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[PMID]: 29221971
[Au] Autor:Ikeda K; Aoyagi J; Hanashiro S; Sawada M; Kyuzen M; Morioka H; Ebina J; Nagasawa J; Yanagihashi M; Ishikawa Y; Miura K; Murata K; Takazawa T; Kawabe K; Iwasaki Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Toho University Omori Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Neurology, PL Tokyo Heath Care Center, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: keni@med.toho-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Preventive Treatment with Lomerizine Increases Cerebral Blood Flows during the Interictal Phase of Migraine.
[So] Source:J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis;27(4):998-1002, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were reported in migraineurs. However, little is known how preventive medications of migraine can influence rCBF. Lomerizine, a calcium channel blocker, has been used for migraine prophylaxis in Japan. We examined rCBF after lomerizine treatment. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Migraine was diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition beta. Migraine subtype was classified into migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO). Lomerizine (10 mg/day, per oral) was administered for 3 months. Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) and blood pressure (BP) were compared at baseline and end point. Brain single photon emission computed tomography using Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer was performed at the interictal period. Brain SPECT data were analyzed according to revised version of 3-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template. Clinic-radiological variables were analyzed by paired Student's t test. RESULTS: Ten migraineurs (4 men and 6 women) participated in the present study. Mean age was 54.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.1) years. Mean duration of migraine was 25.3 (SD 9.8) years. Migraine subtype showed 4 MA and 6 MO patients. Mean score of HIT-6 was 66.3 (SD 11.7). Lomerizine treatment decreased HIT-6 scores significantly (P < .01). BP did not differ significantly after lomerizine treatment. Lomerizine treatment increased rCBF 20% approximately in the frontal, the parietal, the temporal, and the occipital region. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicated a significant increase in interictal rCBF after lomerizine treatment in migraineurs. The upregulation of rCBF could contribute to the antimigraine mechanism of lomerizine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521062
[Au] Autor:Sojka A; Zarowski M; Steinborn B; Hedzelek W; Wisniewska-Spychala B; Dorocka-Bobkowska B
[Ad] Address:Department of Prosthodontics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Temporomandibular disorders in adolescents with headache.
[So] Source:Adv Clin Exp Med;27(2):193-199, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1899-5276
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Headache is a common complaint in all age groups and is a frequent cause of medical consultations and hospitalization. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bite and non-bite parafunctions as well as the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in adolescents presenting with primary headaches. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Parents of adolescents presented with headaches to the Department of Developmental Neurology within a 12-month period were asked to complete a questionnaire developed by the authors of this study. Of the 1000 patients evaluated, 19 females and 21 males, aged 13 to 17 years, met the inclusion criterion - a confirmed clinical diagnosis of migraine or a tension headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. The diagnostic algorithm of the study group consisted of a full medical history, an assessment of the occurrence of bite habits and a physical examination based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). RESULTS: Bite and non-bite parafunctions were found in 36 of the study group patients. A significant difference (p = 0.0003) between the number of bite parafunctions and non-bite parafunctions was found in females but not in males. However, bite parafunctions were more frequent in boys compared to girls (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that it may be useful for pediatricians and neurologists to include TMD dysfunctions as a part of a standard examination of adolescents presenting with persistent headaches.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17219/acem/64945

  3 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518882
[Au] Autor:Xiong C; Zhang X
[Ad] Address:Affiliated Eye Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Research Institute of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Jiangxi Provincial Key Laboratory for Ophthalmology, Nanchang 330006, China.
[Ti] Title:[Progress of clinical correlation research on migraine and glaucoma].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Yan Ke Za Zhi;54(3):224-228, 2018 Mar 11.
[Is] ISSN:0412-4081
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:Migraine is a common primary headache disorder. The estimated annual prevalence rate of migraine in China is 9.3%. Migraine is typically involved with a series of ocular symptoms including glaucoma, visual performance tests relevant to glaucoma exhibited correlation between glaucoma and migraine. Even though migraine patients exhibit no glaucoma-related signs during intermissions of migraine attacks, the results of visual function tests (visual field, electrophysiology, ocular imaging) relevant to glaucoma still indicate abnormalities. It is fairly typical that most of the patients may neglect their ocular problems when migraine breaks out. Epidemiological data suggests an increasing prevalence of migraine patients with glaucoma, particularly normal tension glaucoma. This paper reviews and discusses the effect of migraine on the clinical assessment and diagnosis of glaucoma. .
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0412-4081.2018.03.015

  4 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29459398
[Au] Autor:Pezzini A; Busto G; Zedde M; Gamba M; Zini A; Poli L; Caria F; De Giuli V; Simone AM; Pascarella R; Padovani A; Padroni M; Gasparotti R; Colagrande S; Fainardi E
[Ad] Address:From the Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Sperimentali, Clinica Neurologica (A.P., L.P., F.C., V.D.G., A.P.) and Sezione di Neuroradiologia, Dipartimento di Specialità Medico-Chirurgiche, Scienze Radiologiche e Sanità Pubblica (R.G.), Università degli Studi di Brescia, Italia; Dipartimento di Scie
[Ti] Title:Vulnerability to Infarction During Cerebral Ischemia in Migraine Sufferers.
[So] Source:Stroke;49(3):573-578, 2018 03.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebral hyperexcitability in migraine experiencers might sensitize brain tissue to ischemia. We investigated whether a personal history of migraine is associated with vulnerability to brain ischemia in humans. METHODS: Multicenter cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent a brain computed tomography perfusion and were scheduled to undergo reperfusion therapy. In a case-control design, we compared the proportion of subjects with no-mismatch, the volume of penumbra salvaged, as well as the final infarct size in a group of patients with migraine and a group of patients with no history of migraine. RESULTS: We included 61 patients with migraine (34 [55.7%] men; mean age, 52.2±15.1 years; migraine without aura/migraine with aura, 44/17) and 61 patients with no history of migraine. The proportion of no-mismatch among migraineurs was significantly higher than among nonmigraineurs (17 [27.9%] versus 7 [11.5%]; =0.039) and was more prominent among patients with migraine with aura (6 [35.3%]; =0.030) while it was nonsignificantly increased in patients with migraine without aura (11 [25.0%]; =0.114). Migraine, especially migraine with aura, was independently associated with a no-mismatch pattern (odds ratio, 2.65; 95% CI, 0.95-7.41 for migraine; odds ratio, 5.54; 95% CI, 1.28-23.99 for migraine with aura), and there was a linear decrease of the proportion of patients with migraine with aura with increasing quartiles of mismatch volumes. Patients with migraine with aura had also smaller volumes of salvaged penumbra (9.8±41.2 mL) compared with patients with migraine without aura (36.4±54.1 mL) and patients with no migraine (45.1±55.0 mL; =0.056). Conversely, there was no difference in final infarct size among the 3 migraine subgroups ( =0.312). CONCLUSIONS: Migraine is likely to increase individual vulnerability to ischemic stroke during the process of acute brain ischemia and might represent, therefore, a potential new therapeutic target against occurrence and progression of the ischemic damage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.020554

  5 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29364542
[Au] Autor:Yelehe-Okouma M; Czmil-Garon J; Pape E; Petitpain N; Gillet P
[Ad] Address:Centre Régional de Pharmacovigilance, CHRU de Nancy, Hôpital Central, 29, avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 60034, 54035, Nancy, France.
[Ti] Title:Drug-induced aseptic meningitis: a mini-review.
[So] Source:Fundam Clin Pharmacol;, 2018 Jan 24.
[Is] ISSN:1472-8206
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aseptic meningitis associates a typical clinical picture of meningitis with the absence of bacterial or fungal material in the cerebrospinal fluid. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) may be due to two mechanisms: (i) a direct meningeal irritation caused by the intrathecal administration of drugs and (ii) an immunologic hypersensitivity reaction to a systemic administration. If the direct meningeal irritation allows a rather easy recognition, the immunologic hypersensitivity reaction is a source of challenging diagnostics. DIAM linked to a systemic treatment exerts typically an early onset, usually within a week. This period can be shortened to a few hours in case of drug rechallenge. The fast and spontaneous regression of clinical symptoms is usual after stopping the suspected drug. Apart from these chronological aspects, no specific clinical or biological parameters are pathognomonic. CSF analysis usually shows pleiocytosis. The proteinorachia is increased while glycorachia remains normal. Underlying pathologies can stimulate the occurrence of DIAM. Thus, systemic lupus erythematosus appears to promote DIAM during NSAID therapy, especially ibuprofen-based one. Similarly, some patients with chronic migraine are prone to intravenous immunoglobulin-induced aseptic meningitis. DIAM will be mainly evoked on chronological criteria such as rapid occurrence after initiation, rapid regression after discontinuation, and recurrence after rechallenge of the suspected drug. When occurring, positive rechallenge may be very useful in the absence of initial diagnosis. Finally, DIAM remains a diagnosis of elimination. It should be suggested only after all infectious causes have been ruled out.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/fcp.12349

  6 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516470
[Au] Autor:Charleston L; Royce J; Monteith TS; Broner SW; O'Brien HL; Manrriquez SL; Robbins MS
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
[Ti] Title:Migraine Care Challenges and Strategies in US Uninsured and Underinsured Adults: A Narrative Review, Part 1.
[So] Source:Headache;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4610
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To review the scope of the problem facing individuals with migraine who are under- or uninsured. In this first of a 2-part narrative review, we will explore migraine epidemiology and the challenges that face this vulnerable population. BACKGROUND: Implementation of the Affordable Care Act has improved access to health care for many individuals who were previously uninsured, but there are many, particularly those of certain demographics, who are at high risk for worse outcomes. METHODS: A narrative review was performed after a series of discussions within the Underserved Populations in Headache Medicine Special Interest Section meetings of the American Headache Society. Literature was reviewed for key concepts underpinning conceptual boundaries and a broad overview of the subject matter. Published guidelines, state-specific Medicaid websites, headache quality measurement set, literature review, and expert opinion were used to tailor suggested treatment options and therapeutic strategies. RESULTS: Migraine is common, yet remains underdiagnosed and associated with worse outcomes among those of under-represented backgrounds and those who are underinsured or uninsured. Low socioeconomics may play an important role in the disease progression, characteristics, outcome, and quality of life of patients with migraine and other headache disorders. Other barriers to optimal care include time constraints, lack of access to specialty providers, transportation, and financial limitations. CONCLUSION: There are many barriers and challenges that affect people with migraine who are underinsured or uninsured, particularly those of under-represented racial backgrounds and of lower socioeconomic status.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/head.13286

  7 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29476821
[Au] Autor:McCarson KE; Winter MK; Abrahamson DR; Berman NE; Smith PG
[Ad] Address:Kansas Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA; Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA. Electr
[Ti] Title:Assessing complex movement behaviors in rodent models of neurological disorders.
[So] Source:Neurobiol Learn Mem;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9564
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Behavioral phenotyping is a crucial step in validating animal models of human disease. Most traditional behavioral analyses rely on investigator observation of animal subjects, which can be confounded by inter-observer variability, scoring consistency, and the ability to observe extremely rapid, small, or repetitive movements. Force-Plate Actimeter (FPA)-based assessments can quantify locomotor activity and detailed motor activity with an incredibly rich data stream that can reveal details of movement unobservable by the naked eye. This report describes four specific examples of FPA analysis of behavior that have been useful in specific rat or mouse models of human neurological disease, which show how FPA analysis can be used to capture and quantify specific features of the complex behavioral phenotypes of these animal models. The first example quantifies nociceptive behavior of the rat following injection of formalin into the footpad as a common model of persistent inflammatory pain. The second uses actimetry to quantify intense, rapid circling behaviors in a transgenic mouse that overexpresses human laminin α5, a basement membrane protein. The third example assesses place preference behaviors in a rat model of migraine headache modeling phonophobia and photophobia. In the fourth example, FPA analysis revealed a unique movement signature emerged with age in a digenic mutant mouse model of Tourette Syndrome. Taken together, these approaches demonstrate the power and usefulness of the FPA in the examination and quantification of minute details of motor behaviors, greatly expanding the scope and detail of behavioral phenotyping of preclinical models of human disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29408974
[Au] Autor:Liu SY; Perez MA; Lau N
[Ad] Address:The Grado Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:The Impact of Sleep Disorders on Driving Safety - Findings from the SHRP 2 Naturalistic Driving Study.
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Study Objectives: This study investigated the association between driving safety and seven sleep disorders amongst 3,541 participants of the Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2) naturalistic driving study. Methods: SHRP 2 collected naturalistic driving data from participants between 16 to 98 years old by instrumenting participants' vehicles. The analyses used logistic regression to determine the likelihood of crash/near-crash involvement, Poisson log-linear regression to assess crash/near-crash rate, and ordinal logistic regression to assess driver maneuver appropriateness and crash/near-crash severity. These analyses did not account for any medical treatments for the sleep disorders. Results: Females with restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), drivers with insomnia or nacrolepsy are associated with significantly higher risk of crash/near-crash. Drivers with shift work sleep disorder (SWSD) are assoicated with significantly increased crash/near-crash rate. Females with RLS/WED or sleep apnea and drivers with SWSD are associated with less safe driver maneuver and drivers with periodic limb movement disorder are assoicated with more severe events. The four analyses provide no evidence of safety decrements associated with migraine. Conclusions: This study is the first examination on the association between seven sleep disorders and different measures of driving risk using large-scale naturalistic driving study data. The results corroborate much of the existing simulator and epidemiological research related to sleep disorder patients and their driving safety, but add ecological validity to those findings. These results contribute to the empirical basis for medical professionals, policy makers and employers in making decisions to aid individuals with sleep disorders in balancing safety and personal mobility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsy023

  9 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29244264
[Au] Autor:Mohseni N; Togha M; Arzaghi SM; Nekooie S; Tafti MF; Fatehi F
[Ad] Address:Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Personality Traits and Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Patients With Medication-Overuse Headache Versus Episodic Migraine.
[So] Source:Prim Care Companion CNS Disord;19(6), 2017 Dec 14.
[Is] ISSN:2155-7780
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: An episodic migraine (EM) may lead to medication-overuse headache (MOH), an abnormal behavioral pattern of noncompliance. Anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and disorders caused by psychoactive substances other than analgesics all have been reported with MOH at higher rates than with EM. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships between personality traits and anxiety and depressive disorders and headache type. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 55 patients with EM and 50 patients with MOH were recruited from were recruited from 2 university hospital clinics in Tehran, Iran, from January 2013 to November 2015. Personality traits were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-125). Patients were assessed for depression with the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and anxiety with the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7). Results: There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding sex, age, or educational level. The TCI-125 analysis between the 2 groups showed a significant mean ± SD difference in reward dependence (EM: 9.77 ± 2.06, MOH: 8.69 ± 2.15, P = .01) and self-transcendence (EM: 8.42 ± 2.45, MOH: 6.83 ± 3.90, P = .03). The GAD-7 and PHQ-9 analyses demonstrated no significant difference between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Reward-dependence and self-transcendence scores were significantly lower in patients with MOH than in those with EM. These results suggest that people with lower reward-dependence and self-transcendence scores may not adequately respond to prescribed medications, leading them to the frequent use of multiple drugs at higher doses. A multidisciplinary approach to management may be suggested for migraine patients, and it is reasonable to consider behavioral therapy in conjunction with pharmacotherapy to ameliorate comorbid conditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 25730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512871
[Au] Autor:Karsan N; Palethorpe D; Rattanawong W; Marin JC; Bhola R; Goadsby PJ
[Ad] Address:Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London.
[Ti] Title:Flunarizine in migraine-related headache prevention:Results from 200 patients treated in the UK.
[So] Source:Eur J Neurol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1468-1331
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: For over 20 years, as a group we have been using flunarizine in primary headache disorders. Flunarizine is widely used in Europe, but not licensed in the UK. In September 2014, the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) published supportive guidelines for flunarizine use in migraine, based on randomised controlled evidence that it is as effective as propranolol and topiramate in adults. METHODS: We reviewed a cohort of adult patients (n=200) treated with flunarizine from our practice. These patients' clinical information: diagnosis, dose, efficacy, side effects and duration of treatment, was collected. RESULTS: The most common indication for flunarizine use was chronic migraine, followed by migraine with aura, sporadic hemiplegic migraine and familial hemiplegic migraine and new daily persistent headache with migrainous features. Flunarizine is generally effective; with only 24% (n = 47) of patients reporting no clinical effect. The commonest dose used was 10 mg per day. Duration of treatment information was available for 39% (n = 78). Of these patients 64% (n = 50) continued treatment for more than one year. Doses up to 15 mg were generally well tolerated, with only 10.5% (n = 21) of patients stopping treatment due to adverse effects. The most common adverse events were tiredness, mood change and weight gain. CONCLUSION: The data provide supportive evidence from tertiary headache practice in the UK for the use of flunarizine in migraine. The data encourage development of future guidance regarding flunarizine use in headache centres in countries where its use is not routine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ene.13621


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