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[PMID]: 26740305
[Au] Autor:Muzik M; McGinnis EW; Bocknek E; Morelen D; Rosenblum KL; Liberzon I; Seng J; Abelson JL
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan....
[Ti] Title:PTSD SYMPTOMS ACROSS PREGNANCY AND EARLY POSTPARTUM AMONG WOMEN WITH LIFETIME PTSD DIAGNOSIS.
[So] Source:Depress Anxiety;33(7):584-91, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6394
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Little is known about trajectories of PTSD symptoms across the peripartum period in women with trauma histories, specifically those who met lifetime PTSD diagnoses prior to pregnancy. The present study seeks to identify factors that influence PTSD symptom load across pregnancy and early postpartum, and study its impact on postpartum adaptation. METHOD: The current study is a secondary analysis on pregnant women with a Lifetime PTSD diagnosis (N = 319) derived from a larger community sample who were interviewed twice across pregnancy (28 and 35 weeks) and again at 6 weeks postpartum, assessing socioeconomic risks, mental health, past and ongoing trauma exposure, and adaptation to postpartum. RESULTS: Using trajectory analysis, first we examined the natural course of PTSD symptoms based on patterns across peripartum, and found four distinct trajectory groups. Second, we explored factors (demographic, historical, and gestational) that shape the PTSD symptom trajectories, and examined the impact of trajectory membership on maternal postpartum adaptation. We found that child abuse history, demographic risk, and lifetime PTSD symptom count increased pregnancy-onset PTSD risk, whereas gestational PTSD symptom trajectory was best predicted by interim trauma and labor anxiety. Women with the greatest PTSD symptom rise during pregnancy were most likely to suffer postpartum depression and reported greatest bonding impairment with their infants at 6 weeks postpartum. CONCLUSIONS: Screening for modifiable risks (interpersonal trauma exposure and labor anxiety) and /or PTSD symptom load during pregnancy appears critical to promote maternal wellbeing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/da.22465

  2 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27197284
[Au] Autor:Childs EJ; Chaffee KG; Gallinger S; Syngal S; Schwartz AG; Cote ML; Bondy ML; Hruban RH; Chanock SJ; Hoover RN; Fuchs CS; Rider DN; Amundadottir LT; Stolzenberg-Solomon R; Wolpin BM; Risch HA; Goggins MG; Petersen GM; Klein AP
[Ad] Address:Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland....
[Ti] Title:Association of Common Susceptibility Variants of Pancreatic Cancer in Higher-Risk Patients: A PACGENE Study.
[So] Source:Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev;25(7):1185-91, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1538-7755
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Individuals from pancreatic cancer families are at increased risk, not only of pancreatic cancer, but also of melanoma, breast, ovarian, and colon cancers. While some of the increased risk may be due to mutations in high-penetrance genes (i.e., BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, p16/CDKN2A or DNA mismatch repair genes), common genetic variants may also be involved. In a high-risk population of cases with either a family history of pancreatic cancer or early-onset pancreatic cancer (diagnosis before the age of 50 years), we examined the role of genetic variants previously associated with risk of pancreatic, breast, ovarian, or prostate cancer. We genotyped 985 cases (79 early-onset cases, 906 cases with a family history of pancreatic cancer) and 877 controls for 215,389 SNPs using the iSelect Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (iCOGS) array with custom content. Logistic regression was performed using a log-linear additive model. We replicated several previously reported pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci, including recently identified variants on 2p13.3 and 7p13 (2p13.3, rs1486134: OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63; P = 9.29 × 10(-4); 7p13, rs17688601: OR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.63-0.93; P = 6.59 × 10(-3)). For the replicated loci, the magnitude of association observed in these high-risk patients was similar to that observed in studies of unselected patients. In addition to the established pancreatic cancer loci, we also found suggestive evidence of association (P < 5 × 10(-5)) to pancreatic cancer for SNPs at HDAC9 (7p21.1) and COL6A2 (21q22.3). Even in high-risk populations, common variants influence pancreatic cancer susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1185-91. ©2016 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-1217

  3 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27197274
[Au] Autor:McGuire V; Hartge P; Liao LM; Sinha R; Bernstein L; Canchola AJ; Anderson GL; Stefanick ML; Whittemore AS
[Ad] Address:Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California....
[Ti] Title:Parity and Oral Contraceptive Use in Relation to Ovarian Cancer Risk in Older Women.
[So] Source:Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev;25(7):1059-63, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1538-7755
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested that the ovarian cancer risk reductions associated with parity and oral contraceptive use are weaker in postmenopausal than premenopausal women, yet little is known about the persistence of these reductions as women age. This question gains importance with the increasing numbers of older women in the population. METHODS: We addressed the question using data from three large U.S. cohort studies involving 310,290 white women aged 50+ years at recruitment, of whom 1,815 developed subsequent incident invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. We used Cox regression, stratified by cohort, to examine age-related trends in the HRs per full-term pregnancy and per year of oral contraceptive use. RESULTS: The parity-associated risk reductions waned with age (Ptrend < 0.001 in HR with increasing age), particularly among women aged 75 years or more, for whom we observed no association with parity. However, we observed no such attenuation in the oral contraceptive-associated risk reductions (P = 0.79 for trend in HR with increasing age). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that prior oral contraceptive use is important for ovarian cancer risk assessment among women of all ages, while the benefits of parity wane as women age. IMPACT: This information, if duplicated in other studies, will be useful to preventive counseling and risk prediction, particularly for women at increased ovarian cancer risk due to a personal history of breast cancer or a family history of ovarian cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1059-63. ©2016 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0011

  4 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27254086
[Au] Autor:Jha SC; Meltzer-Brody S; Steiner RJ; Cornea E; Woolson S; Ahn M; Verde AR; Hamer RM; Zhu H; Styner M; Gilmore JH; Knickmeyer RC
[Ad] Address:Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA....
[Ti] Title:Antenatal depression, treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and neonatal brain structure: A propensity-matched cohort study.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;253:43-53, 2016 Jul 30.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this propensity-matched cohort study was to evaluate the impact of prenatal SSRI exposure and a history of maternal depression on neonatal brain volumes and white matter microstructure. SSRI-exposed neonates (n=27) were matched to children of mothers with no history of depression or SSRI use (n=54). Additionally, neonates of mothers with a history of depression, but no prenatal SSRI exposure (n=41), were matched to children of mothers with no history of depression or SSRI use (n=82). Structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion weighted imaging scans were acquired with a 3T Siemens Allegra scanner. Global tissue volumes were characterized using an automatic, atlas-moderated expectation maximization segmentation tool. Local differences in gray matter volumes were examined using deformation-based morphometry. Quantitative tractography was performed using an adaptation of the UNC-Utah NA-MIC DTI framework. SSRI-exposed neonates exhibited widespread changes in white matter microstructure compared to matched controls. Children exposed to a history of maternal depression but no SSRIs showed no significant differences in brain development compared to matched controls. No significant differences were found in global or regional tissue volumes. Additional research is needed to clarify whether SSRIs directly alter white matter development or whether this relationship is mediated by depressive symptoms during pregnancy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27142338
[Au] Autor:Shui IM; Wong CJ; Zhao S; Kolb S; Ebot EM; Geybels MS; Rubicz R; Wright JL; Lin DW; Klotzle B; Bibikova M; Fan JB; Ostrander EA; Feng Z; Stanford JL
[Ad] Address:Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington....
[Ti] Title:Prostate tumor DNA methylation is associated with cigarette smoking and adverse prostate cancer outcomes.
[So] Source:Cancer;122(14):2168-77, 2016 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0142
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: DNA methylation has been hypothesized as a mechanism for explaining the association between smoking and adverse prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes. This study was aimed at assessing whether smoking is associated with prostate tumor DNA methylation and whether these alterations may explain in part the association of smoking with PCa recurrence and mortality. METHODS: A total of 523 men had radical prostatectomy as their primary treatment, detailed smoking history data, long-term follow-up for PCa outcomes, and tumor tissue profiled for DNA methylation. Ninety percent of the men also had matched tumor gene expression data. A methylome-wide analysis was conducted to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by smoking status. To select potential functionally relevant DMRs, their correlation with the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of corresponding genes was evaluated. Finally, a smoking-related methylation score based on the top-ranked DMRs was created to assess its association with PCa outcomes. RESULTS: Forty DMRs were associated with smoking status, and 10 of these were strongly correlated with mRNA expression (aldehyde oxidase 1 [AOX1], claudin 5 [CLDN5], early B-cell factor 1 [EBF1], homeobox A7 [HOXA7], lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 [LGALS3], microtubule-associated protein τ [MAPT], protocadherin γ A [PCDHGA]/protocadherin γ B [PCDHGB], paraoxonase 3 [PON3], synaptonemal complex protein 2 like [SYCP2L], and zinc finger and SCAN domain containing 12 [ZSCAN12]). Men who were in the highest tertile for the smoking-methylation score derived from these DMRs had a higher risk of recurrence (odds ratio [OR], 2.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42-3.72) and lethal disease (OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 1.65-11.78) in comparison with men in the lower 2 tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: This integrative molecular epidemiology study supports the hypothesis that smoking-associated tumor DNA methylation changes may explain at least part of the association between smoking and adverse PCa outcomes. Future studies are warranted to confirm these findings and understand the implications for improving patient outcomes. Cancer 2016;122:2168-77. © 2016 American Cancer Society.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/cncr.30045

  6 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27172585
[Au] Autor:Cohen NL; Heinz AJ; Ilgen M; Bonn-Miller MO
[Ad] Address:National Center for PTSD, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, California....
[Ti] Title:Pain, Cannabis Species, and Cannabis Use Disorders.
[So] Source:J Stud Alcohol Drugs;77(3):515-20, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:1938-4114
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals who used medical cannabis for chronic pain were at increased risk for cannabis use problems compared with individuals who used medical cannabis for other reasons (e.g., anxiety, insomnia, and muscle spasms). An additional aim was to determine whether individuals who used cannabis for chronic pain, as well as those who reported greater within-group pain levels, demonstrated a species preference (i.e., sativa, indica, hybrids) and the extent to which species preference was associated with cannabis use problems. METHOD: Participants were 163 medical cannabis users (77% male), recruited from a medical marijuana dispensary in California, who completed assessments of medical cannabis use motives, history, preferences (species type), and problems, as well as current pain level. RESULTS: Individuals who used cannabis to manage chronic pain experienced fewer cannabis use problems than those who did not use it for pain; among those who used it for pain, the average pain level in the past week was not associated with cannabis use problems. Furthermore, individuals who used cannabis for chronic pain were more likely to use indica over sativa. Preference for indica was associated with fewer cannabis use problems than preference for hybrid species. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals who use cannabis to manage chronic pain may be at a lower risk for cannabis use problems, relative to individuals who use it for other indications, potentially as a function of their species preference.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26962696
[Au] Autor:Villani E; Sacchi M; Magnani F; Nicodemo A; Williams SE; Rossi A; Ratiglia R; De Cillà S; Nucci P
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy 2Eye Clinic San Giuseppe Hospital, Milan, Italy....
[Ti] Title:The Ocular Surface in Medically Controlled Glaucoma: An In Vivo Confocal Study.
[So] Source:Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci;57(3):1003-10, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1552-5783
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To study clinical and in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) ocular surface findings in stable, medically controlled primary open-angle glaucoma (MCPOAG) patients. METHODS: We recruited 100 consecutive patients with MCPOAG and 50 healthy controls. Patients had to have been treated with the same medical regimen without variation for the 18 months before enrollment and were excluded if there was a history of dry eye prior to glaucoma diagnosis. Each participant underwent ocular surface clinical and LSCM examination. RESULTS: In MCPOAG patients, subbasal nerve length and tortuosity and dendritic cell density were increased compared to controls (P < 0.01), but there were no clinical abnormalities. Patients treated with preserved drugs (n = 80) had reduced tear film breakup time (P < 0.05, ANOVA), and those preserved with benzalkonium chloride (n = 72) had reduced Schirmer test values (P < 0.001). Patients (n = 50) treated with two or more drugs had increased lissamine green conjunctival staining (P < 0.001, LSD post hoc test). Patients (n = 29) treated with three or more eye drops daily had decreased Schirmer test values. Laser scanning confocal microscopy showed subbasal changes related to preservatives, type and number of drugs, and number of eye drops. CONCLUSIONS: In stable MCPOAG patients without dry eye history, the ocular surface changes due to antiglaucoma medications are mostly subclinical. Active ingredients, preservatives, number of concomitant drugs, and number of eye drops instilled per day are all elements that can induce ocular surface changes. The clinical relevance of these changes remains to be determined.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1167/iovs.15-17455

  8 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26685176
[Au] Autor:Wallau GL; Capy P; Loreto E; Le Rouzic A; Hua-Van A
[Ad] Address:Pós Graduação em Biodiversidade Animal, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Departamento de Entomologia, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhães-FIOCRUZ-CPqAM, Recife, PE, Brazil gabriel.wallau@gmail.com gabriel.wallau@cpqam.fiocruz.br....
[Ti] Title:VHICA, a New Method to Discriminate between Vertical and Horizontal Transposon Transfer: Application to the Mariner Family within Drosophila.
[So] Source:Mol Biol Evol;33(4):1094-109, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1537-1719
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Transposable elements (TEs) are genomic repeated sequences that display complex evolutionary patterns. They are usually inherited vertically, but can occasionally be transmitted between sexually independent species, through so-called horizontal transposon transfers (HTTs). Recurrent HTTs are supposed to be essential in life cycle of TEs, which are otherwise destined for eventual decay. HTTs also impact the host genome evolution. However, the extent of HTTs in eukaryotes is largely unknown, due to the lack of efficient, statistically supported methods that can be applied to multiple species sequence data sets. Here, we developed a new automated method available as a R package "vhica" that discriminates whether a given TE family was vertically or horizontally transferred, and potentially infers donor and receptor species. The method is well suited for TE sequences extracted from complete genomes, and applicable to multiple TEs and species at the same time. We first validated our method using Drosophila TE families with well-known evolutionary histories, displaying both HTTs and vertical transmission. We then tested 26 different lineages of mariner elements recently characterized in 20 Drosophila genomes, and found HTTs in 24 of them. Furthermore, several independent HTT events could often be detected within the same mariner lineage. The VHICA (Vertical and Horizontal Inheritance Consistence Analysis) method thus appears as a valuable tool to analyze the evolutionary history of TEs across a large range of species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Cu] Class update date: 160305
[Lr] Last revision date:160305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/molbev/msv341

  9 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26671457
[Au] Autor:Stevison LS; Woerner AE; Kidd JM; Kelley JL; Veeramah KR; McManus KF; Bustamante CD; Hammer MF; Wall JD; Great Ape Genome Project
[Ad] Address:Institute for Human Genetics, University of California San Francisco Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University lss0021@auburn.edu wallj@humgen.ucsf.edu....
[Ti] Title:The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.
[So] Source:Mol Biol Evol;33(4):928-45, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1537-1719
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Cu] Class update date: 160321
[Lr] Last revision date:160321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/molbev/msv331

  10 / 814152 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26659563
[Au] Autor:Nagy LG; Riley R; Tritt A; Adam C; Daum C; Floudas D; Sun H; Yadav JS; Pangilinan J; Larsson KH; Matsuura K; Barry K; Labutti K; Kuo R; Ohm RA; Bhattacharya SS; Shirouzu T; Yoshinaga Y; Martin FM; Grigoriev IV; Hibbett DS
[Ad] Address:Synthetic and Systems Biology Unit, Institute of Biochemistry, BRC-HAS, Szeged, Hungary lnagy@brc.hu dhibbett@clarku.edu....
[Ti] Title:Comparative Genomics of Early-Diverging Mushroom-Forming Fungi Provides Insights into the Origins of Lignocellulose Decay Capabilities.
[So] Source:Mol Biol Evol;33(4):959-70, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1537-1719
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Evolution of lignocellulose decomposition was one of the most ecologically important innovations in fungi. White-rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes (mushrooms and relatives) are the most effective microorganisms in degrading both cellulose and lignin components of woody plant cell walls (PCW). However, the precise evolutionary origins of lignocellulose decomposition are poorly understood, largely because certain early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes and its sister group, the Dacrymycetes, have yet to be sampled, or have been undersampled, in comparative genomic studies. Here, we present new genome sequences of ten saprotrophic fungi, including members of the Dacrymycetes and early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes (Cantharellales, Sebacinales, Auriculariales, and Trechisporales), which we use to refine the origins and evolutionary history of the enzymatic toolkit of lignocellulose decomposition. We reconstructed the origin of ligninolytic enzymes, focusing on class II peroxidases (AA2), as well as enzymes that attack crystalline cellulose. Despite previous reports of white rot appearing as early as the Dacrymycetes, our results suggest that white-rot fungi evolved later in the Agaricomycetes, with the first class II peroxidases reconstructed in the ancestor of the Auriculariales and residual Agaricomycetes. The exemplars of the most ancient clades of Agaricomycetes that we sampled all lack class II peroxidases, and are thus concluded to use a combination of plesiomorphic and derived PCW degrading enzymes that predate the evolution of white rot.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/molbev/msv337


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