Database : MEDLINE
Search on : maxillary and artery [Words]
References found : 1889 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 189 go to page                         

  1 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524709
[Au] Autor:Wang L; Cai L; Lu S; Qian H; Lawton MT; Shi X
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, SanBo Brain Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona.
[Ti] Title:The History and Evolution of Internal Maxillary Artery Bypass.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Internal maxillary artery (IMA) bypass has gain momentum in the last 5 years for the treatment of complex cerebrovascular disorders and skull base tumors. However, some issues regarding this treatment modality have been proposed. As one of the most experienced neurosurgical team to perform internal maxillary artery bypass in the world (>100 clinical cases), we reviewed literature in aspects of basic anatomy of maxillary artery with its variations to the lateral pterygoid muscle, initial anastomosis modalities and subsequent exposure techniques in cadaver studies, pre-operative arterial evaluation methods, optimal interposed graft selections and surgical outcome in the management of complex aneurysms, skull base tumors and steno-occlusive disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29498976
[Au] Autor:Bykowski MR; Hill A; Garland C; Tobler W; Losee JE; Goldstein JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
[Ti] Title:Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Maxillary Artery and Its Branches Following Le Fort I Osteotomy: Evidence-Based Guidelines.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Although rare, pseudoaneurysms (PA) can develop following Le Fort I osteotomy and lead to life-threatening hemorrhage. However, the typical presentation of a PA following a Le Fort I osteotomy is not well characterized. Evidence-based guidelines are not currently available for evaluation of PA following Le Fort I osteotomy. METHODS: A case report is presented of a 27-year-old man who underwent Le Fort I advancement and subsequently developed a bleeding PA. A comprehensive search of journal articles was performed using the MEDLINE/PubMed database between 1964 and April 2016. Keywords and phrases used were "(osteotomy OR craniofacial OR orthognathic) AND (pseudoaneurysm OR aneurysm OR epistaxis)." Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta- Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. RESULTS:: The literature search yielded 13 reports of 18 patients. All 18 patients underwent Le Fort I osteotomy and subsequently developed a delayed postoperative bleeding PA. All studies were level IV or V evidence. Twenty-eight percent (N = 5) of the cases documented "excessive" intraoperative bleeding or more than 500 mL of estimated blood loss. The average time for the first bleeding episode and time until final bleed was 17.3  14.3 days (range: 3-62 days) and 27.8  21.2 days following surgery (range: 6-77 days), respectively. Sixty-seven percent (N = 12) had multiple episodes of bleeding. The duration between the bleeding events averaged 10.6 ( 7.9 days) with a range of 1 to 35 days. Bleeding PA's were treated with image-guided embolization (15/18 patients; 83.3%) or ligation or clamping (3/18 patients; 16.7%). CONCLUSION: In the setting of recurrent and/or delayed postoperative epistaxis following Le Fort I osteotomy, surgeons should maintain a high clinical suspicion for PA. Ruptured PA's are often preceded by multiple episodes of progressively worsening epistaxis. Based on the presented case report and pooled data from the literature, angiography is recommended to evaluate for PA in the setting of recurrent epistaxis following Le Fort I osteotomy, especially within the first 4 weeks following surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004396

  3 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29284902
[Au] Autor:Dizdarevic D; Masic T; Muslic E
[Ad] Address:Clinic for Maxillofacial Surgery, University Clinical Center in Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
[Ti] Title:Elongated Miofascial Temporal Flap in Comparison with Standard Surgical Procedure of Temporal Muscle Reconstruction.
[So] Source:Med Arch;71(5):338-340, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0350-199X
[Cp] Country of publication:Bosnia and Herzegovina
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Flap of the temporal muscle (m. temporalis) with its natural position, its mass and its length, compared with other bound and free microvascular flaps, is the method of choice for covering the middle part of the face after the removal of large tumor masses. Material: The study included a sample of 36 patients who were surgically treated due to malignant process at the middle face level with the performed partial, total or bilateral maxillectomy at the Clinic for Maxillofacial Surgery, University Clinical Center in Sarajevo. The sample is divided into three groups. Methods: The usual procedure of lifting the temporal flap in the first group, at the second extension of the coronoid processus. A group of three-elongated myofascial flap, which includes lifting the muscle along with deep temporal branches of maxillary artery with deep temporal fascia, its two layers and associated stem of thesuperficial temporal artery. Results: Statistical analysis of the length indicated that in group III the mean length was 9.83 cm, group II- 8.25, and group I- 6 cm. The longest segmental lobe in group three provides safer work and the length of the lifted lobe with double vascular stem. This provides coverage of defects that cross over the median line of the middle face. The results coincide with the comparative world studies. Conclusion: For large defects at the meddle part of the face that overlap the median line, an extraordinary solution is elongated myofascial flap with double vascular supply, with a larger flap mass and a length of about 9.83 cm.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.5455/medarh.2017.71.338-340

  4 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29303858
[Au] Autor:Leite PCC; Tolentino ES; Yamashita AL; Iwaki LCV; Iwaki Filho L
[Ad] Address:Private Practice, Rio do Sul, Santa Catarina.
[Ti] Title:Surgical Treatment of Synovial Chondromatosis in the Inferior Compartment of the Temporomandibular Joint With Articular Disc Involvement.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;29(2):e199-e203, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The authors report an unusual case of painful synovial chondromatosis originated in the inferior compartment of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with articular disc involvement in a 56-year-old woman with complaint of severe pain in the right preauricular region. Magnetic resonance images showed advanced destruction of the right articular disc anteriorly displaced, condylar erosion, and distinct nodules within an extremely expanded inferior joint compartment with large amount of fluid, as well as a large TMJ effusion. A scintigraphy showed elevated bone uptake in the right TMJ, demonstrating intense bone remodeling activity in the region. After a right internal maxillary artery embolization, the patient underwent open surgery. The intraoperative procedures, including articular disc removal, condylar remodeling, and replacement of the articular disc, are described in detail. Synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ is a rare disease, especially when it affects the inferior compartment and the articular disc. Initial diagnosis is challenging and imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) play an important role in identifying signs, making accurate diagnosis, and offering additional information not available with conventional imaging, such as TMJ inflammation or remodeling. In these patients, open surgery may be considered a definitive treatment, since the postoperative recurrence rate is very low.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004262

  5 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29227408
[Au] Autor:Guo J; Zhan R; Ren Y; Meng X; Liu R; Li G; Wang D; Sun J
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery.
[Ti] Title:The Hybrid Technical Management of Large and Complicated Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistula of Preauricular Region.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;29(2):432-436, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is defined as an abnormal communication between the high flow arterial system and the low flow venous network, which directly connects the arterial feeding vessels and the near draining veins without normal intervening capillary bed. Arteriovenous fistula incurs in preauricular region is exceeding rare. Most of these fistulae occur as a result of an iatrogenic injury, the volume is small, feeding and draining vessels of feeding and draining are simple, and can be cured easily. However, the treatment of the large and complicated AVF after incidental trauma in preauricular region is a challenge even for senior neurosurgeon. In this study, the authors discuss the management of a traumatic AVF through combined therapeutic method of surgical ligation and transarterial embolization. It is fed by ipsilateral superficial temporal artery, internal maxillary artery, posterior auricular artery, and their accessory branches and is drained by ipsilateral common facial vein and external jugular vein. Also the etiology, clinical manifestations, pathology, diagnosis, and management are summarized. CONCLUSION: Large and complicated traumatic AVF in preauricular region is rare, often due from an injury in maxillofacial region, combined therapy needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004138

  6 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29317359
[Au] Autor:Liu Y; Shi X; Kc KIS; Sun Y; Liu F; Qian H; Zhang J
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Fuxing Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing.
[Ti] Title:Microsurgical Treatment for Complex Basilar Artery Aneurysms with Long-Term Follow-Up in a Series of 35 Cases.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;111:e710-e721, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There has been a massive shift in the balance toward endovascular therapy for basilar artery (BA) aneurysms in the modern era. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiologic data from patients with BA aneurysms who were treated in a single medical center during a 10-year period from August 2006 to May2016. RESULTS: Thirty-five consecutive patients with 46 aneurysms during the 10-year period were included. The rate of complete aneurysm occlusion in 35 cases using a 1-stage operation was 58.8% (20/34). The graft patency rates of 13 bypass surgeries were 84.6% (11/13) within 1 week and 69.2% (9/13) at 3 months after surgery. The cut flow index for all bypass cases was 0.79. The overall survival was 94% at discharge (2 patients died). The 3-month outcome was favorable (modified Rankin Scale score 0-2) for 27 patients (77.1%) and poor (modified Rankin Scale score 3-5) for 5 patients (14.2%), and 3 patients died (8.6%). The survival for patients with BA apex aneurysms was higher than the survival observed for patients with BA trunk/vertebrobasilar junction aneurysms. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical treatments for BA aneurysms can be effective, with good patient outcomes in the early stage after operation. Patients with wide-necked, fusiform, or dolichoectatic aneurysms seem to exclude the aneurysm, preventing unnecessary retreatments with bypass techniques. The potential for a poor prognosis of patients with BA trunk/vertebrobasilar junction aneurysms was higher than that for patients with basilar apex aneurysms who presented with unfavorable subsequent events.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29489414
[Au] Autor:Watanabe M; Watanabe A; Takano N; Saito C; Shibahara T
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tokyo Dental College, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Morphologic Evaluation for Safe Le Fort I Osteotomy in Cleft Lip and Palate.
[So] Source:Cleft Palate Craniofac J;:1055665618757368, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to determine the structure and morphology of the maxilla in patients with cleft lip and palate to ensure safe Le Fort I osteotomy. PATIENTS: A total of 34 sides of 17 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (nonsyndromic cases) were included in this study. The control group included 10 sides of 5 patients who exhibited skeletal mandibular protrusion without malformation. METHODS: Finite element analysis was performed to examine the distribution of occlusal force over the maxilla, and continuous 3-dimensional measurement was performed at the sites of stress concentration. RESULTS: In patients with cleft lip and palate, bones at the lateral border of the piriform aperture and the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus were significantly thicker than those in controls ( P < .05). Furthermore, the attachment of the pterygomaxillary junction was wider and thicker ( P < .05), and the anterior distance to the descending palatine artery was shorter ( P < .01) in patients with cleft lip and palate than in controls. Our results further indicated that alveolar bone grafting may significantly influence bone thickness and the attachment state of the pterygomaxillary junction. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the complications of LFI can be reduced in patients with cleft lip and palate by ensuring proper understanding of each patient's maxillary anatomy and bone thickness, as well as the location of the descending palatine artery and the attachment state of the pterygomaxillary junction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1055665618757368

  8 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29488393
[Au] Autor:Tawfik KO; Harmon JJ; Walters Z; Samy R; de Alarcon A; Stevens SM; Abruzzo T
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
[Ti] Title:Facial Palsy Following Embolization of a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma.
[So] Source:Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol;:3489418761456, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1943-572X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To describe a case of the rare complication of facial palsy following preoperative embolization of a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). To illustrate the vascular supply to the facial nerve and as a result, highlight the etiology of the facial nerve palsy. METHODS: The angiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of a case of facial palsy following preoperative embolization of a JNA is reviewed. RESULTS: A 13-year-old male developed left-sided facial palsy following preoperative embolization of a left-sided JNA. Evaluation of MR imaging studies and retrospective review of the angiographic data suggested errant embolization of particles into the petrosquamosal branch of the middle meningeal artery (MMA), a branch of the internal maxillary artery (IMA), through collateral vasculature. The petrosquamosal branch of the MMA is the predominant blood supply to the facial nerve in the facial canal. The facial palsy resolved since complete infarction of the nerve was likely prevented by collateral blood supply from the stylomastoid artery. CONCLUSIONS: Facial palsy is a potential complication of embolization of the IMA, a branch of the external carotid artery (ECA). This is secondary to ischemia of the facial nerve due to embolization of its vascular supply. Clinicians should be aware of this potential complication and counsel patients accordingly prior to embolization for JNA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0003489418761456

  9 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29486313
[Au] Autor:Dubey A; Yadav N; Ratre S; Parihar VS; Yadav YR
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, NSCB Medical college Jabalpur Madhya Pradesh India and Department of Radiology and Imaging.
[Ti] Title:Full endoscopic vascular decompression in trigeminal neuralgia: Experience of 230 Patients.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Although most surgeons are employing endoscope as an adjunct to the microscope in microvascular decompression, a full endoscopic technique is less commonly performed. The present study is aimed to evaluate results of 230 patients of endoscopic vascular decompression. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with typical neuralgia, with or without preoperatively detected vascular compression, were advised to undergo vascular decompression. RESULTS: Maxillary and mandibular division were involved in 116, and 93 patients respectively. Superior cerebellar (n=174) artery was most common vascular conflict followed by anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n=96). Tortuous basilar artery and small veins were possible causes of neuralgia in 1 and 2 patients respectively. Single and double vessels conflict was observed in 173 and 50 patients respectively. The compressing vessel was placed anterior to the trigeminal nerve in 39 patients. An arterial loop was in contact with the nerve, producing grooving, and displacing the nerve in 215, 35 and 21 patients respectively. Complete, satisfactory and no relief of pain was observed in 204 (88.7%), 11 (5.8%) and 15 (6.5%) patients respectively. Recurrence was observed in 25 patients at an average 60 months follow up. Temporary complications included trigeminal dysesthesia, vertigo, facial paresis, CSF leak, and reduced hearing in 9, 8, 8, 7, and 3 patients respectively. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic vascular decompression is a safe and efficient alternative technique to endoscopic assisted microvascular decompression provided surgeon is experienced in endoscopic surgery. It is helpful in identification of all offending vessels including the double vessel, and anterior compression without brain and nerve retraction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 1889 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29477005
[Au] Autor:Gospodarev V; Chakravarthy V; Harms C; Myers H; Kaplan B; Kim E; Pond M; De Los Reyes K
[Ad] Address:Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA, United States.
[Ti] Title:CT Cisternography for Evaluation of Trigeminal Neuralgia when MRI is contraindicated: Case Report.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Trigeminal neuralgia (TGN) causes severe unilateral facial pain. The etiology is hypothesized to be segmental demyelination of the trigeminal nerve root via compression by the superior cerebellar artery (SCA). Microvascular decompression (MVD) allows immediate and long-term pain relief. Preoperative evaluation includes MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and/or MRA (magnetic resonance angiography) of the brain. Having a pacemaker is a contraindication for MRI. There have been isolated reports of using computed tomography (CT) cisternography scans for radiation planning for TGN. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 75-year-old male with a permanent pacemaker who had refractory TGN in the V2 (maxillary) distribution of the trigeminal nerve underwent CT cisternography to prepare for MVD. CT angiography with Isovue 370 intravenous contrast injection and 0.625 mm axial images were obtained from the skull base across the posterior fossa. An intrathecal injection of Isovue 180 was performed at the L2/3 level. Imaging revealed the right SCA abutting the medial margin of the proximal right trigeminal nerve. In surgery (KD), a standard retrosigmoid suboccipital craniotomy was performed to access the cerebellopontine angle and separate the abutting SCA and trigeminal nerve. The patient had immediate pain relief. CONCLUSIONS: MRI is the preferred method of evaluating for TGN because it offers excellent visualization of vasculature in relation to the trigeminal nerve without accompanying radiation exposure. However, for patients who have contraindications to MRI, CT cisternography is shown to also be an effective method for visualizing the trigeminal root entry zone and nearby vasculature in preparation for MVD of the trigeminal nerve.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180224
[Lr] Last revision date:180224
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 189 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information