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[PMID]: 24823837
[Au] Autor:Pofantis H; Papatheodoropoulos C
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Physiology, Department of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Patras, 26504, Rion, Patras, Greece.
[Ti] Title:The α5GABAA receptor modulates the induction of long-term potentiation at ventral but not dorsal CA1 hippocampal synapses.
[So] Source:Synapse;68(9):394-401, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2396
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The hippocampal synapses display conspicuous ability for long-term plasticity which is thought to underlie learning and memory. Growing evidence shows that this ability differs along the long axis of the hippocampus, with the ventral CA1 hippocampal synapses displaying remarkably lower ability for long-term potentiation (LTP) compared with their dorsal counterpart when activated with high-frequency stimulation. Here, we show that low frequency, 10 Hz stimulation induced LTP more reliably in dorsal than in ventral CA1 field. Blockade of alpha5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors eliminated the difference between dorsal and ventral hippocampus. We propose that α5GABAA receptor-mediated activity plays a crucial role in regulating the threshold for induction of LTP especially at the ventral CA1 hippocampal synapses. This might have important implications for the functional specialization along the hippocampus. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/syn.21751

  2 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24968101
[Au] Autor:Bhandari R; van der Veen R; Parsons CE; Young KS; Voorthuis A; Bakermans-Kranenburg MJ; Stein A; Kringelbach ML; van IJzendoorn MH
[Ad] Address:a Centre for Child and Family Studies , Leiden University , Leiden , Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Effects of intranasal oxytocin administration on memory for infant cues: Moderation by childhood emotional maltreatment.
[So] Source:Soc Neurosci;9(5):536-47, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1747-0927
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oxytocin has been implicated in parent-infant attachment and social recognition. With respect to emotion recognition memory, both memory-enhancing and impairing effects have been observed, suggesting an influence of individual factors. We assessed the effects of oxytocin on memory for infant cues, and whether these effects are moderated by self-reported childhood emotional maltreatment. Nulliparous females (N = 102) participated in a randomized, double-blind, between-subjects study with intranasal oxytocin or placebo administration. Participants' memory was tested using the Baby Social Reward Task, where participants were asked to select the happier infant from a pair of two infants based on the information that they received about the infants' mood in the previous phase. Participants reporting more childhood emotional maltreatment were less accurate in this task after inhaling oxytocin. Our findings add to a growing body of literature showing that the effects of intranasal oxytocin on memory and social behavior are moderated by adverse early life experiences.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/17470919.2014.932307

  3 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24889756
[Au] Autor:Dumontheil I; Jensen SK; Wood NW; Meyer ML; Lieberman MD; Blakemore SJ
[Ad] Address:a Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience , University College London , London , UK.
[Ti] Title:Preliminary investigation of the influence of dopamine regulating genes on social working memory.
[So] Source:Soc Neurosci;9(5):437-51, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1747-0927
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Working memory (WM) refers to mental processes that enable temporary retention and manipulation of information, including information about other people ("social working memory"). Previous studies have demonstrated that nonsocial WM is supported by dopamine neurotransmission. Here, we investigated in 131 healthy adults whether dopamine is similarly involved in social WM by testing whether social and nonsocial WM are influenced by genetic variants in three genes coding for molecules regulating the availability of dopamine in the brain: catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), dopamine active transporter (DAT), and monoamine-oxidase A (MAOA). An advantage for the Met allele of COMT was observed in the two standard WM tasks and in the social WM task. However, the influence of COMT on social WM performance was not accounted for by its influence on either standard WM paradigms. There was no main effect of DAT1 or MAOA, but a significant COMT x DAT1 interaction on social WM performance. This study provides novel preliminary evidence of effects of genetic variants of the dopamine neurotransmitter system on social cognition. The results further suggest that the effects observed on standard WM do not explain the genetic effects on effortful social cognition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/17470919.2014.925503

  4 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25043763
[Au] Autor:Bylicka B; Chruscinski D; Maniscalco S
[Ad] Address:Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Non-Markovianity and reservoir memory of quantum channels: a quantum information theory perspective.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;4:5720, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Quantum technologies rely on the ability to coherently transfer information encoded in quantum states along quantum channels. Decoherence induced by the environment sets limits on the efficiency of any quantum-enhanced protocol. Generally, the longer a quantum channel is the worse its capacity is. We show that for non-Markovian quantum channels this is not always true: surprisingly the capacity of a longer channel can be greater than of a shorter one. We introduce a general theoretical framework linking non-Markovianity to the capacities of quantum channels and demonstrate how harnessing non-Markovianity may improve the efficiency of quantum information processing and communication.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep05720

  5 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24814378
[Au] Autor:Dujardin A; Bosmans G; Braet C; Goossens L
[Ad] Address:Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, University of Leuven, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Attachment-related expectations and mother-referent memory bias in middle childhood.
[So] Source:Scand J Psychol;55(4):296-302, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1467-9450
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Understanding the cognitive processing of attachment-relevant information has become a major focus of attachment research. Previous research demonstrated links between attachment and memory for attachment-related information, but results were contradictory and did not control for mood-effects. The current study aimed to provide a conceptual framework to capture inconsistencies. A straightforward memory bias hypothesis was derived and tested. Fifty children (aged 10-12) completed questionnaires assessing confidence in maternal support and depressive symptoms, and a memory task in which they recalled positive and negative words that referred to previous interactions with mother. Less confidence in maternal support and more depressive symptoms were linked to a more negative mother-related memory bias. The effect of confidence in maternal support remained marginally significant when controlling for depressive symptoms, explaining the initial effect of depressive symptoms. These findings support attachment theory's hypothesis that attachment-relevant information is processed in an attachment expectation-congruent way.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/sjop.12129

  6 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24935516
[Au] Autor:Tulek B; Atalay NB; Yildirim G; Kanat F; Süerdem M
[Ad] Address:Department of Chest Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Cognitive function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Relationship to global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease 2011 categories.
[So] Source:Respirology;19(6):873-80, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1440-1843
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Recently, comorbidities such as impaired cognitive function have been attracting more focus when considering the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Here we investigated the relationship between cognitive function and the categories given in the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines in 2011. Specifically, after controlling for non-COPD covariates, we assessed the clinical features that may be predictive of cognitive impairment in patients with COPD. METHODS: We recruited 119 stable patients with mild to very severe COPD. We administered a broad array of standardized neuropsychological tests that assessed cognitive functions in the domains of attention, memory, psychomotor coordination and language. RESULTS: Cognitive scores were significantly different between patients falling within GOLD 2011 categories. Scores were lower in patients with high future risk compared with low future risk. In parallel, there were significant differences in cognitive function between COPD patient subgroups when patients were grouped according to the forced expiratory volume in 1 s, exacerbation history and C-reactive protein levels. After controlling for non-COPD predictors, only exacerbation history remained a significant predictor of cognitive scores. CONCLUSIONS: The number of exacerbation events in a year may be used as a predictor of cognitive impairment in patients with COPD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/resp.12333

  7 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24916920
[Au] Autor:Meijer EH; Selle NK; Elber L; Ben-Shakhar G
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Department of Psychology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Memory detection with the Concealed Information Test: A meta analysis of skin conductance, respiration, heart rate, and P300 data.
[So] Source:Psychophysiology;51(9):879-904, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1540-5958
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Concealed Information Test (CIT) uses psychophysiological measures to determine the presence or absence of crime-related information in a suspect's memory. We conducted a meta-analysis on the validity of the CIT based on four physiological measures-skin conductance response (SCR), respiration line length (RLL), changes in heart rate (HR), and enhanced amplitudes of the P300 component of the event-related potential (P300). This meta-analysis relied on laboratory studies that used either the mock-crime or the personal-item paradigm. Results showed a mean effect size (d*) of 1.55 for SCR, 1.11 for RLL, 0.89 for HR, and 1.89 for P300. However, P300 outperformed SCR only in the personal-item paradigm, but not in the mock-crime paradigm. Motivation level, number of questions, publication year, and the inclusion of innocent participants emerged as significant moderators for the SCR, while only the type of paradigm used moderated the P300 effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/psyp.12239

  8 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24708027
[Au] Autor:Reinhart RM; Carlisle NB; Woodman GF
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Center for Cognitive and Integrative Neuroscience, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
[Ti] Title:Visual working memory gives up attentional control early in learning: Ruling out interhemispheric cancellation.
[So] Source:Psychophysiology;51(8):800-4, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1540-5958
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Current research suggests that we can watch visual working memory surrender the control of attention early in the process of learning to search for a specific object. This inference is based on the observation that the contralateral delay activity (CDA) rapidly decreases in amplitude across trials when subjects search for the same target object. Here, we tested the alternative explanation that the role of visual working memory does not actually decline across learning, but instead lateralized representations accumulate in both hemispheres across trials and wash out the lateralized CDA. We show that the decline in CDA amplitude occurred even when the target objects were consistently lateralized to a single visual hemifield. Our findings demonstrate that reductions in the amplitude of the CDA during learning are not simply due to the dilution of the CDA from interhemispheric cancellation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/psyp.12217

  9 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24929961
[Au] Autor:Christiaans JA; Klein PJ; Metaxas A; Kooijman EJ; Schuit RC; Leysen JE; Lammertsma AA; van Berckel BN; Windhorst AD
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology & Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands....
[Ti] Title:Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of carbon-11 labelled N-((5-(4-fluoro-2-[(11)C]methoxyphenyl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)cyclopentanamine as a PET tracer for NR2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors.
[So] Source:Nucl Med Biol;41(8):670-80, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9614
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays an important role in learning and memory. Overactivation is thought to play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Currently, it is not possible to assess N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) bio-availability in vivo. The purpose of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the NR2B binding site of the NMDA receptor. METHODS: N-((5-(4-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)cyclopentanamine was radiolabelled with carbon-11 in the phenyl moiety. Biodistribution and blocking studies were carried out in anaesthetized mice and in non-anaesthetized rats. RESULTS: N-((5-(4-fluoro-2-[(11)C]methoxyphenyl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)cyclopentanamine was prepared in 49±3% (decay-corrected) yield, affording 4.1±0.3GBq of formulated product at the end of synthesis with a radiochemical purity of >99% and with a specific activity of 78±10GBq/µmol. CONCLUSION: A new NR2B PET ligand was developed in high yield. [(11)C]4 readily enters the brain and binds to the NR2B subunit-containing NMDAr in the rodent brain. High sigma-1 receptor binding may, however, limit its future application as a PET probe for imaging the NR2B subunit-containing NMDAr. Anaesthesia has an effect on NMDAr function and therefore can complicate interpretation of preclinical in vivo results. In addition, effects of endogenous compounds cannot be excluded. Despite these potential limitations, further studies are warranted to investigate the values of [(11)C]4 as an NR2B PET ligand.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 246017 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24939237
[Au] Autor:Greve A; Cooper E; Henson RN
[Ad] Address:MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, England, United Kingdom. Electronic address: andrea.greve@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:No evidence that 'fast-mapping' benefits novel learning in healthy Older adults.
[So] Source:Neuropsychologia;60:52-9, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3514
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Much evidence suggests that the Hippocampus is necessary for learning novel associations. Contrary to this, Sharon, Moscovitch, and Gilboa (2011) reported four amnesic patients with Hippocampal damage who maintained the capacity to learn novel object-name associations when trained with a 'fast-mapping' (FM) technique. This technique therefore potentially offers an alternative route for learning novel information in populations experiencing memory problems. We examined this potential in healthy ageing, by comparing 24 Older and 24 Young participants who completed a FM procedure very similar to Sharon et al. (2011). As expected, the Older group showed worse memory than the Young group under standard explicit encoding (EE) instructions. However, the Older group continued to show worse performance under the FM procedure, with no evidence that FM alleviated their memory deficit. Indeed, performance was worse for the FM than EE condition in both groups. Structural MRI scans confirmed reduced Hippocampal grey-matter volume in the Older group, which correlated with memory performance across both groups and both EE/FM conditions. We conclude FM does not help memory problems that occur with normal ageing, and discuss theoretical implications for memory theories.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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