Database : MEDLINE
Search on : laryngeal and edema [Words]
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[PMID]: 29523383
[Au] Autor:Kwok M; Eslick GD
[Ad] Address:The Whiteley-Martin Research Centre, Discipline of Surgery, Sydney Medical School, Nepean Hospital, The University of Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:The Impact of Vocal and Laryngeal Pathologies Among Professional Singers: A Meta-analysis.
[So] Source:J Voice;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4588
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Professional singers are more likely to develop laryngeal pathologies and symptoms associated with misuse and overuse of the voice. However, different studies have shown conflicting evidence. We aim to perform a systematic review and quantitative meta-analysis to determine the prevalence and risk of laryngeal pathologies and symptoms among professional singers. METHODS: Four electronic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL) were searched, with no language restrictions. From 3368 potential studies, a total of 21 studies met our inclusion criteria. A systematic review of the literature was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies that reported the risk of laryngeal pathologies in singers were included. Data were pooled by a random effects model and the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. RESULTS: There was a positive relationship between singing and laryngeal pathologies. There was an increased risk of hoarseness (OR: 2.00, 95% CI: 1.61-2.49), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.19-1.77), Reinke edema (OR: 2.15, 95% CI: 1.08-4.30), and polyps (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.06-4.14) in professional singers. CONCLUSION: Professional singers are at an increased risk of laryngeal pathologies and symptoms associated with vocal misuse and overuse, particularly hoarseness, GERD, edema, and polyps.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29331580
[Au] Autor:Abu Ammar A; Gruber M; Martin P; Stern O; Jahshan F; Ertracht O; Sela E; Srouji S; Zussman E
[Ad] Address:NanoEngineering Group, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Local delivery of mometasone furoate from an eluting endotracheal tube.
[So] Source:J Control Release;272:54-61, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4995
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Laryngeal and tracheal morbidity is a common complication of endotracheal tube (ETT)-based airway management, and manifests as local irritation, inflammation, and edema. Systemic corticosteroids are commonly administered to manage these conditions; however, their efficacy is inadequate and limited by potential severe side effects. In the present study, a steroid delivery system for local therapy was developed to generate relatively high local drug concentrations and to improve drug efficacy. ETTs were coated with electrospun poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers loaded with mometasone furoate (MF), creating a microscale thick layer. MF exhibited sustained release from coated ETTs over 14days in vitro. An in vivo efficacy study in rats demonstrated the therapeutic benefit of MF-coated ETTs over bare ETTs, as measured by reduced laryngeal mucosal thickness and submucosal laryngeal edema. The fiber coating remained intact during tube intubation and extubation, demonstrating good adhesion to the tubes even after 24h in aqueous solution at 37°C. These findings demonstrate the potential of drug-loaded ETTs to revolutionize the standard of care for endotracheal intubation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29454226
[Au] Autor:Miles A; McLellan N; Machan R; Vokes D; Hunting A; McFarlane M; Holmes J; Lynn K
[Ad] Address:The University of Auckland, Tamaki Campus, Morrin Rd, New Zealand. Electronic address: a.miles@auckland.ac.nz.
[Ti] Title:Dysphagia and laryngeal pathology in post-surgical cardiothoracic patients.
[So] Source:J Crit Care;45:121-127, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8615
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Cardiothoracic surgery is known to result in dysphagia and laryngeal injury. While prevalence has been explored, extent, trajectory and longevity of symptoms are poorly understood. This retrospective, observational study explored dysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery referred for instrumental swallowing assessment. METHODS: Clinical notes and endoscopic recordings of 106 patients (age range 18-87yrs; mean 63yrs; SD 15yrs) (including 190 endoscopes) at one large tertiary centre were reviewed by two speech-language pathologists and a laryngologist. Standardized measures of laryngeal anatomy and physiology, New Zealand Secretion Scale, Penetration-Aspiration scale and Yale Residue Scale were rated. RESULTS: Prevalence of abnormality included 39% silent aspiration, 65% laryngeal edema and 61% vocal paralysis. The incidence of pneumonia was 36% with a post-operative stroke rate of 14%. Forty percent of patients were receiving a standard diet by discharge from acute care; while, 24% continued to require enteral feeding and 8% received laryngeal surgery within twelve months of discharge. Vocal fold motion impairment was significantly associated with ventilation time and tracheostomy tube duration (p<.05). CONCLUSION: Early endoscopic assessment for identification of dysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery may allow early management and prevention of secondary complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180217
[Lr] Last revision date:180217
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29337588
[Au] Autor:Smith SE; Newsome AS; Hawkins WA
[Ad] Address:University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, 15506, Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy, Athens, Georgia, United States.
[Ti] Title:An Argument for the Protocolized Screening and Management of Post-extubation Stridor.
[So] Source:Am J Respir Crit Care Med;, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1535-4970
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1164/rccm.201711-2364LE

  5 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29294022
[Au] Autor:Li HX; Liu J; Cheng Y; Liu MN; Fang WT; Lv CX
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, P. R. China.
[Ti] Title:Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: treatment results from a prospective observational study.
[So] Source:Dis Esophagus;, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1442-2050
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A prospective observational study was performed to evaluate the results of treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (CESCC). Patients had CESCC, no distant metastasis, were 18-75 years old, and had PS 0-2. Radiotherapy (RT) was administered as either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a total dose of 60 Gy/30 fractions. All patients were treated with platinum-based doublet concurrent chemotherapeutic regimens. CCRT was followed by 2-3 cycles of consolidation chemotherapy. The endpoints were overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), toxicities, and failure patterns. Ninety-two patients were enrolled from March 2007 to July 2014. The median follow-up time was 34 months. For all patients, the 3-year OS was 49.8% (median OS: 36 months, 95% CI: 24.963-47.051), and the 3-year PFS was 42.1%, (median PFS: 25 months, 95% CI: 17.097-32.903). Treatment failures occurred in 54 patients, including 30 cases (32.6%) with locoregional failure alone, 14 cases (15.2%) with distant metastasis alone, and 10 cases (10.9%) with both locoregional failure and distant metastasis. There were 51 (55.4%) and 3 cases (3.3%) of grade 3 and grade 5 radiation esophagitis, respectively. One patient (1%) had grade 5 laryngeal edema. Overall, CCRT has tolerable acute toxicities, and this regimen is an option for the treatment of patients with CESCC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180102
[Lr] Last revision date:180102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/dote/dox144

  6 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29293182
[Au] Autor:Schieren M; Egyed E; Hartmann B; Aleksanyan A; Stoelben E; Wappler F; Defosse JM
[Ad] Address:From the Departments of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and Thoracic Surgery, Medical Centre Cologne-Merheim, University Witten/Herdecke, Cologne, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Airway Management by Laryngeal Mask Airways for Cervical Tracheal Resection and Reconstruction: A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis.
[So] Source:Anesth Analg;, 2017 Dec 29.
[Is] ISSN:1526-7598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) may have advantages over endotracheal intubation for tracheal resection and reconstruction in cases of severe and proximally located subglottic stenosis. This retrospective case series examines the feasibility of using SADs as a novel approach to airway management in tracheal resections. METHODS: All patients who were managed with SADs for cervical tracheal resection and reconstruction during the study period (2010-2015) in our university hospital were included.To examine the feasibility of airway management with SADs for tracheal resection, medical records were obtained from our institution's electronic database and reviewed. RESULTS: SADs were used in 10 patients who had extensive tracheal stenosis and a high prevalence of severe comorbidities. SAD insertion and subsequent positive pressure ventilation were successful in all patients, although 1 patient with preoperative respiratory failure had persistent hypercarbia. During the phase of resection and reconstruction, high-frequency jet ventilation was used to ensure adequate oxygenation. There were no intraoperative complications related to anesthetic management, apart from transient hypercarbia during and after jet ventilation. Most patients (n = 6; 60%) had an uneventful postoperative course. In this high-risk cohort, postoperative complications (ie, vocal cord edema, postoperative hemorrhage, pneumonia) occurred in 4 patients (40%). CONCLUSIONS: This retrospective case series demonstrates the feasibility of using supraglottic airways alongside high-frequency jet ventilation for airway management in at least some cases of cervical tracheal resection and reconstruction. However, the small number of cases examined limits conclusions regarding indications, contraindications, and periprocedural safety.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180102
[Lr] Last revision date:180102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1213/ANE.0000000000002753

  7 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29242052
[Au] Autor:Nacci A; Baracca G; Romeo SO; Cavaliere MD; Barillari MR; Berrettini S; Ursino F; Fattori B
[Ad] Address:ENT, Audiology and Phoniatrics Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: a.nacci@med.unipi.it.
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic and Phoniatric Evaluation in Singing Students.
[So] Source:J Voice;, 2017 Dec 11.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4588
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: In To analyze laryngostroboscopic findings and ENT/phoniatric examination results in a group of singing students and in a control group of non-singing subjects to emphasize the importance of ENT/phoniatric examination and of laryngostroboscopy before taking up singing. METHODS: 56 singing students and 60 healthy euphonic non-singer volunteers were recruited. In each subject a perceptual assessment and a self-assessment (VHI) of the voice were performed. The singing students filled out the Singing-VHI. All subjects underwent flexible fiberoptic endoscopy and laryngostroboscopy. All subjects were evaluated through the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) and the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). RESULTS: At laryngostroboscopy, 60.7% of students presented pathological findings, versus 20% of controls (P < 0.0001). Incomplete glottic closure (35.7% vs. 13.3%), supraglottic hypertonus (16.1% vs. 5%), organic lesions (bilateral nodules, cysts, sulcus vergeture) (17.9% vs. 3.3%), posterior erythema (16.1% vs. 5%) and laryngeal edema (14.3% vs 3.3%) were more frequent in the students. The most common symptoms in singers were phonasthenia (37.5 % vs 6.7%; P = 0.0001) and mucus sensation (17.9% vs. 5%, P = 0.03). S-VHI showed higher values in students with pathological laryngostroboscopy (P < 0.0001). Finally, average RSI and RFS were higher in students. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the high percentage of organic and functional voice disorders in singing students, it would be desirable that every subject who is going to start singing underwent an ENT/phoniatric investigation with videostrobolaryngoscopy to ascertain vocal folds healthy condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171215
[Lr] Last revision date:171215
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29102939
[Au] Autor:Wiegand S; Teymoortash A; Hanschmann H
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany Susanne.wiegand@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
[Ti] Title:Endo-extralaryngeal Laterofixation of the Vocal Folds in Patients with Bilateral Vocal Fold Immobility.
[So] Source:In Vivo;31(6):1159-1162, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1791-7549
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Bilateral vocal fold paralysis can result in shortness of breath and severe dyspnea which can be life-threatening. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-five patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent endo-extralaryngeal laterofixation according to Lichtenberger were retrospectively analyzed regarding etiology, symptoms, treatment and complications. RESULTS: In 27 patients, laterofixation of the vocal cord alone was performed. Eight patients underwent laterofixation and additional posterior chordectomy of the opposite vocal cord according to Dennis and Kashima. The time of intervention ranged from 1 day to 38 years after the onset of bilateral vocal cord immobility. The intraoperative course was uneventful in all patients. None of the patients had postoperative aspiration. Postoperative voice function was acceptable in all patients. Complications of suture laterofixation were laryngeal edema, formation of fibrin, and malposition of the suture. CONCLUSION: Laterofixation of the vocal cords according to Lichtenberger is a safe and easy method that can be used as a first-stage treatment of vocal cord paralysis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171105
[Lr] Last revision date:171105
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29063231
[Au] Autor:Atallah I; Aldkhyyal A; Castellanos PF
[Ad] Address:Division of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Boshell Building 563, Birmingham, AL, 35233, USA.
[Ti] Title:Modified single-stage segmental cricotracheal resection.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;, 2017 Oct 23.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objective of our work is to demonstrate in a large cohort of patients with cricotracheal stenosis that resection of long airway segments could be performed with no increased risk of postoperative complications. A consecutive series of patients getting cervical segmental cricotracheal resection (CTR) were reviewed. The typical segmental tracheal resection technique has been modified to accommodate long segment removal. Modifications include using trachea to enable the reconstruction of the larynx itself as well as the placement of a "laryngosternopexy" stitch between the thyroid lamina and the sternoclavicular ligament designed to take all of the tension off the anastomosis and to prevent inadvertent head extension. Anastomosis was performed by using continuous barbed sutures that allowed gradual approximation of the proximal and distal segments even in the presence of a large segmental airway resection defect that could involve as much as half of the tracheal length. Thirty-eight patients were treated. Primary etiologies of cricotracheal stenosis were prolonged intubation and tracheostomy. All had Grade III-IV stenosis. Only one patient had postoperative revision surgery for anastomosis-based disease. All patients with tracheostomy (n = 29) were successfully decannulated. Complications occurred in five patients. These included acute airway obstruction requiring emergency tracheostomy through the anastomosis, a tracheal dehiscence, laryngeal edema with airway obstruction, superficial wound infections, neck abscesses, and transient vocal cord immobility. Modified cricotracheal resection has comparable results to traditional techniques and may offer advantages such as resection of long tracheal segments without any increase in the risk of post-anastomosis airway leak.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-017-4753-y

  10 / 2380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29054457
[Au] Autor:Ueha R; Nito T; Goto T; Sato T; Ushiku T; Yamasoba T
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655 Japan. Electronic address: ruu1025@yahoo.co.jp.
[Ti] Title:Bilateral vocal cord immobility resulting from cytomegalovirus pharyngitis: A case report.
[So] Source:J Infect Chemother;, 2017 Oct 17.
[Is] ISSN:1437-7780
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an infectious herpes virus present in approximately 50% of the world's population. Pharyngitis is an uncommon manifestation of CMV infection, and vocal cord immobility (VCI) following CMV pharyngitis is quite rare. An 83-year-old man with well-controlled diabetes mellitus and hypertension was admitted due to dyspnea, odynophagia, and dysphagia. Laryngeal fiberscopy revealed bilateral vocal cords almost fixed at the median position, with mucosal redness, swelling, and edema at the hypopharyngeal area. The airway was so narrowed that an emergency tracheostomy was performed to secure an airway. VCI resulting from a malignant tumor was suspected at first, but repeated pathological examinations revealed CMV infection in the pharyngeal mucosa. Despite intravenous ganciclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), the patient's bilateral VCI improved only slightly. Laryngeal electromyography was used to investigate the causes of VCI, and revealed vocal fold paralysis on the left side and cricoarytenoid joint fixation on the right side. This case highlights the importance of considering CMV infection in the differential diagnosis of patients with pharyngitis and VCI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing the etiology of VCI following CMV pharyngitis using laryngeal electromyography.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171021
[Lr] Last revision date:171021
[St] Status:Publisher


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