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[PMID]: 25336212
[Au] Autor:Saito T; Asai K; Sato S; Takano H; Mizuno K; Shimizu W
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603, Japan tnsaitonms@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Ultrastructural features of cardiomyocytes in dilated cardiomyopathy with initially decompensated heart failure as a predictor of prognosis.
[So] Source:Eur Heart J;36(12):724-32, 2015 Mar 21.
[Is] ISSN:1522-9645
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: The aim of the present study was to clarify the significance of myocardial ultrastructural changes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). METHODS AND RESULTS: Endomyocardial biopsy of the left ventricle was performed in 250 consecutive DCM patients (54.9 ± 13.9 years, 79% men), presenting initially as decompensated heart failure (HF). Myofilament changes of cardiomyocytes were evaluated by electron microscopy and compared with clinical and morphometric data. Mortality and HF recurrence were evaluated during the follow-up period. During the follow-up period (4.9 ± 3.9 years), 24 patients (10%) died and 67 (27%) were readmitted because of HF recurrence, including those who had died because of HF. Myofilament changes, classified as either focal derangement of myofilaments (sarcomere damage) or diffuse myofilament lysis (disappearance of most sarcomeres in cardiomyocytes), were identified in 164 patients (66%). Multivariate analysis identified a family history of DCM [hazard ratio (HR) 4.763; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.012-12.518], atrial fibrillation (HR 6.132; 95% CI 2.188-17.180), haemoglobin level (HR 0.685; 95% CI 0.528-0.889), and diffuse myofilament lysis (HR 4.048; 95% CI 1.427-11.481) as independent predictors of mortality. A family history of DCM (HR 2.268; 95% CI 1.276-4.030), haemoglobin level (HR 0.876; 95% CI 0.785-0.979), focal derangement of myofilaments (HR 7.431; 95% CI 2.916-18.934), and diffuse myofilament lysis (HR 6.480; 95% CI 2.403-17.473) were predictors of readmission due to HF recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: In DCM patients with first-decompensated HF, myofilament changes are strongly associated with mortality and HF recurrence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/eurheartj/ehu404

  2 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25796023
[Au] Autor:Rahbar N; Vali Zadeh S; Ghorbani R; Kheradmand P
[Ad] Address:Research Center of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding and Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran. rahbar.nahid@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of parvovirus b19 specific antibody in pregnant women with spontaneous abortion.
[So] Source:Acta Med Iran;53(3):168-72, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1735-9694
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human parvovirus B19 is a very common viral infection especially in school-aged children. The infection during pregnancy can affect the fetus due to lack of mother's immunity. Although, there is still no evidence of fetal teratogenic effects with parvovirus B19, but non-immune fetal hydrops and abortion may be caused by vertical transmission of the virus during pregnancy. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of parvovirus B19-specific antibody (IgM) in pregnant women who had a spontaneous abortion. This cross-sectional study was carried out in all pregnant women who referred due to a spontaneous abortion. All demographic information such as age, occupation, and gestational age, last history of abortion, gravity, and presence of children below the age of six was recorded and a blood sample was provided for all the women. Then, the blood samples were tested to assay parvovirus B19-specific antibody (IgM) by EuroImmune ELISA kit. Among 94 pregnant women with the mean age of 28.4 years who had a spontaneous abortion, parvovirus B19 specific antibody (IgM) was detected in 17 participants (18.1%). Meanwhile, 14 women (14.9%) were suspected for presence of the antibody in their blood sample. There was no significant difference between the presence of antibody and age of pregnant women, occupation, gestational age, number of previous abortion, presence of children below the age of six and number of pregnancy. These findings revealed that a high percentage of pregnant women are probably non-immune against parvovirus B19, and also there might be a number of spontaneous abortions in which parvovirus infection caused fetal death.  However, more studies are needed to prove the absolute role of parvovirus B19 in these abortions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25595520
[Au] Autor:Scott LN; Pilkonis PA; Hipwell AE; Keenan K; Stepp SD
[Ad] Address:University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address: scottln2@upmc.edu....
[Ti] Title:Non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal ideation as predictors of suicide attempts in adolescent girls: A multi-wave prospective study.
[So] Source:Compr Psychiatry;58:1-10, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8384
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although both suicide ideation (SI) and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) are known risk factors for suicidal behavior, few longitudinal studies have examined whether having a history of one or both of these factors prospectively predicts increased risk for suicide attempts. According to the theory of acquired capability for suicide, engagement in NSSI may reduce inhibitions around self-inflicted violence, imparting greater risk for suicide attempts among those with SI than would be observed in those with SI who do not have a history of NSSI. We used prospective data from the Pittsburgh Girls Study, a large community sample, to compare groups of girls reporting no SI or NSSI, SI only, or both NSSI and SI between early to late adolescence on any lifetime or recent suicide attempts in late adolescence and early adulthood. As compared to girls with no SI or NSSI history and those with only an SI history, girls with a history of both NSSI and SI were significantly more likely to subsequently report both lifetime and recent suicide attempts. Results are consistent with the acquired capability theory for suicide and suggest that adolescent girls who have engaged in NSSI and also report SI represent a particularly high-risk group in need of prevention and intervention efforts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25691445
[Au] Autor:Krishnamachari B; Il'yasova D; Scheurer ME; Bondy M; Zhou R; Wrensch M; Davis F
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury. Electronic address: bkrishna@nyit.edu....
[Ti] Title:A pooled multisite analysis of the effects of atopic medical conditions in glioma risk in different ethnic groups.
[So] Source:Ann Epidemiol;25(4):270-4, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2585
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The incidences of atopic conditions (allergies, asthma, or eczema) and glioma vary by ethnicity. Atopic conditions are inversely associated with gliomas. We conducted a pooled multisite study investigating the associations of atopic conditions with glioma in different race/ethnicity groups. METHODS: Using glioma cases and healthy controls, unconditional logistic regression was conducted to assess the associations of atopic conditions with glioma separately in white, black, Asian, and Hispanic subpopulations. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. RESULTS: Glioblastoma multiforme cases were less likely than controls to report a history of atopic conditions in whites (OR = 0.46, [95% CI, 0.38-0.54]) and Asians (OR = 0.27, [95% CI, 0.10-0.73]). The same trend was seen when looking at glioma cases of all histologies. An inverse association was not seen in blacks for glioblastoma multiforme or all histologies combined. CONCLUSIONS: The inverse association between glioma and atopic conditions may vary by ethnicity due to a difference in the biology of atopic conditions in different ethnicities but may be due to chance because of the limitations of small nonwhite sample sizes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24960435
[Au] Autor:Binswanger IA; Whitley E; Haffey PR; Mueller SR; Min SJ
[Ad] Address:a Division of General Internal Medicine , University of Colorado School of Medicine , Aurora , Colorado , USA.
[Ti] Title:A patient navigation intervention for drug-involved former prison inmates.
[So] Source:Subst Abus;36(1):34-41, 2015 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1547-0164
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Former prison inmates experience high rates of hospitalizations and death during the transition from prison to the community, particularly from drug-related causes and early after release. The authors designed a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of patient navigation to reduce barriers to health care and hospitalizations for former prison inmates. METHODS: Forty former prison inmates with a history of drug involvement were recruited and randomized within 15 days after prison release. Participants were randomized to receive 3 months of patient navigation (PN) with facilitated enrollment into an indigent care discount program (intervention) or facilitated enrollment into an indigent care discount program alone (control). Structured interviews were conducted at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Outcomes were measured as a change in self-reported barriers to care and as the rate of health service use per 100 person-days. RESULTS: The mean number of reported barriers to care was reduced at 3 and 6 months in both groups. At 6 months, the rate of emergency department/urgent care visits per 100 person-days since baseline was 1.1 among intervention participants and 0.5 among control participants (P = .04), whereas the rate of hospitalizations per 100 person-days was 0.2 in intervention participants and 0.6 in control participants (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Recruitment of former inmates into an RCT of patient navigation was highly feasible, but follow-up was limited by rearrests. Results suggest a significantly lower rate of hospitalizations among navigation participants, although the rate of emergency department/urgent care visits was not improved. Patient navigation is a promising, pragmatic intervention that may be effective at reducing high-cost health care utilization in former prison inmates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/08897077.2014.932320

  6 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25130936
[Au] Autor:Yadav S; Dave M; Edakkanambeth Varayil J; Harmsen WS; Tremaine WJ; Zinsmeister AR; Sweetser SR; Melton LJ; Sandborn WJ; Loftus EV
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota....
[Ti] Title:A Population-based Study of Incidence, Risk Factors, Clinical Spectrum, and Outcomes of Ischemic Colitis.
[So] Source:Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol;13(4):731-738.e6, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1542-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND & AIMS: Little is known about progression of ischemic colitis (IC) among unselected patients. We aimed to estimate the incidence, risk factors, and natural history of IC in a population-based cohort in Olmsted County, Minnesota. METHODS: We performed a retrospective population-based cohort and nested case-control study of IC. Each IC case was matched to 2 controls from the same population on the basis of sex, age, and closest registration number. Conditional logistic regression, the Kaplan-Meier method, and proportional hazards regression were used to assess comorbidities, estimate survival, and identify characteristics associated with survival, respectively. RESULTS: Four hundred forty-five county residents (median age, 71.6 years; 67% female) were diagnosed with IC from 1976 through 2009 and were matched with 890 controls. The age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence rates of IC nearly quadrupled from 6.1 cases/100,000 person-years in 1976-1980 to 22.9/100,000 in 2005-2009. The odds for IC were significantly higher among subjects with atherosclerotic diseases; odds ratios ranged from 2.6 for individuals with coronary disease to 7.9 for individuals with peripheral vascular disease. Of IC cases, 59% survived for 5 years (95% confidence interval, 54%-64%), compared with 90% of controls (95% confidence interval, 88%-92%). Age >40 years, male sex, right-sided colon involvement, concomitant small bowel involvement, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were all independently associated with mortality (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of IC increased during the past 3 decades in a population-based cohort in Minnesota. IC typically presents in older patients with multiple comorbidities and is associated with high in-hospital mortality (11.5%) and rates of surgery (17%).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25789086
[Au] Autor:Evans DC; Wojda TR; Jones CD; Otey AJ; Stawicki SP
[Ad] Address:David C Evans, Thomas R Wojda, Christian D Jones, Andrew J Otey, Stanislaw P Stawicki, Department of Surgery, the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States....
[Ti] Title:Intentional ingestions of foreign objects among prisoners: A review.
[So] Source:World J Gastrointest Endosc;7(3):162-8, 2015 Mar 16.
[Is] ISSN:1948-5190
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The intentional ingestion of foreign objects (IIFO) is described more commonly in prison populations than in the general population, with an estimated annual incidence of 1 in 1900 inmates in our state correctional facilities. Incidents often involve ingestion of small metal objects (e.g., paperclips, razor blades) or other commonly available items like pens or eating utensils. Despite ingestion of relatively sharp objects, most episodes can be clinically managed with either observation or endoscopy. Surgery should be reserved for those with signs or symptoms of gastrointestinal perforation or obstruction. For those with a history of IIFO, efforts should focus on prevention of recurrence as subsequent episodes are associated with higher morbidity, significant healthcare and security costs. The pattern of IIFO is often repetitive, with escalation both in frequency of ingestions and in number of items ingested. Little is known about successful prevention strategies, but efforts to monitor patients and provide psychiatric care are potential best-practice strategies. This article aims to provide state-of-the art review on the topic, followed by a set of basic recommendations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150319
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4253/wjge.v7.i3.162

  8 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25789119
[Au] Autor:Al-Sinani S; Woodhouse N; Al-Mamari A; Al-Shafie O; Al-Shafaee M; Al-Yahyaee S; Hassan M; Jaju D; Al-Hashmi K; Al-Abri M; Al-Rassadi K; Rizvi S; Loic Y; Froguel P; Bayoumi R
[Ad] Address:Sawsan Al-Sinani, Nicolas Woodhouse, Ali Al-Mamari, Omaima Al-Shafie, Mohammed Al-Shafaee, Said Al-Yahyaee, Mohammed Hassan, Deepali Jaju, Khamis Al-Hashmi, Mohammed Al-Abri, Khalid Al-Rassadi, Syed Rizvi, Riad Bayoumi, Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qabo...
[Ti] Title:Association of gene variants with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes among Omanis.
[So] Source:World J Diabetes;6(2):358-66, 2015 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1948-9358
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To investigate the association of 10 known common gene variants with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) among Omanis. METHODS: Using case-control design, a total of 992 diabetic patients and 294 normoglycemic Omani Arabs were genotyped, by an allelic discrimination assay-by-design TaqMan method on fast real time polymerase chain reaction system, for the following gene variants: KCNJ11 (rs5219), TCF7L2 (rs7903146), CDKAL1 (rs10946398), CDKN2A/B (rs10811661), FTO (rs9939609 and rs8050136), IGF2BP2 (rs4402960), SLC30A8 (rs13266634) CAPN10 (rs3792267) and HHEX (rs1111875). T2D patients were recruited from the Diabetes Clinic (n = 243) and inpatients (n = 749) at Sultan Qaboos Univesity Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. Adult control participants (n = 294) were volunteers from the community and from those visiting Family Medicine Clinic at SQU, for regular medical checkup. The difficulty in recruiting Omani participants with no family history of diabetes was the main reason behind the small number of control participants in this study. Almost all volunteers questioned had a relative with diabetes mellitus. Inspite of the small number of normoglycemic controls in this study, this sample was sufficient for detection of genes and loci for common alleles influencing T2D with an odds ratio of ≥ 1.3 reaching at least 80% power. Data was collected from June 2010 to February 2012. RESULTS: Using binary logistic regression analysis, four gene variants showed significant association with T2D risk: KCNJ11 (rs5219, P = 5.8 × 10(-6), OR = 1.74), TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 0.001, OR = 1.46), CDKAL1 (rs10946398, P = 0.002, OR = 1.44) and CDKN2A/B (rs10811661, P = 0.020, OR = 1.40). The fixation index analysis of these four gene variants indicated significant genetic differentiation between diabetics and controls {[KCNJ11 (rs5219), P < 0.001], [TCF7L2 (rs7903146), P < 0.001], [CDKAL1 (rs10946398), P < 0.05], [CDKN2A/B (rs10811661), P < 0.05]}. The highest genotype variation % between diabetics and controls was found at KCNJ11 (2.07%) and TCF7L2 (1.62%). This study was not able to detect an association of T2D risk with gene variants of IGF2BP2 (rs4402960), SLC30A8 (rs13266634), CAPN10 (rs3792267) and HHEX (rs1111875). Moreover, no association was found between FTO gene variants (rs9939609 and rs8050136) and T2D risk. However, T2D risk was found to be significantly associated with obesity (P = 0.002, OR = 2.22); and with the Waist-to-Hip ratio (n = 532, P = 1.9 ×10(-7), OR = 2.4), [among males (n = 234, P = 1.2 × 10(-4), OR = 2.0) and females (n = 298, P = 0.001, OR = 6.3)]. CONCLUSION: Results confirmed the association of KCNJ11 (rs5219), TCF7L2 (rs7903146), CDKAL1 (rs10946398) and CDKN2A/B (rs10811661) gene variants with susceptibility to T2D among Omani Arabs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150319
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4239/wjd.v6.i2.358

  9 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25789109
[Au] Autor:Poomalar GK
[Ad] Address:Gunasekaran Kala Poomalar, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College Hospital, Madagadipet, Puducherry 605107, India.
[Ti] Title:Changing trends in management of gestational diabetes mellitus.
[So] Source:World J Diabetes;6(2):284-95, 2015 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1948-9358
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is on the rise globally. In view of the increasing prevalence of GDM and fetal and neonatal complications associated with it, there is a splurge of research in this field and management of GDM is undergoing a sea change. Trends are changing in prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and future follow up. There is emerging evidence regarding use of moderate exercise, probiotics and vitamin D in the prevention of GDM. Regarding treatment, newer insulin analogs like aspart, lispro and detemir are associated with better glycemic control than older insulins. Continuous glucose monitoring systems and continuous subcutaneous insulin systems may play a role in those who require higher doses of insulin for sugar control. Evidence exists that favors metformin as a safer alternative to insulin in view of good glycemic control and better perinatal outcomes. As the risk of developing GDM in subsequent pregnancies and also the risk of overt diabetes in later life is high, regular assessment of these women is required in future. Lifestyle interventions or metformin should be offered to women with a history of GDM who develop pre-diabetes. Further studies are required in the field of prevention of GDM for optimizing obstetric outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150319
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4239/wjd.v6.i2.284

  10 / 753577 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25789105
[Au] Autor:Noctor E; Dunne FP
[Ad] Address:Eoin Noctor, Steno Diabetes Center, DK-2820 Gentofte, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: The influence of changing diagnostic criteria.
[So] Source:World J Diabetes;6(2):234-44, 2015 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1948-9358
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) carries a lifetime risk of progression to type 2 diabetes of up to 60%. Identification of those women at higher risk of progression to diabetes allows the timely introduction of measures to delay or prevent diabetes onset. However, there is a large degree of variability in the literature with regard to the proportion of women with a history of GDM who go on to develop diabetes. Heterogeneity between cohorts with regard to diagnostic criteria used, duration of follow-up, and the characteristics of the study population limit the ability to make meaningful comparisons across studies. As the new International Association for Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group criteria are increasingly adopted worldwide, the prevalence of GDM is set to increase by two-to three-fold. Here, we review the literature to examine the evolution of diagnostic criteria for GDM, the implications of changing criteria on the proportion of women with previous GDM progressing to diabetes, and how the use of different diagnostic criteria may influence the development of appropriate follow-up strategies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150321
[Lr] Last revision date:150321
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150319
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4239/wjd.v6.i2.234


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