Database : MEDLINE
Search on : methylphenidate [Words]
References found : 8067 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 807 go to page                         

  1 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29476896
[Au] Autor:Nishitomi K; Yano K; Kobayashi M; Jino K; Kano T; Horiguchi N; Shinohara S; Hasegawa M
[Ad] Address:Pain & Neuroscience, Drug Discovery & Disease Research Laboratory, Shionogi Co. Ltd., Toyonaka, Osaka, Japan. Electronic address: kouhei.nishitomi@shionogi.co.jp.
[Ti] Title:Systemic administration of guanfacine improves food-motivated impulsive choice behavior primarily via direct stimulation of postsynaptic α -adrenergic receptors in rats.
[So] Source:Behav Brain Res;345:21-29, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7549
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Impulsive choice behavior, which can be assessed using the delay discounting task, is a characteristic of various psychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Guanfacine is a selective α -adrenergic receptor agonist that is clinically effective in treating ADHD. However, there is no clear evidence that systemic guanfacine administration reduces impulsive choice behavior in the delay discounting task in rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of systemic guanfacine administration on food-motivated impulsive choice behavior in rats and the neuronal mechanism underlying this effect. Repeated administration of either guanfacine, methylphenidate, or atomoxetine significantly enhanced impulse control, increasing the number of times the rats chose a large but delayed reward in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of guanfacine was significantly blocked by pretreatment with an α -adrenergic receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effect of guanfacine remained unaffected in rats pretreated with a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin, consistent with a post-synaptic action. In contrast, the effect of atomoxetine on impulsive choice behavior was attenuated by pretreatment with the noradrenergic neurotoxin. These results provide the first evidence that systemically administered guanfacine reduces impulsive choice behavior in rats and that direct stimulation of postsynaptic, rather than presynaptic, α -adrenergic receptors is involved in this effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29476840
[Au] Autor:Aasen IE; Øgrim G; Kropotov J; Brunner JF
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Neuropsychology, Helgeland Hospital, Mosjøen, Norway. Electronic address: ida.aasen@ntnu.no.
[Ti] Title:Methylphenidate selectively modulates one sub-component of the no-go P3 in pediatric ADHD medication responders.
[So] Source:Biol Psychol;134:30-38, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6246
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Methylphenidate (MPH) has been shown to modulate the amplitude of the no-go P3 component of the event-related potential (ERP; Øgrim, Aasen, & Brunner, 2016). Using group independent component analysis, the no-go P3 from a cued go/no-go task has been separated into two sub-components (Brunner et al., 2013). This study investigated whether sub-components of the no-go P3 could be identified in children with ADHD, and how MPH modulates their amplitudes. ERPs were registered twice (on/off MPH) in 57 children with ADHD classified as medication responders in a four-week medication trial. Two no-go P3 sub-components were identified. In the MPH session, the amplitude of one sub-component, the IC P3no-go (mean latency 378 ms, with a central distribution), was significantly larger than at baseline, whereas the other sub-component, the IC P3no-go (mean latency 428 ms, with a centro-frontal distribution), was not significantly affected. These results add to the literature documenting that the no-go P3 consists of two overlapping phenomena with different functional correlates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29519208
[Au] Autor:Iaccarino MA; Philpotts LL; Zafonte R; Biederman J
[Ad] Address:1 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Stimulant Use in the Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Qualitative Literature Review.
[So] Source:J Atten Disord;:1087054718759752, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1557-1246
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) often presents with cognitive complaints including difficulty with attention and concentration. As these symptoms resemble those of ADHD, stimulants may be a potential treatment for mTBI. This review evaluates the literature on the use of stimulants for the treatment of mTBI. METHOD: A systematic evaluation of the literature using six databases: Ovidmedline, Pubmed, psychINFO, CINAH, Embase, and Cochrane. Broad search terms were used and studies were included that evaluate the use of stimulant and stimulant-like medications in the mTBI population. Data extracted included stimulant type and dosing, symptoms targeted, outcomes, safety and tolerability, and if the study population had ADHD. RESULTS: Nine studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Immediate release methylphenidate and amantadine were used for treatment. Methylphenidate had some impact on attention, fatigue, and depression. However, due to the limited number of studies and heterogeneity of study populations, symptoms targeted, and outcome measures used, meaningful conclusions regarding the effect of stimulants in mTBI could not be made. No study evaluated for the presence of ADHD within the study population, despite stimulants being the mainstay treatment for ADHD. CONCLUSION: PProspective studies on the use of stimulants in mTBI, that evaluate participants for a diagnosis of ADHD, are needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1087054718759752

  4 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29374517
[Au] Autor:Angyal N; Horvath EZ; Tarnok Z; Richman MJ; Bognar E; Lakatos K; Sasvari-Szekely M; Nemoda Z
[Ad] Address:Institute of Medical Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Pathobiochemistry, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
[Ti] Title:Association analysis of norepinephrine transporter polymorphisms and methylphenidate response in ADHD patients.
[So] Source:Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry;84(Pt A):122-128, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4216
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Methylphenidate (MPH) is the most frequently prescribed drug in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Hitherto mostly the dopamine transporter gene has been studied in MPH-response and only a few studies analyzed the norepinephrine transporter (NET, SLC6A2) gene, although MPH is a potent inhibitor of both dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. We aimed to analyze this monoamine transporter gene in relation to ADHD per se and MPH-response in particular to gain further knowledge in ADHD pharmacogenetics using a Caucasian sample. METHODS: Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs28386840, rs2242446, rs3785143, rs3785157, rs5569, rs7194256 SNP) were studied across the NET gene in 163 ADHD children (age: 9.3±2.6; 86.5% male) using ADHD-RS hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention scales. For case-control analysis 486 control subjects were also genotyped. At the MPH-response analysis responders had minimum 25% decrease of ADHD-RS total score after 2months of treatment, and chi-square test compared 90 responders and 32 non-responders, whereas ANOVA was used to assess symptom improvement after the first month among the 122 ADHD patients. RESULTS: The classical case-control analysis did not yield any association with ADHD diagnosis, which was supported by meta-analysis conducted on the available genetic data (combining previously published and the present studies). On the other hand, the intronic rs3785143 showed nominal association with inattention symptoms (p=0.01). The haplotype analysis supported this association, and indicated the importance of the first haploblock encompassing the intronic and 2 promoter SNPs. With MPH-response only the promoter rs28386840 showed nominal association: Those with at least one T-allele were overrepresented in the responder group (42% vs 19%, p=0.08), and they had better improvement on the hyperactivity-impulsivity scale compared to the AA genotype (p=0.04). CONCLUSION: Although none of our single SNP findings remained significant after correcting for multiple testing, our results from the MPH-response analysis indicate the potential importance of promoter variants in the NET gene.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29372315
[Au] Autor:King M; Van Breda K; Stein DJ; Lutz K; Rauch HGL
[Ad] Address:Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. michaeltcking@me.com.
[Ti] Title:Predicting the ergogenic response to methylphenidate.
[So] Source:Eur J Appl Physiol;118(4):777-784, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1439-6327
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Methylphenidate (MPH) and other stimulants have been shown to enhance physical performance. However, stimulant research has almost exclusively been conducted in young, active persons with a normal BMI, and may not generalize to other groups. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ergogenic response to MPH could be predicted by individual level characteristics. METHODS: We investigated whether weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), age, and BMI could predict the ergogenic response to MPH. In a double-blind, cross-over design 29 subjects (14M, 15F, 29.7 ± 9.68 years, BMI: 26.1 ± 6.82, MVPA: 568.8 ± 705.6 min) ingested MPH or placebo before performing a handgrip task. Percent change in mean force between placebo and MPH conditions was used to evaluate the extent of the ergogenic response. RESULTS: Mean force was significantly higher in MPH conditions [6.39% increase, T(25) = 3.09, p = 0.005 118.8 ± 37.96 (± SD) vs. 111.8 ± 34.99 Ns] but variable (coefficient of variation:163%). Using linear regression, we observed that min MVPA (T(25) = -2.15, ß = -0.400, p = 0.044) and age [T(25) = -3.29, ß = -0.598, p = 0.003] but not BMI [T(25) = 1.67, ß = 0.320 p = 0.109] significantly predicted percent change in mean force in MPH conditions. CONCLUSIONS: We report that lower levels of physical activity and younger age predict an improved ergogenic response to MPH and that this may be explained by differences in dopaminergic function. This study illustrates that the ergogenic response to MPH is partly dependent on individual differences such as habitual levels of physical activity and age.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00421-018-3800-8

  6 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29489078
[Au] Autor:Froehlich TE; Becker SP; Nick TG; Brinkman WB; Stein MA; Peugh J; Epstein JN
[Ad] Address:Cincinnati Children's Hospital, 3333 Burnet Ave, MLC 4002, Cincinnati, OH 45229. tanya.froehlich@cchmc.org.
[Ti] Title:Sluggish Cognitive Tempo as a Possible Predictor of Methylphenidate Response in Children With ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:J Clin Psychiatry;79(2), 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1555-2101
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To examine whether sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptomatology moderates dose response to methylphenidate and whether the impact of SCT on medication response is distinct from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtype effects. METHODS: Stimulant-naive children with ADHD predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-I; n = 126) or ADHD combined type (ADHD-C; n = 45) aged 7-11 years were recruited from the community from September 2006 to June 2013 to participate in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, 4-week crossover trial of long-acting methylphenidate. ADHD diagnosis and subtype were established according to DSM-IV criteria using a structured interview and teacher ADHD symptom ratings. SCT symptoms were assessed using a teacher-rated scale with 2 factors (Sluggish/Sleepy and Daydreamy). Primary outcomes included (1) categorization of children as methylphenidate responders, methylphenidate nonresponders, or placebo responders by 2 blinded physicians and (2) parent and teacher ratings of child behavior on the Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Rating Scales while subjects were on treatment with placebo or 1 of 3 methylphenidate dosages (low, medium, high). RESULTS: Increased SCT Sluggish/Sleepy factor scores were associated with being a methylphenidate nonresponder or placebo responder rather than a methylphenidate responder (P = .04). Sluggish/Sleepy factor scores were also linked to diminished methylphenidate dose response for parent- and teacher-rated inattention symptoms (Sluggish/Sleepy factor × dose P = .004). SCT Daydreamy symptoms and ADHD subtype (ADHD-I vs ADHD-C) were not associated with methylphenidate responder status and did not moderate methylphenidate dose response for inattention symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: SCT Sluggish/Sleepy symptoms, but not SCT Daydreamy symptoms or ADHD subtype, predicted methylphenidate nonresponse. This novel finding, if replicated, may have important implications for assessing SCT as part of ADHD care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01727414.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29206921
[Au] Autor:Schmidt A; Müller F; Dolder PC; Schmid Y; Zanchi D; Egloff L; Liechti ME; Borgwardt S
[Ad] Address:University of Basel, Department of Psychiatry (UPK), Basel, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Acute effects of methylphenidate, modafinil and MDMA on negative emotion processing.
[So] Source:Int J Neuropsychopharmacol;, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1469-5111
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Stimulants such as methylphenidate (MPH) and modafinil are frequently used as cognitive enhancers in healthy people, whereas 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is proposed to enhance mood and empathy in healthy subjects. However, comparative data on the effects of MPH and modafinil on negative emotions in healthy subjects have been widely missing. The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of MPH and modafinil on the neural correlates of fearful face processing using MDMA as a positive control. Methods: Using a double-blind within-subject placebo-controlled cross-over design, 60 mg MPH, 600 mg modafinil, and 125 mg MDMA were administrated to 22 healthy subjects, while performing an event-related fMRI task to assess brain activation in response to fearful faces. Negative mood states were assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and subjective ratings. Results: Relative to placebo, modafinil, but not MPH or MDMA, increased brain activation within a limbic-cortical-striatal-pallidal-thalamic circuit during fearful face processing. Modafinil but not MPH also increased amydgala responses to fearful faces compared with MDMA. Furthermore, activation in the middle and inferior frontal gyrus in response to fearful faces correlated positively with subjective feelings of fearfulness and depressiveness after modafinil administration. Conclusions: In spite of the cognitive enhancement effects of 600 mg modafinil in healthy people, potential adverse effects on emotion processing should be considered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ijnp/pyx112

  8 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29512177
[Au] Autor:Pauly V; Frauger E; Lepelley M; Mallaret M; Boucherie Q; Micallef J
[Ad] Address:Laboratoire de santé publique EA 3279, Centre d'évaluation de la pharmacodépendance-addictovigilance (CEIP-A) de Marseille (PACA Corse) associé, Faculté de médecine, Aix-Marseille Université, 13005, Marseille, France.
[Ti] Title:Patterns and profiles of Methylphenidate use in both children and adults.
[So] Source:Br J Clin Pharmacol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2125
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The aim was to characterize patterns of Methylphenidate (MPH) use in France in both children and adults over a three year period. METHODS: Using the French General Health Insurance database limited to two areas covering approximately 4 million individuals, we made up a cohort of incident MPH users between July 2010 and June 2013. Splitting them into distinct age groups ( [18-24]; [25;49]; >=50 years olds for adults and less than 6 years old, [6-11] and [12;17] for children), we described these populations at MPH initiation and during follow-up according to duration of treatment, quantities dispensed, and co-prescription with Central Nervous System (CNS) drugs. RESULTS: We included a cohort of 3 534 incident users involving 30 238 dispensations of MPH leading to an annual rate of 29 incident users/ 100 000 in 2013. Children (66% of new users) were characterized by long-term use of MPH with few co-medications. The group of 25-49-year-old patients where more frequently dispensed MPH than other groups, had the highest mean dosage and were more often co-prescribed other CNS drugs. The >=50 years-old group was more often co-prescribed antidepressants and antiparkinsonians. CONCLUSIONS: Our pharmacoepidemiological study involving incident MPH users and a large number of characteristics shows different patterns of MPH use among children and adults. The results among 25-49 years suggest that MPH may be used for medical conditions other than Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or narcolepsy in adults and that it might be subject to misuse and/or abuse.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/bcp.13544

  9 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29510390
[Au] Autor:Crunelle CL; van den Brink W; Moggi F; Konstenius M; Franck J; Levin FR; van de Glind G; Demetrovics Z; Coetzee C; Luderer M; Schellekens A; Matthys F; ICASA consensus group
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Brussels, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:International Consensus Statement on Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment of Substance Use Disorder Patients with Comorbid Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.
[So] Source:Eur Addict Res;24(1):43-51, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1421-9891
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often co-occurs with substance use disorders (SUD) and is associated with early onset and more severe development of SUD and with reduced treatment effectiveness. Screening tools allow for a good recognition of possible ADHD in adults with SUD and should be used routinely, followed by an ADHD diagnostic process initiated as soon as possible. Simultaneous and integrated treatment of ADHD and SUD, using a combination of pharmaco- and psychotherapy, is recommended. Long-acting methylphenidate, extended-release amphetamines, and atomoxetine with up-titration to higher dosages may be considered in patients unresponsive to standard doses. This paper includes evidence- and consensus-based recommendations developed to provide guidance in the screening, diagnosis and treatment of patients with ADHD-SUD comorbidity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000487767

  10 / 8067 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29504733
[Au] Autor:Snircova E; Marcincakova Husarova V; Ondrejka I; Hrtanek I; Farsky I; Nosalova G
[Ad] Address:Clinic of Psychiatry, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Martin, Slovakia.
[Ti] Title:QTc prolongation after ADHD medication.
[So] Source:Neuro Endocrinol Lett;38(8):549-554, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:0172-780X
[Cp] Country of publication:Sweden
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Multicenter studies have shown that cardiovascular risks of ADHD medication are extremely low. However, QTc length has been shown to be increased in smaller samples of patients or case reports after stimulant and atomoxetine medication. Based on recent studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with drug-induced QTc prolongation and polymorphisms linkage to regional populations, we hypothesized that the drug-induced QTc prolongation could be a factor of particular polymorphisms linked to specific regional populations undistinguished in multicenter studies. METHODS: We included 69 patients from a region of central Slovakia, 36 patients were taking atomoxetine and 33 patients methylphenidate. QTc, heart rate, potassium levels and BMI were examined before and after 8 weeks of treatment. Therapeutic effect was measured by ADHD-RS-IV. RESULTS: We found QTc prolongation after 8 weeks of treatment both with atomoxetine and methylphenidate that was neither followed by the significant changes in BMI and potassium levels nor the significant increase of heart rate. CONCLUSION: This is the first study revealing QTc prolongation in the group of ADHD children from the same region after 8-week treatment with atomoxetine and methylphenidate, indicating the potential discrete abnormalities in cardiac functioning associated with polymorphisms in genes of dopaminergic and noradrenergic system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 807 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information