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[PMID]: 24936023
[Au] Autor:Markota M; Sin J; Pantazopoulos H; Jonilionis R; Berretta S
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Translational Neuroscience Laboratory, Mclean Hospital, Belmont, MA;...
[Ti] Title:Reduced dopamine transporter expression in the amygdala of subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia.
[So] Source:Schizophr Bull;40(5):984-91, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1745-1701
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A disruption of dopaminergic transmission in the amygdala of subjects with schizophrenia was proposed as a main contributor to pathophysiological and clinical manifestations of this disorder. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT) is decreased in the amygdala of subjects with schizophrenia. In normal control, schizophrenic subjects and bipolar disorder subjects, we measured numerical density of axon varicosities immunoreactive (IR) for DAT in the lateral (LN), basal, accessory basal (ABN), and cortical (CO) nuclei and intercalated cell masses (ITCM) of the amygdala. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-IR and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH)-IR varicosities were measured to test for potential loss of varicosities and serotonin transporter (5HTT)-IR for involvement of the serotoninergic system. Among several potential confounding variables tested, particular emphasis was placed on exposure to therapeutic drugs. In schizophrenic subjects, DAT-IR varicosities were decreased in LN (P = .0002), ABN (P = .013), and CO (P = .0001) in comparison with controls, and in comparison with bipolar disorder subjects in LN (P = .004) and CO (P = .002). DBH-IR varicosities were decreased in ABN (P = .008) and ITCM (P = .017), compared with controls. TH- and 5HTT-IR varicosities were not altered. No changes were detected in bipolar disorder. Taken together with TH and DBH findings, reductions of DAT-IR varicosities point to decreased DAT expression in dopaminergic terminals in the amygdala of subjects with schizophrenia. This DAT decrease may disrupt dopamine uptake, leading to increased dopaminergic synaptic transmission and spillage into the extracellular space with activation of extrasynaptic dopamine receptors. Concurrent decrease of noradrenaline in the ABN may disrupt memory consolidation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/schbul/sbu084

  2 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24072809
[Au] Autor:Cuesta MJ; Sánchez-Torres AM; de Jalón EG; Campos MS; Ibáñez B; Moreno-Izco L; Peralta V
[Ad] Address:Psychiatric Unit B, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; mcuestaz@cfnavarra.es....
[Ti] Title:Spontaneous Parkinsonism Is Associated With Cognitive Impairment in Antipsychotic-Naive Patients With First-Episode Psychosis: A 6-Month Follow-up Study.
[So] Source:Schizophr Bull;40(5):1164-73, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1745-1701
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There is now growing evidence that parkinsonism and other extrapyramidal signs are highly prevalent in patients with first-episode psychosis who have never been exposed to antipsychotic drugs. However, the neurocognitive correlates of parkinsonism in this population remained to be clarified. A sample comprising 100 consecutive drug-naive patients with first-episode psychosis were enrolled on the study and followed up for 6 months. Seventy-seven completed assessments at 3 time points (baseline, 1 mo, and 6 mo), involving clinical and cognitive examinations and a specific assessment of motor abnormalities. The Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS) was used for the assessment of extrapyramidal signs, and each motor domain was evaluated with a standard assessment scale. Linear mixed models were built to explore the longitudinal relationships between parkinsonism scores and cognitive impairment. Parkinsonism scores showed significant strong longitudinal associations with deficits in memory, executive functioning, and attention. Spontaneous parkinsonism (total SAS score and hypokinesia and rigidity subscores at baseline) showed high 6-month predictive values for cognitive impairment. In addition, they also had high predictive values for neurologic soft-sign abnormalities but not for dyskinesia, akathisia, and pure catatonic abnormalities. No predictive value was found for glabella-salivation or tremor subscores on the SAS scale. These results emphasize the relevance of the assessment of parkinsonism signs prior to starting to administer antipsychotic drugs, as core manifestations of psychotic illness with a high predictive value for cognitive impairment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/schbul/sbt125

  3 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25126920
[Au] Autor:Sinclair N; Saglamyurek E; Mallahzadeh H; Slater JA; George M; Ricken R; Hedges MP; Oblak D; Simon C; Sohler W; Tittel W
[Ad] Address:Institute for Quantum Science and Technology, and Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2 N 1N4, Canada....
[Ti] Title:Spectral Multiplexing for Scalable Quantum Photonics using an Atomic Frequency Comb Quantum Memory and Feed-Forward Control.
[So] Source:Phys Rev Lett;113(5):053603, 2014 Aug 1.
[Is] ISSN:1079-7114
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Future multiphoton applications of quantum optics and quantum information science require quantum memories that simultaneously store many photon states, each encoded into a different optical mode, and enable one to select the mapping between any input and a specific retrieved mode during storage. Here we show, with the example of a quantum repeater, how to employ spectrally multiplexed states and memories with fixed storage times that allow such mapping between spectral modes. Furthermore, using a Ti:Tm:LiNbO_{3} waveguide cooled to 3 K, a phase modulator, and a spectral filter, we demonstrate storage followed by the required feed-forward-controlled frequency manipulation with time-bin qubits encoded into up to 26 multiplexed spectral modes and 97% fidelity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24400992
[Au] Autor:Finkel D; Pedersen NL
[Ad] Address:a Department of Psychology , Indiana University Southeast , New Albany , IN , USA.
[Ti] Title:Genetic and environmental contributions to the associations between intraindividual variability in reaction time and cognitive function.
[So] Source:Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn;21(6):746-64, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1744-4128
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ABSTRACT Intraindividual variability (IIV) in reaction time has been related to cognitive decline, but questions remain about the nature of this relationship. Mean and range in movement and decision time for simple reaction time were available from 241 individuals aged 51-86 years at the fifth testing wave of the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. Cognitive performance on four factors was also available: verbal, spatial, memory, and speed. Analyses indicated that range in reaction time could be used as an indicator of IIV. Heritability estimates were 35% for mean reaction and 20% for range in reaction. Multivariate analysis indicated that the genetic variance on the memory, speed, and spatial factors is shared with genetic variance for mean or range in reaction time. IIV shares significant genetic variance with fluid ability in late adulthood, over and above and genetic variance shared with mean reaction time.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/13825585.2013.874523

  5 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24344673
[Au] Autor:Bezdicek O; Stepankova H; Moták L; Axelrod BN; Woodard JL; Preiss M; Nikolai T; Ruzicka E; Poreh A
[Ad] Address:a Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience , Charles University in Prague , Prague , Czech Republic.
[Ti] Title:Czech version of Rey Auditory Verbal Learning test: Normative data.
[So] Source:Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn;21(6):693-721, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1744-4128
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ABSTRACT The present study provides normative data stratified by age for the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning test Czech version (RAVLT) derived from a sample of 306 cognitively normal subjects (20-85 years). Participants met strict inclusion criteria (absence of any active or past neurological or psychiatric disorder) and performed within normal limits on other neuropsychological measures. Our analyses revealed significant relationships between most RAVLT indices and age and education. Normative data are provided not only for basic RAVLT scores, but for the first time also for a variety of derived (gained/lost access, primacy/recency effect) and error scores. The study confirmed a logarithmic character of the learning slope and is consistent with other studies. It enables the clinician to evaluate more precisely subject's RAVLT memory performance on a vast number of indices and can be viewed as a concrete example of Quantified Process Approach to neuropsychological assessment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/13825585.2013.865699

  6 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25128537
[Au] Autor:Fortress AM; Kim J; Poole RL; Gould TJ; Frick KM
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA....
[Ti] Title:17ß-Estradiol regulates histone alterations associated with memory consolidation and increases Bdnf promoter acetylation in middle-aged female mice.
[So] Source:Learn Mem;21(9):457-67, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1549-5485
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Histone acetylation is essential for hippocampal memory formation in young adult rodents. Although dysfunctional histone acetylation has been associated with age-related memory decline in male rodents, little is known about whether histone acetylation is altered by aging in female rodents. In young female mice, the ability of 17ß-estradiol (E2) to enhance object recognition memory consolidation requires histone H3 acetylation in the dorsal hippocampus. However, the extent to which histone acetylation is regulated by E2 in middle-aged females is unknown. The mnemonic benefits of E2 in aging females appear to be greatest in middle age, and so pinpointing the molecular mechanisms through which E2 enhances memory at this age could lead to the development of safer and more effective treatments for maintaining memory function without the side effects of current therapies. Here, we show that dorsal hippocampal infusion of E2 rapidly enhanced object recognition and spatial memory, and increased histone H3 acetylation in the dorsal hippocampus, while also significantly reducing levels of histone deacetylase (HDAC2 and HDAC3) proteins. E2 specifically increased histone H3 acetylation at Bdnf promoters pII and pIV in the dorsal hippocampus of both young and middle-aged mice, despite age-related decreases in pI and pIV acetylation. Furthermore, levels of mature BDNF and pro-BDNF proteins in the dorsal hippocampus were increased by E2 in middle-aged females. Together, these data suggest that the middle-aged female dorsal hippocampus remains epigenetically responsive to E2, and that E2 may enhance memory in middle-aged females via epigenetic regulation of Bdnf.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1101/lm.034033.113

  7 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25128536
[Au] Autor:Santoyo-Zedillo M; Rodriguez-Ortiz CJ; Chavez-Marchetta G; Bermudez-Rattoni F; Balderas I
[Ad] Address:División de Neurociencias, Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México D.F., Mexico....
[Ti] Title:Retrieval is not necessary to trigger reconsolidation of object recognition memory in the perirhinal cortex.
[So] Source:Learn Mem;21(9):452-6, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1549-5485
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Memory retrieval has been considered as requisite to initiate memory reconsolidation; however, some studies indicate that blocking retrieval does not prevent memory from undergoing reconsolidation. Since N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors in the perirhinal cortex have been involved in object recognition memory formation, the present study evaluated whether retrieval and reconsolidation are independent processes by manipulating these glutamate receptors. The results showed that AMPA receptor antagonist infusions in the perirhinal cortex blocked retrieval, but did not affect memory reconsolidation, although NMDA receptor antagonist infusions disrupted reconsolidation even if retrieval was blocked. Importantly, neither of these antagonists disrupted short-term memory. These data suggest that memory underwent reconsolidation even in the absence of retrieval.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1101/lm.035428.114

  8 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25128535
[Au] Autor:Song S; Cohen L
[Ad] Address:Human Cortical Physiology and Stroke Neurorehabilitation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA songss@mail.nih.gov cohenl@ninds.nih.gov.
[Ti] Title:Impact of conscious intent on chunking during motor learning.
[So] Source:Learn Mem;21(9):449-51, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1549-5485
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Humans and other mammals learn sequences of movements by splitting them into smaller "chunks." Such chunks are defined by the faster speed of performance of groups of movements. The purpose of this report is to determine how conscious intent to learn impacts chunking, an issue that remains unknown. Here, we studied 80 subjects who either with or without conscious intent learned a motor sequence. Performance was tested before and up to 1-wk post-training. Chunk formation, carryover of chunks, and concatenation of chunks into longer chunks, all measures of motor chunking success, were determined at each time-point. We found that formation, carryover, and concatenation of chunks were comparable across groups and did not improve over the training session and subsequent testing times. Thus, motor learning progressed in the absence of improvements in chunking irrespective of conscious intent. These data suggest that mechanisms other than chunking contribute to successful motor learning with and without conscious intent.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1101/lm.035824.114

  9 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25128553
[Au] Autor:Akue AD; Lee JY; Jameson SC
[Ti] Title:Correction: derivation and maintenance of virtual memory CD8 T cells.
[So] Source:J Immunol;193(5):2609, 2014 Sep 1.
[Is] ISSN:1550-6606
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1490029

  10 / 247253 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25080484
[Au] Autor:Lin W; Cerny D; Chua E; Duan K; Yi JT; Shadan NB; Lum J; Maho-Vaillant M; Zolezzi F; Wong SC; Larbi A; Fink K; Musette P; Poidinger M; Calbo S
[Ad] Address:Biomedical Sciences Institutes, Singapore Immunology Network, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 138648;...
[Ti] Title:Human regulatory B cells combine phenotypic and genetic hallmarks with a distinct differentiation fate.
[So] Source:J Immunol;193(5):2258-66, 2014 Sep 1.
[Is] ISSN:1550-6606
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Regulatory B cells (B-reg) produce IL-10 and suppress inflammation in both mice and humans, but limited data on the phenotype and function of these cells have precluded detailed assessment of their contribution to host immunity. In this article, we report that human B-reg cannot be defined based on a phenotype composed of conventional B cell markers, and that IL-10 production can be elicited in both the CD27(+) memory population and naive B cell subset after only a brief stimulation in vitro. We therefore sought to obtain a better definition of IL-10-producing human B-regs using a multiparameter analysis of B cell phenotype, function, and gene expression profile. Exposure to CpG and anti-Ig are the most potent stimuli for IL-10 secretion in human B cells, but microarray analysis revealed that human B cells cotreated with these reagents resulted in only ∼0.7% of genes being differentially expressed between IL-10(+) and IL-10(-) cells. Instead, connectivity map analysis revealed that IL-10-secreting B cells are those undergoing specific differentiation toward a germinal center fate, and we identified a CD11c(+) B cell subset that was not capable of producing IL-10 even under optimal conditions. Our findings will assist in the identification of a broader range of human pro-B-reg populations that may represent novel targets for immunotherapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1303214


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