Database : MEDLINE
Search on : history [Words]
References found : 771523 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 77153 go to page                         

  1 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25689100
[Au] Autor:Mann EA; Alam Z; Hufgard JR; Mogle M; Williams MT; Vorhees CV; Reddy P
[Ad] Address:Division of Pediatric Urology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Electronic address: Elizabeth.Mann@cchmc.org....
[Ti] Title:Chronic social defeat, but not restraint stress, alters bladder function in mice.
[So] Source:Physiol Behav;150:83-92, 2015 Oct 15.
[Is] ISSN:1873-507X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Voiding disorders in humans, particularly in children are associated with increased incidence of behavioral issues as well as past history of childhood abuse. We hypothesized that creating stress in mice, utilizing either a chronic social defeat model (SD) or restraint stress in shallow water model (RSSW) would engender changes in bladder function, morphology, and behavior, thereby enabling us to study the resultant voiding dysfunction. METHODS: For SD stress (14days), C57BL/6 male mice were exposed daily to a larger aggressive CD-1 male for 10min, followed by sensory exposure in a barrier cage for 24h. Control mice were similarly housed with no exposure. For RSSW (21days), C57BL/6 mice were put in a perforated conical tube with feet immersed in water daily for 4h, then returned to single housing cages. Control mice were also in single housing. After the stress period, voiding patterns were obtained on filter paper, followed by behavioral tests. At necropsy, blood was taken for corticosterone analysis, and bladder and body weights measured. Bladder cryosections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) for morphological assessment. Sequential sections were immunostained with antibodies to Ki-67 as a proliferation marker, CD31 (endothelial cell marker), and uroplakin-II. ImageJ software was used to measure bladder wall thickness on blinded H&E photomicrographs as well as quantitate CD31 staining. Both Ki-67-positive and -negative nuclei were counted with Imaris software to obtain a proliferation index. RESULTS: Only SD mice had a single large void pattern. Bladder-to-body weight ratios increased in SD mice (p≤0.02) but not in RSSW mice. Plasma corticosterone levels were elevated in all stressed mice. SD mice exhibited lower levels of locomotor activity compared with controls; RSSW mice were hyperactive. In SD mice, bladder wall thickness was increased (p≤0.003) but no change was seen in Ki-67 proliferation index, consistent with hypertrophy. No difference with control mice was seen in vascularity as visualized by CD31 staining. Uniform uroplakin-II staining lined the urothelium of both SD and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Mice exposed to repeated SD (14days) respond with altered voiding indicative of urine retention, and exhibit bladder wall changes consistent with hypertrophy while the urothelial barrier is maintained. These changes were not observed with repeated RSSW. SD, in contrast to RSSW, provides a model of psychological stress to further study the interplay of behavior and bladder dysfunction, enabling an improved understanding of voiding dysfunction, and the ability to create innovative and more effective management pathways for children who present with voiding dysfunction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26152838
[Au] Autor:Teixeira MS; Alper CM; Martin BS; Doyle BM; Doyle WJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania....
[Ti] Title:Oral pseudoephedrine decreases the rate of transmucosal nitrous oxide exchange for the middle ear.
[So] Source:Laryngoscope;125(9):2181-6, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1531-4995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Determine if oral treatment with a vasoconstrictor decreases the blood to middle ear exchange rate of the perfusion-limited gas, nitrous oxide (N2 O). STUDY DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, crossover study. METHODS: Ten adult subjects with and 10 without past middle ear disease completed paired experimental sessions, identical except for oral treatment with either pseudoephedrine hydrochloride or lactose placebo. At each session, subjects were fitted with a nonrebreathing mask and breathed room air for 20 minutes (acclimation period), 50% N2 O:50% O2 for 20 minutes (experimental period), and 100% O2 for 10 minutes (recovery period). Throughout, heart rate, blood pressure, and O2 saturation were monitored, and bilateral middle ear pressures were recorded by tympanometry every minute. The primary outcome was the slope of the middle ear pressure-time function for the experimental period, which estimates the volume N2 O exchange rate. Using repeated measures analysis of variance, the effects of group (disease history), treatment (active vs. placebo), and period (1 vs. 2) on the recorded vital signs, and of group, treatment, and ear (left/right) on the middle ear pressure-time slope were evaluated for statistical significance. RESULTS: Statistically significant effects of period on O2 saturation (period 2 > period 1) and of treatment on heart rate (active > placebo) were documented. Only treatment was statistically significant for the middle ear pressure-time slope, with a shallower slope characterizing the active treatment session. CONCLUSIONS: The volume exchange rate across the middle ear mucosa of perfusion-limited gases can be modulated pharmacologically. Theoretically, similar drugs can be used to reduce the requisite eustachian tube opening efficiency for adequate middle ear pressure regulation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 1b Laryngoscope, 125:2181-2186, 2015.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/lary.25221

  3 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25681317
[Au] Autor:Edelstein DL; Cruz-Correa M; Soto-Salgado M; Axilbund JE; Hylind LM; Romans K; Blair C; Wiley E; Tersmette AC; Offerhaus JA; Giardiello FM
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland....
[Ti] Title:Risk of Colorectal and Other Cancers in Patients With Serrated Polyposis.
[So] Source:Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol;13(9):1697-9, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1542-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patients with serrated polyposis develop multiple colorectal hyperplastic and/or serrated sessile adenomas/polyps. We investigated the risk of colorectal and other cancers by analyzing data from 64 patients with serrated polyposis (mean age at diagnosis, 54 y; 41% men; 92% white) listed in the Johns Hopkins Polyposis Registry. Medical, endoscopic, and histopathology reports were evaluated. Six patients (9.4%) had a history of colorectal cancer, diagnosed at a mean age of 56 years; 6 additional patients (9.4%) had at least 1 advanced colorectal adenoma. Extracolonic cancers were found in 16% of the study population. The standard incidence ratio for colorectal cancer in patients with serrated polyposis was 18.72 (95% confidence interval, 6.87-40.74) and for extracolonic cancer was 31.20 (95% confidence interval, 14.96-57.37), compared with the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population. Patients with serrated polyposis therefore have a high risk for colorectal cancer and require vigilant colorectal surveillance, starting at the time of diagnosis of serrated polyposis. The risk of extracolonic cancer also appears to be increased, but this requires further evaluation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26188533
[Au] Autor:Abd Alamir M; Radulescu V; Goyfman M; Mohler ER; Gao YL; Budoff MJ; CRIC Study Investigators
[Ad] Address:Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA, Torrance, CA, USA....
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and correlates of mitral annular calcification in adults with chronic kidney disease: Results from CRIC study.
[So] Source:Atherosclerosis;242(1):117-22, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1484
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Risk factors for mitral annular calcification (MAC) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) demonstrate significant overlap in the general population. The aim of this paper is to determine whether there are independent relationships between MAC and demographics, traditional and novel CVD risk factors using cardiac CT in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) in a cross-sectional study. METHODS: A sample of 2070 subjects underwent coronary calcium scanning during the CRIC study. Data were obtained for each participant at time of scan. SUBJECTS: were dichotomized into the presence and absence of MAC. Differences in baseline demographic and transitional risk factor data were evaluated across groups. Covariates used in multivariable adjustment were age, gender, BMI, HDL, LDL, lipid lowering medications, smoking status, family history of heart attack, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, phosphate, PTH, albuminuria, and calcium. RESULTS: Our study consisted of 2070 subjects, of which 331 had MAC (prevalence of 16.0%). The mean MAC score was 511.98 (SD 1368.76). Age and white race remained independently associated with presence of MAC. Decreased GFR was also a risk factor. African American and Hispanic race, as well as former smoking status were protective against MAC. In multivariable adjusted analyses, the remaining covariates were not significantly associated with MAC. Among renal covariates, elevated phosphate was significant. CONCLUSION: In the CRIC population, presence of MAC was independently associated with age, Caucasian race, decreased GFR, and elevated phosphate. These results are suggested by mechanisms of dysregulation of inflammation, hormones, and electrolytes in subjects with renal disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26180029
[Au] Autor:Quinn GP; Zebrack BJ; Sehovic I; Bowman ML; Vadaparampil ST
[Ad] Address:Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida....
[Ti] Title:Adoption and cancer survivors: Findings from a learning activity for oncology nurses.
[So] Source:Cancer;121(17):2993-3000, 2015 Sep 1.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0142
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To the authors' knowledge, little is known regarding the rate at which cancer survivors successfully adopt a child or about their experiences negotiating a costly, and perhaps discriminatory, process regarding the prospective parent's health history. The current study describes the results of a learning activity in which nurses contacted an adoption agency to learn more about the process for survivors with the goal of helping nurses provide patients with accurate information for making a well-informed decision regarding adoption. METHODS: Training program participants identified an adoption agency (local, state, or international) and conducted an interview using a semistructured guide. After the interview, participants created a summary of responses to the questions. The authors examined responses to each question using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: A total of 77 participants (98% completion rate) across 15 states provided a summary. Responses were distributed across the following categories: adoption costs, steps required for survivors seeking adoption, challenges for survivors seeking adoption, birth parents' reservations, and planned institutional changes to increase adoption awareness. The majority of respondents reported improving their knowledge of adoption and cancer, increased challenges for survivors, and the need to educate patients concerning the realities of adoption policies. The need for a letter stating the survivor was 5 years cancer free was identified as a significant obstacle for survivors. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses are charged with following practice guidelines that include recommendations for appropriate reproductive health referrals. Cancer survivors would benefit from a health care provider who can provide education and concrete information when patients are making a decision about fertility and adoption. Cancer 2015;121:2993-3000. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/cncr.29322

  6 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25931291
[Au] Autor:Parikh SA; Leis JF; Chaffee KG; Call TG; Hanson CA; Ding W; Chanan-Khan AA; Bowen D; Conte M; Schwager S; Slager SL; Van Dyke DL; Jelinek DF; Kay NE; Shanafelt TD
[Ad] Address:Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota....
[Ti] Title:Hypogammaglobulinemia in newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Natural history, clinical correlates, and outcomes.
[So] Source:Cancer;121(17):2883-91, 2015 Sep 1.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0142
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Although hypogammaglobulinemia is a well recognized complication in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), its prevalence at the time of CLL diagnosis, and association with novel prognostic markers and clinical outcome is not well understood. METHODS: All patients at the Mayo Clinic between January 1999 and July 2013 who had newly diagnosed CLL and had a baseline assessment of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) were included. The relation between hypogammaglobulinemia at diagnosis and the novel prognostic parameters time to first treatment (TFT) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 1485 patients who met the eligibility criteria, 382 (26%) had hypogammaglobulinemia (median IgG, 624 mg/dL), whereas the remaining 1103 patients (74%) had normal serum IgG levels (median IgG, 1040 mg/dL). Patients who had hypogammaglobulinemia at diagnosis were more likely to have advanced Rai stage (III-IV; P = .001) and higher expression of CD49d (P < .001) compared with patients who had normal IgG levels. Although the median TFT for patients who had hypogammaglobulinemia was shorter compared with that for patients who had normal IgG levels (3.8 years vs 7.4 years; P < .001), on multivariable analysis, there was no difference in OS between these 2 groups (12.8 years vs 11.3 years, respectively; P = .73). Of 1103 patients who had CLL with normal IgG levels at diagnosis and who did not receive CLL therapy, the risk of acquired hypogammaglobulinemia was 11% at 5 years and 23% at 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Hypogammaglobulinemia is present in 25% of patients with newly diagnosed CLL. Approximately 25% of patients who have CLL with normal IgG levels at diagnosis will subsequently develop hypogammaglobulinemia on long-term follow-up. The presence of hypogammaglobulinemia does not appear to impact overall survival. Cancer 2015;121:2883-2891. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/cncr.29438

  7 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26060977
[Au] Autor:Nelson DW; Simianu VV; Bastawrous AL; Billingham RP; Fichera A; Florence MG; Johnson EK; Johnson MG; Thirlby RC; Flum DR; Steele SR; Colorectal Writing Group for the Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program­Comparative Effectiveness Research Translation Network (SCOAP-CERTAIN) Collaborative
[Ad] Address:Madigan Army Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Fort Lewis, Washington....
[Ti] Title:Thromboembolic Complications and Prophylaxis Patterns in Colorectal Surgery.
[So] Source:JAMA Surg;150(8):712-20, 2015 Aug 1.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6262
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:IMPORTANCE: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important complication of colorectal surgery, but its incidence is unclear in the era of VTE prophylaxis. OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence of and risk factors associated with thromboembolic complications and contemporary VTE prophylaxis patterns following colorectal surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective data from the Washington State Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program (SCOAP) linked to a statewide hospital discharge database. At 52 Washington State SCOAP hospitals, participants included consecutive patients undergoing colorectal surgery between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Venous thromboembolism complications in-hospital and up to 90 days after surgery. RESULTS: Among 16 120 patients (mean age, 61.4 years; 54.5% female), the use of perioperative and in-hospital VTE chemoprophylaxis increased significantly from 31.6% to 86.4% and from 59.6% to 91.4%, respectively, by 2011 (P < .001 for trend for both). Overall, 10.6% (1399 of 13 230) were discharged on a chemoprophylaxis regimen. The incidence of VTE was 2.2% (360 of 16 120). Patients undergoing abdominal operations had higher rates of 90-day VTE compared with patients having pelvic operations (2.5% [246 of 9702] vs 1.8% [114 of 6413], P = .001). Those having an operation for cancer had a similar incidence of 90-day VTE compared with those having an operation for nonmalignant processes (2.1% [128 of 6213] vs 2.3% [232 of 9902], P = .24). On adjusted analysis, older age, nonelective surgery, history of VTE, and operations for inflammatory disease were associated with increased risk of 90-day VTE (P < .05 for all). There was no significant decrease in VTE over time. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Venous thromboembolism rates are low and largely unchanged despite increases in perioperative and postoperative prophylaxis. These data should be considered in developing future guidelines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.1057

  8 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25760303
[Au] Autor:Smith MJ; Cobia DJ; Reilly JL; Gilman JM; Roberts AG; Alpert KI; Wang L; Breiter HC; Csernansky JG
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois....
[Ti] Title:Cannabis-related episodic memory deficits and hippocampal morphological differences in healthy individuals and schizophrenia subjects.
[So] Source:Hippocampus;25(9):1042-51, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1098-1063
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cannabis use has been associated with episodic memory (EM) impairments and abnormal hippocampus morphology among both healthy individuals and schizophrenia subjects. Considering the hippocampus' role in EM, research is needed to evaluate the relationship between cannabis-related hippocampal morphology and EM among healthy and clinical groups. We examined differences in hippocampus morphology between control and schizophrenia subjects with and without a past (not current) cannabis use disorder (CUD). Subjects group-matched on demographics included 44 healthy controls (CON), 10 subjects with a CUD history (CON-CUD), 28 schizophrenia subjects with no history of substance use disorders (SCZ), and 15 schizophrenia subjects with a CUD history (SCZ-CUD). Large-deformation, high-dimensional brain mapping with MRI produced surface-based representations of the hippocampus that were compared across all four groups and correlated with EM and CUD history. Surface maps of the hippocampus were generated to visualize morphological differences. CON-CUD and SCZ-CUD were characterized by distinct cannabis-related hippocampal shape differences and parametric deficits in EM performance. Shape differences observed in CON-CUD were associated with poorer EM performance, while shape differences observed in SCZ-CUD were associated with a longer duration of CUD and shorter duration of CUD remission. A past history of CUD may be associated with notable differences in hippocampal morphology and EM impairments among adults with and without schizophrenia. Although the results may be compatible with a causal hypothesis, we must consider that the observed cannabis-related shape differences in the hippocampus could also be explained as biomarkers of a neurobiological susceptibility to poor memory or the effects of cannabis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/hipo.22427

  9 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26214552
[Au] Autor:Schonberger RB; Dai F; Brandt CA; Burg MM
[Ad] Address:From the *Department of Anesthesiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; †Yale Center for Analytical Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut; ‡VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut; §Departments of Emergency Medicine and Anesthesiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; and ∥Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
[Ti] Title:Balancing Model Performance and Simplicity to Predict Postoperative Primary Care Blood Pressure Elevation.
[So] Source:Anesth Analg;121(3):632-41, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1526-7598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Because of uncertainty regarding the reliability of perioperative blood pressures and traditional notions downplaying the role of anesthesiologists in longitudinal patient care, there is no consensus for anesthesiologists to recommend postoperative primary care blood pressure follow-up for patients presenting for surgery with an increased blood pressure. The decision of whom to refer should ideally be based on a predictive model that balances performance with ease-of-use. If an acceptable decision rule was developed, a new practice paradigm integrating the surgical encounter into broader public health efforts could be tested, with the goal of reducing long-term morbidity from hypertension among surgical patients. METHODS: Using national data from US veterans receiving surgical care, we determined the prevalence of poorly controlled outpatient clinic blood pressures ≥140/90 mm Hg, based on the mean of up to 4 readings in the year after surgery. Four increasingly complex logistic regression models were assessed to predict this outcome. The first included the mean of 2 preoperative blood pressure readings; other models progressively added a broad array of demographic and clinical data. After internal validation, the C-statistics and the Net Reclassification Index between the simplest and most complex models were assessed. The performance characteristics of several simple blood pressure referral thresholds were then calculated. RESULTS: Among 215,621 patients, poorly controlled outpatient clinic blood pressure was present postoperatively in 25.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25.5%-25.9%) including 14.2% (95% CI, 13.9%-14.6%) of patients lacking a hypertension history. The most complex prediction model demonstrated statistically significant, but clinically marginal, improvement in discrimination over a model based on preoperative blood pressure alone (C-statistic, 0.736 [95% CI, 0.734-0.739] vs 0.721 [95% CI, 0.718-0.723]; P for difference <0.0001). The Net Reclassification Index was 0.088 (95% CI, 0.082-0.093); P < 0.0001. A preoperative blood pressure threshold ≥150/95 mm Hg, calculated as the mean of 2 readings, identified patients more likely than not to demonstrate outpatient clinic blood pressures in the hypertensive range. Four of 5 patients not meeting this criterion were indeed found to be normotensive during outpatient clinic follow-up (positive predictive value, 51.5%; 95% CI, 51.0-52.0; negative predictive value, 79.6%; 95% CI, 79.4-79.7). CONCLUSIONS: In a national cohort of surgical patients, poorly controlled postoperative clinic blood pressure was present in >1 of 4 patients (95% CI, 25.5%-25.9%). Predictive modeling based on the mean of 2 preoperative blood pressure measurements performed nearly as well as more complicated models and may provide acceptable predictive performance to guide postoperative referral decisions. Future studies of the feasibility and efficacy of such referrals are needed to assess possible beneficial effects on long-term cardiovascular morbidity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1213/ANE.0000000000000860

  10 / 771523 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 26286712
[Au] Autor:Lucyk K; Lu M; Sajobi T; Quan H
[Ad] Address:Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4Z6, Canada. klucyk@ucalgary.ca....
[Ti] Title:Administrative health data in Canada: lessons from history.
[So] Source:BMC Med Inform Decis Mak;15:69, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Health decision-making requires evidence from high-quality data. As one example, the Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) compiles data from the majority of Canadian hospitals to form one of the most comprehensive and highly regarded administrative health databases available for health research, internationally. However, despite the success of this and other administrative health data resources, little is known about their history or the factors that have led to their success. The purpose of this paper is to provide an historical overview of Canadian administrative health data for health research to contribute to the institutional memory of this field. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative content analysis of approximately 20 key sources to construct an historical narrative of administrative health data in Canada. Specifically, we searched for content related to key events, individuals, challenges, and successes in this field over time. RESULTS: In Canada, administrative health data for health research has developed in tangent with provincial research centres. Interestingly, the lessons learned from this history align with the original recommendations of the 1964 Royal Commission on Health Services: (1) standardization, and (2) centralization of data resources, that is (3) facilitated through governmental financial support. CONCLUSIONS: The overview history provided here illustrates the need for longstanding partnerships between government and academia, for classification, terminology and standardization are time-consuming and ever-evolving processes. This paper will be of interest to those who work with administrative health data, and also for countries that are looking to build or improve upon their use of administrative health data for decision-making.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12911-015-0196-9


page 1 of 77153 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information