Database : MEDLINE
Search on : musaceae [Words]
References found : 102 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 11 go to page                         

  1 / 102 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29451754
[Au] Autor:Ferreira KR; Gomes ES; Rodrigues SR
[Ti] Title:Biological aspects and mating behavior of Leucothyreus albopilosus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).
[So] Source:Rev Biol Trop;64(2):547-57, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0034-7744
[Cp] Country of publication:Costa Rica
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The genus Leucothyreus has been linked to some commercial plant crop pests. Eventhough several species have been described for this genus, information about this group is still scarce. This study investigated some biological aspects and mating behavior in Leucothyreus albopilosus. Studies were conducted at the State University of Mato Grosso do Sul, in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Cassilândia, MS, Brazil. For biological studies, adults were collected with light traps from February 2011 to February 2012, and for behavior analyses from September to December 2014. Biological studies were undertaken every three days and included the eggs inspection, and the separation of the newly hatched larvae to observe and describe their developmental stages; to monitor larval growth and differentiate larval instars, we measured the larvae cephalic capsule. Life cycle was determined starting from the newly laid eggs until adult death. For mating behavior studies, adults obtained with light traps were taken to the laboratory. As soon as they started flying in the evening, couples were formed and copulation steps were recorded. In the field, we observed that adults were mostly collected during warmer and wetter periods (from August to March). Our results showed that the embryonic period of L. albopilosus lasted 20.5 days, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd instars lasted 31.0, 33.1 and 85.6 days, respectively. The pupal stage lasted 20 days, and the egg to adult period was completed in 185.5 days; these results suggest that L. albopilosus can be characterized as a univoltine species. Observations of mating behavior in the laboratory showed that, after the sunset, adults projected a small portion of clypeus near the soil surface and flew off seeking a female to mate. The female could accept or reject the male for mating. When the female accepted the male, copulation occurred from 19:00 to 23:00 hours, and lasted 19.45 minutes on average. Sometimes females refused to mate, probably because the male or female were not sexually mature to perform copulation, and there might be a chemical communication between the adults. Adults were observed feeding on ripe bananas (Musa sp., Musaceae) and on mangaba flowers (Hancornia speciosa, Apocynaceae) in the laboratory. With this work we contributed with the description of mating behavior in the genus Leucothyreus and concluded that the biological cycle was completed in less than 200 days.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28836479
[Au] Autor:Ghosh A; Pakhira BP; Tripathy A; Ghosh D
[Ad] Address:a Nutrigenomics & Molecular Medicine Laboratory, Department of Bio-Medical Laboratory Science and Management , Vidyasagar University , Midnapore , India.
[Ti] Title:Male contraceptive efficacy of poly herbal formulation, contracept-TM, composed of aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula fruit and Musa balbisiana seed in rat.
[So] Source:Pharm Biol;55(1):2035-2042, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5116
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Terminalia chebula Retz (Combretaceae) and Musa balbisiana Colla (Musaceae) have a traditional reputation as a male contraceptive. OBJECTIVE: To determine the hypo-testicular activity of aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula (fruit) and Musa balbisiana (seed) separately, and in composite manner at the ratio of 1:1 named as 'Contracept-TM' compared to cyproterone acetate (CPA), for developing a polyherbal contraceptive. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The separate extract of above said plants or 'Contracept-TM' at the dose of 40 mg/100 g body weight of rat/day or CPA at 2 mg/100 g body weight of rat/day was administered for 28 days. Spermiological, androgenic and oxidative stress sensors, LD and ED /100 g body weight values were measured. RESULTS: Treatment of individual, 'Contracept-TM' or CPA resulted significant decrease in the count of spermatogonia A (36.36-49.09%), pre-leptotene spermatocyte (19.11-55.30%), mid-pachytene spermatocyte (28.65-47.28%) and step 7 spermatid (29.65-51.59%). Activities of testicular Δ , 3ß (21.25-48.02%),17ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (29.75-55.08%), catalase (19.06-43.29%) and peroxidase (30.76-62.82%), levels of testosterone (28.15-63.44%), testicular cholesterol (19.61-49.33%), conjugated diene (29.69-84.99%) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (41.25-86.73%) were elevated compare to the control. The ED and LD values were 40 mg and 5.8 g (T. chebula), 48 mg and 6.3 g (M. bulbisiana), 40 mg and 6.0 g ('Contracept-TM'), respectively. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The said spermiological and androgenic sensors' levels were decreased significantly by 'Contracept-TM' than its constitutional individual plant extract and it may be comparable to standard anti-testicular drug like CPA. So, it may be concluded that above polyherbal formulation is potent for inducing hypo-testicular activity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170824
[Lr] Last revision date:170824
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/13880209.2017.1357734

  3 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28677256
[Au] Autor:Nakato V; Mahuku G; Coutinho T
[Ad] Address:Plant Pathology, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Kampala 7878, Uganda.
[Ti] Title:Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum: a major constraint to banana, plantain and enset production in central and east Africa over the past decade.
[So] Source:Mol Plant Pathol;, 2017 Jul 05.
[Is] ISSN:1364-3703
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:TAXONOMY: Bacteria; Phylum Proteobacteria; Class Gammaproteobacteria; Order Xanthomonadales; Family Xanthomonadaceae; Genus Xanthomonas; currently classified as X. campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm). However, fatty acid methyl ester analysis and genetic and genomic evidence suggest that this pathogen is X. vasicola and resides in a separate pathovar. ISOLATION AND DETECTION: Xcm can be isolated on yeast extract peptone glucose agar (YPGA), cellobiose cephalexin agar and yeast extract tryptone sucrose agar (YTSA) complemented with 5-fluorouracil, cephalexin and cycloheximide to confer semi-selectivity. Xcm can also be identified using direct antigen coating enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA), species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using GspDm primers and lateral flow devices that detect latent infections. HOST RANGE: Causes Xanthomonas wilt on plants belonging to the Musaceae, primarily banana (Musa acuminata), plantain (M. acuminata × balbisiana) and enset (Ensete ventricosum). DIVERSITY: There is a high level of genetic homogeneity within Xcm, although genome sequencing has revealed two major sublineages. SYMPTOMS: Yellowing and wilting of leaves, premature fruit ripening and dry rot, bacterial exudate from cut stems. DISTRIBUTION: Xcm has only been found in African countries, namely Burundi, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. ECOLOGY AND EPIDEMIOLOGY: Xcm is transmitted by insects, bats, birds and farming implements. Long-distance dispersal of the pathogen is by the transportation of latently infected plants into new areas. MANAGEMENT: The management of Xcm has relied on cultural practices that keep the pathogen population at tolerable levels. Biotechnology programmes have been successful in producing resistant banana plants. However, the deployment of such genetic material has not as yet been achieved in farmers' fields, and the sustainability of transgenic resistance remains to be addressed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170920
[Lr] Last revision date:170920
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/mpp.12578

  4 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28653934
[Au] Autor:Abbas K; Rizwani GH; Zahid H; Qadir MI
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacognosy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan / Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of pharmaceutical Sciences, GC University Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of nephroprotective activity of Musa paradisiaca L. in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;30(3):881-890, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objective of the study was to investigate the nephroprotective activity of methanolic extract of different morphological parts (bract, flower, trachea and tracheal fluid) of Musa paradisiaca L. (Family: Musaceae) against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. Gentamicin produced significant changes in biochemical (increased levels of blood urea nitrogen level, blood urea, and serum creatinine), and histological parameters in mice. Treatment with methanolic extract of bract (100 and 250mg/kg, b.w) and flowering stalk (trachea) (250 and 500mg/kg, b.w) significantly prevented biochemical and histological changes produced by gentamicin toxicity. The extracts of M. paradisiaca (bract and flowering stalk) could contribute a lead to discovery of a new drug for the treatment of drug-induced nephrotoxicity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gentamicins/toxicity
Kidney/drug effects
Musa/chemistry
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Female
Male
Mice
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Gentamicins); 0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170907
[Lr] Last revision date:170907
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170628
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28609911
[Au] Autor:Argolo PS; Santos RMV; Bittencourt MAL; Noronha ACDS; Moraes GJ; Oliveira AR
[Ad] Address:Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz - UESC, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-900, Ilhéus, BA, Brazil.. aroliveir@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) associated with tropical ornamental plants, with a checklist and a key to the species of Bahia, Brazil.
[So] Source:Zootaxa;4258(4):345-364, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1175-5334
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Twenty-four papers refer to phytoseiid mites from different plant species in the state of Bahia, northeastern Brazil, but none of those refer to taxonomic surveys on ornamental plants. The aim of this study was to determine phytoseiids from tropical ornamentals in the southern coastal region of Bahia state, as well as to present a checklist and an identification key to the species recorded in that state. Samples were collected at eight localities of five municipalities. A total of seventeen species in nine genera was found on fifteen plant species of the families Costaceae, Heliconiaceae, Musaceae and Zingiberaceae. The most frequent and abundant phytoseiid species were Iphiseiodes metapodalis (El-Banhawy), Amblyseius operculatus De Leon and Iphiseiodes zuluagai Denmark & Muma, respectively. The checklist and the identification key to the Phytoseiidae species of Bahia were prepared based on the published literature.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mites
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Asteraceae
Brazil
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170809
[Lr] Last revision date:170809
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170615
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11646/zootaxa.4258.4.3

  6 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28367666
[Au] Autor:M HR; Ghosh D; Banerjee R; Salimath BP
[Ad] Address:a Department of Studies in Biotechnology , Molecular Oncology Lab, University of Mysore , Mysore , India.
[Ti] Title:Suppression of VEGF-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth by Eugenia jambolana, Musa paradisiaca, and Coccinia indica extracts.
[So] Source:Pharm Biol;55(1):1489-1499, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5116
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Abnormal angiogenesis and evasion of apoptosis are hallmarks of cancer. Accordingly, anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic therapies are effective strategies for cancer treatment. Medicinal plants, namely, Eugenia jambolana Lam. (Myrtaceae), Musa paradisiaca L. (Musaceae), and Coccinia indica Wight & Arn. (Cucurbitaceae), have not been greatly investigated for their anticancer potential. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic efficacy of ethyl acetate (EA) and n-butanol (NB) extracts of E. jambolana (seeds), EA extracts of M. paradisiaca (roots) and C. indica (leaves) with respect to mammary neoplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Effect of extracts (2-200 µg/mL) on cytotoxicity and MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and in vitro angiogenesis were evaluated by MTT, [H]thymidine uptake and EC tube formation assays, respectively. In vivo tumour proliferation, VEGF secretion and angiogenesis were assessed using the Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) model followed by rat corneal micro-pocket and chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Apoptosis induction was assessed by morphological and cell cycle analysis. RESULTS: EA extracts of E. jambolana and M. paradisiaca exhibited the highest cytotoxicity (IC 25 and 60 µg/mL), inhibited cell proliferation (up to 81%), and tube formation (83% and 76%). In vivo treatment reduced body weight (50%); cell number (16.5- and 14.7-fold), secreted VEGF (∼90%), neoangiogenesis in rat cornea (2.5- and 1.5-fold) and CAM (3- and 1.6-fold) besides EAT cells accumulation in sub-G1 phase (20% and 18.38%), respectively. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Considering the potent anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic properties, lead molecules from EA extracts of E. jambolana and M. paradisiaca can be developed into anticancer drugs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angiogenesis Inhibitors/pharmacology
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor/prevention & control
Chorioallantoic Membrane/blood supply
Cucurbitaceae/chemistry
Musa/chemistry
Neovascularization, Pathologic
Neovascularization, Physiologic/drug effects
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Syzygium/chemistry
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 1-Butanol/chemistry
Acetates/chemistry
Angiogenesis Inhibitors/isolation & purification
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification
Apoptosis/drug effects
Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor/blood
Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor/pathology
Cell Movement/drug effects
Cell Proliferation/drug effects
Chick Embryo
Corneal Neovascularization/pathology
Corneal Neovascularization/physiopathology
Corneal Neovascularization/prevention & control
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
G1 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/drug effects
Humans
MCF-7 Cells
Mice
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
Plant Leaves
Plant Roots/chemistry
Plants, Medicinal
Rats, Wistar
Seeds/chemistry
Time Factors
Tumor Burden/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Acetates); 0 (Angiogenesis Inhibitors); 0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (VEGFA protein, human); 0 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A); 76845O8NMZ (ethyl acetate); 8PJ61P6TS3 (1-Butanol)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170605
[Lr] Last revision date:170605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170404
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/13880209.2017.1307422

  7 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28087663
[Au] Autor:Van Holle S; Rougé P; Van Damme EJM
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Biochemistry and Glycobiology, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Evolution and structural diversification of Nictaba-like lectin genes in food crops with a focus on soybean (Glycine max).
[So] Source:Ann Bot;119(5):901-914, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: The Nictaba family groups all proteins that show homology to Nictaba, the tobacco lectin. So far, Nictaba and an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue have been shown to be implicated in the plant stress response. The availability of more than 50 sequenced plant genomes provided the opportunity for a genome-wide identification of Nictaba -like genes in 15 species, representing members of the Fabaceae, Poaceae, Solanaceae, Musaceae, Arecaceae, Malvaceae and Rubiaceae. Additionally, phylogenetic relationships between the different species were explored. Furthermore, this study included domain organization analysis, searching for orthologous genes in the legume family and transcript profiling of the Nictaba -like lectin genes in soybean. Methods: Using a combination of BLASTp, InterPro analysis and hidden Markov models, the genomes of Medicago truncatula , Cicer arietinum , Lotus japonicus , Glycine max , Cajanus cajan , Phaseolus vulgaris , Theobroma cacao , Solanum lycopersicum , Solanum tuberosum , Coffea canephora , Oryza sativa , Zea mays, Sorghum bicolor , Musa acuminata and Elaeis guineensis were searched for Nictaba -like genes. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using RAxML and additional protein domains in the Nictaba-like sequences were identified using InterPro. Expression analysis of the soybean Nictaba -like genes was investigated using microarray data. Key Results: Nictaba -like genes were identified in all studied species and analysis of the duplication events demonstrated that both tandem and segmental duplication contributed to the expansion of the Nictaba gene family in angiosperms. The single-domain Nictaba protein and the multi-domain F-box Nictaba architectures are ubiquitous among all analysed species and microarray analysis revealed differential expression patterns for all soybean Nictaba-like genes. Conclusions: Taken together, the comparative genomics data contributes to our understanding of the Nictaba -like gene family in species for which the occurrence of Nictaba domains had not yet been investigated. Given the ubiquitous nature of these genes, they have probably acquired new functions over time and are expected to take on various roles in plant development and defence.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Crops, Agricultural/genetics
Lectins/genetics
Plant Proteins/genetics
Soybeans/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Crops, Agricultural/metabolism
Lectins/metabolism
Models, Molecular
Multigene Family
Phylogeny
Plant Proteins/metabolism
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soybeans/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lectins); 0 (Plant Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170517
[Lr] Last revision date:170517
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170115
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcw259

  8 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28069347
[Au] Autor:Chávez-Salazar A; Bello-Pérez LA; Agama-Acevedo E; Castellanos-Galeano FJ; Álvarez-Barreto CI; Pacheco-Vargas G
[Ad] Address:Universidad de Caldas, Departamento de Ingeniería, Facultad de Ingenierías. Calle 65 No. 26-10, Apartado Aéreo 275, Manizales, Caldas, Colombia. Electronic address: andres.chavez@ucaldas.edu.co.
[Ti] Title:Isolation and partial characterization of starch from banana cultivars grown in Colombia.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;98:240-246, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Banana starch is resistant to hydrolysis by digestive enzymes due to its structure and dietary fibre content. Starch was isolated from the following three cultivars of Colombian Musaceae: Gros Michel (dessert), Dominico Harton and FHIA 20 (cooking); also, the amylose and amylopectin contents, morphology of the granules, thermal properties, pasting, molecular characteristics and digestibility were determined. The total starch content, amylose content and digestibility (gelatinized starch) were higher in cooking varieties; the purity and gelatinization temperature were similar for the three varieties, but the enthalpy was higher in the dessert variety. The three varieties showed higher viscosities in the pasting profile compared to commercial maize starch in both acid and neutral conditions. Starch granules presented with heterogeneous sizes and shapes (elongated and ovals) that had birefringence. The Dominico Hartón variety showed the lowest rapidly digestible starch (RDS) value in the gelatinized sample that is in agreement with the greater proportion of long chains.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Musa/chemistry
Starch/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amylopectin/chemistry
Colombia
Digestion
Hydrolysis
Musa/growth & development
Starch/metabolism
Temperature
Viscosity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:9005-25-8 (Starch); 9037-22-3 (Amylopectin)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170426
[Lr] Last revision date:170426
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170111
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27839785
[Au] Autor:Hölscher D; Vollrath A; Kai M; Dhakshinamoorthy S; Menezes RC; Svatos A; Schubert US; Buerkert A; Schneider B
[Ad] Address:Research Group Biosynthesis/NMR, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, 07745 Jena, Germany; Organic Plant Production and Agroecosystems Research in the Tropics and Subtropics (OPATS), University of Kassel, Steinstr. 19, 37213 Witzenhausen, Germany. Electronic address: hoelsch
[Ti] Title:Local phytochemical response of Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla cv. 'Bluggoe' (ABB) to colonization by Sternorrhyncha.
[So] Source:Phytochemistry;133:26-32, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The interaction of two Sternorrhyncha species, the banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel (Hemiptera: Aphididae, Aphidinae)), vector of the banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), and the latania scale (Hemiberlesia lataniae Signoret (Hemiptera: Diaspididae, Diaspidinae)) with Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla (ABB Group) 'Bluggoe' (Musaceae) was investigated by a combination of conventional and spatially resolved analytical techniques, H NMR, UHPLC-MS, and matrix-free UV-laser desorption/ionization MS imaging. After infestation, the feeding sites of P. nigronervosa on the pseudostem and the exocarp of banana fruit developed a red tinge, in which tissue-specific accumulations of phenylphenalenones were discovered. Phenylphenalenones were also detected in the black mats of sooty molds growing on the banana aphid exudates and in the dorsal scales of H. lataniae. This suggests that although these secondary metabolites play a role in the reaction of banana plants towards attack by sucking insects, an aphid and an armored scale have established mechanisms to exude these metabolites before they deploy their deleterious effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aphids/physiology
Musa/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Aphids/pathogenicity
Babuvirus
Lepidoptera/pathogenicity
Lepidoptera/physiology
Molecular Structure
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular
Phenalenes/chemistry
Phenalenes/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Phenalenes)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170303
[Lr] Last revision date:170303
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161115
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 102 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27816177
[Au] Autor:Chen Y; Paetz C; Menezes RC; Schneider B
[Ad] Address:Max-Planck Institut für Chemische Ökologie, Beutenberg Campus, Hans-Knöll-Strasse 8, 07745, Jena, Germany; Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Research and Utilization of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, Jiangsu Province and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qianhu Houcun 1, 210014, Nanjing, China.
[Ti] Title:Cultured roots of Xiphidium caeruleum: Phenylphenalenones and their biosynthetic and extractant-dependent conversion.
[So] Source:Phytochemistry;133:15-25, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phytochemical investigation of root cultures of Xiphidium caeruleum (Haemodoraceae) resulted in the structure elucidation of five previously undescribed phenylphenalenone-type compounds, structure revision of a phenylphenalenone glucoside, and identification of nine additional constituents previously reported from other Haemodoraceae and Musaceae plants. The observed extractant-dependent metabolic profiles indicated that phenylphenalenones had been converted hydrolytically and oxidatively. Stable isotope labeling experiments extended the understanding of the phenylphenalenone pathway in plants and provided evidence for a network of biosynthetic and spontaneous conversions linking phenylphenalenones and their derivatives detected in extracts of cultured roots of this plant.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Magnoliopsida/chemistry
Phenalenes/chemistry
Plant Roots/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Glucosides/chemistry
Molecular Structure
Phenalenes/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Glucosides); 0 (Phenalenes)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161107
[St] Status:MEDLINE


page 1 of 11 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information