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[PMID]: 29517607
[Ti] Title:Assessing the Effectiveness of Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) in the Reduction of Ecchymosis and Edema After Oculofacial Surgery: Preliminary Results: Erratum.
[So] Source:Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg;34(2):188, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2677
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000001085

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[PMID]: 29504037
[Au] Autor:Kennedy PG; Mielke LA; Nguyen NH
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA. kennedyp@umn.edu.
[Ti] Title:Ecological responses to forest age, habitat, and host vary by mycorrhizal type in boreal peatlands.
[So] Source:Mycorrhiza;, 2018 Mar 04.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1890
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite covering vast areas of boreal North America, the ecological factors structuring mycorrhizal fungal communities in peatland forests are relatively poorly understood. To assess how these communities vary by age (younger vs. mature), habitat (fen vs. bog), and host (conifer trees vs. ericaceous shrub), we sampled the roots of two canopy trees (Larix laricina and Picea mariana) and an ericaceous shrub (Ledum groenlandicum) at four sites in northern Minnesota, USA. To characterize the specific influence of host co-occurrence on mycorrhizal fungal community structure, we also conducted a greenhouse bioassay using the same three hosts. Root samples were assessed using Illumina-based high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of the ITS1 rRNA gene region. As expected, we found that the relative abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi was high on both Larix and Picea, whereas ericoid mycorrhizal fungi had high relative abundance only on Ledum. Ericoid mycorrhizal fungal richness was significantly higher in mature forests, in bogs, and on Ledum hosts, while ectomycorrhizal fungal richness did not differ significantly across any of these three variables. In terms of community composition, ericoid mycorrhizal fungi were more strongly influenced by host while ectomycorrhizal fungi were more influenced by habitat. In the greenhouse bioassay, the presence of Ledum had consistently stronger effects on the composition of ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, and ericoid-ectomycorrhizal fungal communities than either Larix or Picea. Collectively, these results suggest that partitioning HTS-based datasets by mycorrhizal type in boreal peatland forests is important, as their responses to rapidly changing environmental conditions are not likely to be uniform.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00572-018-0821-4

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[PMID]: 29127796
[Au] Autor:Cui Q; Song C; Wang X; Shi F; Yu X; Tan W
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, PR China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Effects of warming on N O fluxes in a boreal peatland of Permafrost region, Northeast China.
[So] Source:Sci Total Environ;616-617:427-434, 2017 Nov 08.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1026
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Climate warming is expected to increasingly influence boreal peatlands and alter their greenhouse gases emissions. However, the effects of warming on N O fluxes and the N O budgets were ignored in boreal peatlands. Therefore, in a boreal peatland of permafrost zone in Northeast China, a simulated warming experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of warming on N O fluxes in Betula. Fruticosa community (B. Fruticosa) and Ledum. palustre community (L. palustre) during the growing seasons from 2013 to 2015. Results showed that warming treatment increased air temperature at 1.5m aboveground and soil temperature at 5cm depth by 0.6°C and 2°C, respectively. The average seasonal N O fluxes ranged from 6.62 to 9.34µgm h in the warming plot and ranged from 0.41 to 4.55µgm h in the control plots. Warming treatment increased N O fluxes by 147% and transformed the boreal peatlands from a N O sink to a source. The primary driving factors for N O fluxes were soil temperature and active layer depth, whereas soil moisture showed a weak correlation with N O fluxes. The results indicated that warming promoted N O fluxes by increasing soil temperature and active layer depth in a boreal peatland of permafrost zone in Northeast China. Moreover, elevated N O fluxes persisted in this region will potentially drive a noncarbon feedback to ongoing climate change.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171111
[Lr] Last revision date:171111
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 28060248
[Au] Autor:Seiff SR; Lee WW; Mack W; Kang J; Tran K
[Ti] Title:Reply re: "Assessing the Efficacy of Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) in the Reduction of Ecchymosis and Edema After Oculofacial Surgery: Preliminary Results".
[So] Source:Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg;33(1):75, 2017 Jan/Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2677
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 171115
[Lr] Last revision date:171115
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170107
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000000848

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[PMID]: 28060247
[Au] Autor:Kahana A; Kotlus B; Black E
[Ti] Title:Re: "Assessing the Effectiveness of Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) in the Reduction of Ecchymosis and Edema After Oculofacial Surgery: Preliminary Results".
[So] Source:Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg;33(1):74, 2017 Jan/Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2677
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 171115
[Lr] Last revision date:171115
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170107
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000000813

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[PMID]: 26863038
[Au] Autor:Kang JY; Tran KD; Seiff SR; Mack WP; Lee WW
[Ad] Address:*University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; †Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; ‡Department of Ophthalmology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California; and §Department of Ophthalmology, University of South Florida, Florida, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:Assessing the Effectiveness of Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) in the Reduction of Ecchymosis and Edema After Oculofacial Surgery: Preliminary Results.
[So] Source:Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg;33(1):47-52, 2017 Jan/Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2677
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary data on the potential effectiveness of the combination of topical Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) in reducing postoperative ecchymosis and edema in a select population of healthy volunteers after oculofacial surgery. METHODS: This retrospective review examined the postoperative course of healthy volunteers using topical Arnica and Ledum after undergoing common oculofacial procedures, including blepharoplasty, browpexy, and rhinoplasty, in the hands of 4 surgeons at tertiary referral centers from July 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 using medical records review. Each patient included had used topical hydrogel pads (OcuMend, Cearna Inc., Chicago, IL) containing Arnica 50 M (10) 50% and Ledum 50 M (10). The pads were applied bilaterally after surgery through postoperative day 6. At each postoperative visit, the patients were evaluated by their respective surgeons and assigned a subjective physician-patient rating score comparing each patient's observed healing compared with expected healing if not using Arnica/Ledum. Photographs of patients undergoing equivalent procedures, but not using Arnica/Ledum were used as controls for comparison. Physician-patient rating scores were categorical: markedly accelerated healing defined as approximately 7 days ahead of expected, accelerated healing, defined as <7 days ahead of expected, and no appreciable difference from expected. The proportion of patients with each physician-patient rating score was calculated for postoperative days 1 to 2, 3 to 5, 6 to 8, and overall. Difference of proportions was calculated with 95% confidence intervals using Newcombe unpaired difference comparison of proportions. Photographs documenting the clinical progression of selected patients are provided. RESULTS: A total of 27 patients (16 females, 11 males) were included in the study. Age range was 18 to 70 years. The majority of patients were white (52.9%), and underwent blepharoplasty (78.9%). The median duration of follow-up was 7 days, range 1 to 14 days. The proportions of patients with markedly accelerated healing were 38.5% (5 of 13), 85.7% (6 of 7), 60.0% (12 of 20), and 51.9% (14 of 27) at POD 1 to 2, 3 to 5, 6 to 8, and overall, respectively. The proportions of patients with accelerated healing at the same time points were 15.4% (2 of 13), 14.3% (1 of 7), 30.0% (6 of 20), and 37.0% (10 of 27), respectively. The proportions of patients with no appreciable difference at the same time points were 46.2% (6 of 13), 0% (0 of 7), 10.0% (2 of 20), and 11.1% (3 of 27) of patients, respectively. The proportion of patients using Arnica/Ledum with markedly accelerated healing was significantly more than the proportion of those demonstrating no appreciable difference from expected at POD 3 to 5 (85.7% vs. 0%, p = 0.05), POD 6 to 8 (60.0% vs. 10.0%), and overall (51.9% vs. 11.1%, p = 0.05). No adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSIONS: The preliminary results from this study demonstrate that the combination of topical Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) may be effective in reducing postoperative ecchymosis and edema after oculofacial surgery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arnica
Ecchymosis/drug therapy
Edema/drug therapy
Face/surgery
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
Postoperative Complications/drug therapy
Rhododendron
Wound Healing/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blepharoplasty/adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 171115
[Lr] Last revision date:171115
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160211
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000000645

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[PMID]: 27717395
[Au] Autor:Kasper-Pakosz R; Pietras M; Luczaj L
[Ad] Address:Doctoral Studies Programme, Faculty of Biology and Agriculture, University of Rzeszów, ul. Cwiklinskiej 2, 35-601, Rzeszów, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Wild and native plants and mushrooms sold in the open-air markets of south-eastern Poland.
[So] Source:J Ethnobiol Ethnomed;12(1):45, 2016 Oct 07.
[Is] ISSN:1746-4269
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The study of plants and fungi sold in open-air markets is an important part of ethnobotanical enquiry. Only few such studies were carried out in Europe. METHODS: Four of the largest open-air markets of south-eastern Poland were visited regularly, and the plants sold in them were recorded between 2013 and 2015. The aim of the study was to record native and/or wild species sold in the markets. All the plants sold in the markets were photographed regularly. In each market, 25 sellers were interviewed. Voucher specimens were collected and fungi were identified using DNA barcoding. RESULTS: Altogether, 468 species of plants were recorded, 117 of them native to south-eastern Poland - 19 only collected from the wild and 11 both wild and cultivated. Seventeen of the species are under legal protection. Most protected plants were sold from cultivation, although proper authorization procedures had not been performed. Thirty-two species of fungi were sold (including two cultivated species), all of them for culinary purposes. Two species (Lactarius quieticolor, Leccinum schistophilum) are new to the mycobiota of Poland. Ornamental plants constituted a large section of the market, and they dominated the group of native species. Food plants dominated among wild-collected plants and were sold mainly as fruits for jams, juices and alcoholic drinks, or as culinary herbs. Very few medicinal or green vegetable plants were sold. An interesting feature of the markets was the sale of Ledum palustre as an insect repellent. CONCLUSIONS: Finding two species of fungi which are new to Poland highlights the importance of DNA barcoding in ethnomycological studies. Most items in the markets are ornamental plants, or edible fruits and mushrooms. Very few medicinal plants and green vegetables are sold, which differentiates the markets from southern European ones. Such a pattern is probably the model for most central European markets.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Agaricales
Ethnobotany
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: DNA Barcoding, Taxonomic
Plants, Edible
Plants, Medicinal
Poland
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170606
[Lr] Last revision date:170606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161009
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27439729
[Au] Autor:Mortazavi SMJ; Mortazavi G; Paknahad M
[Ad] Address:Medical Physics Department, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Ionizing and Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center (INIRPRC), Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Histological and histochemical study of the protective role of rosemary extract against harmful effect of cell phone electromagnetic radiation on the parotid glands.
[So] Source:Acta Histochem;118(6):657-658, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1618-0372
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cell Phone
Electromagnetic Radiation
Ledum/chemistry
Parotid Gland/injuries
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Parotid Gland/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160722
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27393196
[Au] Autor:Metrak M; Aneta E; Wilkomirski B; Staszewski T; Suska-Malawska M
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Biology, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, University of Warsaw, ul. Zwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089, Warsaw, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Interspecific differences in foliar 1 PAHs load between Scots pine, birch, and wild rosemary from three polish peat bogs.
[So] Source:Environ Monit Assess;188(8):456, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2959
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pine needles are one of the most commonly used bioindicators of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Therefore, the main objective of the current research was the assessment of PAHs accumulation potential of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles in comparison to wild rosemary (Rhododendron tomentosum Harmaja) and birch (Betula spp.) leaves. Our study was carried out on three peat bogs subjected to different degree of anthropopression, which gave us also the opportunity to identify local emission sources. Pine needles had the lowest accumulation potential from all the studied species. The highest accumulation potential, and hence carcinogenic potential, was observed for wild rosemary leaves. As far as emission sources are concerned, the most pronounced influence on atmospheric PAHs loads had traditional charcoal production, resulting in great influx of heavy PAHs. Observed seasonal changes in PAHs concentrations followed the pattern of winter increase, caused mainly by heating season, and summer decrease, caused mainly by volatilization of light PAHs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Air Pollutants/analysis
Betula
Ledum
Pinus sylvestris
Plant Leaves/chemistry
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Environmental Monitoring
Poland
Seasons
Soil
Wetlands
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Air Pollutants); 0 (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons); 0 (Soil)
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160710
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10661-016-5465-2

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[PMID]: 26916332
[Au] Autor:Li S; Brault A; Sanchez Villavicencio M; Haddad PS
[Ad] Address:a Natural Health Products and Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, CIHR Team in Aboriginal Antidiabetic Medicines, Department of Pharmacology , Université De Montréal , Montreal , Canada ;
[Ti] Title:Rhododendron groenlandicum (Labrador tea), an antidiabetic plant from the traditional pharmacopoeia of the Canadian Eastern James Bay Cree, improves renal integrity in the diet-induced obese mouse model.
[So] Source:Pharm Biol;54(10):1998-2006, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5116
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Content Our team has identified Labrador tea [Rhododendron groenlandicum L. (Ericaceae)] as a potential antidiabetic plant from the traditional pharmacopoeia of the Eastern James Bay Cree. In a previous in vivo study, the plant extract was tested in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese model using C57BL/6 mice and it improved glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Objective In the present study, we assessed the plant's potential renoprotective effects. Materials and methods Rhododendron groenlandicum was administered at 250 mg/kg/d to mice fed HFD for 8 weeks to induce obesity and mild diabetes. Histological (periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), Masson and Oil Red O staining), immunohistochemical (IHC) and biochemical parameters were assessed to evaluate the renoprotective potential of R. groenlandicum treatment for an additional 8 weeks. Results Microalbuminuria and renal fibrosis were developed in HFD-fed mice. Meanwhile, there was a tendency for R. groenlandicum to improve microalbuminuria, with the values of albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) reducing from 0.69 to 0.53. Renal fibrosis value was originally 4.85 arbitrary units (AU) in HFD-fed mice, dropped to 3.27 AU after receiving R. groenlandicum treatment. Rhododendron groenlandicum reduced renal steatosis by nearly one-half, whereas the expression of Bcl-2-modifying factor (BMF) diminished from 13.96 AU to 9.43 AU. Discussion and conclusions Taken altogether, the results suggest that R. groenlandicum treatment can improve renal function impaired by HFD.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy
Diabetic Nephropathies/prevention & control
Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology
Kidney/drug effects
Ledum
Obesity/complications
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Urological Agents/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism
Albuminuria/etiology
Albuminuria/prevention & control
Animals
Cytoprotection
Diabetes Mellitus/etiology
Diabetic Nephropathies/etiology
Diabetic Nephropathies/pathology
Diabetic Nephropathies/physiopathology
Diet, High-Fat
Disease Models, Animal
Fibrosis
Hypoglycemic Agents/isolation & purification
Kidney/metabolism
Kidney/pathology
Kidney/physiopathology
Ledum/chemistry
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Pharmacopoeias as Topic
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
Plant Leaves
Plants, Medicinal
Urological Agents/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing); 0 (Bmf protein, mouse); 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Urological Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170207
[Lr] Last revision date:170207
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160227
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3109/13880209.2015.1137953


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