Database : MEDLINE
Search on : hymenolepis and nana [Words]
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[PMID]: 29509952
[Au] Autor:Adugna S; Kebede T; Mekonnen Z; Degarege A; Liang S; Erko B
[Ad] Address:Addis Ababa University, College of Health Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa.
[Ti] Title:Diagnostic performance of Mini Parasep® solvent-free faecal parasite concentrator relative to Kato-Katz and McMaster for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections.
[So] Source:Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3503
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: In this cross-sectional study, we compared the performance of Mini Parasep® solvent-free (SF) faecal parasite concentrator, Kato-Katz thick smear and McMaster techniques for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections among children in Wosha Soyama Primary School, Ethiopia. Methods: Stool samples were collected from 381 children and examined for intestinal parasitic infections using Mini Parasep® SF faecal parasite concentrator, Kato-Katz thick smear and McMaster techniques. Results: About 86.1% of children were infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite based on combined results of the three techniques. The sensitivity and negative predictive values of Mini Parasep® SF, Kato-Katz and McMaster tests for detecting at least one species of intestinal parasite infections were 90.2% and 62.4%, 80.0% and 44.5%, and 55.2% and 26.5%, respectively. While Mini Parasep® SF was more sensitive in detecting Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni and Hymenolepis nana infections, Kato-Katz was more sensitive in detecting Trichuris trichiura infection, and McMaster had higher sensitivity in diagnosing hookworm infection. Conclusions: The Mini Parasep® SF faecal parasite concentrator technique showed better performance than the Kato-Katz and McMaster techniques for the detection of intestinal helminth infections in stool samples, particularly for S. mansoni, A. lumbricoides and H. nana. Hence, Mini Parasep® SF could be used as one of the suitable faecal examination methods for surveillance and monitoring of preventive chemotherapy of schistosomiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/trstmh/try010

  2 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390318
[Au] Autor:Hench J; Cathomas G; Dettmer MS
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pathology, Cantonal Hospital Baselland, Liestal.
[Ti] Title:Hymenolepis nana: A case report of a perfect IBD camouflage warrior.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9146, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: There is evidence that parasitic helminths can ameliorate colitis in animal models and humans. Although infections with Hymenolepis sp. are clinically benign, the immunomodulatory interactions between host and parasite are largely unknown. PATIENT CONCERNS: In this study we examined the intestinal mucosa of an adult asymptomatic patient harboring adult and larval dwarf tapeworms (Hymenolepis nana) who underwent surgery for an unrelated reason. INTERVENTIONS: Routine histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to characterize the host's response to the parasite. Parasitic DNA was sequenced to identify the tapeworm species. DIAGNOSES: Morphological and immunohistochemical studies showed a nearly complete absence of an anti-parasite host immune response. The outer surface of the parasite also showed prominent cross-reactivity with various tested leukocyte antigens. Our findings closely resemble experimentally obtained data from the H. diminuta-infected rat at the state of persistent colonization. OUTCOMES: Cross-reactivity of parasite-borne molecules with anti-human-leukocyte antibodies indicates a potential functional role in active modulation of the host's immune response. LESSIONS: We believe that better understanding of the host-cestode interaction will certainly extend our knowledge on auto-aggressive disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and might provide potential treatment options.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hymenolepiasis/diagnosis
Hymenolepis nana
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/parasitology
Meckel Diverticulum/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Appendicitis/surgery
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidental Findings
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009146

  3 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29463304
[Au] Autor:Teklemariam D; Legesse M; Degarege A; Liang S; Erko B
[Ad] Address:Hawassa College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 84, Hawassa, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Schistosoma mansoni and other intestinal parasitic infections in schoolchildren and vervet monkeys in Lake Ziway area, Ethiopia.
[So] Source:BMC Res Notes;11(1):146, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1756-0500
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess Schistosoma mansoni and other intestinal parasitic infections in schoolchildren and vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) in Bochessa Village, Ziway, Ethiopia. RESULTS: Fecal specimens from selected schoolchildren and droppings of the vervet monkeys were collected and microscopically examined for intestinal parasites using the Kato-Katz thick smear and formol-ether concentration techniques. The prevalences of S. mansoni, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Enterobius vermicularis, hookworms, Hymenolepis nana and Taenia species among the children were 35.7, 26.9, 24.1, 2.1, 2.1, 1.07 and 2.1%, respectively (by Kato-Katz) and 39.3, 36.1, 35.6, 2.9, 10.0, 4.3, and 2.9%, respectively (by formol-ether concentration). Prevalence of S. mansoni in vervet monkeys ranged from 10 to 20%. B. pfeifferi snails were exposed to S. mansoni miracidia from vervet origin, shed cercariae were then used to infect lab-bred albino mice. Adult worms were harvested from the mice 5 weeks post-exposure to cercariae to establish the schistosome life cycle and confirm the infection in the vervet monkeys. The natural infection of S. mansoni in vervet monkeys suggests that the non-human primate is likely to be implicated in the local transmission of schistosomiasis. Further epidemiological and molecular studies are needed to fully elucidate zoonotic role of non-human primate in the area.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13104-018-3248-2

  4 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29405148
[Au] Autor:Saurabh K; Ranjan S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Government Medical College, Bettiah, Bihar, India.
[Ti] Title:Fasciolopsiasis in children: Clinical, sociodemographic profile and outcome.
[So] Source:Indian J Med Microbiol;35(4):551-554, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3646
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of fasciolopsiasis in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A chart review of 56 children presenting with the passage of adult Fasciolopsis buski per stool from February 2015 to January 2016 was done for their clinical profile and risk factors for acquiring fasciolopsiasis in the Paediatric Unit of a medical college of Northern India. RESULTS: The mean age of presentation was 8.2 years (2-14 years age group). Persistent diarrhoea (85.71%) was the most common presentation, whereas anaemia (71.42%) was the most common sign. Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and tuberculosis were well-associated comorbid conditions in this study. Polyparasitism was an important finding, Hymenolepis nana being the most common associated parasite. Patients were treated either with praziquantel or nitazoxanide. CONCLUSION: All patients recovered well except one who died due to severe PEM and disseminated tuberculosis and two cases presented with relapse. Most of the cases of polyparasitism were associated with tuberculosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_17_7

  5 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29386158
[Au] Autor:Khan W; Khan J; Rahman A; Ullah H; Salim M; Iqbal M; Khan I; Salman M; Munir B
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, University of Malakand, Chakdara, Lower Dir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Albendazole in the treatment of Hymenolepiasis in school children.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;31(1(Suppl.)):305-309, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hymenolepiasis is a helminthic and occasionally fatal disease of human imposing heavy economic losses to human society. Present study was aimed to diagnose the school children for the prevalence and control of Hymenolepiasis. A school based cross-sectional analysis of stool samples collected from 188 children aged 06-15 years was carried out (February to June 2016). Two stool samples were collected from each student before diagnosing and after treatment. The samples were fixed in 10% formalin and observed under the light microscope using the methods of direct smear in Lugol's solution, normal saline and flotation techniques. On the basis of drugs accessibility all the H. nana infected children were divided in to 2- groups. Children in group A were treated with albendazole (bendazol) 400mg once orally, group B was treated with albendazole (zentel) 200mg orally. Eggs per gram of faeces were counted in each group before and after treatment. Of the 188 children, current study reveals only 6.08% (n=18/296) infection with H.nana and 10.5% (n=16/151) were diagnosed with co infections. The % efficacy of albendazole (Zentel) and albendazole (bendazol) against Hymenolepis nana infection was reported as 83% and 75% respectively. Present study was concluded that albendazole (zentel) is the drug of choice for the treatment of hymenolepiasis in children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29267590
[Au] Autor:Dafalla AIA; Almuhairi SASO; AlHosani MHJ; Mohamed MY; Alkous MIA; AlAzzawi MA; Abakar AD; Nour BYM; Hasan H; AbuOdeh RO; ElBakri A
[Ad] Address:Sharjah Public Health Clinic, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.
[Ti] Title:Intestinal parasitic infections among expatriate workers in various occupations in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.
[So] Source:Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo;59:e82, 2017 Dec 21.
[Is] ISSN:1678-9946
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent throughout many countries. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasite carriers among 21,347 expatriate workers, including food handlers and housemaids attending the public health center laboratory in Sharjah, UAE. Stool sample collection was performed throughout the period between January and December 2013. All samples were examined microscopically. Demographic data were also obtained and analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 3.3% (708/21,347) of the studied samples (single and multiple infections). Among positive samples, six hundred and eighty-three samples (96.5%) were positive for a single parasite: Giardia lamblia (257; 36.3%) and Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (220; 31.1%), respectively, whereas mono-infections with helminths accounted for 206 (29.1%) of the samples. Infection rates with single worms were: Ascaris lumbricoides (84; 11.9%), Hookworm (34; 4.8%), Trichuris trichiura (33; 4.7%), Taenia spp. (27; 3.81%), Strongyloides stercoralis (13; 1.8%), Hymenolepis nana (13; 1.8%), and Enterobius vermicularis (2; 0.28%), respectively. Infections were significantly associated with gender (x2 = 14.18; p = 0.002) with males as the most commonly infected with both groups of intestinal parasites (protozoa and helminths). A strong statistical association was noted correlating the parasite occurrence with certain nationalities (x2= 49.5, p <0.001). Furthermore, the study has also found a strong statistical correlation between parasite occurrence and occupation (x2= 15.60; p = 0.029). Multiple infections were not common (3.5% of the positive samples), although one individual (0.14%) had four helminth species, concurrently. These findings emphasized that food handlers with different pathogenic parasitic organisms may pose a significant health risk to the public.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29217943
[Au] Autor:Eshetu T; Sibhatu G; Megiso M; Abere A; Baynes HW; Biadgo B; Zeleke AJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Quality Assurance, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Intestinal Parasitosis and Their Associated Factors among People Living with HIV at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest-Ethiopia.
[So] Source:Ethiop J Health Sci;27(4):411-420, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2413-7170
[Cp] Country of publication:Ethiopia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Most HIV clients die of AIDS related intestinal parasitic infections rather than due to the HIV infection itself. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining the prevalence of intestinal parasite and their associated factors among HIV/AIDS clients at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods: Institution based cross sectional study was conducted using systematic random sampling technique from March to May 2016. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Stool samples were collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelson staining techniques. Besides, blood samples were collected for CD4+ count estimation. Both descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used in data analysis. P-values <0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: A total of 223 participants were enrolled in this study, and the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis was found to be 29.1%. The most predominant intestinal parasite detected was cyst of Entamoeba histolytica (8.5%) followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (6.7%), Strongyloides sterocoralis (3.6%) and Cryptosporidium parvum (3.1%), whereas Schistosoma mansoni (0.9%) and Hymenolepis nana (0.9%) were the least detected. Absence of toilet (AOR= 19.4, CI: 6.46-58.3), improper hand washing before meal (AOR=11.23, 95% CI: 4.16-30.27 and CD4+ count < 200 cells/mm (AOR=33.31, 95% CI: 9.159-121.149) had significant association with prevalence of intestinal parasites. Conclusion: The study indicated that intestinal parasites are still a problem among HIV/AIDS patients in the study area. Thus, routine examination for intestinal parasites and interventions should be carried out for better management of clients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29155829
[Au] Autor:Rivero MR; De Angelo C; Nuñez P; Salas M; Motta CE; Chiaretta A; Salomón OD; Liang S
[Ad] Address:Instituto Nacional de Medicina Tropical, INMeT. Ministerio de Salud de la Nación. Puerto Iguazú, Misiones. Argentina.
[Ti] Title:Environmental and socio-demographic individual, family and neighborhood factors associated with children intestinal parasitoses at Iguazú, in the subtropical northern border of Argentina.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(11):e0006098, 2017 Nov 20.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Intestinal parasitoses are a major concern for public health, especially in children from middle and low-income populations of tropical and subtropical areas. We examined the presence and co-infection of parasites in humans as well as parasitic environmental contamination in Puerto Iguazú, Argentina. We explored the environmental and socio-demographic characteristics of the persistence of parasites in children and their environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cross-section survey was conducted among children population comprised into the area of the public health care centers of Iguazú during June 2013 to May 2016. Copro-parasitological status of 483 asymptomatic children was assessed. Simultaneously, a design-based sampling of 744 soil samples and 530 dog feces was used for characterize the environmental contamination. The 71.5% of these sites were contaminated. Sixteen genera were detected in the environment being hookworms (62.0%) the main pathogens group detected followed by Toxocara spp (16.3%), Trichuris spp (15.2%) and Giardia (6.5%). Total children prevalence raised 58.8%, detecting twelve genera of parasite with Giardia intestinalis as the most prevalent pathogen (29.0%) followed by Enterobius vermicularis (23.0%), Hymenolepis nana (12.4%) and hookworms (4.4%). Through questionnaires and census data, we characterized the socio-demographics conditions at an individual, family and neighborhood levels. A multi-level analysis including environmental contamination data showed that the ´presence of parasites´ was mostly determined by individual (e.g. age, playing habits, previous treatment) and household level (e.g. UBN, WASH, mother's literacy) determinants. Remarkably, to define the level of 'parasite co-infection', besides individual and household characteristics, environmental factors at a neighborhood level were important. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work represents the major survey of intestinal parasites in human and environmental samples developed in the region. High prevalence was detected in the children population as well as in their environment. This work shows the importance of considering and promoting multi-level actions over the identified determinants to face this public health problem from integrative approaches.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171120
[Lr] Last revision date:171120
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006098

  9 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29114494
[Au] Autor:Saurabh K; Nag VL; Khera D; Elhence P
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India.
[Ti] Title:Giardiasis mimicking celiac disease in a patient of common variable immunodeficiency.
[So] Source:Trop Parasitol;7(2):125-127, 2017 Jul-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5070
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An adolescent boy presented to pediatrics outpatient department with complaints of recurrent diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and pedal edema since 3-4 months, with no relief even after taking treatment. His investigation revealed decreased serum IgA, IgG, and IgM levels with hypoproteinemia. Duodenal biopsy showed features of celiac disease (CD), but tissue transglutaminase IgA was negative. In stool examination, plenty of cysts and eggs of were present. He improved on treatment and remained asymptomatic for 4 months. However, he again developed symptoms and succumbed to his illness. In patients of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), who present with features of CD, coinfection, especially with and other parasites must always be kept in mind. The aim is to report a case of recurrent giardiasis with CVID mimicking CD from Western Rajasthan, India.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/tp.TP_45_16

  10 / 895 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29103267
[Au] Autor:Ribas A; Jollivet C; Morand S; Thongmalayvong B; Somphavong S; Siew CC; Ting PJ; Suputtamongkol S; Saensombath V; Sanguankiat S; Tan BH; Paboriboune P; Akkhavong K; Chaisiri K
[Ad] Address:Section of Parasitology, Department of Biology, Healthcare and the Environment, Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Intestinal Parasitic Infections and Environmental Water Contamination in a Rural Village of Northern Lao PDR.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(5):523-532, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A field survey studying intestinal parasites in humans and microbial pathogen contamination at environment was performed in a Laotian rural village to identify potential risks for disease outbreaks. A parasitological investigation was conducted in Ban Lak Sip village, Luang Prabang, Lao PDR involving fecal samples from 305 inhabitants as well as water samples taken from 3 sites of the local stream. Water analysis indicated the presence of several enteric pathogens, i.e., Aeromonas spp., Vibrio spp., E. coli H7, E. coli O157: H7, verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC), Shigella spp., and enteric adenovirus. The level of microbial pathogens contamination was associated with human activity, with greater levels of contamination found at the downstream site compared to the site at the village and upstream, respectively. Regarding intestinal parasites, the prevalence of helminth and protozoan infections were 68.9% and 27.2%, respectively. Eight helminth taxa were identified in fecal samples, i.e., 2 tapeworm species (Taenia sp. and Hymenolepis diminuta), 1 trematode (Opisthorchis sp.), and 5 nematodes (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, trichostrongylids, and hookworms). Six species of intestinal protists were identified, i.e., Blastocystis hominis, Cyclospora spp., Endolimax nana, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, Entamoeba coli, and Giardia lamblia. Questionnaires and interviews were also conducted to determine risk factors of infection. These analyses together with a prevailing infection level suggested that most of villagers were exposed to parasites in a similar degree due to limited socio-economic differences and sharing of similar practices. Limited access to effective public health facilities is also a significant contributing factor.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.5.523


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