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[PMID]: 25459873
[Au] Autor:Rajan V; Bell MA
[Ad] Address:University of Delaware, United States. Electronic address: vrajan@udel.edu.
[Ti] Title:Developmental changes in fact and source recall: Contributions from executive function and brain electrical activity.
[So] Source:Dev Cogn Neurosci;12:1-11, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-9307
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Source memory involves recollecting the contextual details surrounding a memory episode. When source information is bound together, it makes a memory episodic in nature. Unfortunately, very little is known about the factors that contribute to its formation in early development. This study examined the development of source memory in middle childhood. Measures of executive function were examined as potential sources of variation in fact and source recall. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were collected during baseline and fact and source retrieval in order to examine memory-related changes in EEG power. Six and 8-year-old children were taught 10 novel facts from two different sources and recall for fact and source information was later tested. Older children were better on fact recall, but both ages were comparable on source recall. However, source recall performance was poor at both ages, suggesting that this ability continues to develop beyond middle childhood. Regression analyses revealed that executive function uniquely predicted variance in source recall performance. Task-related increases in theta power were observed at frontal, temporal and parietal electrode sites during fact and source retrieval. This investigation contributes to our understanding of age-related differences in source memory processing in middle childhood.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25307958
[Au] Autor:Ciurea SO; Bayraktar UD
[Ad] Address:Department of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: sciurea@mdanderson.org.
[Ti] Title:"No donor"? Consider a haploidentical transplant.
[So] Source:Blood Rev;29(2):63-70, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1681
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (HaploSCT) is an attractive option for patients requiring a hematopoietic stem cell transplant who do not have an HLA-matched donor, because it is cheaper, can be performed faster, and may extend transplantation to virtually all patients in need. Significant advances have been made in the recent decade with dramatic improvement in treatment outcomes. Historically, overcoming the HLA-incompatibility barrier has been a significant limitation to the expansion of this form of transplant. While ex vivo T-cell depletion effectively prevented the development of acute GVHD, it was associated with a higher treatment-related mortality, in excess of 40% in some series, due to a significant delay in recovery of the adaptive immune system. Newer methods have successfully maintained the memory T cells in the graft and/or selectively depleted alloreactive T cells, and are associated with improved treatment outcomes. Post-transplant cyclophosphamide for GVHD prevention has proven very effective in controlling GVHD with lower incidence of infectious complications and treatment-related mortality-as low as 7% at 1 year-and has become the new standard in how this transplant is performed. Here, we reviewed the current experience with this approach and various other strategies employed to control alloreactivity in this setting, including selective depletion of T cells from the graft, as well as we discuss post-transplantation therapy to prevent disease relapse and improve immunologic reconstitution.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25648963
[Au] Autor:Debette S; Ibrahim Verbaas CA; Bressler J; Schuur M; Smith A; Bis JC; Davies G; Wolf C; Gudnason V; Chibnik LB; Yang Q; deStefano AL; de Quervain DJ; Srikanth V; Lahti J; Grabe HJ; Smith JA; Priebe L; Yu L; Karbalai N; Hayward C; Wilson JF; Campbell H; Petrovic K; Fornage M; Chauhan G; Yeo R; Boxall R; Becker J; Stegle O; Mather KA; Chouraki V; Sun Q; Rose LM; Resnick S; Oldmeadow C; Kirin M; Wright AF; Jonsdottir MK; Au R; Becker A; Amin N; Nalls MA; Turner ST; Kardia SL; Oostra B; Windham G; Coker LH; Zhao W; Knopman DS; Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Epidemiology, University of Bordeaux; Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. Electronic address: sdebette@bu.edu....
[Ti] Title:Genome-wide Studies of Verbal Declarative Memory in Nondemented Older People: The Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium.
[So] Source:Biol Psychiatry;77(8):749-63, 2015 Apr 15.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2402
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Memory performance in older persons can reflect genetic influences on cognitive function and dementing processes. We aimed to identify genetic contributions to verbal declarative memory in a community setting. METHODS: We conducted genome-wide association studies for paragraph or word list delayed recall in 19 cohorts from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium, comprising 29,076 dementia- and stroke-free individuals of European descent, aged ≥45 years. Replication of suggestive associations (p < 5 × 10(-6)) was sought in 10,617 participants of European descent, 3811 African-Americans, and 1561 young adults. RESULTS: rs4420638, near APOE, was associated with poorer delayed recall performance in discovery (p = 5.57 × 10(-10)) and replication cohorts (p = 5.65 × 10(-8)). This association was stronger for paragraph than word list delayed recall and in the oldest persons. Two associations with specific tests, in subsets of the total sample, reached genome-wide significance in combined analyses of discovery and replication (rs11074779 [HS3ST4], p = 3.11 × 10(-8), and rs6813517 [SPOCK3], p = 2.58 × 10(-8)) near genes involved in immune response. A genetic score combining 58 independent suggestive memory risk variants was associated with increasing Alzheimer disease pathology in 725 autopsy samples. Association of memory risk loci with gene expression in 138 human hippocampus samples showed cis-associations with WDR48 and CLDN5, both related to ubiquitin metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: This largest study to date exploring the genetics of memory function in ~40,000 older individuals revealed genome-wide associations and suggested an involvement of immune and ubiquitin pathways.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24697257
[Au] Autor:Leeds PR; Yu F; Wang Z; Chiu CT; Zhang Y; Leng Y; Linares GR; Chuang DM
[Ad] Address:†Molecular Neurobiology Section, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1363, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1363, United States....
[Ti] Title:A new avenue for lithium: intervention in traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:ACS Chem Neurosci;5(6):422-33, 2014 Jun 18.
[Is] ISSN:1948-7193
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability and death from trauma to central nervous system (CNS) tissues. For patients who survive the initial injury, TBI can lead to neurodegeneration as well as cognitive and motor deficits, and is even a risk factor for the future development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Preclinical studies of multiple neuropathological and neurodegenerative disorders have shown that lithium, which is primarily used to treat bipolar disorder, has considerable neuroprotective effects. Indeed, emerging evidence now suggests that lithium can also mitigate neurological deficits incurred from TBI. Lithium exerts neuroprotective effects and stimulates neurogenesis via multiple signaling pathways; it inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), upregulates neurotrophins and growth factors (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)), modulates inflammatory molecules, upregulates neuroprotective factors (e.g., B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70)), and concomitantly downregulates pro-apoptotic factors. In various experimental TBI paradigms, lithium has been shown to reduce neuronal death, microglial activation, cyclooxygenase-2 induction, amyloid-ß (Aß), and hyperphosphorylated tau levels, to preserve blood-brain barrier integrity, to mitigate neurological deficits and psychiatric disturbance, and to improve learning and memory outcome. Given that lithium exerts multiple therapeutic effects across an array of CNS disorders, including promising results in preclinical models of TBI, additional clinical research is clearly warranted to determine its therapeutic attributes for combating TBI. Here, we review lithium's exciting potential in ameliorating physiological as well as cognitive deficits induced by TBI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1021/cn500040g

  5 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24847112
[Au] Autor:Gorka AX; Knodt AR; Hariri AR
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of NeuroGenetics, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, Duke University, Durham, 27708 NC, USA axgorka@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Basal forebrain moderates the magnitude of task-dependent amygdala functional connectivity.
[So] Source:Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci;10(4):501-7, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1749-5024
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Animal studies reveal that the amygdala promotes attention and emotional memory, in part, by driving activity in downstream target regions including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Prior work has demonstrated that the amygdala influences these regions directly through monosynaptic glutamatergic signaling, and indirectly by driving activity of the cholinergic basal forebrain and subsequent downstream acetylcholine release. Yet to date, no work has addressed the functional relevance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in facilitating signaling from the amygdala in humans. We set out to determine how blood oxygen level-dependent signal within the amygdala and cholinergic basal forebrain interact to predict neural responses within downstream targets. Here, we use functional connectivity analyses to demonstrate that the cholinergic basal forebrain moderates increased amygdala connectivity with both the PFC and the hippocampus during the processing of biologically salient stimuli in humans. We further demonstrate that functional variation within the choline transporter gene predicts the magnitude of this modulatory effect. Collectively, our results provide novel evidence for the importance of cholinergic signaling in modulating neural pathways supporting arousal, attention and memory in humans. Further, our results may shed light on prior association studies linking functional variation within the choline transporter gene and diagnoses of major depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/scan/nsu080

  6 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834437
[Au] Autor:Benoit M; Guerchouche R; Petit PD; Chapoulie E; Manera V; Chaurasia G; Drettakis G; Robert P
[Ad] Address:EA CoBTeK/IA, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, CHU de Nice, Nice, France ; Clinique de Psychiatrie, Pole des Neurosciences Cliniques, CHU de Nice, France....
[Ti] Title:Is it possible to use highly realistic virtual reality in the elderly? A feasibility study with image-based rendering.
[So] Source:Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat;11:557-63, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1176-6328
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Virtual reality (VR) opens up a vast number of possibilities in many domains of therapy. The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the acceptability for elderly subjects of a VR experience using the image-based rendering virtual environment (IBVE) approach and secondly to test the hypothesis that visual cues using VR may enhance the generation of autobiographical memories. METHODS: Eighteen healthy volunteers (mean age 68.2 years) presenting memory complaints with a Mini-Mental State Examination score higher than 27 and no history of neuropsychiatric disease were included. Participants were asked to perform an autobiographical fluency task in four conditions. The first condition was a baseline grey screen, the second was a photograph of a well-known location in the participant's home city (FamPhoto), and the last two conditions displayed VR, ie, a familiar image-based virtual environment (FamIBVE) consisting of an image-based representation of a known landmark square in the center of the city of experimentation (Nice) and an unknown image-based virtual environment (UnknoIBVE), which was captured in a public housing neighborhood containing unrecognizable building fronts. After each of the four experimental conditions, participants filled in self-report questionnaires to assess the task acceptability (levels of emotion, motivation, security, fatigue, and familiarity). CyberSickness and Presence questionnaires were also assessed after the two VR conditions. Autobiographical memory was assessed using a verbal fluency task and quality of the recollection was assessed using the "remember/know" procedure. RESULTS: All subjects completed the experiment. Sense of security and fatigue were not significantly different between the conditions with and without VR. The FamPhoto condition yielded a higher emotion score than the other conditions (P<0.05). The CyberSickness questionnaire showed that participants did not experience sickness during the experiment across the VR conditions. VR stimulates autobiographical memory, as demonstrated by the increased total number of responses on the autobiographical fluency task and the increased number of conscious recollections of memories for familiar versus unknown scenes (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: The study indicates that VR using the FamIBVE system is well tolerated by the elderly. VR can also stimulate recollections of autobiographical memory and convey familiarity of a given scene, which is an essential requirement for use of VR during reminiscence therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150402
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/NDT.S73179

  7 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25768425
[Au] Autor:Liu A; Jain N; Vyas A; Lim LW
[Ad] Address:School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore....
[Ti] Title:Ventromedial prefrontal cortex stimulation enhances memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in the middle-aged rats.
[So] Source:Elife;4, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2050-084X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Memory dysfunction is a key symptom of age-related dementia. Although recent studies have suggested positive effects of electrical stimulation for memory enhancement, its potential targets remain largely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that spatially targeted deep brain stimulation of ventromedial prefrontal cortex enhanced memory functions in a middle-aged rat model. Our results show that acute stimulation enhanced the short-, but not the long-term memory in the novel-object recognition task. Interestingly, after chronic high-frequency stimulation, both the short- and long-term memories were robustly improved in the novel-object recognition test and Morris water-maze spatial task compared to sham. Our results also demonstrated that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation upregulated neurogenesis-associated genes along with enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation. Importantly, these memory behaviors were strongly correlated with the hippocampal neurogenesis. Overall, these findings suggest that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation may serve as a novel effective therapeutic target for dementia-related disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.7554/eLife.04803

  8 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25833031
[Au] Autor:Lewis CE; Thomas KG; Dodge NC; Molteno CD; Meintjes EM; Jacobson JL; Jacobson SW
[Ad] Address:ACSENT Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:Verbal learning and memory impairment in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.
[So] Source:Alcohol Clin Exp Res;39(4):724-32, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0277
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Previous studies using the California Verbal Learning Test-Children's Version (CVLT-C) to examine effects of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure on verbal learning and memory have reported impaired information acquisition (i.e., encoding), rather than retrieval, as the primary mechanism underlying learning and memory impairment. We administered the CVLT-C to 2 independent cohorts to determine whether (i) effects on encoding are also seen at moderate exposure levels, using both categorical (diagnostic/exposure group) and continuous exposure measures; (ii) these deficits are specific or secondary to alcohol-related impairment in IQ; (iii) effects on retrieval can be detected over and above effects on initial encoding; and (iv) effects on learning are attributable to less efficient learning strategy use. METHODS: We administered the CVLT-C and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to 151 Cape Town heavy and nonexposed children (M = 10.3 years), and 291 Detroit adolescents recruited to over-represent moderate-to-heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (M = 14.4 years). RESULTS: Effects on encoding in the heavily exposed Cape Town cohort and on retrieval in both cohorts were significant after adjustment for IQ. Although effects on retrieval were no longer significant in Cape Town after control for initial encoding, effects on recognition memory continued to be evident in Detroit. Children with full or partial fetal alcohol syndrome were less able to use the semantic cluster encoding strategy implicit in the CVLT-C. CONCLUSIONS: Effects on verbal learning were seen primarily in the more heavily exposed Cape Town cohort; effects on recall and recognition memory were also seen at moderate exposure levels in Detroit. These effects were not attributable to alcohol-related impairment in overall intellectual competence. The finding that effects on retention continued to be evident after statistical adjustment for initial encoding in Detroit suggests that a fetal alcohol-related deficit in retrieval is not secondary to a failure to encode the initial information. These data confirm that this impairment in initial learning is mediated, in part, by failure to use the semantic cluster learning strategy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/acer.12671

  9 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25752869
[Au] Autor:Caldwell KK; Goggin SL; Labrecque MT; Allan AM
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosciences, School of Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
[Ti] Title:The Impact of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on Hippocampal-Dependent Outcome Measures is Influenced by Prenatal and Early-Life Rearing Conditions.
[So] Source:Alcohol Clin Exp Res;39(4):631-9, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0277
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The clinical course of individuals exposed to alcohol in utero is influenced by multiple factors, including the social environments of the gravid female and offspring. In the present studies we focused on the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and the prenatal and early-life social environments on the hippocampal formation, as impaired development and functioning of this brain region have been implicated in several of the adverse cognitive outcomes associated with PAE. METHODS: We combined our PAE mouse model with 2 conditions of housing pregnant dams and their preweanling offspring: the standard nest (SN), in which a dam is individually housed prior to parturition and then remains isolated with her offspring, and the communal nest (CN), in which multiple dams are housed together prior to parturition and then following delivery the moms and their litters share a nest. Mouse dams consumed either 10% (w/v) ethanol in 0.066% (w/v) saccharin (SAC) or 0.066% (w/v) SAC alone using a limited (4-hour) access, drinking-in-the-dark paradigm. Immunoblotting techniques were used to measure levels of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), 11-ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, the FK506-binding proteins 51 and 52, and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 in the hippocampal formation isolated from male adolescent offspring. We also determined the effect of PAE and rearing conditions on context discrimination, a hippocampal-dependent learning/memory task. RESULTS: SN PAE offspring displayed impaired context discrimination and neurochemical changes in the hippocampal formation consistent with increased GR nuclear localization. These effects of PAE were, in general, ameliorated in mice reared in a CN. The CN also altered neurochemical measures and improved learning/memory in SAC control animals. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate a complex interplay between the effects of PAE and social environments. The findings have important translational implications, as well as highlight the importance of considering rearing conditions in the interpretation of research findings on PAE.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/acer.12674

  10 / 258757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25749017
[Au] Autor:Nuechterlein KH; Green MF; Calkins ME; Greenwood TA; Gur RE; Gur RC; Lazzeroni LC; Light GA; Radant AD; Seidman LJ; Siever LJ; Silverman JM; Sprock J; Stone WS; Sugar CA; Swerdlow NR; Tsuang DW; Tsuang MT; Turetsky BI; Braff DL
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles CA, United States. Electronic address: keithn@ucla.edu....
[Ti] Title:Attention/vigilance in schizophrenia: Performance results from a large multi-site study of the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS).
[So] Source:Schizophr Res;163(1-3):38-46, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2509
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Attention/vigilance impairments are present in individuals with schizophrenia across psychotic and remitted states and in their first-degree relatives. An important question is whether deficits in attention/vigilance can be consistently and reliably measured across sites varying in many participant demographic, clinical, and functional characteristics, as needed for large-scale genetic studies of endophenotypes. We examined Continuous Performance Test (CPT) data from phase 2 of the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS-2), the largest-scale assessment of cognitive and psychophysiological endophenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. The CPT data from 2251 participants from five sites were examined. A perceptual-load vigilance task (the Degraded Stimulus CPT or DS-CPT) and a memory-load vigilance task (CPT-Identical Pairs or CPT-IP) were utilized. Schizophrenia patients performed more poorly than healthy comparison subjects (HCS) across sites, despite significant site differences in participant age, sex, education, and racial distribution. Patient-HCS differences in signal/noise discrimination (d') in the DS-CPT varied significantly across sites, but averaged a medium effect size. CPT-IP performance showed large patient-HCS differences across sites. Poor CPT performance was independent of or weakly correlated with symptom severity, but was significantly associated with lower educational achievement and functional capacity. Current smoking was associated with poorer CPT-IP d'. Patients taking both atypical and typical antipsychotic medication performed more poorly than those on no or atypical antipsychotic medications, likely reflecting their greater severity of illness. We conclude that CPT deficits in schizophrenia can be reliably detected across sites, are relatively independent of current symptom severity, and are related to functional capacity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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