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[PMID]: 29269053
[Au] Autor:Veeraraghavan B; Lal B; Devanga Ragupathi NK; Neeravi IR; Jeyaraman R; Varghese R; Paul MM; Baskaran A; Ranjan R
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632004, India. Electronic address: vbalaji@cmcvellore.ac.in.
[Ti] Title:First genome report on novel sequence types of Neisseria meningitidis: ST12777 and ST12778.
[So] Source:J Glob Antimicrob Resist;12:117-118, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:2213-7173
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Neisseria meningitidis is an important causative agent of meningitis and/or sepsis with high morbidity and mortality. Baseline genome data on N. meningitidis, especially from developing countries such as India, are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the whole genome sequences of N. meningitidis isolates from a tertiary care centre in India. METHODS: Whole-genome sequencing was performed using an Ion Torrent™ Personal Genome Machine™ (PGM) with 400-bp chemistry. Data were assembled de novo using SPAdes Genome Assembler v.5.0.0.0. Sequence annotation was performed through PATRIC, RAST and the NCBI PGAAP server. Downstream analysis of the isolates was performed using the Center for Genomic Epidemiology databases for antimicrobial resistance genes and sequence types. Virulence factors and CRISPR were analysed using the PubMLST database and CRISPRFinder, respectively. RESULTS: This study reports the whole genome shotgun sequences of eight N. meningitidis isolates from bloodstream infections. The genome data revealed two novel sequence types (ST12777 and ST12778), along with ST11, ST437 and ST6928. The virulence profile of the isolates matched their sequence types. All isolates were negative for plasmid-mediated resistance genes. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ST11 and ST437 N. meningitidis isolates in India along with two novel sequence types (ST12777 and ST12778). These results indicate that the sequence types circulating in India are diverse and require continuous monitoring. Further studies strengthening the genome data on N. meningitidis are required to understand the prevalence, spread, exact resistance and virulence mechanisms along with serotypes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29523496
[Au] Autor:Fifer H; Cole M; Hughes G; Padfield S; Smolarchuk C; Woodford N; Wensley A; Mustafa N; Schaefer U; Myers R; Templeton K; Shepherd J; Underwood A
[Ad] Address:Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infections Reference Unit, National Infection Service, Public Health England, London, UK. Electronic address: Helen.fifer@phe.gov.uk.
[Ti] Title:Sustained transmission of high-level azithromycin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in England: an observational study.
[So] Source:Lancet Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4457
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Between Nov 3, 2014, and Feb 24, 2017, 70 cases of high-level azithromycin-resistant (HL-AziR; minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥256 mg/L) Neisseria gonorrhoeae were reported from across England. Whole-genome sequencing was done to investigate this outbreak to determine whether the ongoing outbreak represented clonal spread of an HL-AziR N gonorrhoeae strain identified in Leeds. We also wanted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of azithromycin resistance in N gonorrhoeae in the UK. METHODS: In this observational study, whole-genome sequencing was done on the HL-AziR N gonorrhoeae isolates from England. As comparators, 110 isolates from the UK and Ireland with a range of azithromycin MICs were also sequenced, including eight isolates from Scotland with azithromycin MICs ranging from 0·12 mg/L to 1·00 mg/L that were N gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence type 9768 (ST9768), which was the sequence type initially responsible for the outbreak. The presence of mutations or genes associated with azithromycin resistance was also investigated. FINDINGS: 37 of the 60 HL-AziR isolates from England belonged to ST9768, and were genetically similar (mean 4·3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms). A 2059A→G mutation was detected in three or all four alleles of the 23S rRNA gene. Five susceptible ST9768 isolates had one mutated 23S rRNA allele and one low-level resistant ST9768 isolate had two mutated alleles. INTERPRETATION: Sustained transmission of a successful HL-AziR clone was seen across England. Mutation 2059A→G was found in isolates with lower azithromycin MICs. Azithromycin exposure might have provided the selection pressure for one or two mutated copies of the 23S rRNA gene to recombine with wild-type copies, leading to three or four mutated copies and the HL-AziR phenotype. HL-AziR could emerge in isolates with low azithromycin MICs and eliminate the effectiveness of azithromycin as part of dual therapy for the treatment of gonorrhoea. FUNDING: Public Health England.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29523451
[Au] Autor:Zhu B; Shi F; Zhang A; Sun X; Xu Z; Xu L; Gao Y; Lv J; Shao Z
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and genetic characteristics of 4CMenB and rLP2086 vaccine candidates among Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strains, China.
[So] Source:Vaccine;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To systematically investigate the prevalence and genetic characteristics of 4CMenB and rLP2086 vaccine candidates among Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (NmB) in China. METHODS: A total of 485 NmB strains isolated in 29 provinces of China between 1968 and 2016 were selected from the culture collection of the national reference laboratory according to the isolation year, location, and source. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and porA gene sequencing were performed on all 485 study strains; PCR was used to detect the fHbp, nadA, and nhba gene of 432 strains; positive amplification products from the fHbp and nadA genes from all strains, as well as those of the nhba gene from 172 representative strains, were sequenced. RESULTS: MLST results showed that the predominant (putative) clonal complexes (CCs) of NmB isolates have changed over time in China. While strains that could not be assigned to existing (p)CCs were the biggest proportion, CC4821 was the most prevalent lineage (36.0%) since 2005. PCR and sequence analysis revealed that the 4CMenB and rLP2086 vaccine candidates were highly diverse. Respectively, 152 PorA genotypes and 83 VR2 sequences were identified with significant diversity within a single CC; the complete nadA gene was found in ten of 432 study strains; fHbp was present in most strains (422/432) with variant 2 predominating (82.9%) in both patient- and carrier- derived isolates; almost all strains harbored the nhba gene while sequences were diverse. CONCLUSIONS: With regards to clonal lineages and vaccine candidate proteins, NmB isolates from China were generally diverse. Further studies should be performed to evaluate the cross-protection of present vaccines against Chinese NmB strains.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29376609
[Au] Autor:Chubukova OA; Shkarin VV
[Ad] Address:Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy of Minzdrav of Russia, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Concomitant urogenital infections in men].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):126-130, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The article presents possible combinations of urogenital infections of various etiologies and some pathogenetic, clinical and epidemiological features, and issues of epidemiological surveillance for co-infection. The authors describe in detail combinations with each other and with other diseases of such pathogens as Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma spp., Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis. They also focus on the problem of co-occurrence of human papillomavirus (HPV) with other urogenital pathogens. The article raises the question of the need to introduce new scientific data on the epidemiology of concomitant urogenital infections in men in the practice of diagnosis, treatment, registration, and implementation of preventive and anti-epidemic measures.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coinfection
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
Papillomavirus Infections
Urinary Tract Infections
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Coinfection/diagnosis
Coinfection/microbiology
Coinfection/therapy
Coinfection/virology
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/diagnosis
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/microbiology
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/therapy
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/virology
Humans
Male
Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis
Papillomavirus Infections/microbiology
Papillomavirus Infections/therapy
Urinary Tract Infections/diagnosis
Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology
Urinary Tract Infections/therapy
Urinary Tract Infections/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 33449 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519430
[Au] Autor:Kaminska A; Szymborski T; Jaroch T; Zmyslowski A; Szterk A
[Ad] Address:Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw, Poland. Electronic address: akamin@ichf.edu.pl.
[Ti] Title:Gold-capped silicon for ultrasensitive SERS-biosensing: Towards human biofluids analysis.
[So] Source:Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl;84:208-217, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-0191
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used in a variety of biomedical, analytical, forensic and environmental investigations due to its chemical specificity, label-free nature combined with high sensitivity. Here, we report a simple method for the fabrication of reproducible and reliable, well-defined, stable SERS substrates with uniform and giant Raman enhancement suitable for routine trace chemical analysis and detection of biological compounds in complex biological fluids. We prepared porous silicone (PS) surface by a galvanostatic anodic etch of crystalline silicon wafers. The electrochemical process generates a specific layer of PS: the thickness and porosity of a given layer is controlled by the current density, the duration of the etch cycle, and the composition of the etchant solution. These substrates presented high sensitivity to p-mercaptobenzoic acid (p-MBA) at a low concentration of 10 M and the enhancement factor of over 10 was achieved. Such high enhancement is attributed to semiconducting silicon-induced and stabilized hot spots. The uniform distribution of SERS-active 'hot-spots' on the Au/Si surface results in high reproducibility towards detecting p-MBA at 40 different, randomly selected positions on a single substrate (RSD=6.7%) and on twenty different SERS substrates prepared under identical conditions (RSD=8%). Designed substrates allow the ultrahigh sensitive and specific detection of human such biofluids as blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a reliable, label-free, and reproducible manner. The SERS spectra of these fluids are rich in patient-specific information and can be useful in many analytical and biomedical applications. We have shown that our developed SERS substrates allow the nanomolar detection of neopterin (bacterial infections' marker) in cerebrospinal fluid samples. In order to test the performance of our SERS method in term of low detection limit (LOD), the calibration curve i.e. plot of SERS intensity of the marker band at 695cm versus the concentration of neopterin in CSF was constructed and used to calculate the neopterin concentration in clinical samples. The level of neopterin was significantly higher in CSF samples infected by Neisseria meningitidis, (54nmol/L), compared to normal (control) group, (4.3nmol/L). The high sensitivity, selectivity and stability of obtained SERS-active substrates combined with simple, low-cost, and easy method of producing offer a promising tool for SERS-based analysis in clinical trials.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 33449 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518095
[Au] Autor:Rubilar PS; Barra GN; Gabastou JM; Alarcón P; Araya P; Hormazábal JC; Fernandez J
[Ad] Address:Sub-Department of Molecular Genetics, Biomedical Department, Public Health Institute, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Increase of Neisseria meningitidis W:cc11 invasive disease in Chile has no correlation with carriage in adolescents.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0193572, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Neisseria meningitidis is a human exclusive pathogen that can lead to invasive meningococcal disease or may be carried in the upper respiratory tract without symptoms. The relationship between carriage and disease remains poorly understood but it is widely accepted that decreasing carriage by immunization should lead to a reduction of invasive cases. Latin America has experienced an increased incidence of serogroup W invasive cases of Neisseria meningitidis in the last decade. Specifically in Chile, despite low total incidence of invasive cases, serogroup W has become predominant since 2011 and has been associated with elevated mortality. Expecting to gain insight into the epidemiology of this disease, this study has used molecular typing schemes to compare Neisseria meningitidis isolates causing invasive disease with those isolates collected from adolescent carriers during the same period in Chile. A lower carriage of the serogroup W clonal complex ST-11/ET37 than expected was found; whereas, the same clonal complex accounted for 66% of total invasive meningococcal disease cases in the country that year. A high diversity of PorA variable regions and fHbp peptides was also ascertained in the carrier isolates compared to the invasive ones. According to the results shown here, the elevated number of serogroup W invasive cases in our country cannot be explained by a rise of carriage of pathogenic isolates. Overall, this study supports the idea that some strains, as W:cc11 found in Chile, possess an enhanced virulence to invade the host. Notwithstanding hypervirulence, this strain has not caused an epidemic in Chile. Finally, as genetic transfer occurs often, close surveillance of Neisseria meningitidis strains causing disease, and particularly hypervirulent W:cc11, should be kept as a priority in our country, in order to prepare the best response to face genetic changes that could lead to enhanced fitness of this pathogen.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0193572

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[PMID]: 29499642
[Au] Autor:Retchless AC; Kretz CB; Chang HY; Bazan JA; Abrams AJ; Norris Turner A; Jenkins LT; Trees DL; Tzeng YL; Stephens DS; MacNeil JR; Wang X
[Ad] Address:Division of Bacterial Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Expansion of a urethritis-associated Neisseria meningitidis clade in the United States with concurrent acquisition of N. gonorrhoeae alleles.
[So] Source:BMC Genomics;19(1):176, 2018 03 02.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Increased reports of Neisseria meningitidis urethritis in multiple U.S. cities during 2015 have been attributed to the emergence of a novel clade of nongroupable N. meningitidis within the ST-11 clonal complex, the "U.S. NmNG urethritis clade". Genetic recombination with N. gonorrhoeae has been proposed to enable efficient sexual transmission by this clade. To understand the evolutionary origin and diversification of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis was performed to identify its members among the N. meningitidis strain collection from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including 209 urogenital and rectal N. meningitidis isolates submitted by U.S. public health departments in eleven states starting in 2015. RESULTS: The earliest representatives of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade were identified from cases of invasive disease that occurred in 2013. Among 209 urogenital and rectal isolates submitted from January 2015 to September 2016, the clade accounted for 189/198 male urogenital isolates, 3/4 female urogenital isolates, and 1/7 rectal isolates. In total, members of the clade were isolated in thirteen states between 2013 and 2016, which evolved from a common ancestor that likely existed during 2011. The ancestor contained N. gonorrhoeae-like alleles in three regions of its genome, two of which may facilitate nitrite-dependent anaerobic growth during colonization of urogenital sites. Additional gonococcal-like alleles were acquired as the clade diversified. Notably, one isolate contained a sequence associated with azithromycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae, but no other gonococcal antimicrobial resistance determinants were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Interspecies genetic recombination contributed to the early evolution and subsequent diversification of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade. Ongoing acquisition of N. gonorrhoeae alleles by the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade may facilitate the expansion of its ecological niche while also increasing the frequency with which it causes urethritis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12864-018-4560-x

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[PMID]: 29458676
[Au] Autor:Gorla MC; Cassiolato AP; Pinhata JMW; de Moraes C; Corso A; Gagetti P; Lemos AP
[Ad] Address:1​Bacteriology Department, Adolfo Lutz Institute, Av. Dr. Arnaldo 351, São Paulo, CEP 01246-902, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Emergence of resistance to ciprofloxacin in Neisseria meningitidis in Brazil.
[So] Source:J Med Microbiol;67(3):286-288, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1473-5644
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To prevent secondary invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) cases and outbreaks, antimicrobial prophylaxis of high-risk contacts is indicated. This study reports two ciprofloxacin-resistant Neisseria meningitidis strains in Brazil. The 3523 N. meningitidis isolates collected throughout Brazil from 2009 to 2016 were evaluated for antimicrobial resistance. Meningococcal isolates showing minimal inhibitory concentrations, MICs≥0.125µg ml to ciprofloxacin, were analysed to determine the presence of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA and parC genes. Two ciprofloxacin-resistant N. meningitidis isolates were found, both presenting a single mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene. These results confirmed that ciprofloxacin is still a first-line drug for chemoprophylaxis. However, we highlight the importance of continued surveillance to monitor the trends of N. meningitidis susceptibility profiles to the antimicrobials recommended for chemoprophylaxis and IMD treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology
Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial/genetics
Meningococcal Infections/microbiology
Neisseria meningitidis/drug effects
Neisseria meningitidis/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Brazil/epidemiology
DNA Gyrase/genetics
DNA Topoisomerase IV/genetics
Fluoroquinolones/pharmacology
Humans
Meningococcal Infections/epidemiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Mutation
Neisseria gonorrhoeae/isolation & purification
Quinolones/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Fluoroquinolones); 0 (Quinolones); 5E8K9I0O4U (Ciprofloxacin); EC 5.99.1.- (DNA Topoisomerase IV); EC 5.99.1.3 (DNA Gyrase)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/jmm.0.000685

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[PMID]: 29304083
[Au] Autor:Adachi K; Xu J; Yeganeh N; Camarca M; Morgado MG; Watts DH; Mofenson LM; Veloso VG; Pilotto JH; Joao E; Gray G; Theron G; Santos B; Fonseca R; Kreitchmann R; Pinto J; Mussi-Pinhata MM; Ceriotto M; Machado DM; Bryson YJ; Grinsztejn B; Moye J; Klausner JD; Bristow CC; Dickover R; Mirochnick M; Nielsen-Saines K; NICHD HPTN 040 Study Team
[Ad] Address:David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Combined evaluation of sexually transmitted infections in HIV-infected pregnant women and infant HIV transmission.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0189851, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Treponema pallidum (TP), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) may lead to adverse pregnancy and infant outcomes. The role of combined maternal STIs in HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) was evaluated in mother-infant pairs from NICHD HPTN 040. METHODOLOGY: Urine samples from HIV-infected pregnant women during labor were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CT, NG, and CMV. Infant HIV infection was determined by serial HIV DNA PCR testing. Maternal syphilis was tested by VDRL and confirmatory treponemal antibodies. RESULTS: A total of 899 mother-infant pairs were evaluated. Over 30% had at least one of the following infections (TP, CT, NG, and/or CMV) detected at the time of delivery. High rates of TP (8.7%), CT (17.8%), NG (4%), and CMV (6.3%) were observed. HIV MTCT was 9.1% (n = 82 infants). HIV MTCT was 12.5%, 10.3%, 11.1%, and 26.3% among infants born to women with CT, TP, NG or CMV respectively. Forty-two percent of HIV-infected infants were born to women with at least one of these 4 infections. Women with these infections were nearly twice as likely to have an HIV-infected infant (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.0), particularly those with 2 STIs (aOR 3.4, 95% CI 1.5-7.7). Individually, maternal CMV (aOR 4.4 1.5-13.0) and infant congenital CMV (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.2-7.8) but not other STIs (TP, CT, or NG) were associated with an increased risk of HIV MTCT. CONCLUSION: HIV-infected pregnant women identified during labor are at high risk for STIs. Co-infection with STIs including CMV nearly doubles HIV MTCT risk. CMV infection appears to confer the largest risk of HIV MTCT. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT00099359.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: HIV Infections/complications
HIV Infections/transmission
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Sexually Transmitted Diseases/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections/complications
Chlamydia trachomatis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonorrhea/complications
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Syphilis/complications
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE III; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180106
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189851

  10 / 33449 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29190210
[Au] Autor:Katz AR
[Ti] Title:Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada, 2017.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;24(3), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2403.171892


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