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[PMID]: 24560040
[Au] Autor:Wanke C; Geworski L
[Ad] Address:Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Stabsstelle Strahlenschutz und Abteilung Medizinische Physik - OE 0020, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, D-30625 Hannover. Electronic address: wanke.carsten@mh-hannover.de.
[Ti] Title:Konservative Kalibrierung eines Freimesssystems für Reststoffe aus dem nuklearmedizinischen Betrieb. [Conservative calibration of a clearance monitor system for waste material from nuclear medicine].
[So] Source:Z Med Phys;24(3):252-60, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1876-4436
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Clearance monitor systems are used for gross gamma measurements of waste potentially contaminated with radioactivity. These measurements are to make sure that legal requirements, e.g. clearance criteria according to the german radiation protection ordinance, are met. This means that measurement results may overestimate, but must not underestimate the true values. This paper describes a pragmatic way using a calibrated Cs-137 point source to generate a conservative calibration for the clearance monitor system used in the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (MHH). The most important nuclides used in nuclear medicine are considered. The measurement result reliably overestimates the true value of the activity present in the waste. The calibration is compliant with the demands for conservativity and traceability to national standards.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 25037626
[Au] Autor:Hakenberg OW; Schroeder A
[Ad] Address:Klinik und Poliklinik für Urologie, Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Schillingallee 35, 18057, Rostock, Deutschland, oliver.hakenberg@med.uni-rostock.de.
[Ti] Title:Qualitätssicherung, Zertifizierung und das neue Institut für Qualität in der Medizin. [Quality assurance, certification and the new Institute for Quality in Medicine].
[So] Source:Urologe A;53(8):1150-5, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0563
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:The political partners of the new coalition federal government in Germany have agreed on the founding of a new Institute for Quality in Medicine based on a law regulating more transparency in the quality assessment of hospitals. How can such an institute find its place in the already existing diverse landscape of quality control and quality management in the German health care system?
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00120-014-3540-2

  3 / 1839930 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24563421
[Au] Autor:Würstlein R; Degenhardt F; Duda V; Madjar H; Merz E; Mundinger A; Ohlinger R; Peisker U; Schulz-Wendtland R; Warm M; Hahn M
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Munich....
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of the Nationwide DEGUM Breast Ultrasound Training Program.
[So] Source:Ultraschall Med;35(4):345-9, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8782
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality standard of the nationwide breast ultrasound training program of the German Society of Ultrasound in Medicine (DEGUM) through objective parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 10 quality criteria, based on the recommendations of The National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (KBV), were defined for this study. All training units of the DEGUM received a questionnaire. The questionnaires and training material were analyzed. RESULTS: All units met the required criteria pertaining to the trainer's qualification, duration per training course and the maximum number of participants per ultrasound machine. Only 1 course did not fulfill the required 50 % practical training time. The requirements to participate in the graduate course (200 self-made and documented cases) were not clearly conceived and a defined training log could be improved. CONCLUSION: DEGUM breast ultrasound training offers trainees a high level of education based on the requirements of the KBV. Despite the high quality of training, the content of course announcements could be improved and an official and structured educational index could be meaningful.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0034-1366088

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[PMID]: 25128503
[Au] Autor:Russell S
[Ad] Address:Education and Research Department, Hospice of St Francis, Hertfordshire, UK Education and Research Department, Peace Hospice Care, Hertfordshire, UK CRIPACC, University of Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire, UK sarah.russell@stfrancis.org.uk.
[Ti] Title:Advance care planning: Whose agenda is it anyway?
[So] Source:Palliat Med;28(8):997-9, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1477-030X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0269216314543426

  5 / 1839930 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25037604
[Ti] Title:Corrigenda.
[So] Source:Palliat Med;28(8):1071, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1477-030X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:THE USE OF APREPITANT IN A CASE OF REFRACTORY NAUSEA AND VOMITING: Lowery L, Andrew I, Gill S, et al. The use of aprepitant in a case of refractory nausea and vomiting. Palliat Med 2014; 28(7): 990-991. DOI: 10.1177/0269216314530180. The wrong version of this article was exported for typesetting and subsequently published. The correct version of this article is reproduced on the following pages and replaces that published. The authors and editorial manager apologise for the error and any confusion caused.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0269216314542193

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[PMID]: 24951633
[Au] Autor:Slort W; Blankenstein AH; Schweitzer BP; Knol DL; van der Horst HE; Aaronson NK; Deliens L
[Ad] Address:Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, EMGO + Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands slortentan@planet.nl w.slort@vumc.nl....
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of the palliative care 'Availability, Current issues and Anticipation' (ACA) communication training programme for general practitioners on patient outcomes: A controlled trial.
[So] Source:Palliat Med;28(8):1036-45, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1477-030X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Although communicating effectively with patients receiving palliative care can be difficult, it may contribute to maintaining or enhancing patients' quality of life. Little is known about the effect of training general practitioners in palliative care-specific communication. We hypothesized that palliative care patients of general practitioners exposed to the 'Availability, Current issues and Anticipation' communication training programme would report better outcomes than patients of control general practitioners. AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Availability, Current issues and Anticipation training programme for general practitioners on patient-reported outcomes. DESIGN: In a controlled trial, general practitioners followed the Availability, Current issues and Anticipation programme or were part of the control group. Patients receiving palliative care of participating general practitioners completed the Palliative Care Outcome Scale, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 Palliative, the Rest & Peace Scale, the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-III and the Availability, Current issues and Anticipation Scale, at baseline and 12 months follow-up. We analysed differences between groups using linear mixed models. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN56722368. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: General practitioners who attended a 2-year Palliative Care Training Course in the Netherlands. RESULTS: Questionnaire data were available for 145 patients (89 in intervention and 56 in control group). We found no significant differences over time between the intervention and control groups in any of the five outcome measures. Ceiling effects were observed for the Rest & Peace Scale, Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-III and Availability, Current issues and Anticipation Scale. CONCLUSION: General practitioner participation in the Availability, Current issues and Anticipation training programme did not have a measurable effect on any of the outcomes investigated. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with general practitioner care, regardless of group assignment. Future research might focus on general practitioners without special interest in palliative care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0269216314538302

  7 / 1839930 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24854032
[Au] Autor:O'Callaghan A; Laking G; Frey R; Robinson J; Gott M
[Ad] Address:Palliative Care, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand anneo@adhb.govt.nz....
[Ti] Title:Can we predict which hospitalised patients are in their last year of life? A prospective cross-sectional study of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance as a screening tool in the acute hospital setting.
[So] Source:Palliat Med;28(8):1046-52, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1477-030X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Screening to identify hospital inpatients with a short life expectancy may be a way to improve care towards the end of life. The Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance is a screening tool that has recently been advocated for use in the hospital setting. AIM: To assess the clinical utility of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance as a screening tool in an acute hospital setting. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality at 6 and 12 months and sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance at 1 year. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cross-sectional study of 501 adult inpatients in a tertiary New Zealand teaching hospital screened utilising the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance. RESULTS: A total of 99 patients were identified as meeting at least one of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance triggers. In this group, 6-month mortality was 56.6% and 12-month mortality was 67.7% compared with 5.2% and 10%, respectively, for those not identified as meeting the criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance at 1 year were 62.6% and 91.9%, respectively, with a positive predictive value of 67.7% and a negative predictive value of 90.0%. CONCLUSION: The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance in this study are comparable to, or better than, results of studies identifying patients with a limited life expectancy in particular disease states (e.g. heart failure and renal failure). Screening utilising the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance in the acute setting could be the first step towards implementing a more systematic way of addressing patient need - both current unrecognised and future anticipated - thereby improving outcomes for this population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0269216314536089

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[PMID]: 24827834
[Au] Autor:Karlekar M; Collier B; Parish A; Olson L; Elasy T
[Ad] Address:Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA mohana.b.karlekar@vanderbilt.edu....
[Ti] Title:Utilization and determinants of palliative care in the trauma intensive care unit: Results of a national survey.
[So] Source:Palliat Med;28(8):1062-8, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1477-030X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of data evaluating utilization of palliative care in trauma intensive care units. AIM: We sought to determine current indications and determinants of palliative care consultation in the trauma intensive care units. DESIGN: Using a cross-sectional assessment, we surveyed trauma surgeons to understand indications, benefits, and barriers trauma surgeons perceive when consulting palliative care. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1232 surveys were emailed to all members of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. RESULTS: A total of 362 providers responded (29% response rate). Majority of respondents were male (n = 287, 80.2%) and practiced in Level 1 (n = 278, 77.7%) trauma centers. Most common indicators for referral to palliative care were expected survival 1 week to 1 month, multisystem organ dysfunction >3 weeks, minimal neurologic responsiveness >1 week, and referral to hospice. In post hoc analysis, there was a significant difference in frequency of utilization of palliative care when respondents had access to board-certified palliative care physicians (χ (2) = 56.4, p < 0.001). Although half of the respondents (n = 199, 55.6%) reported palliative care consults beneficial all or most of the time, nearly still half (n = 174, 48.6%) felt palliative care was underutilized. Most frequent barriers to consultation included resistance from families (n = 144, 40.2%), concerns that physicians were "giving up" (n = 109, 30.4%), and miscommunication of prognosis (n = 98, 27.4%) or diagnosis (n = 58, 16.2%) by the palliative care physician. CONCLUSION: Although a plurality of trauma surgeons reported palliative care beneficial, those surveyed indicate that palliative care is underutilized. Barriers identified provide important opportunities to further appropriate utilization of palliative care services.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0269216314534514

  9 / 1839930 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24821707
[Au] Autor:Burge AT
[Ad] Address:Physiotherapy Department, The Alfred, Prahran, VIC, Australia a.burge@alfred.org.au.
[Ti] Title:Advance care planning education in pulmonary rehabilitation: A qualitative study exploring participant perspectives.
[So] Source:Palliat Med;28(8):1069-70, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1477-030X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0269216314532702

  10 / 1839930 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24815004
[Au] Autor:Miller S; Dorman S
[Ad] Address:Macmillan Unit, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, UK Sarah.miller@rbch.nhs.uk.
[Ti] Title:Resuscitation decisions for patients dying in the community: A qualitative interview study of general practitioner perspectives.
[So] Source:Palliat Med;28(8):1053-61, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1477-030X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Most patients dying at home do not have a Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation decision and may have inappropriate attempts at resuscitation made when they die. AIM: To investigate how general practitioners think and feel about making and communicating Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation decisions for patients dying in the community. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with general practitioners. The interviews were recorded and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sampling was used to recruit 10 general practitioners from urban and rural practices in Southern England and of various ages and experience. Interviews were carried out either in their home or in their practice. RESULTS: General practitioners often wait until the patient has clearly deteriorated to communicate and document the Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation decision. They consider the chance of success of a resuscitation attempt, quality of life, dignity and the patient's and family's wishes. General practitioners feel they should discuss the decision with the patient but have anxieties about this. They vary widely in how much they guide patients and families in decision-making. Timing and the avoidance of conflict are important. Teamwork provides support in decision-making. CONCLUSION: Resuscitation decisions are important in facilitating a peaceful death, but can be difficult for general practitioners to discuss. General practitioners might benefit from clearer guidance on when an attempt at resuscitation is unlikely to be successful, especially in non-malignant disease. Team discussions including Gold Standards Framework meetings can give confidence and support in making difficult end-of-life decisions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0269216314531521


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