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[PMID]: 29521921
[Au] Autor:Boyar V
[Ad] Address:Vita Boyar, MD, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, New Hyde Park, New York; and Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of Dehisced, Thoracic Neonatal Wounds With Single-Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device and Medical-Grade Honey: A Retrospective Case Series.
[So] Source:J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs;45(2):117-122, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1528-3976
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to report on our experience with a portable, single-use negative pressure wound therapy device used in combination with activated active Leptospermum honey (ALH) in the treatment of colonized or infected, dehisced, thoracic wounds in neonates with complex congenital heart disease. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: We reviewed medical records of 18 neonates and reported on findings from 11; the remaining 7 were not included secondary to incomplete records, transfer to a different institution prior to wound healing, or death. The median age of our patients was 12 days (range, 2 days to 5 weeks); their mean gestational age was 34 weeks. All of the neonates had acquired postoperative wound dehiscence that were colonized or infected and were treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Cohen Children's Medical Center (New Hyde Park, New York), a regional perinatal center with a level 4 NICU. METHODS: Wound cultures were obtained on all patients prior to treatment commencement. All cultures were repeated on day 4 of treatment. Systemic antibiotics were administered as necessary. No complications were observed related to the use of negative pressure wound therapy device and ALH. All patients were followed until discharge home or transfer to another facility. The pain scores during placement and removal were acceptable (between 1 and 3; median = 2) using the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale. Staff and parents indicated that the combination of ALH and the negative pressure wound therapy device did not interfere with daily care and parental bonding. CONCLUSIONS: Use of ALH and a single-use negative pressure wound therapy device was successful in this series of 11 neonates with complex congenital heart disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/WON.0000000000000407

  2 / 199 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29300875
[Au] Autor:Clearwater MJ; Revell M; Noe S; Manley-Harris M
[Ad] Address:School of Science, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Influence of genotype, floral stage, and water stress on floral nectar yield and composition of manuka (Leptospermum scoparium).
[So] Source:Ann Bot;121(3):501-512, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Floral nectar can be variable in composition, influencing pollinator behaviour and the composition of honey derived from it. The non-peroxide antibacterial activity of manuka (Leptospermum scoparium, Myrtaceae) honey results from the chemical conversion of the triose sugar dihydroxyacetone (DHA), after DHA accumulates for an unknown reason in the nectar. This study examined variation in nectar DHA, glucose, fructose and sucrose content with floral stage of development, between manuka genotypes with differing flower morphology, and in response to water stress. Methods: Six manuka genotypes were grown without nectar-feeding insects. Stages of flower development were defined, nectar was harvested and its composition was compared between stages and genotypes, and with floral morphology. Water stress was imposed and its effect on nectar composition was examined. Key Results: Nectar was present from soon after flower opening until the end of petal abscission, with the quantity of accumulated nectar sugars rising, then stabilizing or falling, indicating nectar secretion followed by reabsorption in some genotypes. The quantity of DHA, the ratio of DHA to other nectar sugars and the fructose to glucose ratio also varied with stage of development, indicating differences in rates of production and reabsorption between nectar components. Nectar composition and yield per flower also differed between genotypes, although neither was positively related to nectary area or stomatal density. Drying soil had no effect on nectar composition or yield, but variation in nectar yield was correlated with temperature prior to nectar sampling. Conclusions: Manuka nectar yield and composition are strongly influenced by plant genotype, flower age and the environment. There were clear stoichiometric relationships between glucose, fructose and sucrose per flower, but DHA per flower was only weakly correlated with the amount of other sugars, suggesting that accumulation of the triose sugar is indirectly coupled to secretion of the larger sugars by the nectary parenchyma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx183

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[PMID]: 29324426
[Au] Autor:Elsass FT
[Ti] Title:A Sweet Solution: The Use of Medical-grade Honey on Oral Mucositis in the Pediatric Oncology Patient.
[So] Source:Wounds;29(12):E115-E117, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1943-2704
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Pediatric patients develop mucositis when receiving treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation; the most common and sensitive is oral mucositis. Mouth rinses containing antimicrobial, antihistamine, and analgesic medications are the mainstay for pediatric patients; however, patients often refuse these rinses due to the taste or texture. Also, patients under 1 year of age are unable to use these products. OBJECTIVE: Herein, the improvement of oral mucositis with standard oral care and additional use of active Leptospermum honey in pediatric oncology patients after chemotherapy is demonstrated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients received oral care every 4 hours followed by application of the honey paste 3 times daily. The honey paste was applied with a sponge swab to coat the mouth. Patients either swished and spit or had excess honey suctioned out. At completion of this evaluation, the honey treatment was used in 10 pediatric oncology patients between the ages of 9 months and 17 years. RESULTS: The Leptospermum honey paste was easy to apply and was well received by all patients. Healing was observed within 3 days, and patients in all cases reported decreases in pain. Decreased wounds and bleeding were evident in all cases within 5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Leptospermum honey paste proved to be effective in all participating patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180111
[Lr] Last revision date:180111
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 199 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29272983
[Au] Autor:Turchi B; Mancini S; Pistelli L; Najar B; Fratini F
[Ad] Address:a Department of Veterinary Sciences , University of Pisa , Pisa , Italy.
[Ti] Title:Sub-inhibitory concentration of essential oils induces antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.
[So] Source:Nat Prod Res;:1-5, 2017 Dec 22.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6427
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fourteen Staphylococcus aureus wild strains were stressed with sub-inhibitory concentration of five essential oils: Leptospermum scoparium (manuka), Origanum majorana (marjoram), Origanum vulgare (oregano), Satureja montana (winter savoury) and Thymus vulgaris (thyme). Antibiotics susceptibility profiles of the strains were determined by agar disk diffusion method before and after EOs treatment. The following antibiotics were employed: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, amikacin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, aztreonam, ceftazidime, cephalothin, ciprofloxacin, colistin, cefotaxime, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin, cephalexin, neomycin, piperacillin, rifampin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, tetracycline and tobramycin. Before EOs treatment, strains were susceptible to all antibiotics except for aztreonam and colistin. After exposure to sub-inhibitory EOs concentration of manuka, marjoram and oregano, several modifications in antibiotics susceptibility profiles were detected. Conversely, few modifications were induced by winter savoury and thyme EOs. Moreover, occurrence of resistances seems uncorrelated with drug classes as low concentration of EO could induce phenotypic changes in susceptible bacteria leading to antibiotic resistance phenomena.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171223
[Lr] Last revision date:171223
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14786419.2017.1419237

  5 / 199 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29032921
[Au] Autor:Wong D; Albietz JM; Tran H; Du Toit C; Li AH; Yun T; Han J; Schmid KL
[Ad] Address:School of Optometry and Vision Science and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, 60 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove, Qld, 4059, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of contact lens related dry eye with antibacterial honey.
[So] Source:Cont Lens Anterior Eye;40(6):389-393, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5411
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: Contact lens induced dry eye affects approximately 50% of contact lens wearers. The aim was to assess the effects of Manuka (Leptospermum sp.) honey eye drops (Optimel, Melcare, Australia) on dry eye in contact lens wearers. The safety of the honey eye drops in contact lens wear and contact lens wearers' compliance were also evaluated. DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, cross over study, examiner masked, pilot treatment trial. METHODS: Twenty-four participants aged 20 to 55 years with contact lens related dry eye were recruited and randomised to two treatment groups; 20 completed the study. One group used Optimel eye drops twice a day for two weeks followed by conventional lubricant (Systane Ultra, Alcon) therapy for two weeks; the other group completed the treatments in the reverse order. Before and after each treatment dry eye symptomology, ocular surface inflammation, and tear quantity and quality were assessed. Participants completed a daily log detailing their usage of treatments and any issues. RESULTS: Dry eye symptoms improved significantly after Optimel treatment. Patients with more severe symptoms at baseline showed a greater improvement in symptoms. No significant differences were observed in the objective signs of dry eye; presumably because of the short treatment duration. Seventy-five% of contact lens wearers reported good adherence to Optimel treatment and 95% reported no issues using this product. CONCLUSIONS: Optimel Eye Drops reduce the symptoms of dry eye in contact lens wearers and are safe to use. A longer treatment period to assess the effect on clinical signs of dry eye is required.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 199 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28901255
[Au] Autor:Niaz K; Maqbool F; Bahadar H; Abdollahi M
[Ad] Address:International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (IC-TUMS), Tehran. Iran.
[Ti] Title:Health Benefits Of Manuka Honey As An Essential Constituent For Tissue Regeneration.
[So] Source:Curr Drug Metab;, 2017 Sep 11.
[Is] ISSN:1875-5453
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Honey is known for its therapeutic properties from ancient civilizations but only since last few decades its mechanism has been studied on how it causes epithelial regeneration leading to wound and ulcer healing.. In the present review the health perspectives of honey, its chemical composition with special reference to flavonoids, polyphenol composition and other bioactive trace compounds used in tissue regeneration have been highlighted. Honey can inhibit carcinogenesis by moderating with molecular processes of initiation, advancement and progression stage of cancer cells, therefore it is considered a promising anti-cancer agent. Several, well-intentioned characteristics have drawn the attention of researchers to check copious endowed-biological activities of Manuka honey, including antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-proliferative capacities against cancer cells. Thus, scientists are trying to use Manuka honey in the area of biomedical and tissue engineering to design a template for regeneration. Naturally derived antibacterial agents, like Manuka honey, contain mixture of compounds, which can influence antibacterial potency. The non-peroxide bacteriostatic properties of Manuka honey have been formerly associated to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO). The assimilation of MGO as a functional antibacterial additive during designing a tissue template production would explore its properties as a potential agent for manufacturing tissue regeneration template.The role of glyoxal (GO) and MGO in the bacterial growth inhibition, and in addition to immunomodulatory role, it also enhances wound healing and tissue regeneration. Researchers should step forward to explore the biomedical application, particularly integration into tissue regeneration templates. Therefore, further studies are fully needed to provide detailed information on active components of Manuka honey and their potential therapeutic efficacy in numerous models of human diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170913
[Lr] Last revision date:170913
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1389200218666170911152240

  7 / 199 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28784507
[Au] Autor:Rückriemen J; Hohmann C; Hellwig M; Henle T
[Ad] Address:Institute of Food Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Unique fluorescence and high-molecular weight characteristics of protein isolates from manuka honey (Leptospermum scoparium).
[So] Source:Food Res Int;99(Pt 1):469-475, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7145
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study compared the fluorescence properties (λ =350/450nm) and molecular size of proteins from manuka and non-manuka honey. The fluorescence characteristics of non-manuka and manuka proteins differ markedly, whereby manuka honey protein fluorescence increases with increasing methylglyoxal (MGO) content of the honey. It was concluded that manuka honey proteins are modified due to MGO-derived glycation and crosslinking reactions, thus resulting in fluorescent structures. The molecular size of honey proteins was studied using size exclusion chromatography. Manuka honey proteins contain a significantly higher amount of high molecular weight (HMW) fraction compared to non-manuka honey proteins. Moreover, HMW fraction of manuka honey proteins was stable against reducing agents such as dithiothreitol, whereas HMW fraction of non-manuka honey proteins was significantly decreased. Thus, the chemical nature of manuka honey HMW fraction is probably covalent MGO crosslinking, whereas non-manuka HMW fraction is caused by disulfide bonds. Storage of a non-manuka honey, which was artificially spiked with MGO and DHA, did not induce above mentioned fluorescence properties of proteins during 84days of storage. Hence, MGO-derived fluorescence and crosslinking of honey proteins can be useful parameters to characterize manuka honey.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170808
[Lr] Last revision date:170808
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 199 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28672824
[Au] Autor:Park CG; Jang M; Shin E; Kim J
[Ad] Address:Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Korea. parkcg@gnu.ac.kr.
[Ti] Title:Myrtaceae Plant Essential Oils and their ß-Triketone Components as Insecticides against Drosophila suzukii.
[So] Source:Molecules;22(7), 2017 Jun 24.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Spotted wing drosophila (SWD, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), Diptera: Drosophilidae) is recognized as an economically important pest in North America and Europe as well as in Asia. Assessments were made for fumigant and contact toxicities of six Myrtaceae plant essential oils (EOs) and their components to find new alternative types of insecticides active against SWD. Among the EOs tested, Leptospermum citratum EO, consisting mainly of geranial and neral, exhibited effective fumigant activity. Median lethal dose (LD ; mg/L) values of L. citratum were 2.39 and 3.24 for males and females, respectively. All tested EOs except Kunzea ambigua EO exhibited effective contact toxicity. LD (µg/fly) values for contact toxicity of manuka and kanuka were 0.60 and 0.71, respectively, for males and 1.10 and 1.23, respectively, for females. The LD values of the other 3 EOs-L. citratum, allspice and clove bud were 2.11-3.31 and 3.53-5.22 for males and females, respectively. The non-polar fraction of manuka and kanuka did not show significant contact toxicity, whereas the polar and triketone fractions, composed of flavesone, isoleptospermone and leptospermone, exhibited efficient activity with the LD values of 0.13-0.37 and 0.22-0.57 µg/fly for males and females, respectively. Our results indicate that Myrtaceae plant EOs and their triketone components can be used as alternatives to conventional insecticides.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170704
[Lr] Last revision date:170704
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 199 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28595460
[Au] Autor:Turchi B; Mancini S; Pistelli L; Najar B; Cerri D; Fratini F
[Ad] Address:a Department of Veterinary Sciences , University of Pisa , Pisa , Italy.
[Ti] Title:Sub-inhibitory stress with essential oil affects enterotoxins production and essential oil susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus.
[So] Source:Nat Prod Res;:1-7, 2017 Jun 08.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6427
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fourteen wild strains of Staphylococcus aureus positive for gene sea were tested for enterotoxins production and the minimum inhibitory concentration of Leptospermum scoparium, Origanum majorana, Origanum vulgare, Satureja montana and Thymus vulgaris essential oils (EOs) were determined. After this trial, bacteria stressed with sub-inhibitory concentration of each EO were tested for enterotoxins production by an immunoenzymatic assay and resistance to the same EO. Oregano oil exhibited the highest antibacterial activity followed by manuka and thyme oils. After the exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration of EOs, strains displayed an increased sensitivity in more than 95% of the cases. After treatment with oregano and marjoram EOs, few strains showed a modified enterotoxins production, while 43% of the strains were no longer able to produce enterotoxins after treatment with manuka EO. The results obtained in this study highlight that exposure to sub-inhibitory concentration of EO modifies strains enterotoxins production and EOs susceptibility profile.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170622
[Lr] Last revision date:170622
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14786419.2017.1338284

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[PMID]: 28585260
[Au] Autor:Albietz JM; Schmid KL
[Ad] Address:School of Optometry and Vision Science, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Randomised controlled trial of topical antibacterial Manuka (Leptospermum species) honey for evaporative dry eye due to meibomian gland dysfunction.
[So] Source:Clin Exp Optom;100(6):603-615, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1444-0938
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of standardised Manuka (Leptospermum species) antibacterial honey as adjunctive twice daily treatment to conventional therapy (warm compresses, lid massage and preservative-free lubricant), in participants with evaporative dry eye due to moderate to advanced meibomian gland dysfunction. METHODS: This prospective, open-label study involved 114 participants. After two weeks of conventional therapy participants were randomised to one of three treatment groups: Optimel Antibacterial Manuka Eye Gel (98 per cent Leptospermum species honey) plus conventional therapy (n = 37), Optimel Manuka plus Lubricant Eye Drops (16 per cent Leptospermum species honey) plus conventional therapy (n = 37) and a control (conventional therapy) (n = 40). Clinical evaluations performed at baseline and Week 8 included: symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, Ocular Comfort Index), daily lubricant use, tear assessments (break-up time, secretion, osmolarity and InflammaDry), corneal sensation, ocular surface staining, meibomian gland secretion quality and expressibility, bulbar conjunctival, limbal and lid marginal redness and eyelid marginal bacterial cultures and colony counts. RESULTS: Significant improvements (p ≤ 0.05) occurred at Week 8 in symptoms, tear break-up time, staining, tear osmolarity, meibum quality and bulbar, limbal and lid margin redness for all treatments. Improvement in staining was significantly greater with Optimel 16 per cent drops (p = 0.035). Significant improvements (p < 0.05) in meibomian gland expressibility and InflammaDry occurred for both Optimel treatments. Optimel 98 per cent gel was significantly more effective in improving meibum quality (p = 0.005) and gland expressibility (p = 0.042). Total eyelid marginal bacterial colony counts reduced significantly with Optimel 16 per cent drops (p = 0.03) but not the other treatments. Staphylococcus epidermidis counts reduced significantly with Optimel 16 per cent drops (p = 0.041) and Optimel 98 per cent gel (p = 0.027). Both Optimel treatments significantly reduced the need for lubricants, with Optimel 16 per cent drops decreasing lubricant use most (p = 0.001). Temporary redness and stinging were the only adverse effects of Optimel use. CONCLUSIONS: Optimel antibacterial honey treatments are effective as adjunctive therapies for meibomian gland dysfunction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/cxo.12524


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