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[PMID]: 25477227
[Au] Autor:Hunt PS; Barnet RC
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, College of William & Mary, USA. Electronic address: pshunt@wm.edu.
[Ti] Title:An animal model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: Trace conditioning as a window to inform memory deficits and intervention tactics.
[So] Source:Physiol Behav;148:36-44, 2015 Sep 1.
[Is] ISSN:1873-507X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Animal models of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) afford the unique capacity to precisely control timing of alcohol exposure and alcohol exposure amounts in the developing animal. These models have powerfully informed neurophysiological alterations associated with fetal and perinatal alcohol. In two experiments presented here we expand use of the Pavlovian Trace Conditioning procedure to examine cognitive deficits and intervention strategies in a rat model of FASD. Rat pups were exposed to 5g/kg/day ethanol on postnatal days (PD) 4-9, simulating alcohol exposure in the third trimester in humans. During early adolescence, approximately PD 30, the rats were trained in the trace conditioning task in which a light conditioned stimulus (CS) and shock unconditioned stimulus (US) were paired but separated by a 10-s stimulus free trace interval. Learning was assessed in freezing behavior during shock-free tests. Experiment 1 revealed that neonatal ethanol exposure significantly impaired hippocampus-dependent trace conditioning relative to controls. In Experiment 2 a serial compound conditioning procedure known as 'gap filling' completely reversed the ethanol-induced deficit in trace conditioning. We also discuss prior data regarding the beneficial effects of supplemental choline and novel preliminary data regarding the pharmacological cognitive enhancer physostigmine, both of which mitigate the alcohol-induced cognitive deficit otherwise seen in trace conditioning controls. We suggest trace conditioning as a useful tool for characterizing some of the core cognitive deficits seen in FASD, and as a model for developing effective environmental as well as nutritional and pharmacological interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25811710
[Au] Autor:Adam KC; Mance I; Fukuda K; Vogel EK
[Ad] Address:University of Oregon....
[Ti] Title:The Contribution of Attentional Lapses to Individual Differences in Visual Working Memory Capacity.
[So] Source:J Cogn Neurosci;27(8):1601-16, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1530-8898
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Attentional control and working memory capacity are important cognitive abilities that substantially vary between individuals. Although much is known about how attentional control and working memory capacity relate to each other and to constructs like fluid intelligence, little is known about how trial-by-trial fluctuations in attentional engagement impact trial-by-trial working memory performance. Here, we employ a novel whole-report memory task that allowed us to distinguish between varying levels of attentional engagement in humans performing a working memory task. By characterizing low-performance trials, we can distinguish between models in which working memory performance failures are caused by either (1) complete lapses of attention or (2) variations in attentional control. We found that performance failures increase with set-size and strongly predict working memory capacity. Performance variability was best modeled by an attentional control model of attention, not a lapse model. We examined neural signatures of performance failures by measuring EEG activity while participants performed the whole-report task. The number of items correctly recalled in the memory task was predicted by frontal theta power, with decreased frontal theta power associated with poor performance on the task. In addition, we found that poor performance was not explained by failures of sensory encoding; the P1/N1 response and ocular artifact rates were equivalent for high- and low-performance trials. In all, we propose that attentional lapses alone cannot explain individual differences in working memory performance. Instead, we find that graded fluctuations in attentional control better explain the trial-by-trial differences in working memory that we observe.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1162/jocn_a_00811

  3 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26082974
[Au] Autor:Kelly DL; Sullivan KM; McEvoy JP; McMahon RP; Wehring HJ; Gold JM; Liu F; Warfel D; Vyas G; Richardson CM; Fischer BA; Keller WR; Koola MM; Feldman SM; Russ JC; Keefe RS; Osing J; Hubzin L; August S; Walker TM; Buchanan RW
[Ad] Address:From the *Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; †Department of Psychiatry, Georgia Regents University, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA; ‡Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Research Program, Sheppard Pratt Health System and University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; and §Department of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC.
[Ti] Title:Adjunctive Minocycline in Clozapine-Treated Schizophrenia Patients With Persistent Symptoms.
[So] Source:J Clin Psychopharmacol;35(4):374-81, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1533-712X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic for treatment refractory people with schizophrenia, yet many patients only partially respond. Accumulating preclinical and clinical data suggest benefits with minocycline. We tested adjunct minocycline to clozapine in a 10-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Primary outcomes tested were positive, and cognitive symptoms, while avolition, anxiety/depression, and negative symptoms were secondary outcomes. METHODS: Schizophrenia and schizoaffective participants (n = 52) with persistent positive symptoms were randomized to receive adjunct minocycline (100 mg oral capsule twice daily; n = 29) or placebo (n = 23). RESULTS: Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) psychosis factor (P = 0.098; effect size [ES], 0.39) and BPRS total score (P = 0.075; ES, 0.55) were not significant. A change in total BPRS symptoms of more than or equal to 30% was observed in 7 (25%) of 28 among minocycline and 1 (4%) of 23 among placebo participants, respectively (P = 0.044). Global cognitive function (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery) did not differ, although there was a significant variation in size of treatment effects among cognitive domains (P = 0.03), with significant improvement in working memory favoring minocycline (P = 0.023; ES, 0.41). The Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms total score did not differ, but significant improvement in avolition with minocycline was noted (P = 0.012; ES, 0.34). Significant improvement in the BPRS anxiety/depression factor was observed with minocycline (P = 0.028; ES, 0.49). Minocycline was well tolerated with significantly fewer headaches and constipation compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Minocycline's effect on the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery composite score and positive symptoms were not statistically significant. Significant improvements with minocycline were seen in working memory, avolition, and anxiety/depressive symptoms in a chronic population with persistent symptoms. Larger studies are needed to validate these findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/JCP.0000000000000345

  4 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25531147
[Au] Autor:Gavrilov LA; Gavrilova NS
[Ad] Address:Center on Aging, NORC at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill., USA.
[Ti] Title:New Developments in the Biodemography of Aging and Longevity.
[So] Source:Gerontology;61(4):364-71, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1423-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biodemography is a promising scientific approach based on using demographic data and methods for getting insights into biological mechanisms of observed processes. Recently, new important developments have happened in biodemographic studies of aging and longevity that call into question conventional aging theories and open up novel research directions. Recent studies found that the exponential increase of the mortality risk with age (the famous Gompertz law) continues even at extreme old ages in humans, rats, and mice, thus challenging traditional views about old-age mortality deceleration, mortality leveling-off, and late-life mortality plateaus. This new finding represents a challenge to many aging theories, including the evolutionary theory that explains senescence by a declining force of natural selection with age. Innovative ideas are needed to explain why exactly the same exponential pattern of mortality growth is observed not only at reproductive ages, but also at very-old postreproductive ages (up to 106 years), long after the force of natural selection becomes negligible (when there is no room for its further decline). Another important recent development is the discovery of long-term 'memory' for early-life experiences in longevity determination. Siblings born to young mothers have significantly higher chances to live up to 100 years, and this new finding, confirmed by two independent research groups, calls for its explanation. As recent studies found, even the place and season of birth matter for human longevity. Beneficial longevity effects of young maternal age are observed only when children of the same parents are compared, while the maternal age effect often could not be detected in across-families studies, presumably being masked by between-family variation. It was also found that male gender of centenarian has a significant positive effect on the survival of adult male biological relatives (brothers and fathers) but not of female relatives. Finally, large gender differences are found in longevity determinants for males and females, suggesting a higher importance of occupation history for male centenarians as well as a higher importance of home environment history for female centenarians. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1159/000369011

  5 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25939482
[Au] Autor:Pfoh ER; Chan KS; Dinglas VD; Girard TD; Jackson JC; Morris PE; Hough CL; Mendez-Tellez PA; Ely EW; Huang M; Needham DM; Hopkins RO; NIH NHLBI ARDS Network
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. epfoh1@jhu.edu....
[Ti] Title:Cognitive screening among acute respiratory failure survivors: a cross-sectional evaluation of the Mini-Mental State Examination.
[So] Source:Crit Care;19:220, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1466-609X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is a common cognitive screening test, but its utility in identifying impairments in survivors of acute respiratory failure is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MMSE performance versus a concurrently administered detailed neuropsychological test battery in survivors of acute respiratory failure. METHODS: This cross-sectional analysis used data from the ARDSNet Long Term Outcomes Study (ALTOS) and Awakening and Breathing Controlled Trial (ABC). Participants were 242 survivors of acute respiratory failure. The MMSE and detailed neuropsychological tests were administered at 6 and 12 months post-hospital discharge for the ALTOS study, and at hospital discharge, 3 and 12 months for the ABC study. Overall cognitive impairment identified by the MMSE (score <24) was compared to impairments identified by the neuropsychological tests. We also matched orientation, registration, attention, memory and language domains on the MMSE to the corresponding neuropsychological test. Pairwise correlations, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and agreement were assessed. RESULTS: Agreement between MMSE and neuropsychological tests for overall cognitive impairment was fair (42 to 80%). Specificity was excellent (≥93%), but sensitivity was poor (19 to 37%). Correlations between MMSE domains and corresponding neuropsychological tests were weak to moderate (6 months: r = 0.11 to 0.28; 12 months: r = 0.09 to 0.34). The highest correlation between the MMSE and neuropsychological domains was for attention at 6 months (r = 0.28) and language at 12 months (r = 0.34). CONCLUSIONS: In acute respiratory failure survivors, the MMSE has poor sensitivity in detecting cognitive impairment compared with concurrently administered detailed neuropsychological tests. MMSE results in this population should be interpreted with caution.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13054-015-0934-5

  6 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26053402
[Au] Autor:Rutishauser U; Ye S; Koroma M; Tudusciuc O; Ross IB; Chung JM; Mamelak AN
[Ad] Address:1] Department of Neurosurgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. [2] Department of Neurology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. [3] Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. [4] Computation &Neu...
[Ti] Title:Representation of retrieval confidence by single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe.
[So] Source:Nat Neurosci;18(7):1041-50, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1726
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Memory-based decisions are often accompanied by an assessment of choice certainty, but the mechanisms of such confidence judgments remain unknown. We studied the response of 1,065 individual neurons in the human hippocampus and amygdala while neurosurgical patients made memory retrieval decisions together with a confidence judgment. Combining behavioral, neuronal and computational analysis, we identified a population of memory-selective (MS) neurons whose activity signaled stimulus familiarity and confidence, as assessed by subjective report. In contrast, the activity of visually selective (VS) neurons was not sensitive to memory strength. The groups further differed in response latency, tuning and extracellular waveforms. The information provided by MS neurons was sufficient for a race model to decide stimulus familiarity and retrieval confidence. Together, our results indicate a trial-by-trial relationship between a specific group of neurons and declared memory strength in humans. We suggest that VS and MS neurons are a substrate for declarative memories.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/nn.4041

  7 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26030850
[Au] Autor:Mander BA; Marks SM; Vogel JW; Rao V; Lu B; Saletin JM; Ancoli-Israel S; Jagust WJ; Walker MP
[Ad] Address:Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA....
[Ti] Title:ß-amyloid disrupts human NREM slow waves and related hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation.
[So] Source:Nat Neurosci;18(7):1051-7, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1726
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Independent evidence associates ß-amyloid pathology with both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep disruption and memory impairment in older adults. However, whether the influence of ß-amyloid pathology on hippocampus-dependent memory is, in part, driven by impairments of NREM slow wave activity (SWA) and associated overnight memory consolidation is unknown. Here we show that ß-amyloid burden in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) correlates significantly with the severity of impairment in NREM SWA generation. Moreover, reduced NREM SWA generation was further associated with impaired overnight memory consolidation and impoverished hippocampal-neocortical memory transformation. Furthermore, structural equation models revealed that the association between mPFC ß-amyloid pathology and impaired hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation was not direct, but instead statistically depended on the intermediary factor of diminished NREM SWA. By linking ß-amyloid pathology with impaired NREM SWA, these data implicate sleep disruption as a mechanistic pathway through which ß-amyloid pathology may contribute to hippocampus-dependent cognitive decline in the elderly.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/nn.4035

  8 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26106572
[Au] Autor:Tomadesso C; Perrotin A; Mutlu J; Mézenge F; Landeau B; Egret S; de la Sayette V; Jonin PY; Eustache F; Desgranges B; Chételat G
[Ad] Address:INSERM, Caen, U1077, France ; Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, UMR-S1077, Caen, France ; École Pratique des Hautes Etudes, UMR-S1077, Caen, France ; CHU de Caen, Caen, U1077, France....
[Ti] Title:Brain structural, functional, and cognitive correlates of recent versus remote autobiographical memories in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.
[So] Source:Neuroimage Clin;8:473-82, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2213-1582
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Deficits in autobiographical memory appear earlier for recent than for remote life periods over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study aims to further our understanding of this graded effect by investigating the cognitive and neural substrates of recent versus remote autobiographical memories in patients with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) thanks to an autobiographical fluency task. 20 aMCI patients and 25 Healthy elderly Controls (HC) underwent neuropsychological tests assessing remote (20-to-30 years old) and recent (the ten last years) autobiographical memory as well as episodic and semantic memory, executive function and global cognition. All patients also had a structural MRI and an FDG-PET scan. Correlations were assessed between each autobiographical memory score and the other tests as well as grey matter volume and metabolism. Within the aMCI, performances for the remote period correlated with personal semantic memory and episodic memory retrieval whereas performances for the recent period only correlated with episodic memory retrieval. Neuroimaging analyses revealed significant correlations between performances for the remote period and temporal pole and temporo-parietal cortex volumes and anterior cingulate gyrus metabolism, while performances for the recent period correlated with hippocampal volume and posterior cingulate, medial prefrontal and hippocampus metabolism. The brain regions related with the retrieval of events from the recent period showed greater atrophy/hypometabolism in aMCI patients compared to HC than those involved in remote memories. Recall of recent memories essentially relies on episodic memory processes and brain network while remote memories also involve other processes such as semantic memory. This is consistent with the semanticization of memories with time and may explain the better resistance of remote memory in AD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.nicl.2015.05.010

  9 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26106560
[Au] Autor:Brambati SM; Amici S; Racine CA; Neuhaus J; Miller Z; Ogar J; Dronkers N; Miller BL; Rosen H; Gorno-Tempini ML
[Ad] Address:Centre de Recherche de l'Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada....
[Ti] Title:Longitudinal gray matter contraction in three variants of primary progressive aphasia: A tenser-based morphometry study.
[So] Source:Neuroimage Clin;8:345-55, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2213-1582
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study investigated the pattern of longitudinal changes in cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Eight patients with the non-fluent variant of PPA (nfvPPA), 13 patients with the semantic variant (svPPA), seven patients with the logopenic variant (lvPPA), and 29 age-matched, neurologically healthy controls were included in the study. All participants underwent longitudinal MRI, neuropsychological and language testing at baseline and at a 1-year follow-up. Tenser-based morphometry (TBM) was applied to T1-weighted MRI images in order to map the progression of gray and white matter atrophy over a 1-year period. Results showed that each patient group was characterized by a specific pattern of cognitive and anatomical changes. Specifically, nfvPPA patients showed gray matter atrophy progression in the left frontal and subcortical areas as well as a decline in motor speech and executive functions; svPPA patients presented atrophy progression in the medial and lateral temporal lobe and decline in semantic memory abilities; and lvPPA patients showed atrophy progression in lateral/posterior temporal and medial parietal regions with a decline in memory, sentence repetition and calculations. In addition, in all three variants, the white matter fibers underlying the abovementioned cortical areas underwent significant volume contraction over a 1-year period. Overall, these results indicate that the three PPA variants present distinct patterns of neuroanatomical contraction, which reflect their clinical and cognitive progression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.nicl.2015.01.011

  10 / 263159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26106539
[Au] Autor:Hayes JP; Miller DR; Lafleche G; Salat DH; Verfaellie M
[Ad] Address:National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA ; Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA ; Neuroimaging Research for Veterans Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA....
[Ti] Title:The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Neuroimage Clin;8:148-56, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2213-1582
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a common injury among returning troops due to the widespread use of improvised explosive devices in the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. As most of the TBIs sustained are in the mild range, brain changes may not be detected by standard clinical imaging techniques such as CT. Furthermore, the functional significance of these types of injuries is currently being debated. However, accumulating evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to subtle white matter abnormalities and may be especially useful in detecting mild TBI (mTBI). The primary aim of this study was to use DTI to characterize the nature of white matter abnormalities following blast-related mTBI, and in particular, examine the extent to which mTBI-related white matter abnormalities are region-specific or spatially heterogeneous. In addition, we examined whether mTBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) was associated with more extensive white matter abnormality than mTBI without LOC, as well as the potential moderating effect of number of blast exposures. A second aim was to examine the relationship between white matter integrity and neurocognitive function. Finally, a third aim was to examine the contribution of PTSD symptom severity to observed white matter alterations. One hundred fourteen OEF/OIF veterans underwent DTI and neuropsychological examination and were divided into three groups including a control group, blast-related mTBI without LOC (mTBI - LOC) group, and blast-related mTBI with LOC (mTBI + LOC) group. Hierarchical regression models were used to examine the extent to which mTBI and PTSD predicted white matter abnormalities using two approaches: 1) a region-specific analysis and 2) a measure of spatial heterogeneity. Neurocognitive composite scores were calculated for executive functions, attention, memory, and psychomotor speed. Results showed that blast-related mTBI + LOC was associated with greater odds of having spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. Region-specific reduction in fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule was observed in the mTBI + LOC group as the number of blast exposures increased. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI + LOC indirectly influenced verbal memory performance through its effect on white matter integrity. PTSD was not associated with spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. However, there was a suggestion that at higher levels of PTSD symptom severity, LOC was associated with reduced FA in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule. These results support postmortem reports of diffuse axonal injury following mTBI and suggest that injuries with LOC involvement may be particularly detrimental to white matter integrity. Furthermore, these results suggest that LOC-associated white matter abnormalities in turn influence neurocognitive function.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150627
[Lr] Last revision date:150627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.nicl.2015.04.001


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