Database : MEDLINE
Search on : methods [Words]
References found : 4879141 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 487915 go to page                         

  1 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524920
[Au] Autor:Sakhi AK; Sabaredzovic A; Papadopoulou E; Cequier E; Thomsen C
[Ad] Address:Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Division of Infection Control, Environment and Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: amritkaur.sakhi@fhi.no.
[Ti] Title:Levels, variability and determinants of environmental phenols in pairs of Norwegian mothers and children.
[So] Source:Environ Int;114:242-251, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6750
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Exposure to environmental phenols including parabens, bisphenols (BPs), oxybenzone/benzophenone-3 (BP-3) and triclosan (TCS) is ubiquitous. Due to evidence of their estrogenic activity, they have been considered as chemicals of concern. The exposure of the Norwegian population to these compounds is presently unknown. AIMS: To measure urinary levels of twelve different environmental phenols including four emerging bisphenols: S, F, B and AF (abbreviated as BPS, BPF, BPB and BPAF, respectively) in a healthy Norwegian population. We have calculated short-term variability, estimated daily intakes and investigated important determinants of exposure. METHODS: Urine samples were collected from mothers (n = 48) and their children (n = 56) during spring/summer 2012 in two counties in Norway. RESULTS: Six environmental phenols namely methyl, ethyl and propyl paraben, BPA, BP-3 and TCS were detected in almost 100% of the urine samples. Among the emerging bisphenols, BPS was detected most frequently in the urine samples (42-48%) followed by BPF (4-15%). Parabens were positively and significantly correlated to each other in both mothers and children. Levels of parabens and BP-3 were higher in mothers compared to children. All mothers and children had lower estimated daily intakes (back calculated from the urinary concentrations) of parabens and BPA than the respective acceptable and tolerable daily intakes (ADIs and TDIs) established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Observed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) indicated moderate to high reliability of spot urine measurements for all the environmental phenols (ICCs: 0.70-0.97). Use of hair products, deodorants, face and hand creams were significantly associated with higher urinary levels of parabens. CONCLUSIONS: Occurrence of environmental phenols in healthy Norwegian women and children is abundant. Among emerging bisphenols, there is widespread exposure to BPS. A single spot urine sample can be used for estimating short-term exposures of environmental phenols. Urinary levels of parabens were associated with use of PCPs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524917
[Au] Autor:Cardona M; Lewis ET; Turner RM; Alkhouri H; Asha S; Mackenzie J; Perkins M; Suri S; Holdgate A; Winoto L; Chang CW; Gallego-Luxan B; McCarthy S; Kristensen MR; O'Sullivan M; Skjt-Arkil H; Ekmann AA; Nygaard HH; Jensen JJ; Jensen RO; Pedersen JL; Breen D; Petersen JA; Jensen BN; Mogensen CB; Hillman K; Brabrand M
[Ad] Address:The Simpson Centre for Health Services Research, South Western Sydney Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, PO Box 6087, UNSW, NSW, 1466 Australia. Electronic address: magnolia.cardona@unsw.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of a tool to predict short-term mortality in older people presenting at emergency departments: Protocol for a multi-centre cohort study.
[So] Source:Arch Gerontol Geriatr;76:169-174, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6976
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Prognostic uncertainty inhibits clinicians from initiating timely end-of-life discussions and advance care planning. This study evaluates the efficacy of the CriSTAL (Criteria for Screening and Triaging to Appropriate aLternative care) checklist in emergency departments. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of patients aged ≥65 years with any diagnosis admitted via emergency departments in ten hospitals in Australia, Denmark and Ireland. Electronic and paper clinical records will be used to extract risk factors such as nursing home residency, physiological deterioration warranting a rapid response call, personal history of active chronic disease, history of hospitalisations or intensive care unit admission in the past year, evidence of proteinuria or ECG abnormalities, and evidence of frailty to be concurrently measured with Fried Score and Clinical Frailty Scale. Patients or their informal caregivers will be contacted by telephone around three months after initial assessment to ascertain survival, self-reported health, post-discharge frailty and health service utilisation since discharge. Logistic regression and bootstrapping techniques and AUROC curves will be used to test the predictive accuracy of CriSTAL for death within 90 days of admission and in-hospital death. DISCUSSION: The CriSTAL checklist is an objective and practical tool for use in emergency departments among older patients to determine individual probability of death in the short-term. Its validation in this cohort is expected to reduce clinicians' prognostic uncertainty on the time to patients' death and encourage timely end-of-life conversations to support clinical decisions with older frail patients and their families about their imminent or future care choices.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524911
[Au] Autor:Nzayisenga JC; Eriksson K; Sellstedt A
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Physiology, UPSC, Umea University, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Mixotrophic and heterotrophic production of lipids and carbohydrates by a locally isolated microalga using wastewater as a growth medium.
[So] Source:Bioresour Technol;257:260-265, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2976
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The biomass production and changes in biochemical composition of a locally isolated microalga (Chlorella sp.) were investigated in autotrophic, mixotrophic and heterotrophic conditions, using glucose or glycerol as carbon sources and municipal wastewater as the growth medium. Both standard methods and Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) analysis of data acquired by Fourier-transform IR (FTIR) spectrometry showed that autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions promoted carbohydrate accumulation, while heterotrophic conditions with glycerol resulted in the highest lipid content and lowest carbohydrate content. Heterotrophic conditions with glycerol as a carbon source also resulted in high oleic acid (18:1) contents and low linolenic acid (18:3) contents, and thus increasing biodiesel quality. The results also show the utility of MCR-ALS for analyzing changes in microalgal biochemical composition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524908
[Au] Autor:Gutner CA; Pedersen ER; Drummond SPA
[Ad] Address:National Center for PTSD Women's Health Sciences Division, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: cgutner@bu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Going direct to the consumer: Examining treatment preferences for veterans with insomnia, PTSD, and depression.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;263:108-114, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inclusion of consumer preferences to disseminate evidence-based psychosocial treatment (EBPT) is crucial to effectively bridge the science-to-practice quality chasm. We examined this treatment gap for insomnia, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and comorbid symptoms in a sample of 622 young adult veterans through preference in symptom focus, treatment modality, and related gender differences among those screening positive for each problem. Data were collected from veteran drinkers recruited through targeted Facebook advertisements as part of a brief online alcohol intervention. Analyses demonstrated that veterans reported greater willingness to seek insomnia-focused treatment over PTSD- or depression-focused care. Notably, even when participants screened negative for insomnia, they preferred sleep-focused care to PTSD- or depression-focused care. Although one in five veterans with a positive screen would not consider care, veterans screening for both insomnia and PTSD who would consider care had a preference for in-person counseling, and those screening for both insomnia and depression had similar preferences for in-person and mobile app-based/computer self-help treatment. Marginal gender differences were found. Incorporating direct-to-consumer methods into research can help educate stakeholders about methods to expand EBPT access. Though traditional in-person counseling was often preferred, openness to app-based/computer interventions offers alternative methods to provide veterans with EBPTs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524900
[Au] Autor:Krantzberg G; Hartley P
[Ad] Address:McMaster University, Canada. Electronic address: krantz@mcmaster.ca.
[Ti] Title:Feasible policy development and implementation for the destruction of endocrine disruptors in wastewater.
[So] Source:Sci Total Environ;631-632:246-251, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1026
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Endocrine disruptors when introduced to waterways have many adverse health effects on wildlife and humans. These health effects vary from neurological, immune, carcinogenic and reproductive disorders. Currently, there are few wastewater treatment facilities that are purposefully treating endocrine disruptors as part of the normal wastewater treatment process. Current literature has shown that endocrine disruptors can be treated using conventional methods. These conventional methods are centered around the denitrification process, which is rarely adopted in Canada. This paper investigates the current wastewater effluent regulations and guidelines in Canada, Ontario and the European Union. The research identifies a policy strategy that would include denitrification in the wastewater treatment process to help eliminate endocrine disruptors and acutely toxic nitrogen based compounds. Our emphasis here is on action possible in the Province of Ontario Canada, give the context of the Great Lakes basin and the potential for early action to stimulate other jurisdictions to follow. Our recommendations while aimed at one jurisdiction, have broad application globally.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524888
[Au] Autor:Li S; Zheng X; Liu C; Yao Z; Zhang W; Han S
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry (LAPC), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China; College of Earth Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
[Ti] Title:Influences of observation method, season, soil depth, land use and management practice on soil dissolvable organic carbon concentrations: A meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Sci Total Environ;631-632:105-114, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1026
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Quantifications of soil dissolvable organic carbon concentrations, together with other relevant variables, are needed to understand the carbon biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Soil dissolvable organic carbon can generally be grouped into two incomparable categories. One is soil extractable organic carbon (EOC), which is measured by extracting with an aqueous extractant (distilled water or a salt solution). The other is soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which is measured by sampling soil water using tension-free lysimeters or tension samplers. The influences of observation methods, natural factors and management practices on the measured concentrations, which ranged from 2.5-3970 (mean: 69) mg kg of EOC and 0.4-200 (mean: 12) mg L of DOC, were investigated through a meta-analysis. The observation methods (e.g., extractant, extractant-to-soil ratio and pre-treatment) had significant effects on EOC concentrations. The most significant divergence (approximately 109%) occurred especially at the extractant of potassium sulfate (K SO ) solutions compared to distilled water. As EOC concentrations were significantly different (approximately 47%) between non-cultivated and cultivated soils, they were more suitable than DOC concentrations for assessing the influence of land use on soil dissolvable organic carbon levels. While season did not significantly affect EOC concentrations, DOC concentrations showed significant differences (approximately 50%) in summer and autumn compared to spring. For management practices, applications of crop residues and nitrogen fertilizers showed positive effects (approximately 23% to 91%) on soil EOC concentrations, while tillage displayed negative effects (approximately -17%), compared to no straw, no nitrogen fertilizer and no tillage. Compared to no nitrogen, applications of synthetic nitrogen also appeared to significantly enhance DOC concentrations (approximately 32%). However, further studies are needed in the future to confirm/investigate the effects of ecosystem management practices using standardized EOC measurement protocols or more DOC cases of field experiments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524885
[Au] Autor:Chen Q; Wu S; Wu Y; Chen L; Pang Q
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics Surgery, Ningbo No. 2 Hospital, Ningbo 315010, Zhejiang, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:MiR-149 suppresses the inflammatory response of chondrocytes in osteoarthritis by down-regulating the activation of TAK1/NF-κB.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;101:763-768, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that with the complication of disability, while inflammation is the important response of OA. MiR-149 was down-regulated in the OA tissues, while the potential mechanism of miR-149 in OA is unclear. METHODS: A total of 20 OA patients and 20 healthy persons were enrolled in the present study. Real-time PCR was used to detect miR-149 and the mRNA expression of TAK1, western blot was used to detect the protein expression of TAK1. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to identify the targeting relationship between miR-149 and TAK1. Elisa assay was used to identify the level of several pro-inflammatory cytokines. RESULTS: MiR-149 was down-regulated in both OA tissues and IL-1-induced chondrocytes, while the expression of TAK1 was opposite. TAK1 was the target gene miR-149 targets TAK1 to regulate its expression. Human normal chondrocytes subjected to IL-1 significantly promoted the inflammatory response, and also accelerated the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway, while alternatively si-TAK1, miR-149 mimic or PDTC reversed the effects of IL-1. Cells transfected with miR-149 inhibitor promotes the level of inflammation cytokines, as well as the activation of NF-κB, while cells co-transfected with si-TAK1 and miR-149 inhibitor abolishes the effects of miR-149 inhibitor. CONCLUSION: MiR-149 targets TAK1 to regulate the pathogenesis of OA, among which TAK1/NF-κB signaling acted as an important pathway in the inflammatory response that induced by IL-1.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524874
[Au] Autor:DePhilippis D; Petry NM; Bonn-Miller MO; Rosenbach SB; McKay JR
[Ad] Address:Center of Excellence in Substance Addiction Treatment and Education, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States; Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States. Electronic address: dominick.dephilippis@va.go
[Ti] Title:The national implementation of Contingency Management (CM) in the Department of Veterans Affairs: Attendance at CM sessions and substance use outcomes.
[So] Source:Drug Alcohol Depend;185:367-373, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0046
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In 2011, the Department of Veterans Affairs launched an initiative to expand patients' access to contingency management (CM) for the treatment of substance use disorders, particularly stimulant use disorder. This study evaluates the uptake and effectiveness of the VA initiative by presenting data on participation in coaching, fidelity to key components of the CM protocol, and clinical outcomes (CM attendance and substance use). METHODS: Fifty-five months after the first VA stations began offering CM to patients in June 2011, 94 stations had made CM available to 2060 patients. As those 94 VA stations began delivering CM to Veterans, their staff participated in coaching calls to maintain fidelity to CM procedures. As a part of the CM coaching process, those 94 implementation sites provided data describing the setting and structure of their CM programs as well as their fidelity practices. Additional data on patients' CM attendance and urine test results also were collected from the 94 implementation sites. RESULTS: The mean number of coaching calls the 94 programs participated in was 6.5. The majority of sites implemented CM according to recommended standard guidelines and reported high fidelity with most CM practices. On average, patients attended more than half their scheduled CM sessions, and the average percent of samples that tested negative for the target substance was 91.1%. CONCLUSION: The VA's CM implementation initiative has resulted in widespread uptake of CM and produced attendance and substance use outcomes comparable to those found in controlled clinical trials.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524873
[Au] Autor:Laslett AM; Jiang H; Chikritzhs T
[Ad] Address:National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, 6002, Australia; Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, 3086, Australia; School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 3000, Australia. Electronic address: anne-marie.laslett@curtin.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Child injury deaths linked with adult alcohol consumption: A time series analysis.
[So] Source:Drug Alcohol Depend;185:360-366, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0046
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to quantify the population-level associations between child injury deaths and adult (aged 15+ years) per capita alcohol consumption (PCC) and between child injury deaths and the impact of major alcohol and safety policy changes in Australia. METHODS: All child deaths due to external causes during 1910-2013, and child deaths due specifically to road crashes, assaults, suicide and other external causes, were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Child (0-14 year) mortality rates were analysed in relation to PCC using an Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average model. RESULTS: A positive association between PCC and overall child external mortality was identified. The estimated coefficient was 0.326 (p = .002), indicating that a 10% decrease in PCC was associated with a 3.3% reduction in child injury mortality. A positive association was identified for road traffic and other child injury mortality, but not assault injuries. The introduction of compulsory seatbelt legislation in combination with random breath testing was associated with a reduction in overall injury and road traffic child mortality. Decreasing the legal drinking age was associated with an increase in the rate of other external-cause child mortality. CONCLUSION: Reducing PCC in Australia is likely to result in a small but significant reduction in the injury mortality rate of children aged 0-14 years.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 4879141 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524872
[Au] Autor:Caetano R; Vaeth PAC; Canino G
[Ad] Address:Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, 180 Grand Avenue, Suite 1200, Oakland, CA 94612, USA. Electronic address: raul.caetano@utsouthwestern.edu.
[Ti] Title:Illegal drug use and its correlates in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
[So] Source:Drug Alcohol Depend;185:356-359, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0046
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Data on the prevalence and correlates of illegal drug use in Puerto Rico are now almost 20 years old. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to estimate the 12-month prevalence of illegal and non-prescribed medical drug use in San Juan, Puerto Rico and identify sociodemographic correlates of use. METHODS: Data are from a random household sample of 1510 individuals, 18-64 years of age in San Juan, Puerto Rico. RESULTS: The 12-month prevalence of any illegal or non-prescribed drug use was 16.5%. Prevalence among men (20.7%) was higher than among women (12.9%; chi = 16.308; df = 1; p < .01). Prevalence for specific drugs ranged from 11.2% for marijuana to 0.2% for methadone. RESULTS: of the multiple logistic regression analysis showed that male gender (OR = 1.67, 95CI = 1.21-2.3; p < .01), age 18-29 (OR = 2.39; 95CI = 1.35-4.23; p < .01), age 30-39 (OR = 1.93; 95CI = 1.01-3.69; p < .05), low (OR = 2.03; 95CI = 1.36-3.02; p < .001) and medium (OR = 1.50; 95CL = 1.01-2.23; p < .05) family cohesion/pride, and no religious preference (OR = 1.99; 95CI = 1.23-3.22; p < .01) increased the odds of drug use. Annual family income of $40,000-$60,000 (OR = 0.45; 95CI = 0.21-0.93; p < .05) and $60,001 and more (OR = 0.35; 95CI = 0.13-0.94; p > .05) were negatively associated with drug use compared to annual income up to $10,000. CONCLUSIONS: As in many other places in the U.S., drug use in San Juan, Puerto Rico is high, affecting about 1 in 6 adults in the population. The highest prevalence is for marijuana use, which cannot be medically prescribed and of which recreational use is illegal on the island.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 487915 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information