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[PMID]: 29524471
[Au] Autor:Han X; Wu H; Yin P; Chen Z; Cao X; Duan Y; Xu J; Lao L; Xu S
[Ad] Address:Shanghai Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, 200071, China.
[Ti] Title:Electroacupuncture restores hippocampal synaptic plasticity via modulation of 5-HT receptors in a rat model of depression.
[So] Source:Brain Res Bull;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2747
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to determine the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on Wistar Kyoto (WKY) depressive model rats and explore the possible mechanism of EA on hippocampal CA1 region neuronal synaptic plasticity. METHODS: The male WKY rats were randomized to three experimental groups (EA, Sham EA, and Model group, n = 8/group), and Wistar rats as the normal control group (n = 8). EA treatment was administered once daily for 3 weeks at acupuncture points Baihui (GV20) and Yintang (EX-HN3). In the Sham EA group, acupuncture needles were inserted superficially into the acupoints without electrical stimulation. On day 21, the forced swimming test (FST), open field test (OFT) and sucrose preference test (SPT) were conducted. After the behavioral tests, long-term potentiation (LTP) was evoked at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices in vitro by electrophysiological recording, 5-HTT, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1 B protein levels in the hippocampus CA1 region were examined by using Western blot. RESULT: EA significantly decreased immobility in FST and improved sucrose intake compared with the Sham EA and Model groups. The center time and total move time in OFT were significantly increased in the EA group compared to the Model group. Compared with those of the Sham EA and Model groups, the fEPSP slope of the EA group increased significantly, and the LTP induction was successful. EA significantly decreased 5-HTT protein expression in the hippocampus CA1 region in comparison to the Sham EA and Model groups. Additionally, EA down regulated the 5-HT1A protein expression in the hippocampus CA1 region in comparison to the Sham EA group. CONCLUSION: EA could ameliorate depressive-like behaviors by restoring hippocampus CA1 synaptic plasticity, which might be mainly mediated by regulating 5-HT receptor levels.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29287885
[Au] Autor:Sheehan CC; Lopez J; Elmaraghy CA
[Ad] Address:The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, United States.
[Ti] Title:Low rate of positive bronchoscopy for suspected foreign body aspiration in infants.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;104:72-75, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To describe our institution's low rate of positive bronchoscopy in infants suspected of inhaling a foreign body. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of patients at a tertiary children's hospital with suspected inhalation of a foreign body. Charts were reviewed for demographic information, radiologic findings, operative reports, and respiratory viral panels were reviewed. RESULTS: Sixteen pediatric patients under 12 months of age were identified from 2008 to 2016 with a diagnosis of possible airway foreign body inhalation who underwent emergent bronchoscopy. Of these patients, only one was positive for a foreign body present in the airway. The remaining 15 children were found to have a negative direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy evaluation for a foreign body. Of these fifteen patients, 14 were found to have structural airway abnormalities and 7 tested positive for a respiratory viral infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our institution has a low rate of positive bronchoscopy for highly suspected foreign body inhalation in a group of patients less than 12 months of age. Patients presenting with respiratory distress, stridor, or other airway symptoms were often found to have an underlying airway abnormality or viral infection, which coupled with an unclear history, would increase the suspicion for an airway foreign body and subsequent decision to perform bronchoscopy. In stable patients, diagnostic evaluation for an underlying respiratory infection should be performed in these cases. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Case Series.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bronchoscopy/statistics & numerical data
Foreign Bodies/diagnosis
Respiratory System/injuries
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Foreign Bodies/epidemiology
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Laryngoscopy/statistics & numerical data
Male
Retrospective Studies
Tertiary Care Centers
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171231
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28452700
[Au] Autor:Ghadersohi S; Ference EH; Detwiller K; Kern RC
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
[Ti] Title:Presentation, workup, and management of penetrating transorbital and transnasal injuries: A case report and systematic review.
[So] Source:Am J Rhinol Allergy;31(2):29-34, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-8932
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A foreign body (FB) penetrating intracranially after passing transorbitally or transnasally is a rare occurrence. However, otolaryngologists are increasingly being asked to participate in the care of these patients for both endoscopic removal of the object and repair of any skull base defects. OBJECTIVE: To assess the presentation, workup, and management of transnasal or transorbital penetrating FB injury. METHODS: Systematic review of the presentation, workup, and management of transnasal or transorbital penetrating FB injury; plus, a case report of a 53-year-old woman with a transorbital penetrating rose bush branch. We searched medical literature data bases, which resulted in 215 total titles, which were then narrowed based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. RESULTS: Thirty-five cases of transorbital or transnasal low-velocity trauma that involved the paranasal sinuses were reviewed from 33 articles. The average age was 30 years, 40% of the objects were made of wood. Fifty-seven percent of the cases were transorbital, whereas 43% were transnasal. Forty-six percent of the surgical interventions were completed endoscopically or with endoscopic assistance. Complications of injury were common, with 66% of patients experiencing cerebrospinal fluid leaks; 23%, permanent blindness; 17%, meningitis; 14%, ophthalmoplegia; 9%, decreased visual acuity; and 3%, brain abscess. Our patient presented with a traumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak, and recovered well after transorbital and endoscopic removal of the branch, skull base repair, and a prolonged course of antibiotics and antifungal medications. CONCLUSIONS: Transnasal and transorbital penetrating FB injuries are a relatively uncommon occurrence but when they do occur require rapid workup and interdisciplinary management to prevent acute and delayed complications.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak/epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma/epidemiology
Endoscopy
Eye Injuries/epidemiology
Head Injuries, Penetrating/epidemiology
Orbit/surgery
Paranasal Sinuses/surgery
Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak/etiology
Craniocerebral Trauma/surgery
Eye Injuries/surgery
Female
Foreign Bodies
Head Injuries, Penetrating/surgery
Humans
Middle Aged
Skull Base/surgery
United States/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2500/ajra.2017.31.4421

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[PMID]: 29520880
[Au] Autor:Tegelberg R; Virjamo V; Julkunen-Tiitto R
[Ad] Address:Natural Product Research Laboratories, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Dry-air drying at room temperature - a practical pre-treatment method of tree leaves for quantitative analyses of phenolics?
[So] Source:Phytochem Anal;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1099-1565
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: In ecological experiments, storage of plant material is often needed between harvesting and laboratory analyses when the number of samples is too large for immediate, fresh analyses. Thus, accuracy and comparability of the results call for pre-treatment methods where the chemical composition remains unaltered and large number of samples can be treated efficiently. OBJECTIVE: To study if a fast dry-air drying provides an efficient pre-treatment method for quantitative analyses of phenolics. METHODOLOGY: Dry-air drying of mature leaves was done in a drying room equipped with dehumifier (10% relative humidity, room temperature) and results were compared to freeze-drying or freeze-drying after pre-freezing in liquid nitrogen. The quantities of methanol-soluble phenolics of Betula pendula Roth, Betula pubescens Ehrh., Salix myrsinifolia Salisb., Picea abies L. Karsten and Pinus sylvestris L. were analysed with HPLC and condensed tannins were analysed using the acid-butanol test. RESULTS: In deciduous tree leaves (Betula, Salix), the yield of most of the phenolic compounds was equal or higher in samples dried in dry-air room than the yield from freeze-dried samples. In Picea abies needles, however, dry-air drying caused severe reductions in picein, stilbenes, condensed tannin and (+)-catechin concentrations compared to freeze-drying. In Pinus sylvestris highest yields of neolignans but lowest yields of acetylated flavonoids were obtained from samples freeze-dried after pre-freezing. CONCLUSION: Results show that dry-air drying provides effective pre-treatment method for quantifying the soluble phenolics for deciduous tree leaves, but when analysing coniferous species, the different responses between structural classes of phenolics should be taken into account.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/pca.2755

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[PMID]: 29516702
[Au] Autor:Pan JX; Chen YP; Wei NN
[Ad] Address:Department of Rehabilitation, Luoyang Central Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University, Luoyang 471000, Henan Province, China.
[Ti] Title:[Improvement of Upper Limb and Hand Functions of Stroke Patients by Balancing Acupuncture Combined with Motor Relearning Training].
[So] Source:Zhen Ci Yan Jiu;43(2):123-6, 2018 Feb 25.
[Is] ISSN:1000-0607
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To observe the therapeutic effect of balance acupuncture combined with motor relearning training for upper limb and hand functions of stroke patients. METHODS: Sixty-two stroke patients were randomly divided into balance acupuncture group ( =31) and routine acupuncture group ( =31). For patients of the balance acupuncture group, Piantan, Jiantong and Wantong points on the healthy side were used. When Jiantong point taken, the acupuncture needle was removed after the patient experienced an electric shock-like spreading needling sensation. When Wantong point employed, the needle was removed after the patient experienced a local, intensified or spreading needling sensation. When Piantan point used, the needle was retained after the patient experienced an electric shock-like needling sensation, then, the motor relearning training was conducted, and the needle was removed immediately after the training. For patients of the routine acupuncture group, Jianyu(LI 15), Jianzhen (SI 9), Quchi (LI 11), etc. were needled with the needles retained for 30 min after getting needling sensations. The motor relearning training was also carried out after removal of the needle. The treatment in both groups was performed once daily, 6 days a week, and lasted for 8 weeks. The Fugl-Meyer score and motor function scale (MAS) of the upper limb, and the fine performance score and motor function score of the hand were assessed before and after the treatment. RESULTS: Following treatment, the Fugl-Meyer score and MAS of the upper limbs, and the motor function score and fine performance score of the hand were significantly increased in both groups compared with pre-treatment in each group ( <0.05 ), suggesting a functional improvement of both upper limb and hand. The therapeutic effect of the balance acupuncture was obviously superior to that of routine acupuncture in improving functions of both the upper limb and hand ( <0.05).. CONCLUSION: Balance acupuncture combined with motor relearning training is helpful to improve the comprehensive function of the upper limb and hand in stroke patients.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.13702/j.1000-0607.170484

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[PMID]: 29513807
[Au] Autor:Gimnez ME; Houghton EJ; Davrieux CF; Serra E; Pessaux P; Palermo M; Acquafresca PA; Finger C; Dallemagne B; Marescaux J
[Ad] Address:University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
[Ti] Title:PERCUTANEOUS RADIOFREQUENCY ASSISTED LIVER PARTITION WITH PORTAL VEIN EMBOLIZATION FOR STAGED HEPATECTOMY (PRALPPS).
[So] Source:Arq Bras Cir Dig;31(1):e1346, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2317-6326
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng; por
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: When a major hepatic resection is necessary, sometimes the future liver remnant is not enough to maintain sufficient liver function and patients are more likely to develop liver failure after surgery. AIM: To test the hypothesis that performing a percutaneous radiofrecuency liver partition plus percutaneous portal vein embolization (PRALPPS) for stage hepatectomy in pigs is feasible. METHODS: Four pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) both sexes with weights between 25 to 35 kg underwent percutaneous portal vein embolization with coils of the left portal vein. By contrasted CT, the difference between the liver parenchyma corresponding to the embolized zone and the normal one was identified. Immediately, using the fusion of images between ultrasound and CT as a guide, radiofrequency needles were placed percutaneouslyand then ablated until the liver partition was complete. Finally, hepatectomy was completed with a laparoscopic approach. RESULTS: All animals have survived the procedures, with no reported complications. The successful portal embolization process was confirmed both by portography and CT. In the macroscopic analysis of the pieces, the depth of the ablation was analyzed. The hepatic hilum was respected. On the other hand, the correct position of the embolization material on the left portal vein could be also observed. CONCLUSION: "Percutaneous radiofrequency assisted liver partition with portal vein embolization" (PRALLPS) is a feasible procedure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29300870
[Au] Autor:Benomar L; Lamhamedi MS; Pepin S; Rainville A; Lambert MC; Margolis HA; Bousquet J; Beaulieu J
[Ad] Address:Centre d'tude de la fort, Facult de foresterie, de gographie et de gomatique, Pavillon Abitibi Price, Universit Laval, Qubec, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Thermal acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration of southern and northern white spruce seed sources tested along a regional climatic gradient indicates limited potential to cope with temperature warming.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;121(3):443-457, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Knowledge of thermal acclimation of physiological processes of boreal tree species is necessary to determine their ability to adapt to predicted global warming and reduce the uncertainty around the anticipated feedbacks of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycle to climate change. The objective of this work was to examine the extent of thermal acclimation of net photosynthesis (An) and dark respiration (Rd) of two distant white spruce (Picea glauca) seed sources (from south and north of the commerial forest zone in Qubec) in response to latitudinal and seasonal variations in growing conditions. Methods: The temperature responses of An, its biochemical and biophysical limitations, and Rd were measured in 1-year-old needles of seedlings from the seed sources growing in eight forest plantations along a regional thermal gradient of 5.5 C in Qubec, Canada. Key Results: The average optimum temperature (Topt) for An was 19 1.2 C and was similar among seed sources and plantation sites along the thermal gradient. Net photosynthesis at Topt (Aopt) varied significantly among plantation sites and was quadratically related to the mean July temperature (MJT) of plantation sites. Topt for mesophyll conductance, maximum electron transport rate and maximum rate of carboxylation were 28, 22 and 30 C, respectively. Basal respiration rate (Rd at 10 C) was linearly and negatively associated with MJT. Q10 of Rd (the rate of change in Rd with a 10 C increase in temperature) did not show any significant relationship with MJT and averaged 1.5 0.1. The two seed sources were similar in their thermal responses to latitudinal and seasonal variations in growing conditions. Conclusions: The results showed moderate thermal acclimation of respiration and no evidence for thermal acclimation of photosynthesis or local genetic adaptation for traits related to thermal acclimation. Therefore, growth of local white spruces may decline in future climates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx174

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[PMID]: 29240991
[Au] Autor:Hu B; Sakakibara H; Kojima M; Takebayashi Y; Bukamp J; Langer GJ; Peters FS; Schumacher J; Eiblmeier M; Kreuzwieser J; Rennenberg H
[Ad] Address:College of Forestry, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, CN-712100, China.
[Ti] Title:Consequences of Sphaeropsis tip blight disease for the phytohormone profile and antioxidative metabolism of its pine host.
[So] Source:Plant Cell Environ;41(4):737-754, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phytopathogenic fungi infections induce plant defence responses that mediate changes in metabolic and signalling processes with severe consequences for plant growth and development. Sphaeropsis tip blight, induced by the endophytic fungus Sphaeropsis sapinea that spreads from stem tissues to the needles, is the most widespread disease of conifer forests causing dramatic economic losses. However, metabolic consequences of this disease on bark and wood tissues of its host are largely unexplored. Here, we show that diseased host pines experience tissue dehydration in both bark and wood. Increased cytokinin and declined indole-3-acetic acid levels were observed in both tissues and increased jasmonic acid and abscisic acid levels exclusively in the wood. Increased lignin contents at the expense of holo-cellulose with declined structural biomass of the wood reflect cell wall fortification by S.sapinea infection. These changes are consistent with H O accumulation in the wood, required for lignin polymerization. Accumulation of H O was associated with more oxidized redox states of glutathione and ascorbate pools. These findings indicate that S.sapinea affects both phytohormone signalling and the antioxidative defence system in stem tissues of its pine host during the infection process.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/pce.13118

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[PMID]: 29512006
[Au] Autor:Mwikirize C; Nosher JL; Hacihaliloglu I
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, 08854, USA. cosmas.mwikirize@rutgers.edu.
[Ti] Title:Convolution neural networks for real-time needle detection and localization in 2D ultrasound.
[So] Source:Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1861-6429
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: We propose a framework for automatic and accurate detection of steeply inserted needles in 2D ultrasound data using convolution neural networks. We demonstrate its application in needle trajectory estimation and tip localization. METHODS: Our approach consists of a unified network, comprising a fully convolutional network (FCN) and a fast region-based convolutional neural network (R-CNN). The FCN proposes candidate regions, which are then fed to a fast R-CNN for finer needle detection. We leverage a transfer learning paradigm, where the network weights are initialized by training with non-medical images, and fine-tuned with ex vivo ultrasound scans collected during insertion of a 17G epidural needle into freshly excised porcine and bovine tissue at depth settings up to 9cm and [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] insertion angles. Needle detection results are used to accurately estimate needle trajectory from intensity invariant needle features and perform needle tip localization from an intensity search along the needle trajectory. RESULTS: Our needle detection model was trained and validated on 2500 ex vivo ultrasound scans. The detection system has a frame rate of 25 fps on a GPU and achieves 99.6% precision, 99.78% recall rate and an [Formula: see text] score of 0.99. Validation for needle localization was performed on 400 scans collected using a different imaging platform, over a bovine/porcine lumbosacral spine phantom. Shaft localization error of [Formula: see text], tip localization error of [Formula: see text] mm, and a total processing time of 0.58s were achieved. CONCLUSION: The proposed method is fully automatic and provides robust needle localization results in challenging scanning conditions. The accurate and robust results coupled with real-time detection and sub-second total processing make the proposed method promising in applications for needle detection and localization during challenging minimally invasive ultrasound-guided procedures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11548-018-1721-y

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[PMID]: 29481693
[Au] Autor:Moralejo D; El Dib R; Prata RA; Barretti P; Corra I
[Ad] Address:School of Nursing, Memorial University, H2916, Health Sciences Centre, 300 Prince Philip Drive, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada, A1B 3V6.
[Ti] Title:Improving adherence to Standard Precautions for the control of health care-associated infections.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;2:CD010768, 2018 02 26.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: 'Standard Precautions' refers to a system of actions, such as using personal protective equipment or adhering to safe handling of needles, that healthcare workers take to reduce the spread of germs in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of interventions that target healthcare workers to improve adherence to Standard Precautions in patient care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS, two other databases, and two trials registers. We applied no language restrictions. The date of the most recent search was 14 February 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised trials of individuals, cluster-randomised trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies, and interrupted time-series studies that evaluated any intervention to improve adherence to Standard Precautions by any healthcare worker with responsibility for patient care in any hospital, long-term care or community setting, or artificial setting, such as a classroom or a learning laboratory. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data from eligible trials, and assessed risk of bias for each included study, using standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Because of substantial heterogeneity among interventions and outcome measures, meta-analysis was not warranted. We used the GRADE approach to assess certainty of evidence and have presented results narratively in 'Summary of findings' tables. MAIN RESULTS: We included eight studies with a total of 673 participants; three studies were conducted in Asia, two in Europe, two in North America, and one in Australia. Five studies were randomised trials, two were cluster-randomised trials, and one was a non-randomised trial. Three studies compared different educational approaches versus no education, one study compared education with visualisation of respiratory particle dispersion versus education alone, two studies compared education with additional infection control support versus no intervention, one study compared peer evaluation versus no intervention, and one study evaluated use of a checklist and coloured cues. We considered all studies to be at high risk of bias with different risks. All eight studies used different measures to assess healthcare workers' adherence to Standard Precautions. Three studies also assessed healthcare workers' knowledge, and one measured rates of colonisation with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among residents and staff of long-term care facilities. Because of heterogeneity in interventions and outcome measures, we did not conduct a meta-analysis.Education may slightly improve both healthcare workers' adherence to Standard Precautions (three studies; four centres) and their level of knowledge (two studies; three centres; low certainty of evidence for both outcomes).Education with visualisation of respiratory particle dispersion probably improves healthcare workers' use of facial protection but probably leads to little or no difference in knowledge (one study; 20 nurses; moderate certainty of evidence for both outcomes).Education with additional infection control support may slightly improve healthcare workers' adherence to Standard Precautions (two studies; 44 long-term care facilities; low certainty of evidence) but probably leads to little or no difference in rates of health care-associated colonisation with MRSA (one study; 32 long-term care facilities; moderate certainty of evidence).Peer evaluation probably improves healthcare workers' adherence to Standard Precautions (one study; one hospital; moderate certainty of evidence).Checklists and coloured cues probably improve healthcare workers' adherence to Standard Precautions (one study; one hospital; moderate certainty of evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Considerable variation in interventions and in outcome measures used, along with high risk of bias and variability in the certainty of evidence, makes it difficult to draw conclusions about effectiveness of the interventions. This review underlines the need to conduct more robust studies evaluating similar types of interventions and using similar outcome measures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD010768.pub2


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