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[PMID]: 27288998
[Au] Autor:Hawkes D; Dunlop RA; Benhamu J
[Ad] Address:Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Victorian Cytology Service, Carlton, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: dhawkes@unimelb.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Calls by alternative medicine practitioners for vaccinated vs unvaccinated studies is not supported by evidence.
[So] Source:Vaccine;34(28):3223-4, 2016 Jun 14.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27181383
[Au] Autor:Valsangkar NP; Kays JK; Feliciano DV; Martin PJ; Parett JS; Joshi MM; Zimmers TA; Koniaris LG
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN....
[Ti] Title:The impact of members of the Society of University Surgeons on the scholarship of American surgery.
[So] Source:Surgery;160(1):47-53, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1532-7361
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A core objective of the Society of University Surgeons (SUS) is research focused: to "advance the art and science of surgery through original investigation." This study sought to determine the current impact of the SUS on academic surgical productivity. METHODS: Individual faculty data for numbers of publications, citations, and National Institute of Health (NIH) funding history were collected for 4,015 surgical faculty at the top 55 NIH-funded departments of surgery using SCOPUS and the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools. SUS membership was determined from membership registry data. RESULTS: Overall, 502 surgical faculty (12.5%) were SUS members with 92.7% holding positions of associate or full professor (versus 59% of nonmembers). Median publications (P) and citations (C) among SUS members were P: 112, C: 2,460 versus P: 29, C: 467 for nonmembers (P < .001). Academic productivity was considerably higher by rank for SUS members than for nonmembers: associate professors (P: 61 vs 36, C: 1,199 vs 591, P < .001) and full professors (P: 141 vs 81, C: 3,537 vs 1,856, P < .001). Among full professors, SUS members had much higher rates of NIH funding than did nonmembers (52.6% vs 26%, P < .05) and specifically for R01, P01, and U01 awards (37% vs 17.7%, P < .01). SUS members were 2 times more likely to serve in divisional leadership or chair positions (23.5% vs 10.2%, P < .05). CONCLUSION: SUS society members are a highly productive academic group. These data support the premise that the SUS is meeting its research mission and identify its members as very academically productive contributors to research and scholarship in American surgery and medicine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26921679
[Au] Autor:Barton M
[Ad] Address:Molecular Internal Medicine, University of Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: barton@access.uzh.ch.
[Ti] Title:Not lost in translation: Emerging clinical importance of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER.
[So] Source:Steroids;111:37-45, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5867
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:It has been 20years that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) was cloned as the orphan receptor GPR30 from multiple cellular sources, including vascular endothelial cells. Here, I will provide an overview of estrogen biology and the historical background leading to the discovery of rapid vascular estrogen signaling. I will also review the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying GPER function, its role in physiology and disease, some of the currently available GPER-targeting drugs approved for clinical use such as SERMs (selective estrogen receptor modulators) and SERDs (selective estrogen receptor downregulators). Many of currently used drugs such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, or faslodex™/fulvestrant were discovered targeting GPER many years after they had been introduced to the clinics for entirely different purposes. This has important implications for the clinical use of these drugs and their modes of action, which I have termed 'reverse translational medicine'. In addition, environmental pollutants known as 'endocrine disruptors' have been found to bind to GPER. This article also discusses recent evidence in these areas as well as opportunities in translational clinical medicine and GPER research, including medical genetics, personalized medicine, prevention, and its theranostic use.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27021165
[Au] Autor:Cretoiu D; Cretoiu SM
[Ad] Address:Victor BabeÈ™ National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, 050096, Romania; Division of Cell Biology and Histology, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, 050474, Romania.
[Ti] Title:Telocytes in the reproductive organs: Current understanding and future challenges.
[So] Source:Semin Cell Dev Biol;55:40-9, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1096-3634
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Over the past decades, we were witnessing spectacular molecular medicine advances. However, many of the reproductive medicine problems, such as fertility issues and premature birth still represent major challenges for obstetrics and gynecology worldwide. A new cell population - the telocytes (TCs) - were described in the interstitial space of many organs, and their possible implications in many important physiological and pathological processes should not be overlooked. In this article, we present a historical perspective outlining the landmarks in the discovery, evolution and achievements in the field of TCs over the last ten years. We focused on the potential roles of TCs in morphogenesis and maintenance of the normal three-dimensional architecture of tissues, in controlling of the stem cell microenvironment, as having anti-inflammatory and cancer-suppressing properties, participating in the immune surveillance, all mediated by direct homo- and heterocellular junctions or indirectly by extracellular vesicle release. Here, we overview the advances on TCs research in the reproductive organs (uterus and fallopian tube), accessory reproductive organs of female (mammary glands) and the temporary endocrine organ-placenta.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27013113
[Au] Autor:Edelstein L; Fuxe K; Levin M; Popescu BO; Smythies J
[Ad] Address:P.O. Box 2316, Del Mar, CA, USA. Electronic address: larry.edelstein@medimark.com....
[Ti] Title:Telocytes in their context with other intercellular communication agents.
[So] Source:Semin Cell Dev Biol;55:9-13, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1096-3634
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The past decade has borne witness to an explosion in our understanding of the fundamental complexities of intercellular communication. Previously, the field was solely defined by the simple exchange of endocrine, autocrine and epicrine agents. Then it was discovered that cells possess an elaborate system of extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, which carry a vast array of small and large molecules (including many epigenetic agents such as a variety RNAs and DNA), as well as large organelles that modulate almost every aspect of cellular function. In addition, it was thought that electrical communication between cells was limited mainly to neurotransmitters and neuromodulators in the nervous system. Also within the past decade, it was found that - in addition to neurons - most cells (both mammalian and non-mammalian) communicate via elaborate bioelectric systems which modulate many fundamental cellular processes including growth, differentiation, morphogenesis and repair. In the nervous system, volume transmission via the extracellular matrix has been added to the list. Lastly, it was discovered that what had previously been regarded as simple connective cells in most tissues proved to be miniature communication devices now known as telocytes. These unusually long, tenuous and sinuous cells utilize elaborate electrical, chemical and epigenetic mechanisms, including the exchange of exosomes, to integrate many activities within and between nearly all types of cells in tissues and organs. Their interrelationship with neural stem cells and neurogenesis in the context of neurodegenerative disease is just beginning to be explored. This review presents an account of precisely how each of these varied mechanisms are relevant and critical to the understanding of what telocytes are and how they function.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26826525
[Au] Autor:Bei Y; Zhou Q; Sun Q; Xiao J
[Ad] Address:Regeneration and Aging Lab, Experimental Center of Life Sciences, School of Life Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Bio-Energy Crops, School of Life Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China....
[Ti] Title:Telocytes in cardiac regeneration and repair.
[So] Source:Semin Cell Dev Biol;55:14-21, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1096-3634
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Telocytes (TCs) are a novel type of stromal cells reported by Popescu's group in 2010. The unique feature that distinguishes TCs from other "classical" stromal cells is their extremely long and thin telopodes (Tps). As evidenced by electron microscopy, TCs are widely distributed in almost all tissues and organs. TCs contribute to form a three-dimensional interstitial network and play as active regulators in intercellular communication via homocellular/heterocellular junctions or shed vesicles. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests the potential role of TCs in regenerative medicine. Although the heart retains some limited endogenous regenerative capacity, cardiac regenerative and repair response is however insufficient to make up the loss of cardiomyocytes upon injury. Developing novel strategies to increase cardiomyocyte renewal and repair is of great importance for the treatment of cardiac diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of TCs in cardiac regeneration and repair. We particularly describe the intercellular communication between TCs and cardiomyocytes, stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Also, we discuss the current knowledge about TCs in cardiac repair after myocardial injury, as well as their potential roles in cardiac development and aging. TC-based therapy or TC-derived exosome delivery might be used as novel therapeutic strategies to promote cardiac regeneration and repair.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26805441
[Au] Autor:Boos AM; Weigand A; Brodbeck R; Beier JP; Arkudas A; Horch RE
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Laboratory for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, University Hospital of Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Krankenhausstr. 12, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: anja.boos@uk-erlangen.de....
[Ti] Title:The potential role of telocytes in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.
[So] Source:Semin Cell Dev Biol;55:70-8, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1096-3634
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Research and ideas for potential applications in the field of Tissue Engineering (TE) and Regenerative Medicine (RM) have been constantly increasing over recent years, basically driven by the fundamental human dream of repairing and regenerating lost tissue and organ functions. The basic idea of TE is to combine cells with putative stem cell properties with extracellular matrix components, growth factors and supporting matrices to achieve independently growing tissue. As a side effect, in the past years, more insights have been gained into cell-cell interaction and how to manipulate cell behavior. However, to date the ideal cell source has still to be found. Apart from commonly known various stem cell sources, telocytes (TC) have recently attracted increasing attention because they might play a potential role for TE and RM. It becomes increasingly evident that TC provide a regenerative potential and act in cellular communication through their network-forming telopodes. While TE in vitro experiments can be the first step, the key for elucidating their regenerative role will be the investigation of the interaction of TC with the surrounding tissue. For later clinical applications further steps have to include an upscaling process of vascularization of engineered tissue. Arteriovenous loop models to vascularize such constructs provide an ideal platform for preclinical testing of future therapeutic concepts in RM. The following review article should give an overview of what is known so far about the potential role of TC in TE and RM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27288830
[Au] Autor:Zhang YP; Zhang YY; Duan DD
[Ad] Address:Pediatric Heart Center, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:From Genome-Wide Association Study to Phenome-Wide Association Study: New Paradigms in Obesity Research.
[So] Source:Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci;140:185-231, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1878-0814
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Obesity is a condition in which excess body fat has accumulated over an extent that increases the risk of many chronic diseases. The current clinical classification of obesity is based on measurement of body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, and body fat percentage. However, these measurements do not account for the wide individual variations in fat distribution, degree of fatness or health risks, and genetic variants identified in the genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In this review, we will address this important issue with the introduction of phenome, phenomics, and phenome-wide association study (PheWAS). We will discuss the new paradigm shift from GWAS to PheWAS in obesity research. In the era of precision medicine, phenomics and PheWAS provide the required approaches to better definition and classification of obesity according to the association of obese phenome with their unique molecular makeup, lifestyle, and environmental impact.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27288826
[Au] Autor:Han JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Children's Foundation Research Institute, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Memphis, TN, United States of America. Electronic address: jhan14@uthsc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Rare Syndromes and Common Variants of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Human Obesity.
[So] Source:Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci;140:75-95, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1878-0814
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rare genetic disorders that cause BDNF haploinsufficiency, such as WAGR syndrome, 11p deletion, and 11p inversion, serve as models for understanding the role of BDNF in human energy balance and neurocognition. Patients with BDNF haploinsufficiency or inactivating mutations of the BDNF receptor exhibit hyperphagia, childhood-onset obesity, intellectual disability, and impaired nociception. Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and ROHHAD syndromes are separate genetic disorders that do not directly affect the BDNF locus but share many similar clinical features with BDNF haploinsufficiency, and BDNF insufficiency is believed to possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of each of these conditions. In the general population, common variants of BDNF that affect BDNF gene expression or BDNF protein processing have also been associated with modest alterations in energy balance and cognitive functioning. Thus, variable degrees of BDNF insufficiency appear to contribute to a spectrum of excess weight gain and cognitive impairment that ranges in phenotypic severity. In this modern era of precision medicine, genotype-specific therapies aimed at increasing BDNF signaling in patients with rare and common disorders associated with BDNF insufficiency could serve as useful approaches for treating obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 2032995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27288923
[Au] Autor:Subedi L; Gaire BP; Do MH; Lee TH; Kim SY
[Ad] Address:Laboratoy of Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy and Gachon Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gachon University, Incheon, 406-799, Republic of Korea....
[Ti] Title:Anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the Lindera neesiana fruit in vitro.
[So] Source:Phytomedicine;23(8):872-81, 2016 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1618-095X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lindera neesiana Kurz (Lauraceae), popularly known as Siltimur in Nepal, is an aromatic and spicy plant with edible fruits. It is a traditional herbal medicine widely used for the treatment of diarrhea, tooth pain, headache, and gastric disorders and is also used as a stimulant. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to examine in vitro cytoprotective, anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective potential of an aqueous extract of L. neesiana (LNE) fruit using different central nervous system (CNS) cell lines. METHODS: In order to study the neuroprotective potential of LNE, we used three different types of CNS cell lines: murine microglia (BV2), rat glioma (C6), and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a). Cell viability was assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reagent, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, and nerve growth factor (NGF) release in the culture media was determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family proteins, Bax, B cell lymphoma (BCL)-2, and cleaved caspase 3. Neurite outgrowth was determined using the IncuCyte imaging system. RESULTS: LNE treatment not only reduced nitric oxide (NO) production in a dose-dependent manner, but also significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokines, iNOS and COX-2 production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated BV-2 cells. LNE increased the expression of phosphorylated (p)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas p-p38 and p- janus kinase (JNK) expression was significantly decreased in activated microglia. Furthermore, LNE increased cell viability of N2a cells, which was accompanied by decreased caspase-3 expression and the ratio of Bax/Bcl2 protein expression as well as increased NGF and neurite outgrowth, suggesting its neuroprotective potential against LPS-induced effects. Additionally, LNE substantially increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) secretion in N2a cells and inhibited lipid dehydrogenase (LDH) release in H2O2-stimulated BV2 cells demonstrating the strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of LNE in CNS cell lines. CONCLUSION: Here we found that water the soluble extract of LNE has promising anti-neuroinflammation and anti-apoptotic properties and identify LNE as a potential natural candidate for neuroprotection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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