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[PMID]: 25120050
[Au] Autor:Eghtedar A; Rodriguez I; Kantarjian H; O'Brien S; Daver N; Garcia-Manero G; Ferrajoli A; Kadia T; Pierce S; Cortes J; Ravandi F
[Ad] Address:Department of Leukemia, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center , Houston, TX , USA.
[Ti] Title:Incidence of secondary neoplasms in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid plus chemotherapy or with all-trans retinoic acid plus arsenic trioxide.
[So] Source:Leuk Lymphoma;56(5):1342-5, 2015 May.
[Is] ISSN:1029-2403
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The incidence and pattern of secondary neoplasms in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-containing regimens is not well described. We compared 160 patients with APL treated with ATRA plus idarubicin (n = 54) or ATRA plus arsenic trioxide (ATO) (n = 106) for the incidence of secondary cancers per unit time of follow-up. Median follow-up times for the two cohorts were 136 and 29 months, respectively. Nine patients developed secondary cancers in the chemotherapy group. These included two breast cancers, three myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia, one vulvar cancer, one prostate cancer, one colon cancer and one soft tissue sarcoma. A melanoma and one pancreatic cancer developed in the ATO group. We conclude that treatment of patients with APL using the non-chemotherapy regimen of ATRA plus ATO is not associated with a higher incidence of secondary cancers (p = 0.29) adjusted for unit time of exposure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3109/10428194.2014.953143

  2 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26085905
[Au] Autor:Waisberg J; Ivankovics IG
[Ad] Address:Jaques Waisberg, Department of Surgery, ABC Medical School, Santo André, São Paulo 09060-650, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Liver-first approach of colorectal cancer with synchronous hepatic metastases: A reverse strategy.
[So] Source:World J Hepatol;7(11):1444-9, 2015 Jun 18.
[Is] ISSN:1948-5182
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recently, there has been a change in the strategy of how synchronous colorectal hepatic metastases are attributed to the development of more valuable protocols of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal neoplasms and their hepatic metastases. There is a consensus that patients with synchronous colorectal hepatic metastases have lower survival than those with metachronous colorectal hepatic metastases. Currently, controversy remains concerning the best approach is sequence in a patient with colorectal cancer and synchronous hepatic metastases resection. To obtain a better patient selection, the authors have suggested the initial realization of systemic chemotherapy in the circumstance of patients with colorectal tumor stage IV, since these patients have a systemic disease. The rationale behind this liver-first strategy is initially the control of synchronous hepatic metastases of colorectal carcinoma, which can optimize a potentially curative hepatic resection and longstanding survival. The liver-first strategy procedure is indicated for patients with colorectal hepatic metastases who require downstaging therapy to make a curative liver resection possible. Thus, the liver-first strategy is considered an option in cases of rectal carcinoma in the early stage and with limited or advanced synchronous colorectal hepatic metastases or in case of patients with asymptomatic colorectal carcinoma, but with extensive liver metastases. Patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy and with progression of neoplastic disease should not undergo hepatic resection, because it does not change the prognosis and may even make it worse. To date, there have been no randomized controlled trials on surgical approach of colorectal synchronous hepatic metastases, despite the relatively high number of available manuscripts on this subject. All of these published studies are observational, usually retrospective, and often non-comparative. The patient selection criteria for the liver-first strategy should be individualized, and the approach of these patients should be performed by a multidisciplinary team so its benefits will be fully realized.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150618
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4254/wjh.v7.i11.1444

  3 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25897964
[Au] Autor:Lin X; Xu W; Shao M; Fan Q; Wen G; Li C; Jing L; Sun X
[Ad] Address:Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515, China. 851917277@qq.com....
[Ti] Title:Shenling Baizhu San supresses colitis associated colorectal cancer through inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and myeloid-derived suppressor infiltration.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;15:126, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Shenling Baizhu San (SBS) is a well-known and classical Chinese medicine formula. It has been used for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders for about nine hundred years. Recent reports showed that it was effective in curing colitis and ameliorating the major manifestations of postoperational colorectal cancer (CRC). This study was to evaluate the effects of SBS on azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis associated CRC (caCRC) and to analyze the underlying mechanism of SBS in preventing CRC. METHODS: The colon tissue of mice in different group was determined by immunohistochemistry and western blot. TGF-ß1 in serum was measured by ELISA. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were identified by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The formed neoplasms phenotypically resembled human caCRC with upregulated ß-catenin, p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). SBS treatment reduced the death rate of mice and decreased the incidence and multiplicity of colonic neoplasms. SBS decreased the number of MDSCs and the level of transforming growth factor ß1 (TGF-ß1). SBS alleviated epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) through downregulating N-cadherin (N-cad), Vimentin, Fibronectin, Snail, and upregulating E-cadherin (E-cad). It reduced the activation of Wnt5a and EMT induced by TGF-ß1. CONCLUSIONS: SBS reduced the death rate through decreasing the incidence and multiplicity of colonic tumors. SBS lowered MDSCs infiltration and inhibited TGF-ß1 induced EMT to exert its anti-caCRC effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 150513
[Lr] Last revision date:150513
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-015-0649-9

  4 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25694611
[Au] Autor:Nasti TH; Rudemiller KJ; Cochran JB; Kim HK; Tsuruta Y; Fineberg NS; Athar M; Elmets CA; Timares L
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL 35294;...
[Ti] Title:Immunoprevention of chemical carcinogenesis through early recognition of oncogene mutations.
[So] Source:J Immunol;194(6):2683-95, 2015 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1550-6606
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Prevention of tumors induced by environmental carcinogens has not been achieved. Skin tumors produced by polyaromatic hydrocarbons, such as 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), often harbor an H-ras point mutation, suggesting that it is a poor target for early immunosurveillance. The application of pyrosequencing and allele-specific PCR techniques established that mutations in the genome and expression of the Mut H-ras gene could be detected as early as 1 d after DMBA application. Further, DMBA sensitization raised Mut H-ras epitope-specific CTLs capable of eliminating Mut H-ras(+) preneoplastic skin cells, demonstrating that immunosurveillance is normally induced but may be ineffective owing to insufficient effector pool size and/or immunosuppression. To test whether selective pre-expansion of CD8 T cells with specificity for the single Mut H-ras epitope was sufficient for tumor prevention, MHC class I epitope-focused lentivector-infected dendritic cell- and DNA-based vaccines were designed to bias toward CTL rather than regulatory T cell induction. Mut H-ras, but not wild-type H-ras, epitope-focused vaccination generated specific CTLs and inhibited DMBA-induced tumor initiation, growth, and progression in preventative and therapeutic settings. Transferred Mut H-ras-specific effectors induced rapid tumor regression, overcoming established tumor suppression in tumor-bearing mice. These studies support further evaluation of oncogenic mutations for their potential to act as early tumor-specific, immunogenic epitopes in expanding relevant immunosurveillance effectors to block tumor formation, rather than treating established tumors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cancer Vaccines/therapeutic use
Genes, ras/genetics
Point Mutation/genetics
Skin Neoplasms/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene/toxicity
Animals
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
Cancer Vaccines/administration & dosage
Carcinogens/toxicity
Cytokines/immunology
Cytokines/metabolism
DNA Mutational Analysis
Dendritic Cells/immunology
Dendritic Cells/metabolism
Epitopes/genetics
Epitopes/immunology
Female
Genes, ras/immunology
HEK293 Cells
Humans
Immunotherapy, Adoptive/methods
Mice, Inbred C3H
Mice, Inbred Strains
Point Mutation/drug effects
Skin Neoplasms/chemically induced
Skin Neoplasms/genetics
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/metabolism
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Burden/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cancer Vaccines); 0 (Carcinogens); 0 (Cytokines); 0 (Epitopes); 57-97-6 (9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene)
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150309
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1402125

  5 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25745020
[Au] Autor:Vachon CM; Pankratz VS; Scott CG; Haeberle L; Ziv E; Jensen MR; Brandt KR; Whaley DH; Olson JE; Heusinger K; Hack CC; Jud SM; Beckmann MW; Schulz-Wendtland R; Tice JA; Norman AD; Cunningham JM; Purrington KS; Easton DF; Sellers TA; Kerlikowske K; Fasching PA; Couch FJ
[Ad] Address:Affiliations of authors: Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic (CMV, VSP, CGS, MRJ, JEO, ADN, FJC); Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Erlangen Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Comprehensive Cancer Center Erlangen-EM...
[Ti] Title:The contributions of breast density and common genetic variation to breast cancer risk.
[So] Source:J Natl Cancer Inst;107(5), 2015 May.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2105
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We evaluated whether a 76-locus polygenic risk score (PRS) and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density were independent risk factors within three studies (1643 case patients, 2397 control patients) using logistic regression models. We incorporated the PRS odds ratio (OR) into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk-prediction model while accounting for its attributable risk and compared five-year absolute risk predictions between models using area under the curve (AUC) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. BI-RADS density and PRS were independent risk factors across all three studies (P interaction = .23). Relative to those with scattered fibroglandular densities and average PRS (2(nd) quartile), women with extreme density and highest quartile PRS had 2.7-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.74 to 4.12) increased risk, while those with low density and PRS had reduced risk (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.51). PRS added independent information (P < .001) to the BCSC model and improved discriminatory accuracy from AUC = 0.66 to AUC = 0.69. Although the BCSC-PRS model was well calibrated in case-control data, independent cohort data are needed to test calibration in the general population.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms/genetics
Breast/pathology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Area Under Curve
Breast Neoplasms/pathology
Breast Neoplasms/radiography
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Germany/epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Mammary Glands, Human/abnormalities
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
United States/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150306
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25722414
[Au] Autor:Borah S; Xi L; Zaug AJ; Powell NM; Dancik GM; Cohen SB; Costello JC; Theodorescu D; Cech TR
[Ad] Address:Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado BioFrontiers Institute, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA....
[Ti] Title:Cancer. TERT promoter mutations and telomerase reactivation in urothelial cancer.
[So] Source:Science;347(6225):1006-10, 2015 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Reactivation of telomerase, the chromosome end-replicating enzyme, drives human cell immortality and cancer. Point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter occur at high frequency in multiple cancers, including urothelial cancer (UC), but their effect on telomerase function has been unclear. In a study of 23 human UC cell lines, we show that these promoter mutations correlate with higher levels of TERT messenger RNA (mRNA), TERT protein, telomerase enzymatic activity, and telomere length. Although previous studies found no relation between TERT promoter mutations and UC patient outcome, we find that elevated TERT mRNA expression strongly correlates with reduced disease-specific survival in two independent UC patient cohorts (n = 35; n = 87). These results suggest that high telomerase activity may be a better marker of aggressive UC tumors than TERT promoter mutations alone.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Telomerase/genetics
Telomerase/metabolism
Telomere Homeostasis
Tumor Markers, Biological/genetics
Tumor Markers, Biological/metabolism
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/enzymology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cell Line, Tumor
Enzyme Activation
Humans
Point Mutation
Promoter Regions, Genetic
RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis
RNA, Messenger/genetics
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology
Urothelium/enzymology
Urothelium/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Messenger); 0 (Tumor Markers, Biological); EC 2.7.7.49 (TERT protein, human); EC 2.7.7.49 (Telomerase)
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150227
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1126/science.1260200

  7 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25630954
[Au] Autor:Magnan H; Goodbody CM; Riedel E; Pratilas CA; Wexler LH; Chou AJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
[Ti] Title:Ifosfamide dose-intensification for patients with metastatic Ewing sarcoma.
[So] Source:Pediatr Blood Cancer;62(4):594-7, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1545-5017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Outcomes for patients with metastatic Ewing sarcoma (ES) remain poor. We investigated whether the intensification of ifosfamide improved survival for patients with metastatic ES. PROCEDURE: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 30 patients with metastatic ES treated with the MSKCC "EFT regimen." The regimen included an intensification of ifosfamide dosing from 1,800 mg/m(2) /day × 5 days per cycle to 2,800 mg/m(2) /day × 5 days per cycle. RESULTS: Twenty six of the 30 patients completed planned chemotherapy. Two patients experienced disease progression during therapy. There were no toxic deaths. One patient developed secondary leukemia. The 4-year event free survival (EFS) was 27% and the overall survival (OS) was 39%. CONCLUSIONS: Intensification of ifosfamide was tolerated and did not increase toxicity in patients with metastatic ES. The intensification did not improve outcomes for these patients with metastatic disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating/administration & dosage
Bone Neoplasms
Ifosfamide/administration & dosage
Sarcoma, Ewing
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Bone Neoplasms/drug therapy
Bone Neoplasms/mortality
Bone Neoplasms/pathology
Child
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Ifosfamide/adverse effects
Male
Neoplasm Metastasis
Sarcoma, Ewing/drug therapy
Sarcoma, Ewing/mortality
Sarcoma, Ewing/pathology
Survival Rate
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating); UM20QQM95Y (Ifosfamide)
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150223
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/pbc.25373

  8 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25398436
[Au] Autor:Galanis E; Atherton PJ; Maurer MJ; Knutson KL; Dowdy SC; Cliby WA; Haluska P; Long HJ; Oberg A; Aderca I; Block MS; Bakkum-Gamez J; Federspiel MJ; Russell SJ; Kalli KR; Keeney G; Peng KW; Hartmann LC
[Ad] Address:Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. galanis.evanthia@mayo.edu....
[Ti] Title:Oncolytic measles virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter to treat drug-resistant ovarian cancer.
[So] Source:Cancer Res;75(1):22-30, 2015 Jan 1.
[Is] ISSN:1538-7445
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Edmonston vaccine strains of measles virus (MV) have significant antitumor activity in mouse xenograft models of ovarian cancer. MV engineered to express the sodium iodide symporter gene (MV-NIS) facilitates localization of viral gene expression and offers a tool for tumor radiovirotherapy. Here, we report results from a clinical evaluation of MV-NIS in patients with taxol- and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. MV-NIS was given intraperitoneally every 4 weeks for up to 6 cycles. Treatment was well tolerated and associated with promising median overall survival in these patients with heavily pretreated ovarian cancer; no dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 16 patients treated at high-dose levels (10(8)-10(9) TCID50), and their median overall survival of 26.5 months compared favorably with other contemporary series. MV receptor CD46 and nectin-4 expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in patient tumors. Sodium iodide symporter expression in patient tumors after treatment was confirmed in three patients by (123)I uptake on SPECT/CTs and was associated with long progression-free survival. Immune monitoring posttreatment showed an increase in effector T cells recognizing the tumor antigens IGFBP2 and FRα, indicating that MV-NIS treatment triggered cellular immunity against the patients' tumor and suggesting that an immune mechanism mediating the observed antitumor effect. Our findings support further clinical evaluation of MV-NIS as an effective immunovirotherapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Measles virus/physiology
Oncolytic Virotherapy/methods
Oncolytic Viruses/physiology
Ovarian Neoplasms/therapy
Symporters/biosynthesis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cohort Studies
Drug Resistance, Neoplasm
Female
Humans
Measles virus/genetics
Measles virus/metabolism
Mice
Middle Aged
Oncolytic Viruses/genetics
Oncolytic Viruses/metabolism
Ovarian Neoplasms/pathology
Ovarian Neoplasms/virology
Symporters/genetics
Transgenes
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Symporters); 0 (sodium-iodide symporter)
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-2533

  9 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25106902
[Au] Autor:von Rundstedt FC; Lerner SP; Godoy G; Amiel G; Wheeler TM; Truong LD; Shen SS
[Ad] Address:Scott Department of Urology, Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital (LDT, SSS), Houston, Texas....
[Ti] Title:Usefulness of transurethral biopsy for staging the prostatic urethra before radical cystectomy.
[So] Source:J Urol;193(1):58-63, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1527-3792
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: We determined the likelihood that transurethral resection biopsy of the prostatic urethra adjacent to the verumontanum would detect prostatic involvement of urothelial carcinoma in patients with bladder carcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We compared precystectomy transurethral resection biopsy specimens of the prostatic urethra with those of the matched radical cystoprostatectomy in 272 patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. All prostates were evaluated by whole mount step sections. RESULTS: Prostatic involvement by urothelial carcinoma was detected by transurethral resection biopsy or radical cystoprostatectomy in 101 patients (37.1%). Transurethral resection biopsy detected urothelial carcinoma in 72 cases with 71.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The overall accuracy of transurethral resection biopsy to detect urothelial carcinoma of the prostate was 89% (positive and negative predictive values 100% and 86%, respectively). Invasive prostatic urothelial carcinoma arising from the prostatic urethra was detected by transurethral resection biopsy in 21 of 26 patients (81%) while prostatic carcinoma in situ was detected in 39 of 52 (75%). Transurethral resection biopsy detected prostatic invasive urothelial carcinoma resulting from transmural invasion of a bladder tumor in 4 of 15 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Prostatic involvement by urothelial carcinoma of the bladder was found in 37.1% of patients. Transurethral resection biopsy missed most tumors resulting from transmural invasion of the bladder primary lesion. Carcinoma in situ and invasive urothelial carcinoma arising from the prostatic urethra were detected in most cases. Transurethral resection biopsy of the prostatic urethra can complement staging and support clinical decision making with respect to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and planning for an orthotopic neobladder.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carcinoma, Transitional Cell/surgery
Cystectomy
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary/pathology
Preoperative Care
Prostate/pathology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biopsy/methods
Cystectomy/methods
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Urethra
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141219
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 1980440 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24792236
[Au] Autor:Mashni J; Godoy G; Haarer C; Dalbagni G; Reuter VE; Al-Ahmadie H; Ahmadie HA; Bochner BH
[Ad] Address:Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 353 East 68th Street, New York, NY, 10065, USA.
[Ti] Title:Prospective evaluation of plasma kinetic bipolar resection of bladder cancer: comparison to monopolar resection and pathologic findings.
[So] Source:Int Urol Nephrol;46(9):1699-705, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2584
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the Gyrus ACMI plasma kinetic bipolar device (Gyrus ACMI, Southborough, MA) improves pathologic specimen preservation and clinical outcomes compared to standard monopolar electrocautery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In our prospective study, 83 patients underwent monopolar or bipolar transurethral resection of bladder tumors between April 2006 and February 2007 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dedicated genitourinary oncology pathologists blinded to resection type and assessed pathologic features including stage and grade, presence of muscularis propria, fragment size, presence and thickness of thermal artifacts within the specimen, layer of tissue most affected, severity of tissue distortion, and diagnostic impact of thermal artifacts. Clinical outcomes including, perforation, obturator reflex, need for muscle paralysis, a catheter, or admission, were recorded. Clinical and pathologic outcomes between resection modality were compared. RESULTS: There were no significant thermal artifacts in 9/38 (23.7 %) and 11/45 (24.4 %) monopolar and bipolar specimens, respectively. The layer of bladder tissue most affected by thermal artifacts was readable in 18/38 (47.4 %) monopolar and 27/45 (60.0 %) bipolar specimens. Tissue distortion from thermal artifacts led to areas within 11/38 (28.9 %) monopolar and 7/45 (15.6 %) bipolar specimens being unreadable. Ultimately, thermal artifacts caused moderate diagnostic difficulty in 2/38 (5.3 %) specimens of the monopolar group and severe diagnostic difficulty in 1/45 (2.2 %) bipolar specimens. Clinically, there was no major difference between resection methods. CONCLUSION: Plasma kinetic bipolar equipment appears to cause less tissue distortion and has the potential to facilitate staging and grading of bladder tumors. No differences in clinical outcomes were appreciated between resection methods. If these results can be repeated in larger studies, the bipolar device represents a small advancement in transurethral resection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Electrocoagulation
Electrosurgery
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 150620
[Lr] Last revision date:150620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140828
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11255-014-0719-9


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