Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29511683
[Au] Autor:Lee SE; Lim JY; Ryu DB; Kim TW; Jeon YW; Yoon JH; Cho BS; Eom KS; Kim YJ; Kim HJ; Lee S; Cho SG; Kim DW; Lee JW; Min WS; Min CK
[Ad] Address:Department of Hematology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Circulating CD3 CD4 CD161 Cells Are Associated with Early Complications after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2018:5097325, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to explore if measurement of pretransplant circulating CD161-expressing cells, in addition to clinical risk factors, could predict mucositis and infections in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). To determine if CD161-expressing cells are likely to predict early complications, namely, mucositis (≥grade 3), infections, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation, we prospectively examined CD161-expressing cells (CD3 CD4 CD161 and CD3 CD8 CD161 ) in peripheral blood samples from 108 patients with MM undergoing ASCT. After adjusting for factors identified by univariate analysis that predicted mucositis (≥grade 3), infection before engraftment, and CMV reactivation, multivariate analyses revealed that the low proportion of CD3 CD4 CD161 cells in peripheral blood was an independent predictor of mucositis (≥grade 3) ( = 0.020), infections before engraftment ( = 0.014), and CMV reactivation ( = 0.010). In addition, we found that female sex and decreased glomerular filtration rate were independent factors for predicting mucositis. Female sex and severe pulmonary comorbidity were independent factors for predicting infection before engraftment. We found that the proportion of circulating CD3 CD4 CD161 cells is useful for predicting the occurrence of early complications, including mucositis and infections, after ASCT in patients with MM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2018/5097325

  2 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523884
[Au] Autor:Augeul-Meunier K; Chretien ML; Stoppa AM; Karlin L; Benboubker L; Diaz JMT; Mohty M; Yakoub-Agha I; Bay JO; Perrot A; Bulabois CE; Huynh A; Mercier M; Frenzel L; Avet-Loiseau H; de Latour RP; Cornillon J
[Ad] Address:Institut de Cancérologie Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France.
[Ti] Title:Extending autologous transplantation as first line therapy in multiple myeloma patients with severe renal impairment: a retrospective study by the SFGM-TC.
[So] Source:Bone Marrow Transplant;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5365
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Renal impairment is a common complication of multiple myeloma (MM), accounting for 20-30% of MM patients at diagnosis and 40-50% of patients during the course of their disease. This feature is associated with poor prognosis and shorter survival as compared to patients with normal renal function (NRF). Therefore, therapeutic management is challenging as autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is often not considered as a valuable strategy, mainly due to concerns of toxicity. In this retrospective and multicenter study, we included 55 MM patients with dialysis-dependent or independent renal failure who underwent high-dose melphalan-based ASCT in order to assess the efficacy outcomes and toxicities of this strategy. Response to ASCT was at least VGPR (very good PR) in 58% of patients and 96% of patients who also received bortezomib-based induction were at least in PR after ASCT. Median OS was 76 months and median PFS was 55 months, similarly to MM patients with NRF. In multivariate analysis, dose of melphalan (140 mg/m ) was correlated with better PFS (18 months, P = 0.005). Toxicities included febrile neutropenia (75%) and severe mucositis (34%). Overall, this work confirmed that ASCT conditioned by 140 mg/m melphalan is a beneficial procedure for MM patients with renal failure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41409-018-0122-8

  3 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505509
[Au] Autor:Xu L; Zhu Y; Yu J; Deng M; Zhu X
[Ad] Address:Department of Children's Critical Care Medicine, Xin-Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Nursing care of a boy seriously infected with Steven-Johnson syndrome after treatment with azithromycin: A case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9112, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an acute blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. SJS in children is not common but potentially serious disease. But the epidemiology of SJS in China is not well defined. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 6-year-old boy was initially diagnosed as pneumonia admitted to hospital after admission, and the body appears red rash with blisters, skin damage, lip debaucjed, repeated high fever, and rapid progression. DIAGNOSES: SJS often results from an allergy reaction response to a range of drugs. It is a clinical diagnosis suggested by fever and malaise followed by an extensive painful, nonblanching, macular rash that commonly progresses to blistering or sloughing, and mucositis. INTERVENTIONS: The boy was treated with continuous renal replacement therapy, anti-infection therapy, high-dose glucocorticoid treatment, and symptomatic treatment. OUTCOMES: The patient was recovered after 33 days of treatment. LESSONS: The current treatment is mainly symptomatic treatment, and for the patient, it is important to make skin care related well, included early out blisters at effusion, reducing skin ulceration of the mucosa area, keeping skin clean, removing mucosa secretion and blood clots, doing eye care related, preventing the complications, ensuring adequate intake of nutrition and warm and so on.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects
Azithromycin/adverse effects
Skin Care/nursing
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/nursing
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Humans
Male
Pneumonia/drug therapy
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 83905-01-5 (Azithromycin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009112

  4 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521658
[Au] Autor:Rathe M; Shen RL; Sangild PT
[Ad] Address:Department of Hematology and Oncology, Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Trophic factors in the treatment and prevention of alimentary tract mucositis.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Support Palliat Care;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1751-4266
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Mucositis is a common adverse effect of cytotoxic anticancer treatment with serious implications for the quality of life, morbidity and mortality of cancers patients. Although, evidence supporting the use of certain treatments exists there is no gold standard for preventing or treating mucositis. Current management strategies are scarce with recommendations referring primarily to specific cytotoxic treatment regimens in certain clinical scenarios. RECENT FINDINGS: Trophic factors may contribute to preserve epithelial integrity, function, and accelerate regeneration after chemotherapeutic treatment. Accordingly, various growth factors have been evaluated in the prevention or treatment of alimentary tract mucositis. However, in spite of often showing promising results in preclinical testing currently perlifermin is the only trophic factor recommended for the prevention of mucositis. SUMMARY: More knowledge from representative preclinical models, and testing growth factor interventions across different models, may be the key to advance the field from basic science to clinical application of new growth factors. For promising new therapies, subsequent establishment of adequately powered clinical trials and uniform reporting of mucositis, are important elements to help establish new standard interventions that can be included into the continuously updated clinical recommendations for treatment of mucositis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SPC.0000000000000340

  5 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520941
[Au] Autor:Patianna G; Valente NA; D'Addona A; Andreana S
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Surgery and Implantology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:In-vitro evaluation of controlled-release 14% doxycycline gel for decontamination of machined and sandblasted acid-etched implants.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Peri-implant infections are associated with the establishment and maturation of a bacterial biofilm characterized by a predominance of Gram-negative fusiform anaerobic species. The decontamination of implant surfaces is then crucial for a successful peri-implant therapy. METHODS: Twenty-one smooth and 21 rough implants, divided into four groups according to surface and treatment modality, were contaminated with Streptococcus sanguinis and then placed in an incubator with the atmosphere of 5% CO2 at 37°C for 24 hours to allow the bacteria to grow. After 24 hours, the test groups were treated with controlled release 14% doxycycline gel injecting the gel circumferentially over the surface of the implant for 3 minutes, while the control groups were irrigated with sterile saline for 1 minute. The implants were then vortexed into triptych soy broth to allow the bacteria to detach from the surface, diluted 1:100 and plated. Colony forming units (CFU) were counted 48 hours after incubation. RESULTS: The use of a 14% doxycycline gel minimized CFU counts compared to control groups, with the difference being statistically significant (P < 0.05). The reduction of CFUs in the smooth test group is more marked than in the rough test group, but the difference doesn't reach statistically significance (P = 0.215). CONCLUSIONS: The use of 14% doxycycline gel in implant surface decontamination was efficacious in this in-vitro study. Adjunctive use of locally delivered 14% doxycycline gel might be a viable option in the management of peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis considering its efficacy in reducing bacterial colonization.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0325

  6 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520826
[Au] Autor:Ribeiro FV; Casati MZ; Casarin RC; Corrêa MG; Cirano FR; Negri BM; Pimentel SP
[Ad] Address:Dental Research Division, School of Dentistry, Paulista University, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Impact of a triclosan-containing toothpaste during the progression of experimental peri-implant mucositis: Clinical parameters and local pattern of osteo-immunoinflammatory mediators in peri-implant fluid.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;89(2):203-212, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the influence of a triclosan-containing toothpaste in the profile of osteo-immunoinflammatory mediators in peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) and in clinical parameters during progression of peri-implant mucositis. METHODS: Twenty-two clinically healthy patients with an implant-supported single-unit crown were enrolled in this double-blind, randomized, crossover study carried out in two phases of 21 days each. During an experimental 3-week period of undisturbed plaque accumulation in the implants, patients were randomly assigned to use three times/day: triclosan (n = 11), triclosan/copolymer/fluoride toothpaste; or placebo (n = 11), fluoride toothpaste. After a professional prophylaxis, a washout period of 30 days was established. Clinical parameters and 15 osteo-immunoinflammatory mediators in the PICF were evaluated at baseline and at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days. RESULTS: Both groups showed increase in plaque index at implant sites from the 3rd until the 21st day (P < 0.05). Only triclosan treatment was able to avoid an increase in bleeding on probing (BOP) throughout the follow-ups (P > 0.05), whereas a significant intensification in BOP was observed from the 14th day in the placebo-treated sites (P < 0.05). Lower interleukin (IL)-10 concentrations were detected in the placebo group at the 21st day when compared with triclosan-treated implant sites (P < 0.05). IL-10 levels were reduced and IL-1ß concentrations were increased at 21 days when compared with baseline only in placebo-treated sites (P < 0.05). Osteoprotegerin levels significantly increased from the 14th until the 21st day only in triclosan-treated sites (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Triclosan-containing toothpaste controls clinical inflammation and interferes positively in the profile of osteo-immunoinflammatory mediators during progression of experimental peri-implant mucositis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0302

  7 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29438463
[Au] Autor:Kang YK; Ryu MH; Park SH; Kim JG; Kim JW; Cho SH; Park YL; Park SR; Rha SY; Kang MJ; Cho JY; Kang SY; Roh SY; Ryoo BY; Nam BH; Jo YW; Yoon KE; Oh SC
[Ad] Address:Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety findings from DREAM: a phase III study of DHP107 (oral paclitaxel) versus IV paclitaxel in patients with advanced gastric cancer after failure of first-line chemotherapy.
[So] Source:Ann Oncol;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1569-8041
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Paclitaxel is currently only available as an intravenous (IV) formulation. DHP107 is a novel oral formulation of lipid ingredients and paclitaxel. DHP107 demonstrated comparable efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics to IV paclitaxel as second-line therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). DREAM is a multicenter, open-label, prospective, randomized phase III study of patients with histologically/cytologically confirmed, unresectable/recurrent AGC after first-line therapy failure. Methods and materials: Patients were randomized 1:1 to DHP107 (200 mg/m2 orally twice daily days 1, 8, 15 every 4 weeks) or IV paclitaxel (175 mg/m2 day 1 every 3 weeks). Patients were stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, disease status, and prior treatment; response was assessed (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) every 6 weeks. Primary endpoint: non-inferiority of progression-free survival (PFS); secondary endpoints: overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. For the efficacy analysis, sequential tests for non-inferiority were performed, first with a non-inferiority margin of 1.48, then with a margin of 1.25. Results: Baseline characteristics were balanced in the 236 randomized patients (n=118 per arm). Median PFS (per-protocol) was 3.0 (95% CI, 1.7-4.0) months for DHP107 and 2.6 (95% CI, 1.8-2.8) months for paclitaxel (hazard ratio [HR]=0.85; 95% CI, 0.64-1.13). A sensitivity analysis on PFS using independent central review showed similar results (HR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.70-1.24). Median OS (final analysis set) was 9.7 (95% CI, 7.1-11.5) months for DHP107 versus 8.9 (95% CI, 7.1-12.2) months for paclitaxel (HR = 1.04; 95% CI, 0.76-1.41). ORR was 17.8% for DHP107 (CR 4.2%; PR 13.6%) versus 25.4% for paclitaxel (CR 3.4%; PR 22.0%). Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and mucositis were more common with DHP107; peripheral neuropathy was more common with paclitaxel. Grade ≥3 adverse events were infrequent, most commonly neutropenia (42% versus 53%); febrile neutropenia was rare (5.9% versus 2.5%). No hypersensitivity reactions occurred with DHP107 (paclitaxel 2.5%). Conclusions: DHP107 as second-line treatment for AGC was non-inferior to paclitaxel for PFS; other efficacy and safety parameters were comparable. DHP107 is the first oral paclitaxel with proven efficacy/safety for the treatment of AGC. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01839773.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/annonc/mdy055

  8 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346519
[Au] Autor:Awan MJ; Nedzi L; Wang D; Tumati V; Sumer B; Xie XJ; Smith I; Truelson J; Hughes R; Myers LL; Lavertu P; Wong S; Yao M
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology.
[Ti] Title:Final Results of a Multi-institutional Phase II Trial of Re-Irradiation with Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin and Cetuximab for Recurrent or Second Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.
[So] Source:Ann Oncol;, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1569-8041
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The optimal regimen of chemotherapy and re-irradiation (re-XRT) for recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is controversial. We report the final outcomes of a multi-center Phase II trial evaluating cetuximab and cisplatin-based chemotherapy concurrent with re-XRT for patients with recurrent HNSCC. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable recurrent disease or positive margins after salvage surgery arising within a previously irradiated field with KPS≥70 were eligible for this trial. Cetuximab 400mg/m2 was delivered as a loading dose in Week 1 followed by weekly cetuximab 250mg/m2 and cisplatin 30mg/m2 concurrent with 6 weeks of IMRT to a dose of 60-66 Gy in 30 daily fractions. Patients who previously received both concurrent cetuximab and cisplatin with radiation or who received radiotherapy less than 6 months prior were ineligible. Results: From 2009 to 2013, 48 patients enrolled on this trial. 2 did not receive any protocol treatment. Of the remaining 46 patients, 34 were male and 12 female, with a median age of 62 years (range 36-85). Treatment was feasible and only 1 patient did not complete the treatment course. Common Grade 3 or higher acute toxicities were lymphopenia (46%), pain (22%), dysphagia (13%), radiation dermatitis (13%), mucositis (11%) and anorexia (11%). There were no Grade 5 acute toxicities. Eight Grade 3 late toxicities were observed, 4 of which were swallowing-related. With a median follow-up of 1.38 years, the 1-year overall survival (OS) was 60.4% and 1-year recurrence-free survival was 34.1%. On univariate analysis, OS was significantly improved with young age (p=0.01). OS was not associated with radiation dose, surgery prior to re-XRT or interval from prior XRT. Conclusions: Concurrent cisplatin and cetuximab with re-XRT is feasible and offers good treatment outcomes for patients with high-risk features. Younger patients had significantly improved OS. ClinicalTrials.Gov Identifier: NCT00833261.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/annonc/mdy018

  9 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29272441
[Au] Autor:Dupuis LL; Johnston DL; Baggott C; Hyslop S; Tomlinson D; Gibson P; Orsey A; Dix D; Price V; Vanan M; Portwine C; Kuczynski S; Spiegler B; Tomlinson GA; Sung L
[Ad] Address:Affiliations of authors: Program in Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (LLD, SH, DT, LS); Department of Pharmacy (LLD), Department of Psychology (BS), and Division of Haematology/Oncology (LS), The
[Ti] Title:Validation of the Symptom Screening in Pediatrics Tool in Children Receiving Cancer Treatments.
[So] Source:J Natl Cancer Inst;, 2017 Dec 20.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2105
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The objective was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the self-report Symptom Screening in Pediatrics Tool (SSPedi) from the perspective of children with cancer and pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Methods: In this multicenter study, respondents were children age eight to 18 years who had cancer or had received HSCT, and their parents. Two different child respondent populations were targeted. More symptomatic respondents were receiving active treatment for cancer, admitted to the hospital, and expected to be in the hospital three days later. Less symptomatic respondents were in maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or had completed cancer therapy. Children completed SSPedi and then responded to validated self-report measures of mucositis, nausea, pain, and global quality of life. Children in the more symptomatic group repeated SSPedi and a global symptom change scale three days later. Parent proxy-report was optional. Reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlations while convergent validity was evaluated using Spearman correlations. Results: Of 502 children enrolled, 302 were in the more symptomatic group and 200 were in the less symptomatic group. Intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82 to 0.92) for test-retest reliability and 0.76 (95% CI = 0.71 to 0.80) for inter-rater reliability. The mean difference in SSPedi scores between more and less symptomatic groups was 7.8 (95% CI = 6.4 to 9.2). SSPedi was responsive to change in global symptoms. All hypothesized relationships among measures were observed. Conclusions: SSPedi is a self-report symptom bother tool for children with cancer and HSCT recipients that is reliable, valid, and responsive to change. SSPedi can be used for clinical and research purposes. Future work should focus on integration into care delivery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jnci/djx250

  10 / 12140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29513234
[Au] Autor:Alqahtani M; Woods TR; Smith MH; Bhattacharyya I; Cohen DM; Islam MN; Fitzpatrick SG
[Ti] Title:Medication use and medical history of 155 patients with oral lichenoid lesions: a retrospective study.
[So] Source:Gen Dent;66(2):40-45, 2018 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0363-6771
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Several medications have been reported as possible etiologic factors for oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs). This study investigated the medication profile and medical history of patients with biopsy-proven OLP or OLLs, also classified by the clinically nonspecific term oral lichenoid mucositis (OLM), in a busy oral medicine clinic. The University of Florida College of Dentistry records from 2009 to 2014 were searched retrospectively for all patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of OLP, OLLs, or OLM. Patients were excluded if dysplasia or carcinoma was diagnosed concurrently at the same biopsy site. The demographics, clinical parameters, systemic diseases, histologic diagnosis, and direct immunofluorescence testing results were recorded. Medication category use was recorded based on both commonly used medications and those that have been reportedly linked to lichenoid disease in the literature. A total of 155 patients with an average age of 63.6 years were included. The majority of patients were women (76.8%) and Caucasian (91.8%). Most of the lesions were multifocal and mixed (white-red) in appearance. The most common systemic conditions were hypertension (n = 80; 51.6%) followed by thyroid disease (n = 52; 33.5%) and diabetes (n = 26; 16.8%). Antihypertensives were the most common medication category followed by, in descending order, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cholesterol-lowering medications, psychiatric medications, and thyroid replacement drugs. The records revealed that 87.7% of the patients took at least 1 medication from 1 of the categories studied. Medication use is common in patients with biopsy-proven OLP or OLLs. Although causation cannot be assessed from the results of this study, the clinician should consider the possibility of medication as a complicating factor in patients with OLP or OLLs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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