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[PMID]: 29524866
[Au] Autor:Regev G; Martins J; Sheridan MP; Leemhuis J; Thompson J; Miller C
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3Z6, Canada; Bovicor Pharmatech Inc., North Vancouver, British Columbia V7H 2Y4, Canada. Electronic address: gillyr@mail.ubc.ca.
[Ti] Title:Feasibility and preliminary safety of nitric oxide releasing solution as a treatment for bovine mastitis.
[So] Source:Res Vet Sci;118:247-253, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2661
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nitric oxide-releasing solution (NORS) is a liquid formulation that releases nitric oxide, a broad spectrum antimicrobial, single electron nitroxide radical. This solution was investigated as a potential antimicrobial treatment for bovine mastitis (BM). Three experiments were performed: a) NORS' effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in an in vitro model; b) NORS' effect on milk obtained from dairy cows showing symptoms of clinical mastitis; and c) the consequences of administering NORS to healthy milking cattle using a dose-escalating in vivo study. Metabolite concentrations were estimated in their blood for methaemoglobin and nitrite; also, milk nitrite concentration and somatic cell count (SCC) were measured to study possible mammary gland inflammation following treatment. NORS lowered the bacterial concentration in all infected samples, in a time- and milk-diluted dependant fashion. Blood methemoglobin concentrations following treatment were all within the normal range for cattle. However, blood and milk nitrite concentrations increased initially but, during the next 24 h, returned to normal range, as did SCC, without any clinical signs of mammary gland inflammation. NORS, if shown to be effective, could be an alternative treatment for mastitis with a shorter clearance time.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524792
[Au] Autor:Griffith R; von Hinke S; Smith S
[Ad] Address:Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: rgriffith@ifs.org.uk.
[Ti] Title:Getting a healthy start: The effectiveness of targeted benefits for improving dietary choices.
[So] Source:J Health Econ;58:176-187, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1646
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There is growing policy interest in encouraging better dietary choices. We study a nationally-implemented policy - the UK Healthy Start scheme - that introduced vouchers for fruit, vegetables and milk. We show that the policy has increased spending on fruit and vegetables and has been more effective than an equivalent-value cash benefit. We also show that the policy improved the nutrient composition of households' shopping baskets, with no offsetting changes in spending on other foodstuffs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524782
[Au] Autor:Nagasaka H; Hirano KI; Yorifuji T; Komatsu H; Takatani T; Morioka I; Hirayama S; Miida T
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Takarazuka City Hospital, Takarazuka, Japan. Electronic address: Nagasaka@cnt-osaka.com.
[Ti] Title:Treatment with medium chain fatty acids milk of CD36-deficient preschool children.
[So] Source:Nutrition;50:45-48, 2017 Nov 29.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1244
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: CD36 deficiency is characterized by limited cellular long chain fatty acid uptake in the skeletal and cardiac muscles and often causes energy crisis in these muscles. However, suitable treatment for CD36 deficiency remains to be established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and metabolic effects of medium chain triacylglycerols (MCTs) in two CD36-deficient preschool children who often developed fasting hypoglycemia and exercise-induced myalgia. METHODS: Fasting blood glucose, total ketone bodies, and free fatty acids were examined and compared for usual supper diets and for diets with replacement of one component with 2 g/kg of 9% MCT-containing milk (MCT milk). Changes in serum creatine kinase and alanine aminotransferase levels, resulting from replacement of glucose water intake with 1 g/kg of MCT milk and determined by using bicycle pedaling tasks, were examined and compared. Hypoglycemic and/or myalgia episodes in daily life were also investigated. RESULTS: Biochemically, participants' blood glucose and total ketone bodies levels after overnight fasting substantially increased after dietary suppers containing MCT milk. Increases in serum creatine kinase and alanine aminotransferase levels resulting from the bicycle pedaling task were suppressed by MCT milk. Hypoglycemia leading to unconsciousness and tachycardia before breakfast decreased after introduction of dietary suppers containing MCT milk. Occurrence of myalgia in the lower limbs also decreased after intakes of MCT milk before long and/or strenuous exercising. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that MCTs can prevent fasting hypoglycemia and exercise-induced myalgia in CD36-deficient young children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520142
[Au] Autor:Wang C; Gu B; Liu Q; Pang Y; Xiao R; Wang S
[Ad] Address:Beijing Key Laboratory of New Molecular Diagnosis Technologies for Infectious Diseases, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Combined use of vancomycin-modified Ag-coated magnetic nanoparticles and secondary enhanced nanoparticles for rapid surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of bacteria.
[So] Source:Int J Nanomedicine;13:1159-1178, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1178-2013
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Pathogenic bacteria have always been a significant threat to human health. The detection of pathogens needs to be rapid, accurate, and convenient. Methods: We present a sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor based on the combination of vancomycin-modified Ag-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe O @Ag-Van MNPs) and Au@Ag nanoparticles (NPs) that can effectively capture and discriminate bacterial pathogens from solution. The high-performance Fe O @Ag MNPs were modified with vancomycin and used as bacteria capturer for magnetic separation and enrichment. The modified MNPS were found to exhibit strong affinity with a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. After separating and rinsing bacteria, Fe O @Ag-Van MNPs and Au@Ag NPs were synergistically used to construct a very large number of hot spots on bacteria cells, leading to ultrasensitive SERS detection. Results: The dominant merits of our dual enhanced strategy included high bacterial-capture efficiency (>65%) within a wide pH range (pH 3.0-11.0), a short assay time (<30 min), and a low detection limit (5×10 cells/mL). Moreover, the spiked tests show that this method is still valid in milk and blood samples. Owing to these capabilities, the combined system enabled the sensitive and specific discrimination of different pathogens in complex solution, as verified by its detection of Gram-positive bacterium , Gram-positive bacterium , and methicillin-resistant . Conclusion: This method has great potential for field applications in food safety, environmental monitoring, and infectious disease diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2147/IJN.S150336

  5 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515743
[Au] Autor:Berrani H; Alaoui AM; Ettair S; Mouane N; Izgua AT
[Ad] Address:Equipe de Recherche en Nutrition et Sciences de l'Alimentation, Hôpital d'enfants, Rabat, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Consommation des produits lactés chez l'enfant et l'adolescent marocain de 2 à 16 ans: une étude monocentrique Consumption of milk products among Moroccan children and adolescents aged 2-16 years: a monocentric study.
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:125, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the daily consumption of milk products in a population of Moroccan children and to determine the factors influencing this consumption. Methods: We conducted a prospective study from 1 October 2013 to 31 April 2014. Children aged between 2 and 16 years were included in the study. The participants were recruited in the city of Fez. Data were collected using a frequency questionnaire. Enrolled parents and children were interviewed on their consumption of milk products and on sociodemographic factors. Children underwent anthropometric examination. The association between variables in milk products consumption was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analysis with logistic regression model. Results: Food survey involved 286 children: 151 girls (52.8%) and 131 boys (45.8%). Children aged 2 to 3 years accounted for 26.4%, those aged 4 to 7 years accounted for 28.9%, those aged 7 to 9 years accounted for 18.3% and adolescents aged 10 to 16 years accounted for 26.4%. Children consumed on average 2.5±1 milk products per day. 57.8% of children aged 2 to 3 years, 53.6% of children aged 4 to 6 years, 40% of children aged 7 to 9 years and 41.2% of children aged 10 to 16 years consumed at least 3 milk products per day. The factors associated with the consumption of at least three milk products per day in univariate analysis were an illiterate maternal education level p < 0.001 OR= 0.1 and an elementary maternal education level p = 0.002 OR = 0.1, a medium familial socio-economic status p < 0.001 OR = 3, age p = 0.01 OR = 0.9 and a normal body mass index p = 0.01 OR = 2.5 and > 90° percentiles p < 0.001 OR= 6. There was a positive correlation between a body mass index > 90° percentiles p= 0.01 OR = 3.9 and the quantity of consumed milk products while there was a negative correlation between a body mass index > 90° percentiles p = 0.01 OR = 3.9 and a low maternal schooling: illiterate p = 0.008 OR= 0.1 elementary p = 0.009 OR = 0.1. Conclusion: The consumption of milk and of other milk products was inappropriate in particular among children aged 7 to 9 years and adolescents aged 10 to 16 years. Low maternal schooling and a body mass index higher than 90° percentiles were factors independently associated with the consumption of less than 3 milk products per day. The awareness of parents and children about the role of the milk and its derivatives in children diet is essential.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.125.9533

  6 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29486367
[Au] Autor:Ketha H; Thacher TD; Oberhelman SS; Fischer PR; Singh RJ; Kumar R
[Ad] Address:Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, United States; Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 55905, United States.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of the effect of daily versus bolus dose maternal vitamin D supplementation on the 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D ratio.
[So] Source:Bone;110:321-325, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Supplementing lactating mothers with high doses of vitamin D can adequately meet vitamin D requirements of the breastfed infant. We compared the effect of bolus versus daily vitamin D dosing in lactating mothers on vitamin D catabolism. We hypothesized that catabolism of 25(OH)D to 24,25(OH) D would be greater in the bolus than in the daily dose group. DESIGN, SETTING AND PATIENTS: Randomized controlled trial (clinicaltrials.govNCT01240265) in 40 lactating women. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were randomized to receive vitamin D orally, either a single dose of 150,000IU or 5000IU daily for 28days. Vitamin D metabolites were measured in serum and breast milk at baseline, 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Temporal changes in the serum 24,25(OH) D /25(OH)D ratio. RESULTS: The concentration of serum 24,25(OH) D was directly related to that of 25(OH)D in both groups (r =0.63; p<0.001). The mean (±SD) 24,25(OH) D /25(OH)D ratio remained lower at all time points than baseline values in the daily dose group (0.093±0.024, 0.084±0.025, 0.083±0.024, 0.080±0.020, 0.081±0.023, 0.083±0.018 at baseline, 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28days, respectively). In the single dose group, the increase in 24,25(OH) D lagged behind that of 25(OH)D, but the 24,25(OH) D /25(OH)D values (0.098±0.032, 0.067±0.019, 0.081±0.017, 0.092±0.024, 0.103±0.020, 0.106±0.024, respectively) exceeded baseline values at 14 and 28days and were greater than the daily dose group at 14 and 28days (p=0.003). The 24,25(OH) D /25(OH)D ratio remained in the normal range with both dosing regimens. Greater breast milk vitamin D values in the single dose group were inversely associated with the 24,25(OH) D /25(OH)D ratio (r =0.14, p<0.001), but not with daily dosing. CONCLUSIONS: After a 14-day lag, a single high dose of vitamin D led to greater production of 24,25(OH) D , presumably via induction of the 24-hydroxylase enzyme (CYP24A1), relative to the 25(OH)D value than did daily vitamin D supplementation, and this effect persisted for at least 28days after vitamin D administration. A daily dose of vitamin D may have more lasting effectiveness in increasing 25(OH)D with lesser diversion of 25(OH)D to 24,25(OH) D than does larger bolus dosing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29471095
[Au] Autor:Medeiros GKVV; Queiroga RCRE; Costa WKA; Gadelha CAA; E Lacerda RR; Lacerda JTJG; Pinto LS; Braganhol E; Teixeira FC; de S Barbosa PP; Campos MIF; Gonçalves GF; Pessôa HLF; Gadelha TS
[Ad] Address:Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Nutrição, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Proteomic of goat milk whey and its bacteriostatic and antitumour potential.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;113:116-123, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Goat whey is normally discarded in the milk processing industry. However, several studies have addressed its biological properties and possible use in human or animal diet. The present study aimed to analysis the protein profile of goat whey to evaluate its possible oxidant, antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumour, and cytotoxic activities in vitro against human erythrocytes. Goat whey was skimmed, and crude protein extract (CPE) was obtained. Next, protein fractions (F) were obtained using ammonium sulphate precipitation method. The proteins were characterized by SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis and soluble protein measurements. No significant differences were observed in protein profile of CPE, F 30-60% and F 60-90%. The highest protein content was found in F 60-90% (0.41mgP/mL). All samples, except F 0-30% showed bacteriostatic activity against different bacterial strains. Only CPE at a concentration of 1000µg/mL was haemolytic against human erythrocytes. Oxidant activity against erythrocytes was not observed. Antioxidant activity was observed only for CPE. Cytotoxicity against C6 rat glioma cell line that was performed with CPE revealed tumour cell death>70% at concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1µg/mL. These results demonstrate at first time that CPE may be used as an antioxidant, bacteriostatic and cytotoxic compound against tumour cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29438718
[Au] Autor:Ben Braïek O; Morandi S; Cremonesi P; Smaoui S; Hani K; Ghrairi T
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Microorganisms and Active Biomolecules (LMBA), Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University of Tunis El-Manar, Tunisia; Research Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology (RLEST), ISSTE, Technopole de Borj Cedria, Tunisia. Electronic address: olfa_bbraiek@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:Safety, potential biotechnological and probiotic properties of bacteriocinogenic Enterococcus lactis strains isolated from raw shrimps.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:109-117, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aims of this study are to isolate new bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacterial strains from white (Penaeus vannamei) and pink (Palaemon serratus) raw shrimps and evaluate their technological and probiotic potentialities. Seven strains were selected, among fifty active isolates, as producing interesting antimicrobial activity. Identified as Enterococcus lactis, these isolates were able to produce enterocins A, B and/or P. The safety aspect, assessed by microbiological and molecular tests, demonstrated that the strains were susceptible to relevant antibiotics such as vancomycin, negative for haemolysin and gelatinase activities, and did not harbour virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. The assessment of potential probiotic and technological properties showed a low or no lipolytic activity, moderate milk-acidifying ability, high reducing power, proteolytic activity and tolerance to bile (P < 0.05) and good autoaggregation and coaggregation capacities. Two strains designated as CQ and C43 exhibiting high enzymatic activities and bile salt hydrolase activity were found to display high survival under simulated in vitro oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract conditions caused by presence of lysozyme, pepsin, pancreatin, bile salts and acidic pH. This study highlights safe Enterococcus lactis strains with great technological and probiotic potentials for future application as new starter, adjunct, protective or probiotic cultures in food industry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29410008
[Au] Autor:Cohen TR; Hazell TJ; Vanstone CA; Rodd C; Weiler HA
[Ad] Address:School of Human Nutrition, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Rd, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada. Electronic address: tamara.cohen@mail.mcgill.ca.
[Ti] Title:Changes in eating behavior and plasma leptin in children with obesity participating in a family-centered lifestyle intervention.
[So] Source:Appetite;125:81-89, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The goal of childhood obesity lifestyle interventions are to positively change body composition, however it is unknown if interventions also modulate factors that are related to energy intake. This study aimed to examine changes in eating behaviors and plasma leptin concentrations in overweight and obese children participating in a 1-year family-centered lifestyle intervention. Interventions were based on Canadian diet and physical activity (PA) guidelines. Children were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: Control (Ctrl; no intervention), Standard treatment (StnTx: 2 servings milk and alternatives/day (d), 3x/wk weight-bearing PA), or Modified treatment (ModTx: 4 servings milk and alternatives/day; daily weight-bearing PA). Study visits occurred every 3-months for 1-y; interventions were held once a month for 6-months with one follow-up visit at 8-months. Ctrl received counselling after 1-y. Caregivers completed the Children's Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ) and reported on diet and activity. Plasma leptin were measured from morning fasted blood samples. Seventy-eight children (mean age 7.8 ±â€¯0.8 y; mean BMI 24.4 ±â€¯3.3 kg/m ) participated; 94% completed the study. Compared to baseline, at 6-months StnTx reduced Emotional Overeating and Desire to Drink scores (p < 0.05) while Food Responsiveness scores were reduced in both StnTx and ModTx (p < 0.05). At 1-year, scores for Desire to Drink in StnTx remained reduced compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Plasma leptin concentrations were significantly lower in ModTx at 6-months compared to baseline (p < 0.05). This study resulted in intervention groups favorably changing eating behaviors, supporting the use family-centered lifestyle interventions using Canadian diet and PA recommendations for children with obesity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 187964 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29311427
[Au] Autor:Shinozuka Y; Kawai K; Sato R; Higashitani A; Hamamoto Y; Okita M; Isobe N
[Ad] Address:School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5201, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Blood ionized calcium levels and acute-phase blood glucose kinetics in goats after intramammary infusion of lipopolysaccharide.
[So] Source:J Vet Med Sci;80(2):242-246, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1347-7439
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to determine the blood ionized calcium (Ca) levels and acute-phase blood glucose kinetics in goats with mastitis induced by an intramammary challenge of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Five goats were subjected to intramammary challenge of either LPS (10 µg) or saline (control). Some clinical manifestations (rectal temperature, pulse rate, respiration rate, ruminal motility, physical activity, and dehydration) were observed, and blood was collected for the measurement of several parameters [ionized and total Ca levels, blood glucose level, pH, and white blood count (WBC)] at 0 (just before challenge), 1-4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hr post-challenge in both the LPS and control phases. Milk was collected at 0 (just before challenge), 4, 8, 12 and 24 hr post-challenge to measure the somatic cell count (SCC) and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activity. In the LPS phase, increased rectal temperature, significantly decreased ionized Ca and total Ca levels and WBCs were observed compared with those at 0 hr, although there were no differences in all parameters between phases. LPS infusion significantly increased SCCs in milk and NAGase activity. The present results demonstrated that, during the acute phase of mastitis induced by intramammary challenge by LPS at a concentration sufficient to cause general symptoms in goats, a decreased blood ionized Ca level occurs, but not hypoglycemia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1292/jvms.17-0615


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