Database : MEDLINE
Search on : history [Words]
References found : 755166 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 75517 go to page                         

  1 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 25841113
[Au] Autor:G Lerner A; Lev-Ran S
[Ad] Address:Lev Hasharon Mental Health Medical Center, Pardessya, Israel Sackler School Of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel.
[Ti] Title:LSD-associated "Alice in Wonderland Syndrome"(AIWS): A Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD) Case Report.
[So] Source:Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci;52(1):67-8, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0333-7308
[Cp] Country of publication:Israel
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A side effect associated with the use of LSD is the return of perceptual disturbances which anteriorly emerged during intoxication, despite absence of present use. Here we present the case of a patient with a previous history of sporadic and recreational cannabis, alcohol and LSD consumption who reported LSD associated "Alice in Wonderland Syndrome" (AIWS) or Todd's syndrome. AIWS is basically characterized by four frequent visual illusions: macropsia, micropsia, pelopsia and teleopsia. AIWS only appeared during LSD consumption and continued after LSD suspension, namely, Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD). This phenomenon did not cause a major functional impairment but provoked sufficient worry and concern due to its persistent continuation. The patient refused medical treatment and continued psychiatric follow-up. At the one year follow-up he reported complete remission. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of AIWS which persist after LSD interruption (HPPD) in the professional literature. Reasons for this intriguing, benign, reversible and apparently harmless side effect are proposed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 25841230
[Au] Autor:G Lerner A; Goodman C; Rudinski D; Lev-Ran S
[Ad] Address:Lev Hasharon Mental Health Medical Center, Pardessya, Israel Sackler School Of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel....
[Ti] Title:LSD Flashbacks - The Appearance of New Visual Imagery Not Experienced During Initial Intoxication: Two Case Reports.
[So] Source:Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci;51(4):307-9, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:0333-7308
[Cp] Country of publication:Israel
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A side effect associated with the use of synthetic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamide-(LSD) is the partial or total recurrence of perceptual disturbances which previously appeared during intoxication, despite absence of recent use. These are commonly referred to as "flashbacks" or Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD). Here we present two cases of patients with a prior history of LSD use who turned to psychiatric consultation following brief episodes of HPPD. Surprisingly, in both cases new visual imagery appeared during episodes of flashbacks which was not experienced during primary LSD use. Both subjects reported the ability to discern between LSD-associated visual disturbances and new visual imagery. This phenomenon did not cause functional impairment and in both cases caused gradual concern due to its persistence. Both patients refused medical treatment and continued psychiatric follow-up. At one year follow-up both patients reported almost complete spontaneous remission. To the best of our knowledge these are the first reported cases of LSD-related benign flashbacks in which new imagery is experienced. Reasons for this reversible and apparently harmless side effect are proposed. Conclusions from case reports should be taken with caution.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 25841224
[Au] Autor:G Lerner A; Goodman C; Bor O; Lev-Ran S
[Ad] Address:Lev Hasharon Mental Health Medical Center, Pardessya, Israel Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel....
[Ti] Title:Synthetic Cannabis Substances (SPS) Use and Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD): Two Case Reports.
[So] Source:Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci;51(4):277-80, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:0333-7308
[Cp] Country of publication:Israel
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hallucinogen Persistent Perceptual Disorder (HPPD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the recurrence of distressing perceptual disturbances which previously emerged during primary hallucinogen intoxication, in the absence of recent use. Here we present two patients who developed HPPD following use of Synthetic Cannabis Substances (SCS), with no prior history of natural-occurring or synthetic hallucinogen use. Both cases had a prior history of cannabis dependence and current tobacco dependence. In both cases patients reported the presence of visual disturbances when smoking SCS and staring at stationary and moving objects. Both patients discontinued SCS use abruptly after suffering from a panic attack under the influence of SCS. Despite cessation of SCS, both patients continued to suffer from HPPD which was accompanied by significant anxiety. Following clonazepam treatment, both subjects reported significant improvement in symptoms and remained with a residual focal visual disturbance which was not accompanied by significant anxiety. To the best of our knowledge these are the first reports of HPPD following SCS use. In light of the increasing use of SCS, clinical psychiatrists should be aware of these perceptual side effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 25841221
[Au] Autor:Feingold D; Nitzan U; Ratzoni G; Lev-Ran S
[Ad] Address:Addiction Medicine Services, Department of Psychiatry, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel....
[Ti] Title:Clinical Correlates of Alcohol Abuse among Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients in Israel.
[So] Source:Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci;51(4):258-60, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:0333-7308
[Cp] Country of publication:Israel
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent epidemiological studies have reported a world-wide increase in the rates of alcohol use among adolescents. Research has shown a strong link between alcohol abuse and psychiatric disorders. This study explored the clinical and demographic correlates of adolescents with a history of alcohol abuse (AA) compared to adolescents with no history of alcohol abuse (NAA) among a group of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Israel. METHOD: Two hundred and thirty-eight subjects were screened, all were patients consecutively admitted to an adolescent inpatient unit at a university-affiliated mental health center in Israel during a 4-year period RESULT: Patients in the AA group were more prone to have a history of suicide attempts and self-injury compared to patients in the NAA group. Prevalence of attentiondeficit disruptive behavior disorders was more common in the AA group, and these patients were more prone to have a history of criminal activity and drug use. Median length of hospitalization was greater in the NAA group. LIMITATIONS: Limitations concerning attribution of causality due to the cross-sectional nature of this study. CONCLUSION: Higher prevalence of criminal behavior, selfinjury and suicide attempts associated with alcohol abuse may be related to higher levels of impulsivity, indicated by higher prevalence of attention-deficit disruptive behavior disorders. Alcohol-related disorders should be carefully screened and addressed in adolescent psychiatric units and in consequent ambulatory treatment settings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25732801
[Au] Autor:Cheng-Ching E; Jones S; Hui FK; Man S; Gilden D; Bhimraj A; Uchino K
[Ad] Address:Department of Neuroradiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA....
[Ti] Title:High-resolution MRI vessel wall imaging in varicella zoster virus vasculopathy.
[So] Source:J Neurol Sci;351(1-2):168-73, 2015 Apr 15.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5883
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Contrast-enhanced vessel wall imaging high-resolution MRI (HRMR) has revealed vessel wall thickening and enhancement in multiple intracranial vasculopathies, including varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculopathy. We retrospectively reviewed a database of patients with virologically-verified VZV vasculopathy, who underwent initial and follow-up HRMR between April 2011 and May 2014. Six patients were identified. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were collected, including stroke risk factors, history of VZV-related disorders, neurological presentation, course and antiviral treatment. Initial HRMR in patients with VZV vasculopathy demonstrated various patterns of stenosis, vessel wall thickening and enhancement, predominantly in terminal internal carotid artery segments and the M1 segment of the middle cerebral arteries. Follow-up HRMR showed improvement of stenosis, with reduced vessel wall thickening and enhancement at multiple times after treatment. HRMR has the potential to assist in diagnosis and treatment of VZV vasculopathy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25730634
[Au] Autor:Thompson T; Seo J; Griffith J; Baxter M; James A; Kaphingst KA
[Ad] Address:a Health Communication Research Laboratory , Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis , St. Louis , Missouri , USA.
[Ti] Title:The Context of Collecting Family Health History: Examining Definitions of Family and Family Communication about Health among African American Women.
[So] Source:J Health Commun;20(4):416-23, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1087-0415
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Public health initiatives encourage the public to discuss and record family health history information, which can inform prevention and screening for a variety of conditions. Most research on family health history discussion and collection, however, has predominantly involved White participants and has not considered lay definitions of family or family communication patterns about health. This qualitative study of 32 African American women-16 with a history of cancer-analyzed participants' definitions of family, family communication about health, and collection of family health history information. Family was defined by biological relatedness, social ties, interactions, and proximity. Several participants noted using different definitions of family for different purposes (e.g., biomedical vs. social). Health discussions took place between and within generations and were influenced by structural relationships (e.g., sister) and characteristics of family members (e.g., trustworthiness). Participants described managing tensions between sharing health information and protecting privacy, especially related to generational differences in sharing information, fear of familial conflict or gossip, and denial (sometimes described as refusal to "own" or "claim" a disease). Few participants reported that anyone in their family kept formal family health history records. Results suggest family health history initiatives should address family tensions and communication patterns that affect discussion and collection of family health history information.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:T
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/10810730.2014.977466

  7 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25618195
[Au] Autor:Pane Seifert HT; Farmer EM; Wagner HR; Maultsby LT; Burns BJ
[Ad] Address:Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Services Effectiveness Research Program, Box 3454 DUMC, Durham, NC 27710, USA....
[Ti] Title:Patterns of maltreatment and diagnosis across levels of care in group homes.
[So] Source:Child Abuse Negl;42:72-83, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7757
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patterns of Axis I psychiatric diagnosis and maltreatment history were explored among youth in group homes, including match of clinical need to level or restrictiveness of care. Data on demographics, diagnoses, maltreatment, and group home level of care (Level I, II, or III homes, representing lower to higher intensity of supervision and treatment) were obtained from 523 youth who participated in a quasi-experimental study of group homes. Three quarters of youth had a diagnosis and two-thirds of youth had a maltreatment history. Youth in higher level homes had more diagnoses and higher rates of all disorders except adjustment disorders. Youth in Level I homes had a history of more maltreatment types, particularly high rates of neglect. Sexual abuse, physical abuse, and emotional abuse were most common among youth in higher level homes. Regardless of diagnosis history, comparable proportions of youth had a maltreatment history, and similar patterns were found across levels of care. Together, findings indicate that group homes with varying degrees of restrictiveness serve youth with different psychiatric diagnosis and maltreatment histories. Youth triaged to higher level homes had more diagnoses, while youth placed in the least restrictive homes had a history of more maltreatment subtypes. Further, distinct patterns of diagnosis types and maltreatment subtypes were seen across homes. Implications include the importance of assessing unique clinical needs of youth to promote an appropriate match to level of care and treatment plan.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25769133
[Au] Autor:Thakkar KN; Schall JD; Logan GD; Park S
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: k.n.thakkar@umcutrecht.nl....
[Ti] Title:Response inhibition and response monitoring in a saccadic double-step task in schizophrenia.
[So] Source:Brain Cogn;95:90-8, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2147
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cognitive control impairments are linked to functional outcome in schizophrenia. The goal of the current study was to investigate precise abnormalities in two aspects of cognitive control: reactively changing a prepared response, and monitoring performance and adjusting behavior accordingly. We adapted an oculomotor task from neurophysiological studies of the cellular basis of cognitive control in nonhuman primates. METHODS: 16 medicated outpatients with schizophrenia (SZ) and 18 demographically-matched healthy controls performed the modified double-step task. In this task, participants were required to make a saccade to a visual target. Infrequently, the target jumped to a new location and participants were instructed to rapidly inhibit and change their response. A race model provided an estimate of the time needed to cancel a planned movement. Response monitoring was assessed by measuring reaction time (RT) adjustments based on trial history. RESULTS: SZ patients had normal visually-guided saccadic RTs but required more time to switch the response to the new target location. Additionally, the estimated latency of inhibition was longer in patients and related to employment. Finally, although both groups slowed down on trials that required inhibiting and changing a response, patients showed exaggerated performance-based adjustments in RTs, which was correlated with positive symptom severity. CONCLUSIONS: SZ patients have impairments in rapidly inhibiting eye movements and show idiosyncratic response monitoring. These results are consistent with functional abnormalities in a network involving cortical oculomotor regions, the superior colliculus, and basal ganglia, as described in neurophysiological studies of non-human primates using an identical paradigm, and provide a translational bridge for understanding cognitive symptoms of SZ.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24950261
[Au] Autor:Chang ST; Nguyen DC; Raptis C; Menias CO; Zhou G; Wang-Gillam A; Linehan DC; Hawkins WG; Strasberg SM; Fields RC
[Ad] Address:*Department of Radiology †Department of Surgery ‡Division of Public Health Sciences; and §Division of Medical Oncology, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO; and ¶Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO.
[Ti] Title:Natural history of preoperative subcentimeter pulmonary nodules in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a retrospective cohort study.
[So] Source:Ann Surg;261(5):970-5, 2015 May.
[Is] ISSN:1528-1140
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the detection rate, radiologic characteristics, and natural history of incidental subcentimeter pulmonary nodules (SCPN) among patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma and to clarify whether further preoperative evaluation should be considered. BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of SCPN detected by routine preoperative abdominal imaging in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma is unknown. METHODS: Patients who underwent resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma between 2000 and 2010 were queried from a prospectively maintained database at a single institution. Pre- and postoperative computed tomographic (CT) imaging was independently reviewed and the presence and radiologic features of SCPNs were analyzed for associations with overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Of the 463 patients who met inclusion criteria, 329 (71%) had reviewable preoperative imaging. Preoperative SCPNs were described in 59 patients (18%), and 41 patients had follow-up imaging available for review. Only increasing age (67.1 vs 63.5 years; P = 0.005) was associated with the presence of SCPN. Six patients (1.8%) had new or enlarging nodules after surgery, of whom 5 (1.5%) had confirmed metastatic adenocarcinoma. There was no difference in OS between patients with or without preoperative SCPN (16.1 vs 19.1 months; P = 0.201). No radiographic criterion of SCPN (including number, size, laterality, calcification, or contour) was associated with OS. CONCLUSIONS: Neither the presence of preoperative SCPN nor nodule characteristics was associated with OS among patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic cancer. These data do not support routine additional workup of preoperative SCPN in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/SLA.0000000000000719

  10 / 755166 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25747819
[Au] Autor:Lucas EL; Bertrand P; Guazzetti S; Donna F; Peli M; Jursa TP; Lucchini R; Smith DR
[Ad] Address:University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA....
[Ti] Title:Impact of ferromanganese alloy plants on household dust manganese levels: Implications for childhood exposure.
[So] Source:Environ Res;138:279-90, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0953
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adolescents living in communities with ferromanganese alloy plant activity have been shown to exhibit deficits in olfactory and fine motor function. Household dust may serve as an important manganese (Mn) exposure pathway to children, though dust Mn concentrations have not previously been measured to assess household contamination from ferromanganese alloy plant emissions. Here we determined the association between dust concentrations and surface loadings of Mn and other metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn) in indoor and outdoor household dust from three Italian communities that differ by history of ferromanganese alloy plant activity: Bagnolo Mella, with an active ferromanganese alloy plant (n=178 households); Valcamonica, with historically active plants (n=166); and Garda Lake, with no history of ferromanganese plant activity (n=99). We also evaluated Mn levels in other environmental (soil, airborne particulates) and candidate biomarker (blood, hair, saliva, fingernails) samples from children within the households. Household dust Mn concentrations and surface loadings were significantly different between the three sites, with levels highest in Bagnolo Mella (outdoor median Mn concentration=4620, range 487-183,000µg/g), intermediate in Valcamonica (median=876, range 407-8240µg/g), and lowest in Garda Lake (median=407, range 258-7240µg/g). Outdoor dust Mn concentrations in Bagnolo Mella, but not the other communities, were significantly inversely related with distance from the plant (R(2)=0.6630, P<0.0001). Moreover, outdoor dust Mn concentrations and loadings were highly predictive of but significantly higher than indoor dust Mn concentrations and loadings by ~2 to ~7-fold (Mn concentrations) and ~7 to ~20-fold (Mn loadings). Finally, both indoor and outdoor dust Mn concentrations and outdoor dust Mn loading values were highly significantly correlated with both soil and air Mn concentrations, and with children's hair and fingernail Mn concentrations, but weakly or not associated with saliva or blood Mn levels. Given the evidence associating elevated Mn exposure with neurological impairments in children, these data support that dust Mn levels should be reduced in contaminated environments to protect the health of resident children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


page 1 of 75517 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information