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[PMID]: 25596574
[Au] Autor:Karim MF; Brunetti E; Rahman S; Budke CM; Ahsan AS; Al-Mahtab M; Zaki KM; Alam MJ; Akbar SM; Jalil M
[Ad] Address:Sir Salimullah Medical College and Mitford Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. drfazalkarim@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Abdominal cystic echinococcosis in Bangladesh: a hospital-based study.
[So] Source:J Infect Dev Ctries;9(1):70-5, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1972-2680
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is reported from nearly all geographic areas of Bangladesh, but little information is available on its epidemiologic and clinical features. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical manifestations of hepatic and abdominal CE cases presenting to tertiary referral hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh. METHODOLOGY: A retrospective study was conducted via chart reviews of hepatic and abdominal CE patients under care at tertiary referral hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh, between 2002 and 2011. Age, sex, education level, occupation, urban versus rural residence, drinking water source, history of dog ownership, cyst type and location, and clinical manifestations were recorded for all patients. RESULTS: Of the 130 patients enrolled, 92 (70.8%) were female and 38 (29.2%) were male. The majority of patients were from rural (76.2%) rather than urban (23.8%) areas. All cases were from the northern part of the country, with no cases reported from the south or southeast. Most patients were between 21 and 40 years of age. A total of 119 patients (91.5%) had cysts only in the liver, with the remaining 8.5% having cysts in both the liver and lungs or in the abdominal cavity. Seventy-six (58.5%) of the hepatic cysts were stage CE1, indicating recent infection. CONCLUSIONS: Active transmission of Echinococcus granulosus appears to be occurring in Bangladesh, as indicated by the high number of CE1 hepatic cysts seen at tertiary care hospitals. Community ultrasound screening studies are warranted to better define the distribution of cases and risk factors for parasite transmission.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3855/jidc.4934

  2 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25596570
[Au] Autor:Putera I; Pakasi TA; Syahmar I; Bramantyo AA; Karyadi E; Melani A; Sahiratmadja E
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. iwankings@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine in an Indonesian population with D543N NRAMP1 polymorphism.
[So] Source:J Infect Dev Ctries;9(1):42-7, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1972-2680
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination remains a routine immunization in primary care in tuberculosis (TB)-endemic areas, though several studies found that its efficacy was inconclusive. Natural resistance-asociated machrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1) polymorphism has been shown to result in higher susceptibility to TB. Information on genetic susceptibility in populations will be useful in planning the application of the BCG vaccine. The present study explored BCG efficacy in a rural Timor population with specific NRAMP1 polymorphism in a TB-endemic region of eastern Indonesia. METHODOLOGY: A case-control study with 64 newly diagnosed pulmonary TB patients and 65 healthy controls was performed. BCG scars were examined by a physician. NRAMP1 polymorphism was evaluated using molecular methods. RESULTS: Half of the subjects (65; 50.4%) had a clear presenting BCG scar on the upper arm, suggesting a successful BCG vaccination. Among the subjects, D543N NRAMP1 polymorphism, history of contact with TB patients, and not having a clear BCG scar on the upper arm tended to be significantly association with active TB. The significant differences were more profound when subjects were divided based on presenting BCG scar. Subjects without clear BCG scars had significant association with developing TB disease (p = 0.014). In multivariate analysis, history of previous contact with TB patients and unclear presenting BCG scar were associated with active TB (OR 9.2; 2.0-43.8 95% CI, OR 4.8; 2.1-11.0 95% CI, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: BCG vaccination in our population was effective for TB protection, especially in highly endemic areas of TB, regardless genetic susceptibility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3855/jidc.5047

  3 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25596605
[Au] Autor:Phansalkar S; Her QL; Tucker AD; Filiz E; Schnipper J; Getty G; Bates DW
[Ad] Address:Shobha Phansalkar, B.S.Pharm., Ph.D., is Instructor in Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, and Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston. Qoua L. Her, Pharm.D., M.S., is Pharmacy Informatics and Outcomes Research Fellow, Massachusetts Colleg...
[Ti] Title:Impact of incorporating pharmacy claims data into electronic medication reconciliation.
[So] Source:Am J Health Syst Pharm;72(3):212-7, 2015 Feb 1.
[Is] ISSN:1535-2900
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The potential value of adding pharmacy claims data to the medication history in the electronic health record (EHR) to improve the accuracy of medication reconciliation was studied. METHODS: Three medication history sources were used for this evaluation: a gold-standard preadmission medication list (PAML) created by reviewing all available medication history information, an EHR-generated PAML, and pharmacy claims data. The study population consisted of patients from the Partners Medication Reconciliation Study with medication history information available from all three medication history sources. The aggregated medication list from each medication history source was compared with the gold-standard PAML to identify and categorize missing medications, additional medications, and discrepancies in the various attributes of a medication order, including dose, route, and frequency. McNemar's test was used to compare paired proportions of medication entries across each source to the gold-standard PAMLs. RESULTS: Fifteen patients had medication histories in all three medication history sources. Medication entries across all three sources included 169 from the gold- standard PAMLs, 158 from the EHR-PAMLs, and 351 from pharmacy claims data. The EHR-PAMLs and pharmacy claims data correctly reflected 52.1% and 43.2% of the gold-standard PAMLs, respectively. Combining the EHR-PAMLs and pharmacy claims resulted in 69.2% of the gold-standard PAMLs correctly reflected (p < 0.0001). Combining these two data sources increased the accuracy of medication history by 17.1%. CONCLUSION: Combining the EHR-PAML and pharmacy claims data resulted in a significant increase in the number of medications correctly reflected in the gold-standard PAML compared with the EHR-PAML or claims data separately.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2146/ajhp140082

  4 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25596602
[Au] Autor:Jones JM; Richter LM; Alonto A; Leedahl DD
[Ad] Address:Justin M. Jones, Pharm.D., is Postgraduate Year 1 Pharmacy Resident; Lisa M. Richter, Pharm.D., BCPS, is Postgraduate Year 1 Pharmacy Residency Director; Augusto Alonto, M.D., is Infectious Disease Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases; and David D. Leedahl, Pharm.D., BCPS, is Clinical Pharmacy...
[Ti] Title:Desensitization to ceftaroline in a patient with multiple medication hypersensitivity reactions.
[So] Source:Am J Health Syst Pharm;72(3):198-202, 2015 Feb 1.
[Is] ISSN:1535-2900
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The case of a patient with multiple medication hypersensitivity reactions and a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection who underwent desensitization to ceftaroline is reported. SUMMARY: A 32-year-old Caucasian woman with asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease, heart murmur, and major depression was admitted for MRSA cellulitis with a subcutaneous abscess along the left sternomanubrial joint and clavicular osteomyelitis secondary to port placement after gastric bypass surgery. The patient had an extensive history of hypersensitivity reactions. Pertinent documented allergies were as follows: penicillin (anaphylaxis), daptomycin (anaphylaxis), vancomycin (hives), linezolid (hives), ertapenem (rash), ciprofloxacin (rash), and tigecycline (rash). The patient also reported previous reactions to aztreonam (unknown) and gentamicin (hives). The pharmacy was consulted to develop a desensitization protocol for ceftaroline. The desensitization protocol used three serial dilutions of ceftaroline to make 14 sequential infusions with escalating doses. Intramuscular epinephrine, i.v. diphenhydramine, and i.v. methylprednisolone were ordered as needed for the development of immediate hypersensitivity reactions during or after administration of ceftaroline. The cumulative dose (574.94 mg) was administered intravenously over 225 minutes with no breakthrough symptoms reported during or after the desensitization protocol. Ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg i.v. every 12 hours was continued for six weeks. CONCLUSION: Desensitization to ceftaroline was conducted for a patient with extensive history of hypersensitivity reactions to other drugs, including penicillin-induced anaphylaxis. Desensitization and subsequent treatment with full doses of ceftaroline were accomplished without apparent adverse effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2146/ajhp140151

  5 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25589872
[Au] Autor:Williamson TE; Brusatte SL; Wilson GP
[Ad] Address:New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road, NW, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104-1375, USA.
[Ti] Title:The origin and early evolution of metatherian mammals: the Cretaceous record.
[So] Source:Zookeys;(465):1-76, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1313-2989
[Cp] Country of publication:Bulgaria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Metatherians, which comprise marsupials and their closest fossil relatives, were one of the most dominant clades of mammals during the Cretaceous and are the most diverse clade of living mammals after Placentalia. Our understanding of this group has increased greatly over the past 20 years, with the discovery of new specimens and the application of new analytical tools. Here we provide a review of the phylogenetic relationships of metatherians with respect to other mammals, discuss the taxonomic definition and diagnosis of Metatheria, outline the Cretaceous history of major metatherian clades, describe the paleobiology, biogeography, and macroevolution of Cretaceous metatherians, and provide a physical and climatic background of Cretaceous metatherian faunas. Metatherians are a clade of boreosphendian mammals that must have originated by the Late Jurassic, but the first unequivocal metatherian fossil is from the Early Cretaceous of Asia. Metatherians have the distinctive tightly interlocking occlusal molar pattern of tribosphenic mammals, but differ from Eutheria in their dental formula and tooth replacement pattern, which may be related to the metatherian reproductive process which includes an extended period of lactation followed by birth of extremely altricial young. Metatherians were widespread over Laurasia during the Cretaceous, with members present in Asia, Europe, and North America by the early Late Cretaceous. In particular, they were taxonomically and morphologically diverse and relatively abundant in the Late Cretaceous of western North America, where they have been used to examine patterns of biogeography, macroevolution, diversification, and extinction through the Late Cretaceous and across the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary. Metatherian diversification patterns suggest that they were not strongly affected by a Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution, but they clearly underwent a severe extinction across the K-Pg boundary.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3897/zookeys.465.8178

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[PMID]: 25376612
[Au] Autor:Larsen AR; Bai RY; Chung JH; Borodovsky A; Rudin CM; Riggins GJ; Bunz F
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland....
[Ti] Title:Repurposing the antihelmintic mebendazole as a hedgehog inhibitor.
[So] Source:Mol Cancer Ther;14(1):3-13, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1538-8514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is activated in many types of cancer and therefore presents an attractive target for new anticancer agents. Here, we show that mebendazole, a benzamidazole with a long history of safe use against nematode infestations and hydatid disease, potently inhibited Hh signaling and slowed the growth of Hh-driven human medulloblastoma cells at clinically attainable concentrations. As an antiparasitic, mebendazole avidly binds nematode tubulin and causes inhibition of intestinal microtubule synthesis. In human cells, mebendazole suppressed the formation of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based organelle that functions as a signaling hub for Hh pathway activation. The inhibition of Hh signaling by mebendazole was unaffected by mutants in the gene that encodes human Smoothened (SMO), which are selectively propagated in cell clones that survive treatment with the Hh inhibitor vismodegib. Combination of vismodegib and mebendazole resulted in additive Hh signaling inhibition. Because mebendazole can be safely administered to adults and children at high doses over extended time periods, we propose that mebendazole could be rapidly repurposed and clinically tested as a prospective therapeutic agent for many tumors that are dependent on Hh signaling. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(1); 3-13. ©2014 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-14-0755-T

  7 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25589948
[Au] Autor:Lee KH; Lee SE; Jung JW; Jeon SY
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Spinal cord stimulation for intractable visceral pain due to sphincter of oddi dysfunction.
[So] Source:Korean J Pain;28(1):57-60, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2005-9159
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) is a syndrome of chronic biliary pain or recurrent pancreatitis due to the functional obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary flow. We report a case of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for chronic abdominal pain due to SOD. The patient had a history of cholecystectomy and had suffered from chronic right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The patient had been diagnosed as having SOD. The patient was treated with opioid analgesics and nerve blocks, including a splanchnic nerve block. However, two years later, the pain became intractable. We implanted percutaneous SCS at the T5-7 level for this patient. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain and the amount of opioid intake decreased. The patient was tracked for more than six months without significant complications. From our clinical case, SCS is an effective and alternative treatment option for SOD. Further studies and long-term follow-up are necessary to understand the effectiveness and the limitations of SCS on SOD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3344/kjp.2015.28.1.57

  8 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25589983
[Au] Autor:Xiong F; Wang S; Kai J
[Ad] Address:Department of Thoracic Surgery, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430000, China.
[Ti] Title:Video-assisted thoracic surgery right sleeve lobectomy.
[So] Source:J Thorac Dis;6(12):1831-3, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2072-1439
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 50-year-old active male with a smoking history of 30 years (20 cigarettes per day) was admitted to hospital because of more than one month's cough without sputum. No comorbidity was present. The preoperative examination showed: blood test normal, ECG normal, cardio-pulmonary function normal, chest computed tomography (CT) display right upper lobe (RUL) mass of 5 cm diameter. Bronchoscopy examination and biopsy indicated large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) in the take-off of RUL bronchus. No metastatic focus was found after emission computed tomography (ECT) scan of whole body bone, abdominal US scanning and brain MR. After initial evaluation, the clinical stage before operation was cT2bN0M0 (IIA stage). A selective video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) operation was arranged after 9 days of smoking cessation. Lateral position, one 10 mm trocar for camera in the 7th intercostals space in the mid-auxiliary line, 4 cm trocar for operation in the 4th intercostal space in the anterior axillary line, 15 mm trocar for auxiliary operation in the 8th intercostal space in the scapula line, the patient received VATS RUL lobectomy, plus systemic mediastinal lymph nodes dissection. The procedure of 200 minutes operation was smooth with blood loss of about 150 mL. Chest tube was removed 6 days after operation, and the patient discharged 11 days after the operation; The post-operation pathological examination showed RUL LCNEC, and the pathological stage was pT2bN0M0R0 (IIA stage). The patient has received four cycles of EP adjuvant chemotherapy per 21 days and is still alive without disease recurrence and metastasis after re-examination.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2014.12.03

  9 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25589974
[Au] Autor:Yang ZF; He JF; Li XB; Guan WD; Ke CW; Wu SG; Pan SH; Li RF; Kang M; Wu J; Lin JY; Ding GY; Huang JC; Pan WQ; Zhou R; Lin YP; Chen RC; Li YM; Chen L; Xiao WL; Zhang YH; Zhong NS
[Ad] Address:1 State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease (Guangzhou Medical University), 2 National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China ; 3 Guangdong Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430,...
[Ti] Title:Epidemiological and viral genome characteristics of the first human H7N9 influenza infection in Guangdong Province, China.
[So] Source:J Thorac Dis;6(12):1785-93, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2072-1439
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The first H7N9 human case in south of China was confirmed in Guangdong Province on August 2013, outside of the typical influenza season. For investigating the H7N9 virus source and transmission in the local community, we analyze the epidemiology and genome features of the virus isolated from the first human infection detected in Guangdong Province. METHODS: The data including medical records, exposure history and time line of events for the H7N9 patient and close contacts was collected. Variation and genetic signatures of H7N9 virus in Guangdong was analyzed using ClustalW algorithm and comparison with mutations associated with changes in biological characteristics of the virus. RESULTS: The female patient had a history of poultry exposure, and she was transferred from a local primary hospital to an intensive care unit (ICU) upon deterioration. No additional cases were reported. Similar to previous infections with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, the patient presented with both upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms. Respiratory failure progressed quickly, and the patient recovered 4 weeks after the onset of symptoms. Genome analysis of the virus indicated that the predicted antigen city and internal genes of the virus are similar to previously reported H7N9 viruses. The isolated virus is susceptible to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors but resistant to adamantine. Although this virus contains some unique mutations that were only detected in avian or environment-origin avian influenza A (H7N9) viruses, it is still quite similar to other human H7N9 isolates. CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiological features and genome of the first H7N9 virus in Guangdong Province are similar to other human H7N9 infections. This virus may have existed in the environment and live poultry locally; therefore, it is important to be alert of the risk of H7N9 re-emergence in China, including emergence outside the typical influenza season.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2014.12.09

  10 / 746781 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25589955
[Au] Autor:Garas G; Zarogoulidis P; Efthymiou A; Athanasiou T; Tsakiridis K; Mpaka S; Zacharakis E
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Surgery and Cancer, St. Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK ; 2 Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, "G. Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece ; 3 Department of Gastroenterology, "Saint Luke" Private Hospital, Thess...
[Ti] Title:Spontaneous esophageal rupture as the underlying cause of pneumothorax: early recognition is crucial.
[So] Source:J Thorac Dis;6(12):1655-8, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2072-1439
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Boerhaave's syndrome (BS), also known as "spontaneous rupture of the esophagus", constitutes an emergency that requires early diagnosis if death or serious morbidity are to be prevented. First described in 1724, BS is thought to be more common than once thought. Its true incidence remains unknown. Mortality ranges between 20-40% with timely treatment but this rises to virtually 100% if treatment is delayed by more than 48 hours. This is unfortunately a common occurrence due to delayed diagnosis. The commonest precipitating factor is vomiting but BS can be truly "spontaneous". The classical clinical presentation described consists of vomiting, chest pain, and subcutaneous emphysema. However, and contrary to popular belief, this triad is actually uncommon accounting for the frequently delayed diagnosis. A less recognised presenting feature of BS is with pneumothorax due to associated rupture of the parietal pleura. Pneumothorax has been shown to be present in more than 20% of cases of BS-sometimes with a coexistent pleural effusion (hydropneumothorax). This article aims to raise awareness about pneumothorax as the sole initial presenting feature of BS and alert clinicians to consider BS in the differential diagnosis of any patient with respiratory symptoms and a recent history of vomiting.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2014.12.04


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