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[PMID]: 25596575
[Au] Autor:Escobedo AA; Arencibia R; Vega RL; Rodriguez-Morales AJ; Almirall P; Alfonso M
[Ad] Address:Academic Paediatric Hospital "Pedro Borrás", Havana, Cuba. escobedo@infomed.sld.cu.
[Ti] Title:A bibliometric study of international scientific productivity in giardiasis covering the period 1971-2010.
[So] Source:J Infect Dev Ctries;9(1):76-86, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1972-2680
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Despite years of relative neglect, interest in Giardia infection seems to be recently growing, perhaps in part due to its inclusion into the World Health Organization's Neglected Diseases Initiative since 2004. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of Giardia and giardiasis research over time, as represented by the quantity of published papers. METHODOLOGY: Data for this study were collected from the electronic PubMed/Medline database of National Library of Medicine's (NLM), due to it is easily accessibility and wide use. It was accessed online between April and December 2011. Data for the period 1971-2010 were obtained and information was downloaded using the EndNote program developed by Thomson Reuters. RESULTS: During the study period, a total of 6,964 references (articles, reviews, editorials, letter to the editor, etc.) covering different aspects of Giardia and giardiasis were located in the PubMed database after applying the search strategy reported above. Most papers were original articles and published in English. CONCLUSIONS: In this first effort to explore the development and research productivity on giardiasis over time (no previously published bibliometric studies on giardiasis exist), two interesting characteristics of the Giardia and giardiasis literature were discovered: the concentration of papers over journals disseminating the research results, and that research in this field is growing and will likely continue to grow in the coming years.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3855/jidc.5785

  2 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25596567
[Au] Autor:Moreno Cea L; Fernández Espinilla V; Ruíz López Del Prado G; Hernán García C; Cepeda Casado J; Polo Polo MJ; Delgado Márquez A; Andrés García I
[Ad] Address:Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, Spain. lurcea@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Developing countries: health round-trip.
[So] Source:J Infect Dev Ctries;9(1):20-8, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1972-2680
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:International travel can pose various risks to health, depending both on the health needs of the traveller and on the type of travel to be undertaken. Travellers intending to visit a destination in a developing country should consult a travel medicine clinic or medical practitioner before the journey. General precautions can greatly reduce the risk of exposure to infectious agents. Vaccination is a highly effective method of preventing certain infectious diseases. The aim of this study is to know the risks involved and the best way to prevent them.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3855/jidc.4645

  3 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25557881
[Au] Autor:Schneiderman JU; Kools S; Negriff S; Smith S; Trickett PK
[Ad] Address:School of Social Work, University of Southern California, 669 West 34th Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90089.
[Ti] Title:Differences in caregiver-reported health problems and health care use in maltreated adolescents and a comparison group from the same urban environment.
[So] Source:Res Nurs Health;38(1):60-70, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-240X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Maltreated youth have a high prevalence of acute and chronic mental and physical health problems, but it is not clear whether these problems are related to maltreatment or to a disadvantaged environment. To compare health status and health care use of maltreated youth who had an open case with child protective services to comparison youth living in the same community, we conducted a secondary analysis of caregiver reports for 207 maltreated adolescents (mean age 11.9 years) and 142 comparison adolescents (mean age 12.3 years) living in urban Los Angeles, using questionnaire data from a larger longitudinal study framed in a socio-ecological model. Caregivers included biological parents, relatives, and unrelated caregivers. Analyses included t-test, MANOVA, chi-square, and multivariable logistic regression. Caregivers reported similar rates of physical health problems but more mental health problems and psychotropic medicine use in maltreated youth than in the comparison youth, suggesting that maltreated youths' higher rates of mental health problems could not be attributed to the disadvantaged environment. Although there were no differences in health insurance coverage, maltreated youth received preventive medical care more often than comparison youth. For all youth, having Medicaid improved their odds of receiving preventive health and dental care. Attention to mental health issues in maltreated adolescents remains important. Acceptance of Medicaid by neighborhood-based and/or school-based services in low-income communities may reduce barriers to preventive care. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM; N
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/nur.21634

  4 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24988411
[Au] Autor:Jefferis BJ; Sartini C; Ash S; Lennon LT; Wannamethee SG; Lee IM; Whincup PH
[Ad] Address:1Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London Medical School, Rowland Hill Street, London, UNITED KINGDOM; 2Physical Activity Research Group, University College London, London, UNITED KINGDOM; 3Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and 4Population Health Research Institute, St. George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, UNITED KINGDOM.
[Ti] Title:Trajectories of objectively measured physical activity in free-living older men.
[So] Source:Med Sci Sports Exerc;47(2):343-9, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The steep decline in physical activity (PA) among the oldest old is not well understood; there is little information about the patterns of change in PA and sedentary behaviour (SB) in older people. Longitudinal data on objectively measured PA data can give insights about how PA and SB change with age. METHODS: Men age 70-90 yr, from a United Kingdom population-based cohort wore a GT3X accelerometer over the hip annually on up to three occasions (56%, 50%, and 51% response rates) spanning 2 yr. Multilevel models were used to estimate change in activity. Men were grouped according to achieving ≥150 min·wk of MVPA in bouts of ≥10 min (current guidelines) at two or three time points. RESULTS: A total of 1419 ambulatory men had ≥600 min wear time on ≥3 d at ≥2 time points. At baseline, men took 4806 steps per day and spent 72.5% of their day in SB, 23.1% in light PA, and 4.1% in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Mean change per year was -341 steps, +1.1% SB, -0.7% light PA, and -0.4% MVPA each day (all P < 0.001). A total of 76.3% (n = 1083) never met guidelines ("stable low"), 7.9% (n = 112) consistently met guidelines ("stable high"), 8.2% (n = 116) stopped meeting guidelines by the last occasion ("decreasers"), and 4.9% (n = 69) started meeting guidelines by the last occasion ("increasers"). "Decreasers" spent 69.3% of each day in SB at baseline, which increased by 2% per year (P < 0.005), light activity remained at 23.3% (change, -0.2% per year; P = 0.4), and total MVPA decreased from 7.1% by -1.7% per year, (P < 0.001). The number of sedentary bouts >30 min increased from 5.1 by 0.1 per year (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Among older adults, the steep decline in total PA occurred because of reductions in MVPA, while light PA is relatively spared and sedentary time and long sedentary bouts increase.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000410

  5 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24983337
[Au] Autor:Xing J; Lu J; Li J
[Ad] Address:1Department of Emergency Medicine, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun, CHINA; and 2Heart & Vascular Institute and Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.
[Ti] Title:ASIC3 Contributes to the Blunted Muscle Metaboreflex in Heart Failure.
[So] Source:Med Sci Sports Exerc;47(2):257-63, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: During exercise, the sympathetic nervous system is activated and blood pressure and HR increase. In heart failure (HF), the muscle metaboreceptor contribution to sympathetic outflow is attenuated and the mechanoreceptor contribution is accentuated. Previous studies suggest that lactic acid stimulates acid-sensing channel subtype 3 (ASIC3), inducing a neurally mediated pressor response. Thus, we hypothesized that the pressor response to ASIC3 stimulation is smaller in HF rats because of attenuation in expression and function of ASIC3 in sensory nerves. METHODS: Lactic acid was injected into the arterial blood supply of the hind limb to stimulate ASIC3 in muscle afferent nerves and evoke muscle metaboreceptor response in control rats and HF rats. In addition, western blot analysis was used to examine expression of ASIC3 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and patch clamp to examine current response with ASIC3 activation. RESULTS: Lactic acid (4 µmol·kg) increased mean arterial pressure by 28 ± 5 mm Hg in controls (n = 6) but only by 16 ± 3 mm Hg (P < 0.05 vs control) in HF (n = 8). In addition, HF decreased the protein levels of ASIC3 in DRG (optical density, 1.03 ± 0.02 in control, vs 0.79 ± 0.03 in HF; P < 0.05; n = 6 in each group). The peak current amplitude of dorsal DRG neuron in response to ASIC3 stimulation is smaller in HF rats than that in control rats. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with those in controls, cardiovascular responses to lactic acid administered into the hind limb muscles are blunted in HF rats owing to attenuated ASIC3. This suggests that ASIC3 plays a role in engagement in the attenuated metaboreceptor component of the exercise pressor reflex in HF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000415

  6 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24914519
[Au] Autor:Dugan SA; Bromberger JT; Segawa E; Avery E; Sternfeld B
[Ad] Address:1Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; 3Departments of Epidemiology and Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; and 4Department of Research Science, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA.
[Ti] Title:Association between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms: Midlife Women in SWAN.
[So] Source:Med Sci Sports Exerc;47(2):335-42, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The relation of physical activity (PA) and positive mood has been the focus of considerable research, which were primarily cross-sectional. This study was done to evaluate the relation between PA and high depressive symptoms across time and to examine whether being physically active attenuates the risk of depressive symptoms in midlife women. METHODS: The present study is a longitudinal observational study on the menopausal transition in a multiethnic population. Ten years of data on 2891 women were analyzed. The participants were women from seven geographic areas nationwide, age 42-52 yr at baseline, still menstruating, and not using exogenous reproductive hormones. PA was measured with the Kaiser Permanente Physical Activity Scale. The main outcome measure, depressive symptoms, was assessed with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), with primary outcome of CES-D score of 16 or higher. RESULTS: In mixed effect logistic regression models adjusted for covariates, compared with inactivity, PA meeting PA guidelines (approximating public health guidelines) and PA below PA guidelines were each associated with lower risk of high depressive symptoms (CES-D score of 16 or higher) (odds ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.70; and odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.98, respectively] across 10 yr. Being married, Japanese and Hispanic ethnicity, current smoking, reporting very upsetting life events, using antidepressive medications, having hot flashes, and high body mass index were all positively associated with high depressive symptoms, whereas high social support was negatively associated. CONCLUSIONS: Higher PA was associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms persistently over 10 yr, independent of potential confounders. Our findings suggest that reaching moderate-intensity PA levels during midlife may be protective against depressive symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000407

  7 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24870584
[Au] Autor:Whitfield GP; Kohrt WM; Pettee Gabriel KK; Rahbar MH; Kohl HW
[Ad] Address:1Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin, TX; 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; 3Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX; and 4Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
[Ti] Title:Bone Mineral Density across a Range of Physical Activity Volumes: NHANES 2007-2010.
[So] Source:Med Sci Sports Exerc;47(2):326-34, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The association between aerobic physical activity volume and bone mineral density (BMD) is not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to clarify the association between BMD and aerobic activity across a broad range of activity volumes, particularly volumes between those recommended in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans and those of trained endurance athletes. METHODS: Data from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used to quantify the association between reported physical activity and BMD at the lumbar spine and proximal femur across the entire range of activity volumes reported by US adults. Participants were categorized into multiples of the minimum guideline-recommended volume based on reported moderate- and vigorous-intensity leisure activity. Lumbar and proximal femur BMD were assessed with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: Among women, multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses revealed no significant differences in lumbar BMD across activity categories, whereas proximal femur BMD was significantly higher among those who exceeded the guidelines by 2-4 times than those who reported no activity. Among men, multivariable-adjusted BMD at both sites neared its highest values among those who exceeded the guidelines by at least 4 times and was not progressively higher with additional activity. Logistic regression estimating the odds of low BMD generally echoed the linear regression results. CONCLUSIONS: The association between physical activity volume and BMD is complex. Among women, exceeding guidelines by 2-4 times may be important for maximizing BMD at the proximal femur, whereas among men, exceeding guidelines by ≥4 times may be beneficial for lumbar and proximal femur BMD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000400

  8 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24750266
[Au] Autor:Gore RB; Boyle RJ; Gore C; Custovic A; Hanna H; Svensson P; Warner JO
[Ad] Address:Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University Hospitals of South Manchester, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; East and North Herts NHS Trust, Stevenage, UK.
[Ti] Title:Effect of a novel temperature-controlled laminar airflow device on personal breathing zone aeroallergen exposure.
[So] Source:Indoor Air;25(1):36-44, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0668
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Temperature-controlled laminar airflow improves symptoms in atopic asthmatics, but its effects on personal allergen exposure are unknown. We aimed to evaluate its effects on personal cat allergen and particulate exposures in a simulated bedroom environment. Five healthy volunteers lay under an active and an inactive temperature-controlled laminar airflow device for 175 min, in a simulated bedroom containing bedding from a cat owner. Total airborne particles (≥0.5 - ≥10 µm diameter) were quantified with a laser particle counter. Airborne allergen was sampled with Institute of Occupational Medicine filters. Inhaled exposure was sampled with nasal air samplers. Allergen-containing particles were quantified by immunoassay. Treatment reduced total airborne particles (>0.5 µm diameter) by >99% (P < 0.001) and reduced airborne allergen concentration within the breathing zone (ratio of median counts = 30, P = 0.043). Treatment reduced inhaled allergen (ratio of median counts = 7, P = 0.043). Treatment was not associated with a change in airborne allergen concentration outside of the breathing zone (P = 0.160). Temperature-controlled laminar airflow treatment of individuals in an allergen-rich experimental environment results in significant reductions in breathing zone allergenic and non-allergenic particle exposure, and in inhaled cat allergen exposure. These findings may explain the clinical benefits of temperature-controlled laminar airflow.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/ina.12122

  9 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25592457
[Au] Autor:Church CC; Labuda C; Nightingale K
[Ad] Address:National Center for Physical Acoustics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi, USA. Electronic address: cchurch@olemiss.edu.
[Ti] Title:A theoretical study of inertial cavitation from acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and implications for the mechanical index.
[So] Source:Ultrasound Med Biol;41(2):472-85, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-291X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The mechanical index (MI) attempts to quantify the likelihood that exposure to diagnostic ultrasound will produce an adverse biological effect by a non-thermal mechanism. The current formulation of the MI implicitly assumes that the acoustic field is generated using the short pulse durations appropriate to B-mode imaging. However, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging employs high-intensity pulses up to several hundred acoustic periods long. The effect of increased pulse durations on the thresholds for inertial cavitation was studied computationally in water, urine, blood, cardiac and skeletal muscle, brain, kidney, liver and skin. The results indicate that, although the effect of pulse duration on cavitation thresholds in the three liquids can be considerable, reducing them by, for example, 6%-24% at 1 MHz, the effect on tissue is minor. More importantly, the frequency dependence of the MI appears to be unnecessarily conservative; that is, the magnitude of the exponent on frequency could be increased to 0.75. Comparison of these theoretical results with experimental measurements suggests that some tissues do not contain the pre-existing, optimally sized bubbles assumed for the MI. This means that in these tissues, the MI is not necessarily a strong predictor of the probability of an adverse biological effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 1856169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25589884
[Au] Autor:Agyapong J; Chabi J; Ablorde A; Kartey WD; Osei JH; de Souza DK; Dadzie S; Boakye DA; Ohta N; Hadi MP; Suzuki T
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana , Legon LG 581, Ghana....
[Ti] Title:Ovipositional Behavior of Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes.
[So] Source:Trop Med Health;42(4):187-90, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1348-8945
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mosquito eggs laid within two hours are necessary for transgenic (injection) studies, because mosquito eggs become hard after that period. Thus, in order to have eggs available within this two-hour window, it is important to understand the ovipositional behavior of Anopheles gambiae s.s.. In the present study, the ovipositional behavior of An. gambiae s.s. (Kisumu) was investigated in several different conditions: age of mosquitoes, time post blood meal to access oviposition substrate, and light conditions. Two groups of mosquitoes, 3-5 days old and 9-11 days old were blood-fed. For those mosquito groups, an oviposition dish was set either at 48 hours or 72 hours after the blood meal either in a light condition or in an artificial dark condition. The number of laid eggs was compared among the different conditions. The 3-5 day-old mosquitoes apparently produced a higher number of eggs than 9-11 day-old mosquitoes, while there was no significant difference between the two groups. The number of laid eggs per one surviving blood-fed mosquito in the dark condition was significantly higher than that in the light condition (p = 0.03). Providing an oviposition dish at 72 hours after blood meal resulted in a significantly higher number of laid eggs per one surviving blood-fed mosquito than at 48 hours after blood meal (p = 0.03). In conclusion, the optimal condition to have readily available egg supply for transgenic analysis was as follows: 3-5 day-old mosquitoes with an oviposition dish placed at 72 hours after the blood meal in a dark environment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2149/tmh.2014-13


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