Database : MEDLINE
Search on : history [Words]
References found : 732040 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 73204 go to page                         

  1 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24476016
[Au] Autor:Limaiem F; Gargouri F; Bouraoui S; Lahmar A; Mzabi S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Mongi Slim Hospital , La Marsa, Tunisia .
[Ti] Title:Co-existence of hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic tuberculosis.
[So] Source:Surg Infect (Larchmt);15(4):437-40, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8674
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: Abstract Background: Many case reports describe tuberculosis (TB) co-existent with a malignant neoplasm. However, the neoplasm in most of these reports is lung or breast cancer, with only two cases of liver cancer concomitant with TB reported in the literature. Although both TB and cancer are very common diseases, little attention has been given to the pathophysiologic and practical implications of their co-existence. METHODS: Case report and literature review. CASE REPORT: A 73-year-old female patient with a history of hypertension and hepatitis C presented with abdominal pain of 2 mos duration. Laboratory findings showed an elevated serum concentration of α-fetoprotein. A computed tomography scan demonstrated a solitary hypodense tumor in the right lobe of the liver (segment VIII). A pre-operative chest radiograph was within normal limits. The patient underwent an uneventful tumor resection. Histologic examination of a surgical specimen of the tumor demonstrated a moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma co-existent with caseating granulomas. CONCLUSION: Through this case report, the authors discuss the pathogenesis of the rare association of TB and malignant neoplasm of the liver, and present a review of the current literature on the association of TB and cancer. Further research is required to determine whether a TB infection resembles other chronic infections and inflammatory conditions in having a potential to facilitate oncogenesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1089/sur.2012.177

  2 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24080895
[Au] Autor:Reilly JL; Frankovich K; Hill S; Gershon ES; Keefe RS; Keshavan MS; Pearlson GD; Tamminga CA; Sweeney JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; james.reilly@northwestern.edu....
[Ti] Title:Elevated antisaccade error rate as an intermediate phenotype for psychosis across diagnostic categories.
[So] Source:Schizophr Bull;40(5):1011-21, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1745-1701
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Elevated antisaccade error rate, reflecting problems with inhibitory behavioral control, is a promising intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. Here, we consider whether it marks liability across psychotic disorders via common or different neurophysiological mechanisms and whether it represents a neurocognitive risk indicator apart from the generalized cognitive deficit. METHODS: Schizophrenia (n = 267), schizoaffective (n = 150), and psychotic bipolar (n = 202) probands, their first-degree relatives (ns = 304, 193, 242, respectively), and healthy controls (n = 244), participating in the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes consortium, performed antisaccade and prosaccade tasks and completed a neuropsychological battery. RESULTS: Antisaccade error rate was elevated in proband groups with greatest deficit observed in schizophrenia and was unrelated to symptoms and antipsychotic treatment. Increased error rate was also observed among relatives, even those without history of psychosis or psychosis spectrum personality traits. Relatives' deficits were similar across proband diagnoses. Error rate was familial and remained elevated in proband and relative groups after accounting for generalized cognitive impairment. Speed of attentional shifting, indexed by prosaccade latency, was similarly influenced in all groups by manipulations that freed vs increasingly engaged attention systems and was inversely associated with antisaccade error rate in all but schizophrenia probands. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that elevated antisaccade error rate represents an intermediate phenotype for psychosis across diagnostic categories, and that it tracks risk beyond that attributable to the generalized cognitive deficit. The greater severity of antisaccade impairment in schizophrenia and its independence from attention shifting processes suggest more severe and specific prefrontal inhibitory control deficits in this disorder.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/schbul/sbt132

  3 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24899101
[Au] Autor:Cunningham TD; Di Pace BS; Ullal J
[Ad] Address:Graduate Program in Public Health, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Harry Lester Building, 651 Colley Avenue, Norfolk, VA, 23507, USA, CunninTD@EVMS.edu.
[Ti] Title:Osteoporosis treatment disparities: a 6-year aggregate analysis from national survey data.
[So] Source:Osteoporos Int;25(9):2199-208, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1433-2965
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: We studied factors to determine the receipt of osteoporosis treatment in individuals with osteoporosis. Treatment was associated with age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), family history, arthritis and thyroid problems, daily glucocorticoid use, number of prescriptions and healthcare visits, and insurance type. INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is underrecognized and undertreated. Few studies have examined factors associated with osteoporosis treatment in a large, national sample of men and women. METHODS: We aggregated National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 2005 to 2010 and created a subsample which included individuals 50 years or older who were identified to have osteoporosis either by self-report data or by bone density measurements. The primary outcome was the receipt of osteoporosis treatment either from self-report or from prescription records. Covariates included sociodemographics, clinical characteristics, and access to healthcare variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine factors that associate with osteoporosis treatment. RESULTS: From a sample of 31,0134 participants, 1,133 subjects (3.65 %) met the study criteria. Treatment was associated with age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14), gender (OR = 13.25), race (OR = 2.23, White vs. Black; OR = 1.76, other vs. Black), BMI (OR = 1.67, normal vs. obese; OR = 2.68, overweight vs. obese), family history of osteoporosis (OR = 1.94), arthritis (OR = 1.43), daily glucocorticoid use (OR = 1.43), number of prescriptions (OR = 1.01), and number of healthcare visits in the past year (OR = 1.44, 4-9 vs. 0-3 visits). All odds ratios were statistically significant. CONCLUSION: A large number of individuals diagnosed with osteoporosis above the age of 50 remain untreated. It is important for healthcare providers to better assess older adults with osteoporosis, including individuals who frequently receive medical care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00198-014-2747-9

  4 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24866394
[Au] Autor:Gasier HG; Hughes LM; Young CR; Richardson AM
[Ad] Address:Center for Hyperbaric Medicine & Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC 3823 Bldg. CR II, Durham, NC, 27710, USA, heath.gasier@dm.duke.edu.
[Ti] Title:The assessment of bone mineral content and density of the lumbar spine and proximal femur in US submariners.
[So] Source:Osteoporos Int;25(9):2225-34, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1433-2965
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: The submarine environment is unique in that there is limited space and no sunlight, which may negatively affect skeletal health and lead to accelerated bone loss, osteoporosis, and fractures. INTRODUCTION: The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether there was an association with submarine service, specifically time spent at sea, and bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and dual proximal femur (total hip and femoral neck) measured by DXA. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 462 submariners 20-91 years old. Variables included in the analysis were age, height, race, alcohol intake, tobacco use, fracture history, conditions, and medications known to cause bone loss and osteoporosis and submarine service. RESULTS: Of the submarine service predictors, only serving onboard a diesel submarine was determined to be independently associated with a reduction in BMD of the total hip and femur neck, while no submarine service predictor increased the odds of having low BMD. In submariners 50+ years old, the age-adjusted prevalence of osteopenia was 15.7 % (lumbar spine) and 40.4 % (femur neck), while the prevalence of osteoporosis was 4.8 % (lumbar spine) and 4.2 % (femur neck), rates that did not differ from NHANES 2005-2008. In submariners <50 years old, 3.1 % was below the expected range for age. The proportion of submariners 50+ years old that met the FRAX criteria for pharmacological treatment was 12 %. CONCLUSIONS: Intermittent periods of submergence that can range from a few days to 3+ months do not appear to compromise skeletal health differently than the general population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00198-014-2753-y

  5 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24878764
[Au] Autor:Viers A; Smith J; Alleyne CH; Allen MB
[Ad] Address:Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia.
[Ti] Title:Neurosurgery at medical college of georgia, georgia regents university in augusta (1956-2013).
[So] Source:Neurosurgery;75(3):295-305, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: : The neurosurgery service at the Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University at Augusta has a rich history spanning almost 6 decades. Here, we review the development of neurological surgery as a specialty in Augusta and the history of the Department of Neurosurgery at Georgia Regents University. This article describes some of the early neurosurgeons in the city and those who have contributed to the field and helped to shape the department. Our functional and stereotactic program is emphasized. Our surgical epilepsy program dates back more than a half-century and remains a highly experienced program. We also describe our affiliation with the medical illustration graduate program, which was the first to be accredited and remains 1 of 4 such programs in the world. Finally, we list our alumni, former faculty, and current faculty, as well as the major accomplishments in our first decade as a full department. ABBREVIATION: MCG, Medical College of Georgia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1227/NEU.0000000000000421

  6 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24726485
[Au] Autor:Lim TK; Koh KH; Lee HI; Shim JW; Park MJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea....
[Ti] Title:Arthroscopic débridement for primary osteoarthritis of the elbow: analysis of preoperative factors affecting outcome.
[So] Source:J Shoulder Elbow Surg;23(9):1381-7, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-6500
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The purposes of this study were to evaluate the clinical results of arthroscopic débridement and to identify preoperative factors that influence the outcome. METHODS: Forty-three elbows with primary osteoarthritis in 43 patients treated with arthroscopic débridement were retrospectively evaluated. At a mean follow-up of 38 months (range, 18-77 months), the visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain, the arc of elbow motion, and the Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) score were assessed. The relationships between postoperative MEPI score and postoperative motion arc and preoperative factors including age, sex, involvement of the dominant arm, duration of symptoms, demand of elbow activity, VAS score, previous history of failed surgery, and arc of elbow motion were statistically evaluated. RESULTS: The mean VAS score for pain, the mean arc of flexion-extension, and the mean MEPI score significantly improved after the operation (all P values < .001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that among preoperative variables, arc of motion was found to be the only independent prognostic factor that affected both postoperative elbow function (P = .024) and final arc of motion (P < .001). The cutoff value of preoperative arc of motion for the final arc of motion was determined to be 80° (P < .001). Involvement of the dominant arm was found to be another independent factor that affected postoperative MEPI scores (P = .016). CONCLUSIONS: Arthroscopic débridement for elbow osteoarthritis provides satisfactory pain relief, improvement of elbow motion, and good functional outcome. Based on the fact that preoperative motion arc is the independent factor that can predict clinical outcome, arthroscopic treatment is highly recommended for patients who have a motion arc of 80° or more as it yields reliable results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24618192
[Au] Autor:Titchener AG; White JJ; Hinchliffe SR; Tambe AA; Hubbard RB; Clark DI
[Ad] Address:Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, UK. Electronic address: andytitch@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Comorbidities in rotator cuff disease: a case-control study.
[So] Source:J Shoulder Elbow Surg;23(9):1282-8, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-6500
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Rotator cuff disease is a common condition in the general population, but relatively little is known about its associated risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health Improvement Network database to assess and to quantify the relative contributions of some constitutional and environmental risk factors for rotator cuff disease in the community. Our data set included 5000 patients with rotator cuff disease who were individually matched with a single control by age, sex, and general practice (primary care practice). RESULTS: The median age at diagnosis was 55 years (interquartile range, 44-65 years). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors associated with rotator cuff disease were Achilles tendinitis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78), trigger finger (OR = 1.99), lateral epicondylitis (OR = 1.71), and carpal tunnel syndrome (OR = 1.55). Oral corticosteroid therapy (OR = 2.03), oral antidiabetic use (OR = 1.66), insulin use (OR = 1.77), and "overweight" body mass index of 25.1 to 30 (OR = 1.15) were also significantly associated. Current or previous smoking history, body mass index of greater than 30, any alcohol intake, medial epicondylitis, de Quervain syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis were not found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a number of comorbidities and risk factors for rotator cuff disease. These include lateral epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, Achilles tendinitis, oral corticosteroid use, and diabetes mellitus. The findings should alert the clinician to comorbid pathologic processes and guide future research into the etiology of this condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24848475
[Au] Autor:Mochizuki K; Funahashi S
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Cognitive Brain Science, Department of Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and.
[Ti] Title:Opposing history effect of preceding decision and action in the free choice of saccade direction.
[So] Source:J Neurophysiol;112(4):923-32, 2014 Aug 15.
[Is] ISSN:1522-1598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:When we act voluntarily, we make a decision to do so prior to the actual execution. However, because of the strong tie between decision and action, it has been difficult to dissociate these two processes in an animal's free behavior. In the present study, we tried to characterize the differences in these processes on the basis of their unique history effect. Using simple eye movement tasks in which the direction of a saccade was either instructed by a computer or freely chosen by the subject, we found that the preceding decision and action had different effects on the animal's subsequent behavior. While choosing a direction (previous decision) produced a positive history effect that prompted the choice of the same saccade direction, making a saccadic response to a direction (previous action) produced a negative history effect that discouraged the monkey from choosing the same direction. This result suggests that the history effect in sequential behavior reported in previous studies was a mixture of these two different components. Future studies on decision-making need to consider the importance of the distinction between decision and action in animal behavior.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1152/jn.00846.2013

  9 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24709849
[Au] Autor:Latham K
[Ad] Address:Department of Sociology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. keelatha@iupui.edu.
[Ti] Title:Racial and educational disparities in mobility limitation among older women: what is the role of modifiable risk factors?
[So] Source:J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci;69(5):772-83, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1758-5368
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: This research explores whether modifiable risk factors (MRFs) are potential mediators and/or moderators of racial/ethnic and educational mobility limitation disparities among older women. METHOD: Utilizing Waves 2-9 (1994-2008) of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), discrete-time event history models with multiple competing events were estimated using multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: Black women were more likely to develop mobility limitation relative to White women. This disparity was partially mediated by body mass index. Educational disparities were also observed, yet MRFs did not appreciably influence this disparity. The effect of vigorous physical activity on mobility limitation onset varied by race; physical activity was not as protective for Black women compared with White women. Being overweight appeared to weaken the benefit of additional years of education. DISCUSSION: These results reiterate the importance of health promotion via MRFs; however, they also illustrate that the effect of MRFs on mobility limitation varies by race and education among older women, which has implications for health professionals interested in functional health interventions. Future recommendations include the development of interventions and health promotion aimed at increasing participation in positive health behaviors that address salient social factors among at-risk older women.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/geronb/gbu028

  10 / 732040 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25128101
[Au] Autor:Muszynski MA; Zerbe CS; Holland SM; Kong HH
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Medstar Washington Hospital Center and Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC....
[Ti] Title:A woman with warts, leg swelling, and deafness.
[So] Source:J Am Acad Dermatol;71(3):577-80, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6787
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:KEY TEACHING POINTS • We describe a 45-year-old woman with GATA2 deficiency associated with verrucae, lymphedema, immunodeficiency, and a history of infections and skin cancer. • GATA2 deficiency has variable clinical expressivity with differing presentations, including infection, hematopoietic abnormalities, immunodeficiency, lymphedema, and cancer. • Cutaneous manifestations include verruca vulgaris, soft tissue infections, lymphedema, and panniculitis. • Patients may have verrucae that can progress to squamous cell carcinomas; dermatologists therefore play an important role in managing these patients as members of a multidisciplinary team.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


page 1 of 73204 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information