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[PMID]: 25008217
[Au] Autor:Lewis VA; Colla CH; Schoenherr KE; Shortell SM; Fisher ES
[Ad] Address:The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 35 Centerra Parkway, Lebanon, NH, 03766, USA, valerie.a.lewis@dartmouth.edu.
[Ti] Title:Innovation in the safety net: integrating community health centers through accountable care.
[So] Source:J Gen Intern Med;29(11):1484-90, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1525-1497
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Safety net primary care providers, including as community health centers, have long been isolated from mainstream health care providers. Current delivery system reforms such as Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) may either reinforce the isolation of these providers or may spur new integration of safety net providers. OBJECTIVE: This study examines the extent of community health center involvement in ACOs, as well as how and why ACOs are partnering with these safety net primary care providers. DESIGN: Mixed methods study pairing the cross-sectional National Survey of ACOs (conducted 2012 to 2013), followed by in-depth, qualitative interviews with a subset of ACOs that include community health centers (conducted 2013). PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and seventy-three ACOs completed the National Survey of ACOs. Executives from 18 ACOs that include health centers participated in in-depth interviews, along with leadership at eight community health centers participating in ACOs. MAIN MEASURES: Key survey measures include ACO organizational characteristics, care management and quality improvement capabilities. Qualitative interviews used a semi-structured interview guide. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, then coded for thematic content using NVivo software. KEY RESULTS: Overall, 28% of ACOs include a community health center (CHC). ACOs with CHCs are similar to those without CHCs in organizational structure, care management and quality improvement capabilities. Qualitative results showed two major themes. First, ACOs with CHCs typically represent new relationships or formal partnerships between CHCs and other local health care providers. Second, CHCs are considered valued partners brought into ACOs to expand primary care capacity and expertise. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial number of ACOs include CHCs. These results suggest that rather than reinforcing segmentation of safety net providers from the broader delivery system, the ACO model may lead to the integration of safety net primary care providers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11606-014-2911-0

  2 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24893584
[Au] Autor:Ennis SK; Larson EB; Grothaus L; Helfrich CD; Balch S; Phelan EA
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Services, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Box 357230, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA, ennis.steph@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Association of living alone and hospitalization among community-dwelling elders with and without dementia.
[So] Source:J Gen Intern Med;29(11):1451-9, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1525-1497
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Older persons account for the majority of hospitalizations in the United States.1 Identifying risk factors for hospitalization among elders, especially potentially preventable hospitalization, may suggest opportunities to improve primary care. Certain factors-for example, living alone-may increase the risk for hospitalization, and their effect may be greater among persons with dementia and the old-old (aged 85+). OBJECTIVES: To determine the association of living alone and risk for hospitalization, and see if the observed effect is greater among persons with dementia or the old-old. DESIGN: Retrospective longitudinal cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: 2,636 participants in the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study, a longitudinal cohort study of dementia incidence. Participants were adults aged 65+ enrolled in an integrated health care system who completed biennial follow-up visits to assess for dementia and living situation. MAIN MEASURES: Hospitalization for all causes and for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) were identified using automated data. KEY RESULTS: At baseline, the mean age of participants was 75.5 years, 59 % were female and 36 % lived alone. Follow-up time averaged 8.4 years (SD 3.5), yielding 10,431 approximately 2-year periods for analysis. Living alone was positively associated with being aged 85+, female, and having lower reported social support and better physical function, and negatively associated with having dementia. In a regression model adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity burden, physical function and length of follow-up, living alone was not associated with all-cause (OR = 0.93; 95 % CI 0.84, 1.03) or ambulatory care sensitive condition (ACSC) hospitalization (OR = 0.88; 95 % CI 0.73, 1.07). Among participants aged 85+, living alone was associated with a lower risk for all-cause (OR = 0.76; 95 % CI 0.61, 0.94), but not ACSC hospitalization. Dementia did not modify any observed associations. CONCLUSION: Living alone in later life did not increase hospitalization risk, and in this population may be a marker of healthy aging in the old-old.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11606-014-2904-z

  3 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24848492
[Au] Autor:Bidwell AJ; Fairchild TJ; Redmond J; Wang L; Keslacy S; Kanaley JA
[Ad] Address:1Department of Exercise Science, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY; 2Department of Health Promotion and Wellness, State University of New York at Oswego, Oswego, NY; 3School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA; 4Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA; and 5Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO.
[Ti] Title:Physical activity offsets the negative effects of a high-fructose diet.
[So] Source:Med Sci Sports Exerc;46(11):2091-8, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the interaction between a high-fructose diet and PA levels on postprandial lipidemia and inflammation in normal-weight, recreationally active individuals. METHODS: Twenty-two men and women (age, 21.2 ± 0.6 yr; body mass index, 22.5 ± 0.6 kg·m) consumed an additional 75 g of fructose for 14 d on two separate occasions: high physical activity (PA) (approximately 12,500 steps per day) (FR+active) and low PA (approximately 4500 steps per day) (FR+inactive). A fructose-rich test meal was given before and at the end of each intervention. Blood was sampled at baseline and for 6 h after the meal for triglycerides (TG), VLDL, total cholesterol, glucose, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, and C-reactive protein. RESULTS: Log-transformed TG area under the curve (AUC) significantly increased from before (10.1 ± 0.1 mg·dL × min for 6 h) to after (10.3 ± 0.08 mg·dL × min for 6 h, P = 0.04) the FR+inactive intervention, with an 88% increase in Δpeak TG (P = 0.009) and an 84% increase in Δpeak VLDL (P = 0.002). ΔPeak interleukin 6 also increased by 116% after the FR+inactive intervention (P = 0.009). Insulin total AUC significantly decreased after FR+active intervention (P = 0.04), with no change in AUC after the FR+inactive intervention. No changes were observed in glucose, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein concentrations (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Low PA during a period of high fructose intake augments fructose-induced postprandial lipidemia and inflammation, whereas high PA minimizes these fructose-induced metabolic disturbances. Even within a young healthy population, maintenance of high PA (>12,500 steps per day) decreases susceptibility to cardiovascular risk factors associated with elevated fructose consumption.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000343

  4 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24811326
[Au] Autor:Lyden K; Swibas T; Catenacci V; Guo R; Szuminsky N; Melanson EL
[Ad] Address:1Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; 3School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; and 4Necessity Consulting, Mars, PA.
[Ti] Title:Estimating energy expenditure using heat flux measured at a single body site.
[So] Source:Med Sci Sports Exerc;46(11):2159-67, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The Personal Calorie Monitor (PCM) is a portable direct calorimeter that estimates energy expenditure (EE) from measured heat flux (i.e., the sum of conductive, convective, radiative, and evaporative heat). PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to compare EE estimated from measures of heat flux with those measured using indirect calorimetry in a thermoneutral environment (26°C). A secondary aim was to determine whether exposure to ambient temperature below thermoneutral condition (19°C) influences the accuracy of the PCM. METHODS: Thirty-four adults (mean ± SD: age, 28 ± 5 yr; body mass index, 22.9 ± 2.6 kg·m) were studied for 5 h in a whole-room indirect calorimeter (IC) in thermoneutral and cool conditions. Participants wore the PCM on their upper arm and completed two 20-min treadmill walking bouts (0% grade, 3 mph). The remaining time was spent sedentary (e.g., watching television, using a computer). RESULTS: In thermoneutral conditions, EE values (mean (95% confidence interval)) measured by IC and PCM were 560.0 (526.5-593.5) and 623.3 (535.5-711.1) kcal, respectively. In cool conditions, EE values measured by IC and PCM were 572.5 (540.9-604.0) and 745.5 (668.1-822.8) kcal, respectively. Under thermoneutral conditions, mean PCM minute-by-minute EE tracked closely with IC, resulting in a small nonsignificant bias (63 kcal (-5.8 to 132.4)). During cool conditions, mean PCM minute-by-minute EE did not track IC, resulting in a large bias (173.0 kcal (93.9-252.1)) (P <; 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated the validity of using measured heat flux to estimate EE. However, accuracy may be impaired in cool conditions possibly because of excess heat loss from the exposed limbs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000346

  5 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24658222
[Au] Autor:Stabley JN; Moningka NC; Behnke BJ; Delp MD
[Ad] Address:1Center for Exercise Science, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; and 2Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
[Ti] Title:Exercise Training Augments Regional Bone and Marrow Blood Flow during Exercise.
[So] Source:Med Sci Sports Exerc;46(11):2107-12, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The principal nutrient artery to the femur demonstrates an increase in nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in rats after treadmill exercise training. The present study sought to determine whether exercise training improves hindlimb bone and marrow blood flow distribution at rest and during exercise. METHODS: Six 8-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exercise trained (ET) with treadmill walking at 15 m·min up a 15° incline for 60 min·d over a 10- to 12-wk period. Sedentary (SED) control animals were acclimated to treadmill exercise for 5 min·d during the week preceding the blood flow measurements. Blood flow to nine distinct regions of the femur, tibia, and fibula was determined at rest and during low-intensity exercise (15 m·min walking, 0° incline) using the reference sample microsphere method. RESULTS: The results demonstrate an augmentation of exercise hyperemia above that observed in SED rats during exercise in only one region of the bone, the femoral diaphysis, of ET rats. However, whereas exercise hyperemia occurred in three of the nine hindlimb bone regions measured in SED rats, exercise hyperemia occurred in seven of nine regions in ET rats. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate an increase in generalized hindlimb bone and marrow blood flow during physical activity after a period of exercise training. Elevations in regional bone and marrow blood flow after training may augment medullary pressure and bone interstitial fluid flow, thus benefiting bone integrity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000342

  6 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25304031
[Au] Autor:Meng D; Chen Y; Zhao Y; Wang J; Yun D; Yang S; Chen J; Chen H; Lu D
[Ti] Title:Expression and prognostic significance of TCTN1 in human glioblastoma.
[So] Source:J Transl Med;12(1):288, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1479-5876
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal intracranial malignancy in adults, with dismal prognosis despite multimodal therapies. Tectonic family member 1 (TCTN1) is a protein involved in a diverse range of developmental processes, yet its functions in GBM remain unclear. This study aims to investigate expression profile, prognostic value and effects of TCTN1 gene in GBM. METHODS: Protein levels of TCTN1 were assessed by immunohistochemical staining using a tissue microarray constructed by a Chinese cohort of GBM patients (n = 110), and its mRNA expression was also detected in a subset of this cohort. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression were performed to estimate the prognostic significance of TCTN1. Similar analyses were also conducted in another two independent cohorts: The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort (n = 528) and the Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) cohort (n = 228). For the TCGA cohort, the relationships between TCTN1 expression, clinical outcome, molecular subtypes and genetic alterations were also analysed. Furthermore, proliferation of TCTN1 overexpressed or silenced GBM cells was determined by CCK-8 assays. RESULTS: As discovered in three independent cohorts, both mRNA and protein levels of TCTN1 expression were markedly elevated in human GBMs, and higher TCTN1 expression served as an independent prognostic factor predicting poorer prognosis of GBM patients. Additionally, in the TCGA cohort, TCTN1 expression was dramatically decreased in patients within the proneural subtype compared to other subtypes, and significantly influenced by the status of several genetic aberrations such as CDKN2A/B deletion, EGFR amplification, PTEN deletion and TP53 mutation. The prognostic value of TCTN1 was more pronounced in proneural and mesenchymal subtypes, and was also affected by several genetic alterations particularly PTEN deletion. Furthermore, overexpression of TCTN1 significantly promoted proliferation of GBM cells, while its depletion evidently hampered cell growth. CONCLUSIONS: TCTN1 is elevated in human GBMs and predicts poor clinical outcome for GBM patients, which is associated with molecular subtypes and genetic features of GBMs. Additionally, TCTN1 expression impacts GBM cell proliferation. Our results suggest for the first time that TCTN1 may serve as a novel prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target for GBM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12967-014-0288-9

  7 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25292173
[Au] Autor:Zhang J; Shan WF; Jin TT; Wu GQ; Xiong XX; Jin HY; Zhu SM
[Ti] Title:Propofol exerts anti-hepatocellular carcinoma by microvesicle-mediated transfer of miR-142-3p from macrophage to cancer cells.
[So] Source:J Transl Med;12(1):279, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1479-5876
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: We previously confirmed that propofol directly inhibited the viability, proliferation, and invasiveness of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the anti-HCC effects of propofol. METHODS: In vivo antitumor activity was investigated in tumor-bearing mice following an intraperitoneal injection of propofol, with or without clodrolip. The co-culture system was used to verify that miR-142-3p was transported from macrophages to HCC cells. A miR-142-3p inhibitor was used to down-regulate the expression of miR-142-3p. RESULTS: Propofol drastically inhibited tumor growth in tomor-bearing mice through macrophage activation, and stimulated tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) to secrete microvesicles (MVs), which delivered miR-142-3p to HCC cells, resulting in the inhibition of HCC cell invasion. In addition, MVs collected from the plasma of the tumor-bearing mice injected with propofol suppressed tumor growth. More importantly, down-regulation of the expression miR-142-3p reversed the effect of propofol on HCC cell migration. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals a novel role for propofol in the inhibition of HCC through MV-mediated transfer of miR-142-3p from macrophages to cancer cells in vivo.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12967-014-0279-x

  8 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25296623
[Au] Autor:Ramon JM; Morchon S; Baena A; Masuet-Aumatell C
[Ad] Address:Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Smoking Cessation Clinic, Preventive Medicine Department, Bellvitge University Hospital, Feixa Llarga s/n 08907 Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. jmramon@ub.edu.
[Ti] Title:Combining varenicline and nicotine patches: a randomized controlled trial study in smoking cessation.
[So] Source:BMC Med;12(1):172, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1741-7015
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Some smokers may benefit from a therapy that combines different nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) or drugs with different mechanisms of action.The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of the combined therapy of varenicline and nicotine patches versus varenicline monotherapy. METHODS: Three hundred forty-one smokers who smoked 20 or more cigarettes per day were recruited from a smoking cessation clinic between February 2012 and June 2013. The participants were randomized to receive a varenicline plus nicotine patch of 21 mg every 24 hours (170) or varenicline plus a placebo patch (171). All of the smokers received a standard 12-week course of varenicline and an 11-week course of either the placebo patch or the active patch after the target quit day. Both groups received behavioral support. The primary outcome was continuous abstinence for weeks 2 through 12 confirmed by exhaled levels of carbon monoxide. Post hoc subgroup analyses were performed to evaluate the treatment effects for a specific endpoint in subgroups of smokers. RESULTS: The combination of the nicotine patch with varenicline was not associated with higher rates of continuous abstinence at 12 weeks (39.1% versus 31.8%; odds ratio (OR) 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 2.6) and 24 weeks (32.8% versus 28.2%; OR 1.17; 95% CI 0.4 to 1.9). When participants were analyzed by subgroups according to cigarette consumption, the abstinence rates among smokers who smoked more than 29 cigarettes per day at 12 weeks (OR 1.39; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.5) and 24 weeks (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.8) were significantly higher in the combination group. Other post hoc analyses based on level of dependence and previous quit attempts did not show subgroup differences. No differences between the groups for the reported adverse events were observed (χ2 value 0.07; P 0.79). CONCLUSIONS: The combination of varenicline with the nicotine patch does not improve abstinence rates at 12 and 24 weeks compared with varenicline used as monotherapy when all smokers were analyzed as a whole, independent of consumption level. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study is registered at clinicaltrial.gov (NCT01538394).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12916-014-0172-8

  9 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25288375
[Au] Autor:Lara J; Evans EH; O'Brien N; Moynihan PJ; Meyer TD; Adamson AJ; Errington L; Sniehotta FF; White M; Mathers JC
[Ad] Address:Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Biomedical Research Building, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, UK. jose.lara@newcastle.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Association of behaviour change techniques with effectiveness of dietary interventions among adults of retirement age: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.
[So] Source:BMC Med;12(1):177, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1741-7015
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is a need for development of more effective interventions to achieve healthy eating, enhance healthy ageing, and to reduce the risk of age-related diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) used in complex dietary behaviour change interventions and to explore the association between BCTs utilised and intervention effectiveness. METHODS: We undertook a secondary analysis of data from a previous systematic review with meta-analysis of the effectiveness of dietary interventions among people of retirement age. BCTs were identified using the reliable CALO-RE taxonomy in studies reporting fruit and vegetable (F and V) consumption as outcomes. The mean difference in F and V intake between active and control arms was compared between studies in which the BCTs were identified versus those not using the BCTs. Random-effects meta-regression models were used to assess the association of interventions BCTs with F and V intakes. RESULTS: Twenty-eight of the 40 BCTs listed in the CALO-RE taxonomy were identified in the 22 papers reviewed. Studies using the techniques 'barrier identification/problem solving' (93 g, 95% confidence interval (CI) 48 to 137 greater F and V intake), 'plan social support/social change' (78 g, 95%CI 24 to 132 greater F and V intake), 'goal setting (outcome)' (55 g 95%CI 7 to 103 greater F and V intake), 'use of follow-up prompts' (66 g, 95%CI 10 to 123 greater F and V intake) and 'provide feedback on performance' (39 g, 95%CI -2 to 81 greater F and V intake) were associated with greater effects of interventions on F and V consumption compared with studies not using these BCTs. The number of BCTs per study ranged from 2 to 16 (median = 6). Meta-regression showed that one additional BCT led to 8.3 g (95%CI 0.006 to 16.6 g) increase in F and V intake. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study has identified BCTs associated with effectiveness suggesting that these might be active ingredients of dietary interventions which will be effective in increasing F and V intake in older adults. For interventions targeting those in the peri-retirement age group, 'barrier identification/problem solving' and 'plan for social support/social change' may be particularly useful in increasing the effectiveness of dietary interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12916-014-0177-3

  10 / 1856217 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25252963
[Au] Autor:Wang X; Chen H; Ouyang Y; Liu J; Zhao G; Bao W; Yan M
[Ti] Title:Dietary calcium intake and mortality risk from cardiovascular disease and all causes: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
[So] Source:BMC Med;12(1):158, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1741-7015
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Considerable controversy exists regarding the association between dietary calcium intake and risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease and all causes. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to examine the controversy. METHODS: We identified relevant studies by searching MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases between 1 September 2013 and 30 December 2013. Reference lists of relevant articles were also reviewed. Observational prospective studies that reported relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for the association of calcium intake with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were eligible. Study-specific relative risks were pooled using a random-effects model. RESULTS: In this meta-analysis, 11 prospective studies with 12 independent cohorts, involving 757,304 participants, were eligible. There was evidence of a non-linear association between dietary calcium intake and risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease (P for non-linearity <0.01) and all causes (P for non-linearity <0.01). A dose-response analysis showed a U-shaped relationship between dietary calcium intake and cardiovascular mortality. Intakes that were lower and higher than around 800 mg/day were gradually associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality. For all-cause mortality, we also observed a threshold effect at intakes around 900 mg/day. The risk of all-cause mortality did not decrease further at intakes above 900 mg/day. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies suggests that dietary calcium intake is associated with cardiovascular mortality in a U-shaped manner and that high dietary calcium intake (>900 mg/day) is not associated with a decreased risk of all-cause mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12916-014-0158-6


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