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[PMID]: 29517453
[Au] Autor:Anderson KM; Lewandowski A; Dennis PM
[Ti] Title:SUSPECTED HYPERVITAMINOSIS D IN RED-RUMPED AGOUTI ( DASYPROCTA LEPORINA) RECEIVING A COMMERCIAL RODENT DIET.
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;49(1):196-200, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An 8 yr, intact male red-rumped agouti ( Dasyprocta leporina) was evaluated for weight loss. Examination revealed poor body condition, hypercalcemia, elevated serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, metastatic calcification of soft tissues, and hyperechoic kidneys. The diet, formulated for laboratory rodents, contained elevated levels of vitamin D . Histopathology from a female conspecific that died 5 mo prior identified dystrophic mineralization and nephrosclerosis, suggestive of a vitamin D toxicity. The male agouti responded well to a dietary reduction in vitamin D and calcium. Six months into therapy, progressive renal failure was identified and was further managed with enalapril, phosphorus binders, and dietary manipulation. Suspected vitamin D toxicity has been reported in pacas ( Cuniculus paca) and agouti and has been linked to exposure to New World primate diets. In this brief communication, an agouti developed suspected hypervitaminosis D after receiving a commercial rodent diet commonly fed to this species in captivity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1638/2016-0226R2.1

  2 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480854
[Au] Autor:Gebreselassie A; Mehari A; Dagne R; Berhane F; Kibreab A
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine.
[Ti] Title:Hypercalcemic pancreatitis a rare presentation of sarcoidosis: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(2):e9580, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: The usual presentation of sarcoidosis is hilar adenopathy, pulmonary reticular opacities, skin, joint, or eye lesions. Pancreatic involvement is unusual and hypercalcemic pancreatitis as initial manifestation is very rare. PATIENT CONCERNS: We present a case that presented with 1-day history of vomiting, diffuse abdominal pain, and altered mental status. DIAGNOSES: Initial investigations showed highly elevated calcium levels, acute pancreatitis, and kidney failure. Possible causes entertained were malignancy, hyperparathyroidism, hypervitaminosis D, and granulomatous diseases. Full work-up including a hilar lymph node biopsy revealed noncaseating granuloma. After excluding other diseases capable of producing a similar picture, a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made. INTERVENTIONS AND OUTCOMES: The patient was started on aggressive intravenous fluid hydration and intravenous calcitonin, after which her altered mental status resolved and both kidney function and hypercalcemia improved. The patient was discharged on oral prednisone and serum calcium level normalized with progressive improvement of kidney function at follow-up. LESSONS: The current case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for this condition in patients who present with acute pancreatitis, as steroids are the treatment of choice. Thus, prompt recognition of this entity is of therapeutic significance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypercalcemia/diagnosis
Pancreatitis/diagnosis
Sarcoidosis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Hypercalcemia/complications
Hypercalcemia/drug therapy
Hypercalcemia/physiopathology
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis/complications
Pancreatitis/drug therapy
Pancreatitis/physiopathology
Sarcoidosis/complications
Sarcoidosis/drug therapy
Sarcoidosis/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180227
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009580

  3 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498758
[Au] Autor:Taylor PN; Davies JS
[Ad] Address:Lecturer, Division of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine Cardiff University, Heath Park Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK.
[Ti] Title:A review of the growing risk of vitamin D toxicity from inappropriate practice.
[So] Source:Br J Clin Pharmacol;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2125
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vitamin D is a particularly important sterol hormone with evidence emerging of its beneficial effects well beyond bone. In consequence of this and increased global recognition of vitamin D deficiency in the general population, there has been a resurgence in treatment with vitamin D preparations. However, the increasing use of vitamin D treatments has also seen a substantial increase in the numbers of reports of vitamin D intoxication with the majority (75%) of reports published since 2010. Many of these cases are a consequence of inappropriate prescribing, the use of high dose over-the-counter preparations or unlicensed preparations. This review highlights that the majority of cases were preventable and discusses the inappropriate use of poorly formulated, and unlicensed vitamin D preparations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/bcp.13573

  4 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29280194
[Au] Autor:Armstrong AJ; Hauptman JG; Stanley BJ; Klocke E; Burneko M; Holt DE; Runge JJ; Rubin JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Small Animal Clinical Studies, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Prophylactic Calcitriol Administration on Serum Ionized Calcium Concentrations after Parathyroidectomy: 78 Cases (2005-2015).
[So] Source:J Vet Intern Med;32(1):99-106, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1676
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Prophylactic administration of calcitriol has been suggested to mitigate the risk of hypocalcemia after parathyroidectomy. The effect of calcitriol on postoperative serum ionized calcium concentrations has not been evaluated in dogs after parathyroidectomy. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of prophylactic calcitriol administration on postoperative serum ionized calcium (iCa) concentrations in dogs with primary hyperthyroidism (PHPTH) treated by parathyroidectomy. ANIMALS: Seventy-eight dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism treated surgically. METHODS: Multi-institutional retrospective case study. Medical records from 2005 to 2015 were evaluated. Dogs were included if they had a diagnosis of PHPTH and had surgery to remove parathyroid tissue. Serum iCa concentrations were monitored for a minimum of 2 days postoperatively. Two study groups were evaluated: calcitriol administration and no calcitriol administration. RESULTS: Serial postoperative iCa concentrations measured at 12-hour time intervals for 2 days postoperatively were positively associated with preoperative iCa concentrations. This association was evident at each time interval, and the effect of preoperative iCa concentrations on postoperative iCa concentrations decreased as time elapsed (12 hours, P < 0.0001; 24 hours, P < 0.0001; 36 hours, P < 0.04; and 48 hours, P = 0.01). Prophylactic calcitriol administration was not found to be significantly associated with postoperative iCa concentrations or its rate of decrease after parathyroidectomy. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: We found no protective value in administering calcitriol prophylactically to prevent hypocalcemia in the immediate postoperative period (48 hours) after parathyroidectomy. Preoperative iCa concentrations had a significant positive association with postoperative iCa concentrations throughout the monitoring period.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jvim.15028

  5 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29324643
[Au] Autor:Al-Mutawa A; Anderson AK; Alsabah S; Al-Mutawa M
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Life Sciences, Kuwait University, Kuwait City 13034, Kuwait. round0cube@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Nutritional Status of Bariatric Surgery Candidates.
[So] Source:Nutrients;10(1), 2018 Jan 11.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6643
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Obesity is a global epidemic affecting populations globally. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, and has increased dramatically. Bariatric surgery candidates frequently have pre-existing nutritional deficiencies that might exacerbate post-surgery. To provide better health care management pre- and post-bariatric surgery, it is imperative to establish the nutritional status of prospective patients before surgery. The aim of this study was to assess and provide baseline data on the nutritional status of bariatric candidates. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2008 to 2015. The medical records of 1538 patients were reviewed for this study. Pre-operatively, the most commonly observed vitamin deficiencies were Vitamin D (76%) and Vitamin B (16%). Anemia and iron status parameters were low in a considerable number of patients before surgery, as follows: hemoglobin 20%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 48%, ferritin 28%, serum iron 51%, and transferrin saturation 60%. Albumin and transferrin were found to be low in 10% and 9% of the patients, respectively, prior to surgery. In addition to deficiencies, a great number of patients had hypervitaminosis pre-operatively. Excess levels of Vitamin B6 (24%) was the most remarkable. The findings in this study advocate a close monitoring and tailored supplementation pre- and post-bariatric surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29244912
[Au] Autor:Brin VB; Mittsiev KG; Mittsiev AK; Kabisov OT
[Ti] Title:Influence hypervitaminosis D3 on hemodynamic presentation of experimental copper intoxication.
[So] Source:Patol Fiziol Eksp Ter;60(3):83-7, 2016 Jul-Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0031-2991
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:As a component of various enzymes, it refers to copper essential trace elements, but the excessive consumption of the metal leads to the development of the pathogenic effects of xenobiotics on the functional condition of the cardiovascular system. However, the works devoted to the study of the effectiveness of prophylactic calcium in a copper toxicity, is not in the current literature. The purpose: study the effect of long-term toxicity of copper on the functional state of the cardiovascular system and its reactivity in experimental hypercalcemia. Methods: Experimental hypercalcemia model was created by forming a pilot hypervitaminosis D, by introducing «Akvadetrim¼ atraumatic preparation through a probe into the stomach in the dose 3000 IU (0.2 ml) / 100 g of body weight for 30 days. Chronic copper poisoning model created by intragastric administration of copper sulfate solution at a dosage of 20 mg/kg (in terms of metal) for 30 days, daily one time a day. The study of the functional state of the cardiovascular system is to determine the mean arterial pressure, specific peripheral vascular resistance, stroke index, cardiac index, the reactivity of the renin-angiotensin system and adrenoreactivity cardiovascular system. Results: The experimental study revealed that long-term copper poisoning leads to the development of hypertension due to an increase in total peripheral vascular resistance, along with the marked decline in the pumping function of the heart. Experimental hypercalcemia simulated by intragastric administration of vitamin D promotes more pronounced toxic effects of copper sulfate on the cardiovascular system. Conclusion: Copper poisoning of the body is characterized by the development of hypertension and the condition of artificial hypercalcemia potentiates the cardiotoxic effects of copper.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cholecalciferol/adverse effects
Copper Sulfate/toxicity
Hemodynamics/drug effects
Nutrition Disorders/blood
Nutrition Disorders/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cholecalciferol/pharmacology
Copper/toxicity
Male
Nutrition Disorders/chemically induced
Rats
Rats, Wistar
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:1C6V77QF41 (Cholecalciferol); 789U1901C5 (Copper); LRX7AJ16DT (Copper Sulfate)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171216
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28652074
[Au] Autor:Dhibar DP; Sahu KK; Bhadada SK
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India.
[Ti] Title:Vitamin D deficiency: Time for a reality check of the epidemiology. Re. "The increasing problem of subclinical and overt hypervitaminosis D in India: An institutional experience and review."
[So] Source:Nutrition;45:145, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1244
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
Vitamin D
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
India/epidemiology
Nutrition Disorders
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER; COMMENT
[Nm] Name of substance:1406-16-2 (Vitamin D)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171128
[Lr] Last revision date:171128
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170628
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29033473
[Au] Autor:Farah IO; Holt-Gray C; Cameron JA; Tucci M; Benghuzzi H
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217.
[Ti] Title:IMPACT OF ATRA ON OVALBUMIN AND MOLD-SENSITIZED F344 RATS AND REVERSAL OF HEALTH-RELATED IMPLICATIONS BY CITRAL.
[So] Source:Biomed Sci Instrum;53:320-327, 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0067-8856
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The role of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) in the development of hypervitaminosis A pathophysiology is not well understood or established in the literature. As well, the role of Citral (inhibitor of retinoid function; a non-toxic chemical that exists in two forms (diethyl; C1 or cis-trans dimethyl; C2).) in the reversal of pathophysiological implications is also not ascertained under an in vivo setting. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ovalbumin exposure will sensitize the body to supra-physiologic levels of retinoic acid leading to a negative pathophysiological impact and that Citrals 1 and 2 will reverse or ameliorate the related damage to the body's pathophysiology. Even though ovalbumin and retinoic have been previously applied through intra-tracheal route in cancer prevention and immunological research, the objective of this study was to evaluate their interaction as a remedy for hypervitaminosis A. This IACUC approved in vivo study used Fischer 344 rats ( = 80 ;229 to 273g), which were randomly assigned to controls as well as ovalbumin and mold-sensitized treatment groups (0.80 mg/kg and 1X109 mold spores combined from 4 strains/100 µl intra-tracheal; all others were dosed by intra-peritoneal injection at days 1 and 7 with 80 mg/kg each of ATRA as well as 20 and 50 mg/kg each of Citrals 1 or 2 individually or in combination to represent all four chemicals and mold spores treatments.. Positive and negative controls for each treatment were also included in the study. Animals were housed in rat cages at the JSU Research Animal Core Facilities and were placed on a 12:12 light dark cycle. A standard rodent diet and water access were provided ad-libidum. Rat weights were recorded on day 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21 and blood was collected and processed for hematological parameters. Results showed that even though C1 and C2 were not toxic individually, their combination at high dosing was lethal. Exposure of ovalbumin-sensitized rats to ATRA showed various levels of weight losses and negative hematological implications that were ameliorated by exposure to Citrals at various combinations with retinoic acid. Taken together, the study showed that there are variable pathophysiological responses from the interaction of ovalbumin, mold spores and retinoic acid and that Citrals were found to be individually effective in reversing health-related pathophysiologies. These findings warrants further investigations as to the actual role of these interactions in relation to acute pathophysiologic health implications and the possibility of reversing hypervitaminosis A-mediated health-related impacts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29028072
[Au] Autor:Laganà AS; Vitale SG; Ban Frangez H; Vrtacnik-Bokal E; D'Anna R
[Ad] Address:Unit of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Human Pathology in Adulthood and Childhood "G. Barresi", University of Messina, Messina, Italy. antlagana@unime.it.
[Ti] Title:Vitamin D in human reproduction: the more, the better? An evidence-based critical appraisal.
[So] Source:Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci;21(18):4243-4251, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2284-0729
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D is a fat-soluble secosteroid hormone that regulates calcium, magnesium, and phosphate homeostasis and plays a pivotal role as antiproliferative and immunomodulatory mediator. Considering the different sources of synthesis and dietary intake as well as the pleiotropic actions in extremely diverse (micro)environments of the body, the supplementation of this Vitamin should be carefully evaluated taking into account the several pathways that it regulates. In the current brief review, we aimed to summarize the available evidence about the topic, in order to suggest the best evidence-based supplementation strategy for human reproduction, avoiding the unuseful (and sometimes hazardous) empiric supplementation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Narrative overview, synthesizing the findings of literature retrieved from searches of computerized databases. RESULTS: Accumulating evidence from in vitro fertilization (IVF) trials suggests that fertilization rate decreases significantly with increasing levels of 25OH-D in follicular fluid; in addition, Vitamin D levels in the follicular fluid are negatively correlated to the quality of embryos and the higher values of Vitamin D are associated with lower possibility to achieve pregnancy. Both low and high Vitamin D serum concentrations decrease not only spermatozoa count, but their progressive motility as well as increase morphological abnormalities. Finally, studies in animal models found that severe hypervitaminosis D can reduce the total skeletal calcium store in embryos and may compromise the postnatal survival. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the retrieved data, we solicit to be extremely selective in deciding for Vitamin D supplementation, since its excess may play a detrimental role in fertility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 1112 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28914984
[Au] Autor:Stokes VJ; Nielsen MF; Hannan FM; Thakker RV
[Ad] Address:Academic Endocrine Unit, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
[Ti] Title:Hypercalcemic Disorders in Children.
[So] Source:J Bone Miner Res;32(11):2157-2170, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1523-4681
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypercalcemia is defined as a serum calcium concentration that is greater than two standard deviations above the normal mean, which in children may vary with age and sex, reflecting changes in the normal physiology at each developmental stage. Hypercalcemic disorders in children may present with hypotonia, poor feeding, vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, lethargy, polyuria, dehydration, failure to thrive, and seizures. In severe cases renal failure, pancreatitis and reduced consciousness may also occur and older children and adolescents may present with psychiatric symptoms. The causes of hypercalcemia in children can be classified as parathyroid hormone (PTH)-dependent or PTH-independent, and may be congenital or acquired. PTH-independent hypercalcemia, ie, hypercalcemia associated with a suppressed PTH, is commoner in children than PTH-dependent hypercalcemia. Acquired causes of PTH-independent hypercalcemia in children include hypervitaminosis; granulomatous disorders, and endocrinopathies. Congenital syndromes associated with PTH-independent hypercalcemia include idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia (IIH), William's syndrome, and inborn errors of metabolism. PTH-dependent hypercalcemia is usually caused by parathyroid tumors, which may give rise to primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) or tertiary hyperparathyroidism, which usually arises in association with chronic renal failure and in the treatment of hypophosphatemic rickets. Acquired causes of PTH-dependent hypercalcemia in neonates include maternal hypocalcemia and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PHPT usually occurs as an isolated nonsyndromic and nonhereditary endocrinopathy, but may also occur as a hereditary hypercalcemic disorder such as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism, and familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism, and less commonly, as part of inherited complex syndromic disorders such as multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN). Advances in identifying the genetic causes have resulted in increased understanding of the underlying biological pathways and improvements in diagnosis. The management of symptomatic hypercalcemia includes interventions such as fluids, antiresorptive medications, and parathyroid surgery. This article presents a clinical, biochemical, and genetic approach to investigating the causes of pediatric hypercalcemia. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171114
[Lr] Last revision date:171114
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/jbmr.3296


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