Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29524714
[Au] Autor:Ning GZ; Kan SL; Zhu RS; Feng SQ
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Mobi-C Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Fusion for the Treatment of Symptomatic Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Mobi-C cervical disc arthroplasty (MCDA) has been regarded as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). In this study, the effectiveness and safety between MCDA and ACDF for symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease was evaluated. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials. Studies were included based on the eligibility criteria. Risk of bias assessment and quality of evidence assessment were performed. RESULTS: Four studies with 785 patients were included. For clinical outcomes, MCDA were superior to ACDF considering fewer subsequent surgical intervention (P < 0.00001), lower neck pain scores (P = 0.01), lower incidences of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) at both superior and inferior level (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.01, respectively), greater range of motion (ROM) of the operated segment (P < 0.0001), and higher patient satisfaction (P = 0.007). No substantial differences were observed between two groups regarding surgery time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization, neck disability index (NDI) scores and arm pain scores (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses indicated that for patients with two-level CDDD, MCDA demonstrated lower NDI and arm pain scores, and higher patient satisfaction (P < 0.05) compared with ACDF. CONCLUSION: MCDA presented fewer subsequent surgical intervention, lower neck pain score, lower incidences of ASD at superior and inferior level, greater ROM and higher score of patient satisfaction than ACDF. However, considering the surgery time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization, NDI and neck pain scores, MCDA was similar with ACDF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524355
[Au] Autor:Sánchez-González MC; Pérez-Cabezas V; López-Izquierdo I; Gutiérrez-Sánchez E; Ruiz-Molinero C; Rebollo-Salas M; Jiménez-Rejano JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Physics of Condensed Matter, Optics Area, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Is it possible to relate accommodative visual dysfunctions to neck pain?
[So] Source:Ann N Y Acad Sci;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1749-6632
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to establish whether there is a relationship between conditions of accommodative visual dysfunctions and cervical complaints. Fifty-two participants were included. Variables were accommodative amplitude, positive and negative relative accommodation (NRA), accommodative response, and accommodative facility. Subjects were classified as accommodative insufficiency, accommodative excess, or normal. Neck complaints were measured with the Neck Disability Index, the Visual Analogue Scale, and by cervical range of motion, deep flexor muscle activation score, and performance index. We found the following significant relationships: between NRA and both performance index and left-side bending; accommodative amplitude right-eye with right-side bending and with left-side bending; accommodative amplitude left-eye with right-side bending; and accommodative facility left-eye with both performance index and left-side bending. In accommodative amplitude right-eye, aIl participants showed significant values and greater than those with accommodative excess. In both groups, performance index values were decreased. Greater pain and lower right-rotation were found in participants with accommodative excess than in those with accommodative insufficiency. We conclude that accommodative dysfunctions are related to low performance index, decreased range of motion, as well as greater neck pain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nyas.13614

  3 / 24490 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523370
[Au] Autor:Singh S; Kartha S; Bulka BA; Stiansen NS; Winkelstein BA
[Ad] Address:Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 210 S. 33rd Street, 240 Skirkanich Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
[Ti] Title:Physiologic facet capsule stretch can induce pain & upregulate matrix metalloproteinase-3 in the dorsal root ganglia when preceded by a physiological mechanical or nonpainful chemical exposure.
[So] Source:Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon);, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1271
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Neck pain from cervical facet loading is common and induces inflammation and upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) that can sensitize the joint afferents. Yet, the mechanisms by which these occur and whether afferents can be pre-conditioned by certain nonpainful stimuli are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that a nonpainful mechanical or chemical insult predisposes a facet joint to generate pain after a later exposure to typically nonpainful distraction. METHODS: Rats were exposed to either a nonpainful distraction or an intra-articular subthreshold dose of NGF followed by a nonpainful distraction two days later. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured daily and C6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) tissue was assayed for NGF and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression on day 7. FINDINGS: The second distraction increased joint displacement and strains compared to its first application (p = 0.0011). None of the initial exposures altered behavioral sensitivity in either of the groups being pre-conditioned or in controls; but, sensitivity was established in both groups receiving a second distraction within one day that lasted until day 7 (p < 0.024). NGF expression in the DRG was increased in both groups undergoing a pre-conditioning exposure (p < 0.0232). Similar findings were observed for MMP-3 expression, with a pre-conditioning exposure increasing levels after an otherwise nonpainful facet distraction. INTERPRETATION: These findings suggest that nonpainful insults to the facet joint, when combined, can generate painful outcomes, possibly mediated by upregulation of MMP-3 and mature NGF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 24490 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521698
[Au] Autor:Cho SK; Kim JS; Overley SC; Merrill RK
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
[Ti] Title:Cervical Laminoplasty: Indications, Surgical Considerations, and Clinical Outcomes.
[So] Source:J Am Acad Orthop Surg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1940-5480
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cervical laminoplasty was initially described for the management of cervical myelopathy resulting from multilevel stenosis secondary to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The general concepts are preservation of the dorsal elements, preservation of segmental motion, and expansion of the spinal canal via laminar manipulation. No clear evidence suggests that laminoplasty is superior to either posterior laminectomy or anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. However, laminoplasty has its own advantages, indications, and complications. Surgeons have refined the technique to decrease complication rates and improve efficacy. Recent efforts have highlighted less invasive approaches that are muscle sparing and associated with less postoperative morbidity. Although the long-term outcomes suggest that cervical laminoplasty is safe and effective, continued research on the development of novel modifications that decrease common complications, such as C5 nerve palsy, axial neck pain, and loss of lordosis, is required.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.5435/JAAOS-D-16-00242

  5 / 24490 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519969
[Au] Autor:Yamashiro N; Nagasaka T; Ooishi N; Tsuchiya M; Takaki R; Kobayashi F; Shindo K; Takiyama Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi.
[Ti] Title:[An Autopsy Case of Meningoencephalitis and Cerebral Infarction that Developed with Ramsay Hunt Syndrome and Disseminated Herpes Zoster].
[So] Source:Brain Nerve;70(3):253-258, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1881-6096
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:We report here the clinical presentation and subsequent autopsy of a 90-year-old man who developed small papules with pain and swelling in his right ear. On admission, he exhibited right facial nerve paralysis, neck stiffness and Kernig's sign. The cell count was elevated and the varicella-zoster virus-PCR was positive in the CSF. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense lesions in the left pons and left temporal lobe, in FLAIR images. We diagnosed the patient with Ramsay Hunt syndrome and meningoencephalitis due to varicella-zoster virus. Although the symptoms of meningitis improved following treatment with intravenous acyclovir (750 mg/day initially, raised to 1,125 mg/day), 16 days after admission, he died suddenly due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The autopsy findings included lymphocytic infiltration of the leptomeninges and perivascular space of the cerebrum, and slight parenchyma in the left temporal lobe and insula, as the main histological features. Encephalitis due to varicella zoster virus has been recognized as a vasculopathy affecting large and small vessels. Pathological confirmation is rare in varicella zoster virus meningoencephalitis.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11477/mf.1416200990

  6 / 24490 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29517923
[Au] Autor:Ng KCG; Lamontagne M; Jeffers JRT; Grammatopoulos G; Beaulé PE
[Ad] Address:Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Anatomic Predictors of Sagittal Hip and Pelvic Motions in Patients With a Cam Deformity.
[So] Source:Am J Sports Med;:363546518755150, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1552-3365
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: As there is a high prevalence of patients with cam deformities and no ongoing hip dysfunction, understanding the biomechanical factors predicting the onset of symptoms and degenerative changes is critical. One such variable is how the spinopelvic parameters may influence hip and pelvic sagittal mobility. Hypothesis/Purpose: Pelvic incidence may predict sagittal hip and pelvic motions during walking and squatting. The purpose was to determine which anatomic characteristics were associated with symptoms and how they influenced functional hip and pelvic ranges of motion (ROMs) during walking and squatting. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Fifty-seven participants underwent computed tomography and were designated either symptomatic (n = 19, cam deformity with pain), asymptomatic (n = 19, cam deformity with no pain), or control (n = 19, no cam deformity or pain). Multiple femoral (cam deformity, neck angle, torsion), acetabular (version, coverage), and spinopelvic (pelvic tilt, sacral slope, pelvic incidence) parameters were measured from each participant's imaging data, and sagittal hip and pelvic ROMs during walking and squatting were recorded using a motion capture system. RESULTS: Symptomatic participants had large cam deformities, smaller femoral neck-shaft angles, and larger pelvic incidence angles compared with the asymptomatic and control participants. Discriminant function analyses confirmed that radial 1:30 alpha angle (λ = 0.386), femoral neck-shaft angle (λ = 0.262), and pelvic incidence (λ = 0.213) ( P < .001) were the best anatomic parameters to classify participants with their groups. Entering these 3 parameters into a hierarchical linear regression, significant regressions were achieved for hip ROM only when pelvic incidence was included for walking ( R = 0.20, P = .01) and squatting ( R = 0.14, P = .04). A higher pelvic incidence decreased walking hip ROM ( r = -0.402, P = .004). Although symptomatic participants indicated a trend of reduced squatting hip and pelvic ROMs, there were no significant regressions with the anatomic parameters. CONCLUSION: A cam deformity alone may not indicate early clinical signs or decreased ROM. Not only was pelvic incidence a significant parameter to classify the participants, but it was also an important parameter to predict functional ROM. Symptomatic patients with a higher pelvic incidence may experience limited sagittal hip mobility. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement showed a higher pelvic incidence and, combined with a cam deformity and varus neck, can perhaps alter the musculature of their iliopsoas, contributing to a reduced sagittal ROM. With an early and accurate clinical diagnosis, athletes could benefit from a muscle training strategy to protect their hips.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0363546518755150

  7 / 24490 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29484823
[Au] Autor:de Sousa MVP; Kawakubo M; Ferraresi C; Kaippert B; Yoshimura EM; Hamblin MR
[Ad] Address:Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
[Ti] Title:Pain management using photobiomodulation: mechanisms, location, and repeatability quantified by pain threshold and neural biomarkers in mice.
[So] Source:J Biophotonics;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1864-0648
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a simple, efficient and cost-effective treatment for both acute and chronic pain. We previously showed that PBM applied to the mouse head inhibited nociception in the foot. Nevertheless, the optimum parameters, location for irradiation, duration of the effect, and the mechanisms of action remain unclear. In the present study, the pain threshold in the right hind-paw of mice was studied, after PBM (810 nm CW laser, spot size 1 cm or 6 cm , 1.2-36 J/cm ) applied to various anatomical locations. The pain threshold, measured with von Frey filaments, was increased more than 3-fold by PBM to the lower back (dorsal root ganglion, DRG), as well as to other neural structures along the pathway such as the head, neck and ipsilateral (right) paw. On the other hand, application of PBM to the contralateral (left) paw, abdomen and tail had no effect. The optimal effect occurred 2-3 hours post-PBM and disappeared by 24 hours. Seven daily irradiations showed no development of tolerance. Type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors decreased, and prostatic acid phosphatase and tubulin-positive varicosities were increased as shown by immunofluorescence of DRG samples. These findings elucidate the mechanisms of PBM for pain and provide insights for clinical practice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jbio.201700370

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[PMID]: 29436064
[Au] Autor:Maarrawi J; Abdel Hay J; Kobaiter-Maarrawi S; Tabet P; Peyron R; Garcia-Larrea L
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Research in Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine (PTS), Saint-Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon.
[Ti] Title:Randomized double-blind controlled study of bedtime low-dose amitriptyline in chronic neck pain.
[So] Source:Eur J Pain;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2149
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Amitriptyline has well-established efficacy in several chronic pain conditions. While optimal treatment for chronic neck pain (CNP) remains controversial, amitriptyline was not tested for CNP. We evaluated the effect of bedtime amitriptyline in the management of CNP. METHODS: A total of 220 patients suffering from idiopathic CNP were randomized to receive either placebo pill (n = 108) or 5 mg of amitriptyline (n = 112) at bedtime for 2 months. Primary outcome measure was visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Secondary outcome measures were neck pain disability index (NPDI), Bergen Insomnia Score (BIS) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), measured before and at the end of 2 months of treatment, with the percentage of patient satisfaction measured at the end of follow-up only. RESULTS: Eight of 112 patients (7.14%) in the amitriptyline group withdrew from the study because of intolerance. Amitriptyline group showed significantly lower VAS scores than placebo group (3.34 ± 1.45 vs. 6.12 ± 0.92; p < 0.0001), which corresponds to a 53.06 ± 20.29% of improvement from baseline pain as compared to 14.41 ± 11.05%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Similar significant improvements were observed with lesser extents for secondary outcome measures: NPDI, BIS, HAD-A, HAD-D and percentage of patient satisfaction. CONCLUSION: Low-dose amitriptyline is effective for the management of idiopathic CNP with few side effects and high patients' satisfaction. SIGNIFICANCE: This randomized controlled trial is the first to show the effectiveness and tolerance of a medication, low-dose amitriptyline, in managing idiopathic chronic neck pain and its related comorbidities. The optimal treatment of this condition was still controversial in the literature. It extends the indication of low-dose amitriptyline to another chronic pain condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ejp.1206

  9 / 24490 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29414757
[Au] Autor:Jakobsen MD; Sundstrup E; Brandt M; Andersen LL
[Ad] Address:National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: mdj@nrcwe.dk.
[Ti] Title:Effect of physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain in multiple body regions among healthcare workers: Secondary analysis of a cluster randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:Musculoskelet Sci Pract;34:89-96, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2468-7812
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: While physical exercise is beneficial for back and neck-shoulder pain, only few intervention studies have evaluated effects on pain in multiple body regions. Furthermore, direct measurement of pain threshold can provide additional information to self-reported pain intensity. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of workplace versus home-based physical exercise on pressure pain threshold (PPT) and musculoskeletal pain intensity in multiple body regions. STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of an examiner-blinded, cluster randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment. METHOD: Two-hundred female healthcare workers from 18 departments at three hospitals were cluster-randomized to 10 weeks of: 1) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed alone during leisure time for 5 × 10 min per week or 2) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 5 × 10 min per week and up to 5 motivational coaching sessions. PPT (neck, lower back, lower leg) and perceived pain intensity in multiple body regions (feet, knee, hips, lower and upper back, elbow, hand, shoulder, neck, and head) were measured at baseline and 10-week follow-up. RESULTS: In some of the body regions, PPT and pain intensity improved more following WORK than HOME. Between-group differences at follow-up (WORK vs. HOME) were 41 kPA [95% CI 13-70, effect size (ES): 0.22] for PPT in the lower back, and -0.7 [95% CI -1.0-0.3, ES: 0.26] and -0.6 points [95% CI -0.9--0.2, ES: 0.23] for pain intensity in the lower back and feet, respectively. HOME did not improve more than WORK for any of the measurements. CONCLUSION: Physical exercise recommendations for healthcare workers should consider the setting, i.e. performing supervised group-based exercise at work and motivational coaching sessions is more effective than exercising alone at home.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 24490 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29388090
[Au] Autor:Morris S; Booth J
[Ad] Address:Spinal Outpatient's Department, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham, UK. samuel.morris@nuh.nhs.uk.
[Ti] Title:Shaping conservative spinal services with the Spine Tango Registry.
[So] Source:Eur Spine J;27(3):543-553, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0932
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This study reports the results of a registry data collection project within a secondary care spinal osteopathy service. METHODS: Clinical and demographic data were collected using the Spine Tango Conservative registry data collection tool. Outcomes were assessed using the Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Neck Disability Index (NDI), COMI Low Back Conservative (COMI-LBC), COMI Neck Conservative (COMI-NC) and EQ5D. Global treatment outcome (GTO), satisfaction with care and therapeutic complications were reported using the Spine Tango Patient Self Assessment form (STPSA). The correlation of GTO and PROM change scores was analysed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. RESULTS: 262 patients presented during the study period. 100% of patients had chronic spinal pain and 98.8% had previously received other interventions for the same episode. Mean (standard deviation) improvements by PROM: NPRS low back 2.1 (2.5); NPRS neck 2.3 (2.3); COMI-LBC 2.1 (2.2); COMI-NC 2.0 (1.7); ODI 10.5 (12.1); NDI 14.5 (12.2); EQ5D 0.2 (0.3). 83.2% of patients reported that osteopathy had 'helped a lot' or 'helped'. 96.2% of patients were 'very satisfied' or 'satisfied' with care. There were no serious therapeutic complications. CONCLUSIONS: The secondary care spinal osteopathy service demonstrated high satisfaction, few therapeutic complications and positive outcomes on all PROMs. Registry participation has facilitated robust clinical governance and the data support the use of osteopaths to deliver a conservative spinal service in this setting. Registry data collection is a significant administrative and clinical task which should be structured to minimise burden on patients and resources. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00586-018-5484-5


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