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[PMID]: 27356236
[Au] Autor:Pang AP; Sugai C; Maunakea AK
[Ti] Title:High-throughput sequencing offers new insights into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.
[So] Source:Biomol Concepts;7(3):169-78, 2016 Jun 1.
[Is] ISSN:1868-503X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chemical modifications of DNA comprise epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of cellular activities and memory. Although the function of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) has been extensively studied, little is known about the function(s) of relatively rarer and underappreciated cytosine modifications including 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC). The discovery that ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins mediate conversion of 5-mC to 5-hmC, and other oxidation derivatives, sparked renewed interest to understand the biological role of 5-hmC. Studies examining total 5-hmC levels revealed the highly dynamic yet tissue-specific nature of this modification, implicating a role in epigenetic regulation and development. Intriguingly, 5-hmC levels are highest during early development and in the brain where abnormal patterns of 5-hmC have been observed in disease conditions. Thus, 5-hmC adds to the growing list of epigenetic modifications with potential utility in clinical applications and warrants further investigation. This review discusses the emerging functional roles of 5-hmC in normal and disease states, focusing primarily on insights provided by recent studies exploring the genome-wide distribution of this modification in mammals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27262177
[Au] Autor:Peelle JE; Wingfield A
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA. Electronic address: peellej@ent.wustl.edu.
[Ti] Title:The Neural Consequences of Age-Related Hearing Loss.
[So] Source:Trends Neurosci;39(7):486-97, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1878-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:During hearing, acoustic signals travel up the ascending auditory pathway from the cochlea to auditory cortex; efferent connections provide descending feedback. In human listeners, although auditory and cognitive processing have sometimes been viewed as separate domains, a growing body of work suggests they are intimately coupled. Here, we review the effects of hearing loss on neural systems supporting spoken language comprehension, beginning with age-related physiological decline. We suggest that listeners recruit domain general executive systems to maintain successful communication when the auditory signal is degraded, but that this compensatory processing has behavioral consequences: even relatively mild levels of hearing loss can lead to cascading cognitive effects that impact perception, comprehension, and memory, leading to increased listening effort during speech comprehension.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27197149
[Au] Autor:Morris ZS; Guy EI; Francis DM; Gressett MM; Werner LR; Carmichael LL; Yang RK; Armstrong EA; Huang S; Navid F; Gillies SD; Korman A; Hank JA; Rakhmilevich AL; Harari PM; Sondel PM
[Ad] Address:Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. zmorris@uwhealth.org....
[Ti] Title:In Situ Tumor Vaccination by Combining Local Radiation and Tumor-Specific Antibody or Immunocytokine Treatments.
[So] Source:Cancer Res;76(13):3929-41, 2016 Jul 1.
[Is] ISSN:1538-7445
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Interest in combining radiotherapy and immune checkpoint therapy is growing rapidly. In this study, we explored a novel combination of this type to augment antitumor immune responses in preclinical murine models of melanoma, neuroblastoma, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Cooperative effects were observed with local radiotherapy and intratumoral injection of tumor-specific antibodies, arising in part from enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We could improve this response by combining radiation with intratumoral injection of an IL2-linked tumor-specific antibody (termed here an immunocytokine), resulting in complete regression of established tumors in most animals associated with a tumor-specific memory T-cell response. Given the T-cell response elicited by combined local radiation and intratumoral immunocytokine, we tested the potential benefit of adding this treatment to immune checkpoint blockade. In mice bearing large primary tumors or disseminated metastases, the triple-combination of intratumoral immunocytokine, radiation, and systemic anti-CTLA-4 improved primary tumor response and animal survival compared with combinations of any two of these three interventions. Taken together, our results show how combining radiation and intratumoral immunocytokine in murine tumor models can eradicate large tumors and metastases, eliciting an in situ vaccination effect that can be leveraged further by T-cell checkpoint blockade, with immediate implications for clinical evaluation. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3929-41. ©2016 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-2644

  4 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27246567
[Au] Autor:Verplaetse TL; Pittman BP; Shi JM; Tetrault JM; Coppola S; McKee SA
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry , Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut....
[Ti] Title:Effect of Varenicline Combined with High-Dose Alcohol on Craving, Subjective Intoxication, Perceptual Motor Response, and Executive Cognitive Function in Adults with Alcohol Use Disorders: Preliminary Findings.
[So] Source:Alcohol Clin Exp Res;40(7):1567-76, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0277
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Varenicline has been found to decrease alcohol-motivated behaviors. Recent warnings regarding aversive events associated with varenicline used in conjunction with alcohol warrant further investigation into the safety of the drug when combined with alcohol. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to examine the effect of combining varenicline with a high, fixed dose of alcohol on subjective reactivity and cognitive function in adults with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). METHODS: This double-blind, placebo-controlled preliminary investigation examined the effects of varenicline (0, 1, 2 mg/d) on subjective reactivity, cognition, perceptual motor function, and physiologic reactivity to a fixed dose of alcohol (vs. nonalcohol control beverage) using an established laboratory paradigm in smokers and nonsmokers meeting criteria for AUDs (n = 44). All participants had completed a parent varenicline study evaluating alcohol self-administration. Each subject completed 2 fixed-dose laboratory sessions assessing reactivity to a high-dose alcohol (0.08 g/dl) or a nonalcoholic control beverage, order counterbalanced. RESULTS: Varenicline attenuated alcohol-related increases in subjective intoxication and alcohol-related decreases in executive cognitive function. At baseline, varenicline reduced alcohol craving and diastolic blood pressure, and increased associative learning, working memory, and perceptual motor function. Varenicline produced nonspecific effects on diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. Overall, there were few differences in effects between 1 and 2 mg/d varenicline versus placebo. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results continue to support the safety and use of varenicline in combination with alcohol in individuals meeting criteria for AUDs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/acer.13110

  5 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27219099
[Au] Autor:Weafer J; Gallo DA; de Wit H
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Alcohol on Encoding and Consolidation of Memory for Alcohol-Related Images.
[So] Source:Alcohol Clin Exp Res;40(7):1540-7, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0277
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Drug and alcohol abusers develop strong memories for drug-related stimuli. Preclinical studies suggest that such memories are a result of drug actions on reward pathways, which facilitate learning about drug-related stimuli. However, few controlled studies have investigated how drugs affect memory for drug-related stimuli in humans. METHODS: The current study examined the direct effect of alcohol on memory for images of alcohol-related or neutral beverages. Participants received alcohol (0.8 g/kg) either before viewing visual images (encoding condition; n = 20) or immediately after viewing them (consolidation condition; n = 20). A third group received placebo both before and after viewing the images (control condition; n = 19). Memory retrieval was tested exactly 48 hours later, in a drug-free state. RESULTS: Alcohol impaired memory in the encoding condition and enhanced memory in the consolidation condition, but these effects did not differ for alcohol-related and neutral beverage stimuli. However, in the encoding condition, participants who experienced greater alcohol-induced stimulation exhibited better memory for alcohol-related, but not neutral beverage stimuli. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that individual differences in sensitivity to the positive, rewarding effects of alcohol are associated with greater propensity to remember alcohol-related stimuli encountered while intoxicated. As such, stimulant responders may form stronger memory associations with alcohol-related stimuli, which might then influence their drinking behavior.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/acer.13103

  6 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26889706
[Au] Autor:Bi J; Zeng X; Tian D; Li H
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Pesticide & Chemical Biology (CCNU), Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University , Wuhan 430079, P.R. China....
[Ti] Title:Temperature-Responsive Switch Constructed from an Anthracene-Functionalized Pillar[5]arene-Based Host-Guest System.
[So] Source:Org Lett;18(5):1092-5, 2016 Mar 4.
[Is] ISSN:1523-7052
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A monofunctionalized anthracene pillar[5]arene (MAP5) was designed and synthesized by a click reaction. MAP5 was bound to an ionic liquid through host-guest interactions to modify a gold interface. The bonding and release of MAP5 was readily and reversibly controlled by temperature regulation. The developed temperature-responsive switch at an interface can be used in memory storage, drug delivery, and sensing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.orglett.6b00097

  7 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26937937
[Au] Autor:Kim YJ; Kim HK; Yang DH; Jung S; Noh MG; Lee JH; Lee KH; Moon KS
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Neurosurgery (Y-JK, SJ, K-SM); Department of Internal Medicine (HKK, D-HY); and Departments of Pathology, Chonnam National University Research Institute of Medical Sciences (M-GN, J-HL, K-HL), Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital and Medical School, Hwasun-gun, Jeollanamdo, South Korea.
[Ti] Title:Pineal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Concomitant With Pituitary Prolactinoma: Possible Correlation Between 2 Distinguished Pathologies: A Case Report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);95(8):e2923, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This is the first reported case of pineal lymphoma with concomitant prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma.A 51-year-old male experienced worsening headaches accompanied by nausea, diplopia, and memory loss for 1 month. Cranial nerve examination revealed bilateral upward gaze limitation with convergence impairment, which is known as Parinaud syndrome. Magnetic resonance images revealed a mass in the pineal gland with a coexisting mass within the enlarged sella fossa. Hormone analysis revealed hyperprolactinemia. The pineal mass was removed without injuring the hypothalamus, brain stem, or any neighboring vessels. Pathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the pineal gland. After further studies, the pineal lymphoma was determined to be a secondary tumor from a gastric primary tumor. The patient died 6 months after diagnosis due to systemic progression of DLBCL.Although the mechanistic link between hyperprolactinemia and lymphoma progression has not been clarified on a clinical basis, high prolactin levels may contribute to the rapid progression and therapeutic resistance of the lymphoma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Cu] Class update date: 160325
[Lr] Last revision date:160325
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000002923

  8 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26713821
[Au] Autor:Horie NC; Serrao VT; Simon SS; Gascon MR; Dos Santos AX; Zambone MA; Del Bigio de Freitas MM; Cunha-Neto E; Marques EL; Halpern A; de Melo ME; Mancini MC; Cercato C
[Ad] Address:Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Group (N.C.H., E.L.M., A.H., M.E.d.M., M.C.M., C.C.), São Paulo University, School of Medicine; Psychology Division (V.T.S., M.R.P.G.), Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University; Institute of Psychiatry (S.S.S.), São Paulo University, School of Medicine; Nutrition Di...
[Ti] Title:Cognitive Effects of Intentional Weight Loss in Elderly Obese Individuals With Mild Cognitive Impairment.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;101(3):1104-12, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Obesity in midlife is a risk factor for dementia, but it is unknown if caloric restriction-induced weight loss could prevent cognitive decline and therefore dementia in elderly patients with cognitive impairment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cognitive effect of intentional weight loss in obese elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), considering the influence of age, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, physical activity, biochemical markers, and diet. DESIGN: Single-center, prospective controlled trial. SETTING: Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Eighty obese patients with MCI, aged 60 or older (68.1 ± 4.9 y, body mass index [BMI] 35.5 ± 4.4 kg/m(2), 83.7% women, 26.3% APOE allele ϵ4 carriers). INTERVENTION: Random allocation to conventional medical care alone (n = 40) or together with nutritional counselling (n = 40) in group meetings aiming to promote weight loss through caloric restriction for 12 months. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: clinical data, body composition, neuropsychological tests (main outcome), serum biomarkers, APOE genotype, physical performance, dietary recalls. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients completed the follow-up. BMI, on average, decreased 1.7 ± 1.8 kg/m(2) (P = .021), and most of the cognitive tests improved, without difference between the groups. In analysis with linear generalized models, the BMI decrease was associated with improvements in verbal memory, verbal fluency, executive function, and global cognition, after adjustment for education, gender, physical activity, and baseline tests. This association was strongest in younger seniors (for memory and fluency) and in APOE allele ϵ4 carriers (for executive function). Changes in homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance, C-reactive protein, leptin and intake of energy, carbohydrates, and fats were associated with improvement in cognitive tests. CONCLUSIONS: Intentional weight loss through diet was associated with cognitive improvement in patients with MCI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2015-2315

  9 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26906199
[Au] Autor:Tolkach PG; Basharin VA; Grebenyuk AN
[Ad] Address:S. M. Kirov Military Medical Academy, Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, St. Petersburg, Russia. pusher6@yandex.ru.
[Ti] Title:Assessment of Functional Disturbances in the Central Nervous System Caused by Severe Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Rats.
[So] Source:Bull Exp Biol Med;160(4):462-4, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1573-8221
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An experimental model was developed for assessment of disturbances in CNS functions of laboratory animals caused by severe carbon monoxide poisoning. Normalization of the state of experimental rats after acute poisoning was accompanied by the development of cognitive abnormalities. Disturbances in the long-term memory were observed on days 1 and 14 after CO poisoning, while abnormalities in the short-term memory developed on days 1, 7, and 14. Learning impairment were recorded on day 8, while the training course began on day 7.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10517-016-3197-5

  10 / 286137 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26820638
[Au] Autor:Tamura K; Mizuba T; Iramina K
[Ad] Address:Faculty Arts and Science, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan. Electronic address: tamura.kaori.069@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Hearing subject's own name induces the late positive component of event-related potential and beta power suppression.
[So] Source:Brain Res;1635:130-42, 2016 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6240
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The neuronal response to hearing a subject's own name (SON) has been often investigated using event-related potential (ERP) or time-frequency analysis, but seldom by a combination of these methods. Using this combination of approaches would allow the relationship between memory processes engaged by SON and the neuronal responses to be studied in more detail. Thus, the present study used both ERP and time-frequency analysis to investigate memory process for SON by comparing the responses to SON and to unfamiliar names. Specifically, the SON condition was compared with two control conditions: repeated unfamiliar names and singly presented unfamiliar names. This experimental design allowed us to determine the differences in memory processes between hearing one's own name and hearing unrelated but repeatedly heard names. ERP analysis showed that SON elicited a late positive component in parietal areas, while unfamiliar names elicited no positivity. Beta power suppression was observed in response to SON at 0.4-0.6s after stimulus onset at right central sites, but not in response to unfamiliar names. These results are indicative of an involvement of episodic memory processes on hearing SON, which corresponds to the recognition of one's own name. Further, the ERP results suggest the presence of a "new" stimulus recognition process that is activated by singly presented unfamiliar names but not by repeated unfamiliar names.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process


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