Database : MEDLINE
Search on : microscopy [Words]
References found : 728041 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 72805 go to page                         

  1 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524794
[Au] Autor:Kubiasová K; Mik V; Nisler J; Hönig M; Husicková A; Spíchal L; Pekná Z; Samajová O; Dolezal K; Plíhal O; Benková E; Strnad M; Plíhalová L
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Biology, Centre of the Region Haná for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Slechtitelu 27, Olomouc 783 71, Czech Republic.
[Ti] Title:Design, synthesis and perception of fluorescently labeled isoprenoid cytokinins.
[So] Source:Phytochemistry;150:1-11, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Isoprenoid cytokinins play a number of crucial roles in the regulation of plant growth and development. To study cytokinin receptor properties in plants, we designed and prepared fluorescent derivatives of 6-[(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)amino]purine (N -isopentenyladenine, iP) with several fluorescent labels attached to the C2 or N9 atom of the purine moiety via a 2- or 6-carbon linker. The fluorescent labels included dansyl (DS), fluorescein (FC), 7-nitrobenzofurazan (NBD), rhodamine B (RhoB), coumarin (Cou), 7-(diethylamino)coumarin (DEAC) and cyanine 5 dye (Cy5). All prepared compounds were screened for affinity for the Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin receptor (CRE1/AHK4). Although the attachment of the fluorescent labels to iP via the linkers mostly disrupted binding to the receptor, several fluorescent derivatives interacted well. For this reason, three derivatives, two rhodamine B and one 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan labeled iP were tested for their interaction with CRE1/AHK4 and Zea mays cytokinin receptors in detail. We further showed that the three derivatives were able to activate transcription of cytokinin response regulator ARR5 in Arabidopsis seedlings. The activity of fluorescently labeled cytokinins was compared with corresponding 6-dimethylaminopurine fluorescently labeled negative controls. Selected rhodamine B C2-labeled compounds 17, 18 and 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan N9-labeled compound 28 and their respective negative controls (19, 20 and 29, respectively) were used for in planta staining experiments in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture using live cell confocal microscopy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524674
[Au] Autor:Müller J; Prozeller D; Ghazaryan A; Kokkinopoulou M; Mailänder V; Morsbach S; Landfester K
[Ad] Address:Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany; Dermatology Clinic, University Medical Center Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Beyond the Protein Corona - Lipids Matter for Biological Response of Nanocarriers.
[So] Source:Acta Biomater;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-7568
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The interaction of nanocarriers with blood plasma components influences the biological response, and therefore, it needs to be controlled. Whereas protein adsorption to nanocarriers has been investigated to a large extent, the role of lipid interaction for drug delivery and its biological effect is not yet clear. However, lipids represent an important constituent of blood plasma and are usually bound in the form of lipoproteins. Because already for many nanocarrier systems an enrichment of apolipoproteins in their protein corona was reported, we examine the interaction of lipoproteins with nanocarriers. If interaction occurs in terms of lipoprotein adsorption, two scenarios are possible: adsorption of intact lipoprotein complexes or disintegration of the complexes with adsorption of the single components. To investigate the interaction and clarify which scenario occurs, polymeric model nanoparticles and different lipoprotein types have been studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, and other methods. Our data indicate that upon contact with polymeric nanoparticles, disintegration of lipoproteins and adsorption of lipids occurs. Further, the effect of lipoprotein adsorption on cell uptake has been examined, and a major effect of the lipoproteins has been found. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: It is now well accepted that nanomaterials developed as diagnostic or therapeutic carrier systems need to be well characterized in terms of biological responses inside an organism. Many studies have already shown that proteins adsorb to the surface of a nanomaterial and create a new interface that define the identity of the material. However, the presence of other surface-active components of the blood plasma and how they interact with nanomaterials has been much less investigated. Thus, this study aims at providing a significant contribution to understanding the interaction mechanism between lipoproteins and nanomaterials. Since lipoproteins transport a high amount of lipids, which are surface-active molecules, the demonstrated interactions can go as far as complete lipoprotein disintegration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524620
[Au] Autor:Lim DG; Prim RE; Kang E; Jeong SH
[Ad] Address:College of Pharmacy, Dongguk University-Seoul, Goyang, Gyeonggi, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:One-pot synthesis of dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid/polydopamine nanocomplexes to control protein drug release.
[So] Source:Int J Pharm;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3476
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The self-organizing complexes with hyaluronic acid (HA) and polydopamine (PDA), an adhesion mediator via hydrogen bonding, were investigated for use as protein drug carriers. The complexes were prepared with HA of different molecular weights (20 kDa and 200 kDa) and various molar ratios of dopamine and lysozyme, a model protein. Dopamine-conjugated HA (HADA)/PDA complexes were prepared by one-pot synthesis by relying on the self-polymerization of dopamine under oxidative, weakly basic conditions. Lysozyme was bound via coacervation and hydrogen bonding into HADA/PDA complexes. Complex diameters were 100-300 nm, based on transmission electron microscopy image and dynamic light scattering findings. Circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry showed that a stable protein formulation was obtained without degradation while preserving the thermal characteristics of lysozyme. Transition temperature (T ) of the HADA/PDA/lysozyme complex (1:10:0.05 ratio) was 72.45 °C, which is close to the T of the native lysozyme (72.46 °C). The efficacy of complexes was also evaluated to protect the structural stability of lysozyme. Lysozyme (0.33 mol) was complexed with HA monomer; consequently, lysozyme activity in the HADA/PDA complex was not affected from short-term degradation. Protein encapsulation and efficacy of the formulations showed successful complexation as protein carriers, thus suggesting an effective combinatory protein delivery system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524549
[Au] Autor:Rajivgandhi G; Vijayan R; Maruthupandy M; Vaseeharan B; Manoharan N
[Ad] Address:Department of Marine Science, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:Antibiofilm effect of Nocardiopsis sp. GRG 1 (KT235640) compound against biofilm forming Gram negative bacteria on UTIs.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a diverse public health complication and are caused by range of pathogens, however most often by Gram negative bacteria which cause significant life threatening risks to different populations. The prevalence rate and antimicrobial resistance among the Gram negative uropathogens alarmed to significantly heighten the economic burden of these infections. In this study, we investigated the role of Pyrrolo[1,2-a] pyrazine-1,4-dione,hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl) on endophytic actinomycetes Nocardiopsis sp. GRG 1 (KT235640) exhibit the antibiofilm effect against P. mirabilis and E. coli and it was characterized through activity guided techniques using TLC, HPLC, GC-MS, LC-MS and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compound, Pyrrolo [1, 2-a] pyrazine-1, 4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl) inhibits P. mirabilis biofilm formation as well as reduce the viability of preformed biofilms. Furthermore, CLSM image show the, cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell membrane and loss of viability with cell membrane damage. The SEM result confirms that the cell wall degradation against virulent of biofilm forming bacteria. Hence, the Pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl) is active against P. mirabilis and E. coli.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524544
[Au] Autor:Alexeeva N; Tamberg Y; Shunatova N
[Ad] Address:Department of Invertebrate Zoology, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab. 7/9, St. Petersburg, 199034, Russian Federation. Electronic address: nina.alexeyeva.spb@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Postembryonic development of pycnogonids: A deeper look inside.
[So] Source:Arthropod Struct Dev;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5495
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sea spiders form a small, enigmatic group of recent chelicerates, with an unusual bodyplan, oligosegmented larvae and a postembryonic development that is punctuated by many moults. To date, only a few papers examined the anatomical and ultrastructural modifications of the larvae and various instars. Here we traced both internal and external events of the whole postembryonic development in Nymphon brevirostre HODGE 1863 using histology, SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy. During postembryonic development, larvae of this species undergo massive reorganization: spinning apparatus and chelar glands disappear; larval legs redifferentiate; three new segments and abdomen are formed with their corresponding internal organs and appendages; circulatory and reproductive systems develop anew and the digestive and the nervous systems change dramatically. The body cavity remains schizocoelic throughout development, and no traces of even transitory coeloms were found in any instar. In Nimphon brevirostre, just like in Artemia salina LINNAEUS 1758 the heart arises through differentiation of the already existing schizocoel, and thus the circulatory systems of arthropods and annelids are not homologous. We found that classical chelicerate tagmata, prosoma and opisthosoma, are inapplicable to adult pycnogonids, with the most striking difference being the fate and structure of the seventh appendage-bearing segment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524539
[Au] Autor:Lejal N; Truchet S; Bechor E; Bouguyon E; Khedkar V; Bertho N; Vidic J; Adenot P; Solier S; Pick E; Slama-Schwok A
[Ad] Address:Paris Saclay University, U892 INRA, Jouy en Josas, France.
[Ti] Title:Turning off NADPH oxidase-2 by impeding p67 activation in infected mouse macrophages reduced viral entry and inflammation.
[So] Source:Biochim Biophys Acta;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Targeting cells of the host immune system is a promising approach to fight against Influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Macrophage cells use the NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX2) enzymatic complex as a first line of defense against pathogens by generating superoxide ions O and releasing H O . Herein, we investigated whether targeting membrane -embedded NOX2 decreased IAV entry via raft domains and reduced inflammation in infected macrophages. METHODS: Confocal microscopy and western blots monitored levels of the viral nucleoprotein NP and p67 , NOX2 activator subunit, Elisa assays quantified TNF-α levels in LPS or IAV-activated mouse or porcine alveolar macrophages pretreated with a fluorescent NOX inhibitor, called nanoshutter NS1. RESULTS: IAV infection in macrophages promoted p67 translocation to the membrane, rafts clustering and activation of the NOX2 complex at early times. Disrupting rafts reduced intracellular viral NP. NS1 markedly reduced raft clustering and viral entry by binding to the C-terminal of NOX2 also characterized in vitro. NS1 decrease of TNF-α release depended on the cell type. CONCLUSION: NOX2 participated in IAV entry and raft-mediated endocytosis. NOX2 inhibition by NS1 reduced viral entry. NS1 competition with p67 for NOX2 binding shown by in silico models and cell-free assays was in agreement with NS1 inhibiting p67 translocation to membrane-embedded NOX2 in mouse and porcine macrophages. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: We introduce NS1 as a compound targeting NOX2, a critical enzyme controlling viral levels and inflammation in macrophages and discuss the therapeutic relevance of targeting the C-terminal of NADPH oxidases by probes like NS1 in viral infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524504
[Au] Autor:Qiu F; Dong C; Liu Y; Shao X; Huang D; Han Y; Wang B; Liu Y; Huo R; Paulo P; Zhang Z; Zhao D; Chu WF
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology (the State-Province Key Laboratories of Biomedicine-Pharmaceutics of China, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Research, Ministry of Education), College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Pharmacological inhibition of SUMO-1 with ginkgolic acid alleviates cardiac fibrosis induced by myocardial infarction in mice.
[So] Source:Toxicol Appl Pharmacol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0333
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Protein modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart diseases. The present study was designed to determine whether ginkgolic acid (GA) as a SUMO-1 inhibitor exerts an inhibitory effect on cardiac fibrosis induced by myocardial infarction (MI). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: GA was delivered by osmotic pumps in MI mice. Masson staining, electron microscopy (EM) and echocardiography were used to assess cardiac fibrosis, ultrastructure and function. Expression of SUMO-1, PML, TGF-ß1 and Pin1 was measured with Western blot or Real-time PCR. Collagen content, cell viability and myofibroblast transformation were measured in neonatal mouse cardiac fibroblasts (NMCFs). Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein was over-expressed by plasmid transfection. KEY RESULTS: GA improved cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction, and decreased SUMO-1 expression in MI mice. GA (>20 µM) inhibited NMCF viability in a dose-dependent manner. Nontoxic GA (10 µM) restrained angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced myofibroblast transformation and collagen production. GA also inhibited expression of TGF-ß1 mRNA and protein in vitro and in vivo. GA suppressed PML SUMOylation and PML nuclear body (PML-NB) organization, and disrupted expression and recruitment of Pin1 (a positive regulator of TGF-ß1 mRNA), whereas over-expression of PML reversed that. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Inhibition of SUMO-1 by GA alleviated MI-induced heart dysfunction and fibrosis, and the SUMOylated PML/Pin1/TGF-ß1 pathway is crucial for GA-inhibited cardiac fibrosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29520140
[Au] Autor:Pan C; Liu Y; Zhou M; Wang W; Shi M; Xing M; Liao W
[Ad] Address:Department of Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.
[Ti] Title:Theranostic pH-sensitive nanoparticles for highly efficient targeted delivery of doxorubicin for breast tumor treatment.
[So] Source:Int J Nanomedicine;13:1119-1137, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1178-2013
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A multifunctional theranostic nanoplatform integrated with environmental responses has been developed rapidly over the past few years as a novel treatment strategy for several solid tumors. We synthesized pH-sensitive poly(ß-thiopropionate) nanoparticles with a supermagnetic core and folic acid (FA) conjugation (FA-doxorubicin-iron oxide nanoparticles [FA-DOX@ IONPs]) to deliver an antineoplastic drug, DOX, for the treatment of folate receptor (FR)-overexpressed breast cancer. In addition to an imaging function, the nanoparticles can release their payloads in response to an environment of pH 5, such as the acidic environment found in tumors. After chemical ( H nuclear magnetic resonance) and physical (morphology and super-magnetic) characterization, FA-DOX@IONPs were shown to demonstrate pH-dependent drug release profiles. Western blotting analysis revealed the expression of FRs in three breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, BT549, and MD-MBA-231. The cell counting kit-8 assay and transmission electron microscopy showed that FA-DOX@IONPs had the strongest cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells, compared with free DOX and non-FR targeted nanoparticles (DOX@IONPs), and caused cellular apoptosis. The FA-DOX@IONP-mediated cellular uptake and intracellular internalization were clarified by fluorescence microscopy. FA-DOX@IONPs plus magnetic field treatment suppressed in vivo tumor growth in mice to a greater extent than either treatment alone; furthermore, the nanoparticles exerted no toxicity against healthy organs. Magnetic resonance imaging was successfully applied to monitor the nanoparticle accumulation. Our results suggest that theranostic pH-sensitive nanoparticles with dual targeting could enhance the available therapies for cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2147/IJN.S147464

  9 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29516044
[Au] Autor:Stanila DM; Florea AM; Stanila A; Panga AA
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Clinical Emergency Hospital Sibiu, Sibiu, Romania.
[Ti] Title:Endothelial cells loss to the hyperopic pacients during phacoemulsification.
[So] Source:Rom J Ophthalmol;61(4):256-260, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2457-4325
[Cp] Country of publication:Romania
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: The phacoemulsification cataract surgery is the most frequently performed surgery and it generally improves vision in over 90% of the patients. Hyperopic patients are a challenge during phacoemulsification especially because of their short eyeball and shallow anterior chamber. A shallow anterior chamber is associated with overall reduction of the safe zone, which may lead to difficulty in creating the corneal incisions, harder capsulorhexis performing, or endothelial complications. Purpose: The aim of the study was to present the endothelial cells loss after the phacoemulsification procedure in the hyperopic patients. Material and Methods: A number of 1775 patients operated in the Ophthalmology Department of the Clinical Hospital Sibiu from January 11, 2011 to December 20, 2013 have been included in our study; 595 cases with emmetropia and the rest of the 1180 patients had the following refraction errors: 216 - myopia and 964 - hypermetropia. From the total cases of the hypermetropia, we selected 72 patients to measure the endothelial cells density and the corneal thickness by using specular microscopy, one day before and 7-14 days after surgery. Results and discussions: The preexisting hypermetropia might modify the intraoperative and postoperative cataract surgery evolution. Endothelial cell loss is potentially higher from surgical trauma so that the endothelium must be protected with viscoelastics. The loss of endothelial cells in hyperopic eyes occurred with an average of 267 cell/ mm² and the thickness of the cornea increased by 13 µm. Conclusion: The phacoemulsification surgery in the presence of hypermetropia requires more attention. The biometry and the specular microscopy are very important tasks for the preoperative assessment, surgery, and postoperative care. The protection of the corneal endothelium with viscoelastics leads to an insignificant modification of the endothelial cells in hyperopic patients compared to an anterior study of the patients with all ametropies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 728041 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29515291
[Au] Autor:England MJ; Bigelow AW; Merchant MJ; Velliou E; Welch D; Brenner DJ; Kirkby KJ
[Ad] Address:Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Automated microbeam observation environment for biological analysis-Custom portable environmental control applied to a vertical microbeam system.
[So] Source:Sens Actuators B Chem;239:1134-1143, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0925-4005
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vertical Microbeams (VMB) are used to irradiate individual cells with low MeV energy ions. The irradiation of cells using VMBs requires cells to be removed from an incubator; this can cause physiological changes to cells because of the lower CO concentration, temperature and relative humidity outside of the incubator. Consequently, for experiments where cells require irradiation and observation for extended time periods, it is important to provide a controlled environment. The highly customised nature of the microscopes used on VMB systems means that there are no commercially available environmentally controlled microscope systems for VMB systems. The Automated Microbeam Observation Environment for Biological Analysis (AMOEBA) is a highly flexible modular environmental control system used to create incubator conditions on the end of a VMB. The AMOEBA takes advantage of the recent "maker" movement to create an open source control system that can be easily configured by the user to fit their control needs even beyond VMB applications. When applied to the task of controlling cell medium temperature, CO concentration and relative humidity on VMBs it creates a stable environment that allows cells to multiply on the end of a VMB over a period of 36 h, providing a low-cost (costing less than $2700 to build), customisable alternative to commercial time-lapse microscopy systems. AMOEBA adds the potential of VMBs to explore the long-term effects of radiation on single cells opening up new research areas for VMBs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.snb.2016.08.076


page 1 of 72805 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information