Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29523839
[Au] Autor:Butler JB; Freeman JS; Potts BM; Vaillancourt RE; Grattapaglia D; Silva-Junior OB; Simmons BA; Healey AL; Schmutz J; Barry KW; Lee DJ; Henry RJ; King GJ; Baten A; Shepherd M
[Ad] Address:School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, 7001, Australia. Jakob.Butler@utas.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Annotation of the Corymbia terpene synthase gene family shows broad conservation but dynamic evolution of physical clusters relative to Eucalyptus.
[So] Source:Heredity (Edinb);, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2540
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Terpenes are economically and ecologically important phytochemicals. Their synthesis is controlled by the terpene synthase (TPS) gene family, which is highly diversified throughout the plant kingdom. The plant family Myrtaceae are characterised by especially high terpene concentrations, and considerable variation in terpene profiles. Many Myrtaceae are grown commercially for terpene products including the eucalypts Corymbia and Eucalyptus. Eucalyptus grandis has the largest TPS gene family of plants currently sequenced, which is largely conserved in the closely related E. globulus. However, the TPS gene family has been well studied only in these two eucalypt species. The recent assembly of two Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata genomes presents an opportunity to examine the conservation of this important gene family across more divergent eucalypt lineages. Manual annotation of the TPS gene family in C. citriodora subsp. variegata revealed a similar overall number, and relative subfamily representation, to that previously reported in E. grandis and E. globulus. Many of the TPS genes were in physical clusters that varied considerably between Eucalyptus and Corymbia, with several instances of translocation, expansion/contraction and loss. Notably, there was greater conservation in the subfamilies involved in primary metabolism than those involved in secondary metabolism, likely reflecting different selective constraints. The variation in cluster size within subfamilies and the broad conservation between the eucalypts in the face of this variation are discussed, highlighting the potential contribution of selection, concerted evolution and stochastic processes. These findings provide the foundation to better understand terpene evolution within the ecologically and economically important Myrtaceae.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41437-018-0058-1

  2 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29300875
[Au] Autor:Clearwater MJ; Revell M; Noe S; Manley-Harris M
[Ad] Address:School of Science, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Influence of genotype, floral stage, and water stress on floral nectar yield and composition of manuka (Leptospermum scoparium).
[So] Source:Ann Bot;121(3):501-512, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Floral nectar can be variable in composition, influencing pollinator behaviour and the composition of honey derived from it. The non-peroxide antibacterial activity of manuka (Leptospermum scoparium, Myrtaceae) honey results from the chemical conversion of the triose sugar dihydroxyacetone (DHA), after DHA accumulates for an unknown reason in the nectar. This study examined variation in nectar DHA, glucose, fructose and sucrose content with floral stage of development, between manuka genotypes with differing flower morphology, and in response to water stress. Methods: Six manuka genotypes were grown without nectar-feeding insects. Stages of flower development were defined, nectar was harvested and its composition was compared between stages and genotypes, and with floral morphology. Water stress was imposed and its effect on nectar composition was examined. Key Results: Nectar was present from soon after flower opening until the end of petal abscission, with the quantity of accumulated nectar sugars rising, then stabilizing or falling, indicating nectar secretion followed by reabsorption in some genotypes. The quantity of DHA, the ratio of DHA to other nectar sugars and the fructose to glucose ratio also varied with stage of development, indicating differences in rates of production and reabsorption between nectar components. Nectar composition and yield per flower also differed between genotypes, although neither was positively related to nectary area or stomatal density. Drying soil had no effect on nectar composition or yield, but variation in nectar yield was correlated with temperature prior to nectar sampling. Conclusions: Manuka nectar yield and composition are strongly influenced by plant genotype, flower age and the environment. There were clear stoichiometric relationships between glucose, fructose and sucrose per flower, but DHA per flower was only weakly correlated with the amount of other sugars, suggesting that accumulation of the triose sugar is indirectly coupled to secretion of the larger sugars by the nectary parenchyma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx183

  3 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29267929
[Au] Autor:Vasconcelos TNC; Lucas EJ; Faria JEQ; Prenner G
[Ad] Address:Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology Department, Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Richmond, UK.
[Ti] Title:Floral heterochrony promotes flexibility of reproductive strategies in the morphologically homogeneous genus Eugenia (Myrtaceae).
[So] Source:Ann Bot;121(1):161-174, 2018 Jan 25.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Comparative floral ontogeny represents a valuable tool to understand angiosperm evolution. Such an approach may elucidate subtle changes in development that discretely modify floral architecture and underlie reproductive lability in groups with superficial homogeneous morphology. This study presents a comparative survey of floral development in Eugenia (Myrtaceae), one of the largest genera of angiosperms, and shows how previously undocumented ontogenetic trends help to explain the evolution of its megadiversity in contrast to its apparent flower uniformity. Methods: Using scanning electron microscopy, selected steps of the floral ontogeny of a model species (Eugenia punicifolia) are described and compared with 20 further species representing all ten major clades in the Eugenia phylogenetic tree. Additional floral trait data are contrasted for correlation analysis and character reconstructions performed against the Myrtaceae phylogenetic tree. Key results: Eugenia flowers show similar organ arrangement patterns: radially symmetrical, (most commonly) tetramerous flowers with variable numbers of stamens and ovules. Despite a similar general organization, heterochrony is evident from size differences between tissues and structures at similar developmental stages. These differences underlie variable levels of investment in protection, subtle modifications to symmetry, herkogamic effects and independent androecium and gynoecium variation, producing a wide spectrum of floral display and contributing to fluctuations in fitness. During Eugenia's bud development, the hypanthium (as defined here) is completely covered by stamen primordia, unusual in other Myrtaceae. This is the likely plesiomorphic state for Myrteae and may have represented a key evolutionary novelty in the tribe. Conclusions: Floral evolution in Eugenia depends on heterochronic patterns rather than changes in complexity to promote flexibility in floral strategies. The successful early establishment of Myrteae, previously mainly linked to the key innovation of fleshy fruit, may also have benefitted from changes in flower structure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx142

  4 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29502443
[Au] Autor:Shamsudin KJ; Phan CS; Kulip J; Hatai K; Vairappan CS; Kamada T
[Ad] Address:a Laboratory of Natural Products Chemistry, Institute for Tropical Biology and Conservation , Universiti Malaysia Sabah , 88400 Kota Kinabalu , Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Leucoxenols A and B, two new phenolics from Bornean medicinal plant Syzygium leucoxylon.
[So] Source:J Asian Nat Prod Res;:1-7, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1477-2213
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The medicinal plant, Syzygium leucoxylon or commonly known as Obah found in North Borneo was considered as traditional medicine by local committee. Two new phenolics, leucoxenols A (1) and B (2) were isolated and identified as major secondary metabolites from the leaves of S. leucoxylon. Their chemical structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic data such as NMR and HRESIMS. Furthermore, these compounds were active against selected strains of fungi.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/10286020.2018.1440391

  5 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29462700
[Au] Autor:Simões RR; Kraus SI; Coelho IS; Dal-Secco D; Siebert DA; Micke GA; Alberton MD; Santos ARS
[Ad] Address:Laboratório de Neurobiologia da Dor e Inflamação, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900, Brazil; Faculdade Avantis, Balneário Camboriú, SC, Brazil. Electronic address: rolisim@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Eugenia brasiliensis leaves extract attenuates visceral and somatic inflammatory pain in mice.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;217:178-186, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Eugenia brasiliensis Lam. (Myrtaceae) is a Brazilian tree distributed throughout Atlantic rain forest, since Bahia until Santa Catarina state, and is popularly known as "grumixaba, grumixameira, cumbixaba, ibaporoiti, and cereja-brasileira". The bark and leaves of Eugenia brasiliensis are used in folk medicine as adstringent, diuretic, energizing, anti-rheumatic and anti-inflammatory. This study aimed at investigating the chemical composition, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of Eugenia brasiliensis (HEEb). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Chemical composition of the HEEb was determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography/ESI-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of HEEb (30-300 mg/kg) was verified in mice after oral administration by intra-gastric gavage (i.g.) 60 min prior to experimentation. It was investigated whether HEEb decreases visceral pain and leukocyte migration induced by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of acetic acid (0.6%). We also evaluated whether HEEb decreases nociceptive behavior induced by formalin (including paw edema and temperature), prostaglandin E (PGE ), histamine, and compound 48/80. Finally, we evaluated the effect of HEEb in the chronic inflammatory (mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity) pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), as well as quantifying the concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in the paw by ELISA method. RESULTS: Seven polyphenols were identified in HEEb by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. HEEb treatment alleviated nocifensive behavior and leukocyte migration caused by acetic acid. Moreover, HEEb also reduced the inflammatory pain and paw temperature induced by formalin, as well as it decreased nociceptive behavior induced by histamine and compound 48/80. Finally, acute and repeated treatment of animals with HEEb (100 mg/kg, i.g.) markedly reduced the mechanical and thermal (heat) hypersensitivity, besides decrease paw edema and temperature induced by CFA, and this effect was evident until the day 7. Moreover, repeated treatment with HEEb (100 mg/kg, i.g.) significantly reduced the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the paw when compared to the CFA group. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report showing that HEEb presents antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the visceral and somatic inflammatory pain in mice, possibly involving the inhibition of histamine receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokines activated pathways. Our results are of interest because they support the use of Eugenia brasiliensis as a potential source of phytomedicine for inflammatory diseases and pain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498647
[Au] Autor:Yoshida T; Yoshimura M; Amakura Y
[Ad] Address:College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Matsuyama University, 4-2 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8578, Japan. xp769b@bma.biglobe.ne.jp.
[Ti] Title:Chemical and Biological Significance of Oenothein B and Related Ellagitannin Oligomers with Macrocyclic Structure.
[So] Source:Molecules;23(3), 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In 1990, Okuda et al. reported the first isolation and characterization of oenothein B, a unique ellagitannin dimer with a macrocyclic structure, from the leaves. Since then, a variety of macrocyclic analogs, including trimeric-heptameric oligomers have been isolated from various medicinal plants belonging to Onagraceae, Lythraceae, and Myrtaceae. Among notable in vitro and in vivo biological activities reported for oenothein B are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, enzyme inhibitory, antitumor, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory activities. Oenothein B and related oligomers, and/or plant extracts containing them have thus attracted increasing interest as promising targets for the development of chemopreventive agents of life-related diseases associated with oxygen stress in human health. In order to better understand the significance of this type of ellagitannin in medicinal plants, this review summarizes (1) the structural characteristics of oenothein B and related dimers; (2) the oxidative metabolites of oenothein B up to heptameric oligomers; (3) the distribution of oenotheins and other macrocyclic analogs in the plant kingdom; and (4) the pharmacological activities hitherto documented for oenothein B, including those recently found by our laboratory.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29357851
[Au] Autor:Salem MZM; Elansary HO; Ali HM; El-Settawy AA; Elshikh MS; Abdel-Salam EM; Skalicka-Wozniak K
[Ad] Address:Forestry and Wood Technology Department, Faculty of Agriculture (EL-Shatby), Alexandria University, Aflaton St., El-Shatby, P.O. Box 21545, Alexandria, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Bioactivity of essential oils extracted from Cupressus macrocarpa branchlets and Corymbia citriodora leaves grown in Egypt.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;18(1):23, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cupressus macrocarpa Hartw and Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson, widely grown in many subtropical areas, are used for commercial purposes, such as in perfumery, cosmetics, and room fresheners. Their potential as a source of antimicrobial compounds may be useful in different applications. METHODS: The chemical composition of essential oils (EOs) from C. macrocarpa branchlets and C. citriodora leaves was analyzed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Antibacterial and antifungal activities were assessed by the micro-dilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs), and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs). Further, the antioxidant capacity of the EOs was determined via 2,2'-diphenypicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ß-carotene-linoleic acid assays. RESULTS: Terpinen-4-ol (23.7%), α-phellandrene (19.2%), α-citronellol (17.3%), and citronellal were the major constituents of EO from C. macrocarpa branchlets, and α-citronellal (56%), α-citronellol (14.7%), citronellol acetate (12.3%), isopulegol, and eucalyptol were the primary constituents of EO from C. citriodora leaves. Antibacterial activity with MIC values of EO from C. citriodora leaves was ranged from 0.06 mg/mL to 0.20 mg/mL, and MBC from 0.12 mg/mL against E. coli to 0.41 mg/mL. EO from C. macrocarpa branchlets showed less activity against bacterial strains. The MIC values against tested fungi of the EO from C. citriodora ranged from 0.11 to 0.52 mg/mL while for EO from C. macrocarpa from 0.29 to 3.21 mg/mL. The MIC and MFC values of EOs against P. funiculosum were lower than those obtained from Ketoconazole (KTZ) (0.20; 0.45; 0.29 and 0.53 mg/mL, respectively, vs 0.21 and 0.41 mg/mL. Antioxidant activity of the EO from C. citriodora was higher than that of the positive control but lower than that of the standard butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) (IC = 5.1 ± 0.1 µg/mL). CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the EO from Egyptian trees such as C. citriodora leaves may possesses strong bactericidal and fungicidal activities and can be used as an agrochemical for controlling plant pathogens and in human disease management which will add crop additive value.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cupressus/chemistry
Myrtaceae/chemistry
Oils, Volatile/pharmacology
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology
Antifungal Agents/chemistry
Antifungal Agents/pharmacology
Antioxidants/chemistry
Antioxidants/pharmacology
Bacteria/drug effects
Egypt
Fungi/drug effects
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Oils, Volatile/chemistry
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Plant Leaves/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Antifungal Agents); 0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Oils, Volatile); 0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180124
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-018-2085-0

  8 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29396525
[Au] Autor:Zhang M; Zhou C; Song Z; Weng Q; Li M; Ji H; Mo X; Huang H; Lu W; Luo J; Li F; Gan S
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Xiangshan Road, Beijing, 100091, China.
[Ti] Title:The first identification of genomic loci in plants associated with resistance to galling insects: a case study in Eucalyptus L'Hér. (Myrtaceae).
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):2319, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Genomic loci related with resistance to gall-inducing insects have not been identified in any plants. Here, association mapping was used to identify molecular markers for resistance to the gall wasp Leptocybe invasa in two Eucalyptus species. A total of 86 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers were screened out from 839 SSRs and used for association mapping in E. grandis. By applying the mixed linear model, seven markers were identified to be associated significantly (P ≤ 0.05) with the gall wasp resistance in E. grandis, including two validated with a correction of permutation test (P ≤ 0.008). The proportion of the variance in resistance explained by a significant marker ranged from 3.3% to 37.8%. Four out of the seven significant associations in E. grandis were verified and also validated (P ≤ 0.073 in a permutation test) in E. tereticornis, with the variation explained ranging from 24.3% to 48.5%. Favourable alleles with positive effect were also mined from the significant markers in both species. These results provide insight into the genetic control of gall wasp resistance in plants and have great potential for marker-assisted selection for resistance to L. invasa in the important tree genus Eucalyptus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-20780-9

  9 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29433388
[Au] Autor:Ji YE; Sun X; Kim MK; Li WY; Lee SW; Koppula S; Yu SH; Kim HB; Kang TB; Lee KH
[Ad] Address:* Department of Applied Life Science, Graduate School, Konkuk University, Chungju, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Eucalyptus globulus Inhibits Inflammasome-Activated Pro-Inflammatory Responses and Ameliorate Monosodium Urate-Induced Peritonitis in Murine Experimental Model.
[So] Source:Am J Chin Med;:1-11, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:0192-415X
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (E. globulus, Myrtaceae) is used in Europe as a traditional folk remedy for inflammation-related disorders such as arthritis, diabetes, asthma, and gout. We investigated this study to evaluate the protective effects of E. globulus extract (EG) on inflammatory responses, and provide scientific and mechanistic evidence in in vitro and in vivo experimental models. LPS-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) were used to study the regulatory effect of EG on inflammasome activation in vitro. Monosodium urate (MSU)-induced peritonitis was used to study the effect of EG in an in vivo murine model. EG suppressed IL-1ß secretion via the regulation of apoptosis-associated speck-like proteins containing a CARD (ASC) oligomerization and caspase-1 maturation, leading to the inhibition of inflammasome activation. In the in vivo study, EG suppressed the MSU-induced peritonitis by attenuating interleukin (IL)-1ß, providing scientific support for its traditional use in the treatment of inflammation-related disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1142/S0192415X18500210

  10 / 1068 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29424382
[Au] Autor:Negrão AF; Orsi RO
[Ad] Address:Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual Paulista/UNESP, Campus Botucatu, Rua Dr. José Barbosa de Barros, 1780, Fazenda Experimental Lageado, 18610-307 Botucatu, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Harvesting Season and Botanical Origin Interferes in Production and Nutritional Composition of Bee Pollen.
[So] Source:An Acad Bras Cienc;:0, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1678-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We aimed to evaluate the frequency of bee pollen production, its botanical origin and chemical composition when collected in different seasons. Our results indicate that higher proteins (22.80 ± 3.09%) and flavonoids (2789.87 ± 1396.00 µg 100g-1) levels were obtained in the winter season, which also showed greater pollen production (134.50 ± 35.70 grams) and predominance of the Myrtaceae family. As for spring we found high concentrations of lipids (4.62 ± 2.26%) and low ash content (2.22 ± 0.39%). Regarding the amino acid composition and vitamin C content, we found no differences between the averages throughout the seasons. Our results highlight the importance of understanding not only the botanical origin and the chemical composition of bee pollen, but also the harvesting frequency of this product by bees, so that it becomes possible to supplement the colonies in times of natural food resources shortage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher


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