Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29524909
[Au] Autor:Gillet B; Begon M; Diger M; Berger-Vachon C; Rogowski I
[Ad] Address:Univ Lyon-Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, LIBM EA7424, UFRSTAPS 27-29, Villeurbanne Cedex, France; Laboratoire de simulation et de modélisation du mouvement (S2M), Département de kinésiologie, Université de Montréal, Laval, Canada. Electr
[Ti] Title:Shoulder range of motion and strength in young competitive tennis players with and without history of shoulder problems.
[So] Source:Phys Ther Sport;31:22-28, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1600
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a history of shoulder problems on the shoulder flexibility and strength in young competitive tennis players. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-one competitive and asymptomatic tennis players aged between 8 and 15 years old were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of a history of shoulder problems. OUTCOME MEASURES: Glenohumeral joint ranges of motion and the strength of eight shoulder muscles were bilaterally assessed. Five agonist/antagonist muscle strength ratios were also reported. Ranges of motion, strengths and strength ratios were bilaterally compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Players with a history of shoulder problems presented a higher total arc of rotation for both glenohumeral joints (p = 0.02) and a lower external/internal glenohumeral rotator muscle strength ratio (p = 0.02) for both sides. They also presented stronger upper trapezius (p = 0.03) and dominant serratus anterior (p = 0.008) muscles than players without a history of shoulder problems. CONCLUSION: Having a history of shoulder problems may alter the balance between mobility and stability within the shoulder complex suggesting that particular attention should be given to dominant and non-dominant shoulder functions by coaches and clinicians.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524796
[Au] Autor:Motesharei A; Rowe P; Blyth M; Jones B; Maclean A
[Ad] Address:Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, 106 Rottenrow East, Glasgow, G4 0NW, UK. Electronic address: armanrei@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A comparison of gait one year post operation in an RCT of robotic UKA versus traditional Oxford UKA.
[So] Source:Gait Posture;62:41-45, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2219
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Robot-assisted unicompartmental knee surgery has been shown to improve the accuracy of implant alignment. However, little research has been conducted to ascertain if this results in a measureable improvement in knee function post operatively and a more normal gait. The kinematics of 70 OA knees were assessed using motion analysis in an RCT (31 receiving robotic-assisted surgery, and 39 receiving traditional manual surgery) and compared to healthy knees. Statistically significant kinematic differences were seen between the two surgical groups from foot-strike to mid-stance. The robotic-assisted group achieved a higher knee excursion (18.0°, SD 4.9°) compared to the manual group (15.7°, SD 4.1°). There were no significant difference between the healthy group and the robotic assisted group, however there was a significant difference between the healthy group and the manual group (p < 0.001). Hence robotically-assisted knee replacement with Mako Restoris Implants appears to lead not only to better implant alignment but also some kinematic benefits to the user during gait.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524795
[Au] Autor:Faraji Aylar M; Jafarnezhadgero AA; Salari Esker F
[Ad] Address:Division of Biomechanics, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sahand University of Thechnology, Sahand New Town, Tabriz, 51335-1996, Iran. Electronic address: mo_farajiaylar@sut.ac.ir.
[Ti] Title:Sit-to-stand ground reaction force characteristics in blind and sighted female children.
[So] Source:Gait Posture;62:34-40, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2219
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The association between visual sensory and sit-to-stand ground reaction force characteristics is not clear. Impulse is the amount of force applied over a period of time. Also, free moment represents the vertical moment applied in the center of pressure (COP). RESEARCH QUESTION: How the ground reaction force components, vertical loading rate, impulses and free moment respond to long and short term restricted visual information? METHODS: Fifteen female children with congenital blindness and 45 healthy girls with no visual impairments participated in this study. The girls with congenital blindness were placed in one group and the 45 girls with no visual impairments were randomly divided into three groups of 15; eyes open, permanently eyes closed, and temporary eyes closed. The participants in the permanently eyes closed group closed their eyes for 20 min before the test, whereas temporary eyes closed group did tests with their eyes closed throughout, and those in the eyes open group kept their eyes open. RESULTS: Congenital blindness was associated with increased vertical loading rate, range of motion of knee and hip in the medio-lateral plane. Also, medio-lateral and vertical ground reaction force impulses. Similar peak negative and positive free moments were observed in three groups. SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, the results reveal that sit-to-stand ground reaction force components in blind children may have clinical importance for improvement of balance control of these individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524714
[Au] Autor:Ning GZ; Kan SL; Zhu RS; Feng SQ
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Mobi-C Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Fusion for the Treatment of Symptomatic Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Mobi-C cervical disc arthroplasty (MCDA) has been regarded as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). In this study, the effectiveness and safety between MCDA and ACDF for symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease was evaluated. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials. Studies were included based on the eligibility criteria. Risk of bias assessment and quality of evidence assessment were performed. RESULTS: Four studies with 785 patients were included. For clinical outcomes, MCDA were superior to ACDF considering fewer subsequent surgical intervention (P < 0.00001), lower neck pain scores (P = 0.01), lower incidences of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) at both superior and inferior level (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.01, respectively), greater range of motion (ROM) of the operated segment (P < 0.0001), and higher patient satisfaction (P = 0.007). No substantial differences were observed between two groups regarding surgery time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization, neck disability index (NDI) scores and arm pain scores (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses indicated that for patients with two-level CDDD, MCDA demonstrated lower NDI and arm pain scores, and higher patient satisfaction (P < 0.05) compared with ACDF. CONCLUSION: MCDA presented fewer subsequent surgical intervention, lower neck pain score, lower incidences of ASD at superior and inferior level, greater ROM and higher score of patient satisfaction than ACDF. However, considering the surgery time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization, NDI and neck pain scores, MCDA was similar with ACDF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524623
[Au] Autor:Chang DHF; Ban H; Ikegaya Y; Fujita I; Troje NF
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Electronic address: changd@hku.hk.
[Ti] Title:Cortical and subcortical responses to biological motion.
[So] Source:Neuroimage;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9572
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Using fMRI and multivariate analyses we sought to understand the neural representations of articulated body shape and local kinematics in biological motion. We show that in addition to a cortical network that includes areas identified previously for biological motion perception, including the posterior superior temporal sulcus, inferior frontal gyrus, and ventral body areas, the ventral lateral nucleus, a presumably motoric thalamic area is sensitive to both form and kinematic information in biological motion. Our findings suggest that biological motion perception is not achieved as an end-point of segregated cortical form and motion networks as often suggested, but instead involves earlier parts in the visual system including a subcortical network.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524356
[Au] Autor:Furuya S; Furukawa Y; Uehara K; Oku T
[Ad] Address:Sony Computer Science Laboratories Inc. (Sony CSL), Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Probing sensorimotor integration during musical performance.
[So] Source:Ann N Y Acad Sci;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1749-6632
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An integration of afferent sensory information from the visual, auditory, and proprioceptive systems into execution and update of motor programs plays crucial roles in control and acquisition of skillful sequential movements in musical performance. However, conventional behavioral and neurophysiological techniques that have been applied to study simplistic motor behaviors limit elucidating online sensorimotor integration processes underlying skillful musical performance. Here, we propose two novel techniques that were developed to investigate the roles of auditory and proprioceptive feedback in piano performance. First, a closed-loop noninvasive brain stimulation system that consists of transcranial magnetic stimulation, a motion sensor, and a microcomputer enabled to assess time-varying cortical processes subserving auditory-motor integration during piano playing. Second, a force-field system capable of manipulating the weight of a piano key allowed for characterizing movement adaptation based on the feedback obtained, which can shed light on the formation of an internal representation of the piano. Results of neurophysiological and psychophysics experiments provided evidence validating these systems as effective means for disentangling computational and neural processes of sensorimotor integration in musical performance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nyas.13619

  7 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524355
[Au] Autor:Sánchez-González MC; Pérez-Cabezas V; López-Izquierdo I; Gutiérrez-Sánchez E; Ruiz-Molinero C; Rebollo-Salas M; Jiménez-Rejano JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Physics of Condensed Matter, Optics Area, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Is it possible to relate accommodative visual dysfunctions to neck pain?
[So] Source:Ann N Y Acad Sci;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1749-6632
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to establish whether there is a relationship between conditions of accommodative visual dysfunctions and cervical complaints. Fifty-two participants were included. Variables were accommodative amplitude, positive and negative relative accommodation (NRA), accommodative response, and accommodative facility. Subjects were classified as accommodative insufficiency, accommodative excess, or normal. Neck complaints were measured with the Neck Disability Index, the Visual Analogue Scale, and by cervical range of motion, deep flexor muscle activation score, and performance index. We found the following significant relationships: between NRA and both performance index and left-side bending; accommodative amplitude right-eye with right-side bending and with left-side bending; accommodative amplitude left-eye with right-side bending; and accommodative facility left-eye with both performance index and left-side bending. In accommodative amplitude right-eye, aIl participants showed significant values and greater than those with accommodative excess. In both groups, performance index values were decreased. Greater pain and lower right-rotation were found in participants with accommodative excess than in those with accommodative insufficiency. We conclude that accommodative dysfunctions are related to low performance index, decreased range of motion, as well as greater neck pain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nyas.13614

  8 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516008
[Au] Autor:Canè F; Verhegghe B; De Beule M; Bertrand PB; Van der Geest RJ; Segers P; De Santis G
[Ad] Address:IBiTech-bioMMeda, Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:From 4D Medical Images (CT, MRI, and Ultrasound) to 4D Structured Mesh Models of the Left Ventricular Endocardium for Patient-Specific Simulations.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2018:7030718, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:With cardiovascular disease (CVD) remaining the primary cause of death worldwide, early detection of CVDs becomes essential. The intracardiac flow is an important component of ventricular function, motion kinetics, wash-out of ventricular chambers, and ventricular energetics. Coupling between Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and medical images can play a fundamental role in terms of patient-specific diagnostic tools. From a technical perspective, CFD simulations with moving boundaries could easily lead to negative volumes errors and the sudden failure of the simulation. The generation of high-quality 4D meshes (3D in space + time) with 1-to-1 vertex becomes essential to perform a CFD simulation with moving boundaries. In this context, we developed a semiautomatic morphing tool able to create 4D high-quality structured meshes starting from a segmented 4D dataset. To prove the versatility and efficiency, the method was tested on three different 4D datasets (Ultrasound, MRI, and CT) by evaluating the quality and accuracy of the resulting 4D meshes. Furthermore, an estimation of some physiological quantities is accomplished for the 4D CT reconstruction. Future research will aim at extending the region of interest, further automation of the meshing algorithm, and generating structured hexahedral mesh models both for the blood and myocardial volume.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2018/7030718

  9 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511179
[Au] Autor:Woo S; Song KM; Zhang X; Zhou Y; Ezawa M; Liu X; Finizio S; Raabe J; Lee NJ; Kim SI; Park SY; Kim Y; Kim JY; Lee D; Lee O; Choi JW; Min BC; Koo HC; Chang J
[Ad] Address:Center for Spintronics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 02792, Korea. shwoo_@kist.re.kr.
[Ti] Title:Current-driven dynamics and inhibition of the skyrmion Hall effect of ferrimagnetic skyrmions in GdFeCo films.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):959, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Magnetic skyrmions are swirling magnetic textures with novel characteristics suitable for future spintronic and topological applications. Recent studies confirmed the room-temperature stabilization of skyrmions in ultrathin ferromagnets. However, such ferromagnetic skyrmions show an undesirable topological effect, the skyrmion Hall effect, which leads to their current-driven motion towards device edges, where skyrmions could easily be annihilated by topographic defects. Recent theoretical studies have predicted enhanced current-driven behavior for antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled skyrmions. Here we present the stabilization of these skyrmions and their current-driven dynamics in ferrimagnetic GdFeCo films. By utilizing element-specific X-ray imaging, we find that the skyrmions in the Gd and FeCo sublayers are antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled. We further confirm that ferrimagnetic skyrmions can move at a velocity of ~50 m s with reduced skyrmion Hall angle, |θ | ~ 20°. Our findings open the door to ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic skyrmionics while providing key experimental evidences of recent theoretical studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-018-03378-7

  10 / 209665 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501723
[Au] Autor:Gai M; Kurochkin MA; Li D; Khlebtsov BN; Dong L; Tarakina N; Poston R; Gould DJ; Frueh J; Sukhorukov GB
[Ad] Address:School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:In-situ NIR-laser mediated bioactive substance delivery to single cell for EGFP expression based on biocompatible microchamber-arrays.
[So] Source:J Control Release;276:84-92, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4995
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Controlled drug delivery and gene expression is required for a large variety of applications including cancer therapy, wound healing, cell migration, cell modification, cell-analysis, reproductive and regenerative medicine. Controlled delivery of precise amounts of drugs to a single cell is especially interesting for cell and tissue engineering as well as therapeutics and has until now required the application of micro-pipettes, precisely placed dispersed drug delivery vehicles, or injections close to or into the cell. Here we present surface bound micro-chamber arrays able to store small hydrophilic molecules for prolonged times in subaqueous conditions supporting spatiotemporal near infrared laser mediated release. The micro-chambers (MCs) are composed of biocompatible and biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA). Biocompatible gold nanoparticles are employed as light harvesting agents to facilitate photothermal MC opening. The degree of photothermal heating is determined by numerical simulations utilizing optical properties of the MC, and confirmed by Brownian motion measurements of laser-irradiated micro-particles exhibiting similar optical properties like the MCs. The amount of bioactive small molecular cargo (doxycycline) from local release is determined by fluorescence spectroscopy and gene expression in isolated C2C12 cells via enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) biosynthesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


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