ijsem.0.002566

  10 / 1234 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29412917
[Au] Autor:Rasheed DM; Porzel A; Frolov A; El Seedi HR; Wessjohann LA; Farag MA
[Ad] Address:Pharmacognosy Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, October 6 University, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Comparative analysis of Hibiscus sabdariffa (roselle) hot and cold extracts in respect to their potential for α-glucosidase inhibition.
[So] Source:Food Chem;250:236-244, 2018 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:0308-8146
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a functional food with potential health benefits, consumed either as hot or cold beverage. To ensure quality control of its various products, accurate measurement of active metabolites is warranted. Herein, we propose a combination of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical platforms for the untargeted characterization of metabolites in two roselle cultivars, Aswan and Sudan-1. The analyses revealed 33 metabolites, including sugars, flavonoids, anthocyanins, phenolic and aliphatic organic acids. Their relative contents in cultivars were assessed via principle component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis (OPLS). Impact of the different extraction methods (decoction, infusion and maceration) was compared by quantitative H NMR spectroscopy, revealing cold maceration to be optimal for preserving anthocyanins, whereas infusion was more suited for recovering organic acids. The metabolite pattern revealed by the different extraction methods was found in good correlation for their ability to inhibit α-glucosidase enzyme.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Process


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