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[PMID]: 26826203
[Au] Autor:Thomas C; Sill M; Ruland V; Witten A; Hartung S; Kordes U; Jeibmann A; Beschorner R; Keyvani K; Bergmann M; Mittelbronn M; Pietsch T; Felsberg J; Monoranu CM; Varlet P; Hauser P; Olar A; Grundy RG; Wolff JE; Korshunov A; Jones DT; Bewerunge-Hudler M; Hovestadt V; von Deimling A; Pfister SM; Paulus W; Capper D; Hasselblatt M
[Ad] Address:Institute of Neuropathology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany (C.T., V.R., A.J., W.P., M.H.); Division of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany (M.S.); Core Facility Genomics of the Medical Faculty Münster, Münster, Germany (A.W.); Department of Pediat...
[Ti] Title:Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 clinically distinct subgroups.
[So] Source:Neuro Oncol;18(6):790-6, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1523-5866
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Choroid plexus tumors are intraventricular neoplasms derived from the choroid plexus epithelium. A better knowledge of molecular factors involved in choroid plexus tumor biology may aid in identifying patients at risk for recurrence. METHODS: Methylation profiles were examined in 29 choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs, WHO grade I), 32 atypical choroid plexus papillomas (aCPPs, WHO grade II), and 31 choroid plexus carcinomas (CPCs, WHO grade III) by Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Bead Chip Array. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified 3 subgroups: methylation cluster 1 (pediatric CPP and aCPP of mainly supratentorial location), methylation cluster 2 (adult CPP and aCPP of mainly infratentorial location), and methylation cluster 3 (pediatric CPP, aCPP, and CPC of supratentorial location). In methylation cluster 3, progression-free survival (PFS) accounted for a mean of 72 months (CI, 55-89 mo), whereas only 1 of 42 tumors of methylation clusters 1 and 2 progressed (P< .001). On stratification of outcome data according to WHO grade, all CPCs clustered within cluster 3 and were associated with shorter overall survival (mean, 105 mo [CI, 81-128 mo]) and PFS (mean, 55 mo [CI, 36-73 mo]). The aCPP of methylation cluster 3 also progressed frequently (mean, 69 mo [CI, 44-93 mo]), whereas no tumor progression was observed in aCPP of methylation clusters 1 and 2 (P< .05). Only 1 of 29 CPPs recurred. CONCLUSIONS: Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 distinct subgroups (ie, pediatric low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 1], adult low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 2], and pediatric high-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 3]) and may provide useful prognostic information in addition to histopathology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/neuonc/nov322

  2 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26494415
[Au] Autor:Strnad V; Ott OJ; Hildebrandt G; Kauer-Dorner D; Knauerhase H; Major T; Lyczek J; Guinot JL; Dunst J; Gutierrez Miguelez C; Slampa P; Allgäuer M; Lössl K; Polat B; Kovács G; Fischedick AR; Wendt TG; Fietkau R; Hindemith M; Resch A; Kulik A; Arribas L; Niehoff P; Guedea F; Schlamann A; Pötter R; Gall C; Malzer M; Uter W; Polgár C; Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO)
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: vratislav.strnad@uk-erlangen.de....
[Ti] Title:5-year results of accelerated partial breast irradiation using sole interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation with boost after breast-conserving surgery for low-risk invasive and in-situ carcinoma of the female breast: a randomised, phase 3, non-inferiority trial.
[So] Source:Lancet;387(10015):229-38, 2016 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1474-547X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In a phase 3, randomised, non-inferiority trial, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for patients with stage 0, I, and IIA breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving treatment was compared with whole-breast irradiation. Here, we present 5-year follow-up results. METHODS: We did a phase 3, randomised, non-inferiority trial at 16 hospitals and medical centres in seven European countries. 1184 patients with low-risk invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast-conserving surgery were centrally randomised to either whole-breast irradiation or APBI using multicatheter brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was local recurrence. Analysis was done according to treatment received. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00402519. FINDINGS: Between April 20, 2004, and July 30, 2009, 551 patients had whole-breast irradiation with tumour-bed boost and 633 patients received APBI using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy. At 5-year follow-up, nine patients treated with APBI and five patients receiving whole-breast irradiation had a local recurrence; the cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 1.44% (95% CI 0.51-2.38) with APBI and 0.92% (0.12-1.73) with whole-breast irradiation (difference 0.52%, 95% CI -0.72 to 1.75; p=0.42). No grade 4 late side-effects were reported. The 5-year risk of grade 2-3 late side-effects to the skin was 3.2% with APBI versus 5.7% with whole-breast irradiation (p=0.08), and 5-year risk of grade 2-3 subcutaneous tissue late side-effects was 7.6% versus 6.3% (p=0.53). The risk of severe (grade 3) fibrosis at 5 years was 0.2% with whole-breast irradiation and 0% with APBI (p=0.46). INTERPRETATION: The difference between treatments was below the relevance margin of 3 percentage points. Therefore, adjuvant APBI using multicatheter brachytherapy after breast-conserving surgery in patients with early breast cancer is not inferior to adjuvant whole-breast irradiation with respect to 5-year local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. FUNDING: German Cancer Aid.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brachytherapy/methods
Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy
Carcinoma in Situ/radiotherapy
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/radiotherapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms/surgery
Breast Neoplasms/therapy
Carcinoma in Situ/surgery
Carcinoma in Situ/therapy
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/therapy
Catheters, Indwelling
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Mastectomy, Segmental/methods
Middle Aged
Radiotherapy Dosage
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE III; COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 160515
[Lr] Last revision date:160515
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160204
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26630946
[Au] Autor:Elsayad K; Kriz J; Reinartz G; Scobioala S; Ernst I; Haverkamp U; Eich HT
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A1, 48149, Muenster, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Cone-beam CT-guided radiotherapy in the management of lung cancer: Diagnostic and therapeutic value.
[So] Source:Strahlenther Onkol;192(2):83-91, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1439-099X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated an increase in the necessity of adaptive planning over the course of lung cancer radiation therapy (RT) treatment. In this study, we evaluated intrathoracic changes detected by cone-beam CT (CBCT) in lung cancer patients during RT. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 71 lung cancer patients treated with fractionated CBCT-guided RT were evaluated. Intrathoracic changes and plan adaptation priority (AP) scores were compared between small cell lung cancer (SCLC, n = 13) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, n = 58) patients. RESULTS: The median cumulative radiation dose administered was 54 Gy (range 30-72 Gy) and the median fraction dose was 1.8 Gy (range 1.8-3.0 Gy). All patients were subjected to a CBCT scan at least weekly (range 1-5/week). We observed intrathoracic changes in 83 % of the patients over the course of RT [58 % (41/71) regression, 17 % (12/71) progression, 20 % (14/71) atelectasis, 25 % (18/71) pleural effusion, 13 % (9/71) infiltrative changes, and 10 % (7/71) anatomical shift]. Nearly half, 45 % (32/71), of the patients had one intrathoracic soft tissue change, 22.5 % (16/71) had two, and three or more changes were observed in 15.5 % (11/71) of the patients. Plan modifications were performed in 60 % (43/71) of the patients. Visual volume reduction did correlate with the number of CBCT scans acquired (r = 0.313, p = 0.046) and with the timing of chemotherapy administration (r = 0.385, p = 0.013). CONCLUSION: Weekly CBCT monitoring provides an adaptation advantage in patients with lung cancer. In this study, the monitoring allowed for plan adaptations due to tumor volume changes and to other anatomical changes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00066-015-0927-y

  4 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26545764
[Au] Autor:Rudat V; Nour A; Hammoud M; Alaradi A; Mohammed A
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, 31952, Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia. volker.rudat@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer: Analysis of interfractional errors and acute toxicity.
[So] Source:Strahlenther Onkol;192(2):109-17, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1439-099X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to estimate interfractional deviations in patient and prostate position, the impact of the frequency of online verification on the treatment margins, and to assess acute radiation reactions of high-dose external beam image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) of localized prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: IG-IMRT was performed by daily online verification of implanted fiducial prostate markers using a megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A total of 1011 image-guided treatment fractions from 23 consecutive unselected prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The median total dose was 79.2 Gy (range 77.4-81.0 Gy). Acute radiation reactions were assessed weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v.4.03. RESULTS: A relevant combined patient set-up and prostate motion population random error of 4-5 mm was observed. Compared to daily IGRT, image guidance every other day required an expansion of the CTV-PTV (clinical target volume-planning target volume) margin of 8.1, 6.6, and 4.1 mm in the longitudinal, vertical, and lateral directions, thereby, increasing the PTV by approximately 30-40 %. No grade 3 or 4 acute radiation reactions were observed with daily IG-IMRT. CONCLUSION: A high dose with surprisingly low acute toxicity can be applied with daily IG-IMRT using implanted fiducial prostate markers. Daily image guidance is clearly superior to image guidance every other fraction concerning adequate target coverage with minimal margins.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00066-015-0919-y

  5 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26317143
[Au] Autor:Emiroglu M; Inal A; Sert I; Ilhan E; Peker K; Gulcelik MA; Gürçelik MA; Güngör H; Salimoglu S; Can D; Ellidokuz H; Aydin C
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey
[Ti] Title:How do surgeons approach breast cancer surgery in Turkey? A national survey.
[So] Source:Breast Cancer;22(4):421-6, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1880-4233
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the experience, practice and approaches of general surgeons in relation to the treatment of breast cancer in Turkey. METHODS: A survey was conducted between November 2012 and February 2013 with 453 general surgeons who claimed to perform breast surgery. Initial and most preferred approaches for breast cancer surgery and demographic features of participants were questioned. Initial approaches of surgeons for a suspected breast mass were assessed with a clinical scenario. RESULTS: A total of 12.6 % of practicing general surgeons in Turkey responded to the survey. A multidisciplinary assessment was employed by 57.2 % of participants. The most frequently used diagnostic tool was needle biopsies (64.9 %) and the most frequently performed surgery for early stage cancers was breast-conserving surgery (72.2 %). The initial approach for locally advanced breast cancer was neoadjuvant chemotherapy (59.8 %) and mastectomy for metastatic cancer (22.7 %). Sentinel lymph node biopsies were utilized by 59.2 % of participants by different methods in appropriate cases. Oncoplastic breast surgery was performed by 9.0 % of participants, frequently or constantly. The surgeons' initial approaches for the clinical scenario were imaging (56.7 %) and biopsy (40.6 %). CONCLUSIONS: Although there are efforts to improve up-to-date approaches towards breast cancer surgery by surgeons, currently there are significant inadequacies for evidence-based medicine practices.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Breast Neoplasms/surgery
Surgeons/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biopsy, Needle
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy
Breast Neoplasms/pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Mastectomy, Segmental/methods
Mastectomy, Segmental/statistics & numerical data
Neoadjuvant Therapy
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/methods
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/statistics & numerical data
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/utilization
Surveys and Questionnaires
Turkey
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 160515
[Lr] Last revision date:160515
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150827
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12282-013-0500-4

  6 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26026051
[Au] Autor:Chen BW; Chen W; Liang H; Liu H; Liang C; Zhi X; Hu LQ; Yu XZ; Wei T; Ma T; Xue F; Zheng L; Zhao B; Feng XH; Bai XL; Liang TB
[Ad] Address:Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China....
[Ti] Title:Inhibition of mTORC2 Induces Cell-Cycle Arrest and Enhances the Cytotoxicity of Doxorubicin by Suppressing MDR1 Expression in HCC Cells.
[So] Source:Mol Cancer Ther;14(8):1805-15, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1538-8514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:mTOR is aberrantly activated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and plays pivotal roles in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. Rapamycin has been reported to exert antitumor activity in HCC and sensitizes HCC cells to cytotoxic agents. However, due to feedback activation of AKT after mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, simultaneous targeting of mTORC1/2 may be more effective. In this study, we examined the interaction between the dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor OSI-027 and doxorubicin in vitro and in vivo. OSI-027 was found to reduce phosphorylation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 substrates, including 4E-BP1, p70S6K, and AKT (Ser473), and inhibit HCC cell proliferation. Similar to OSI-027 treatment, knockdown of mTORC2 induced G0-G1 phase cell-cycle arrest. In contrast, rapamycin or knockdown of mTORC1 increased phosphorylation of AKT (Ser473), yet had little antiproliferative effect. Notably, OSI-027 synergized with doxorubicin for the antiproliferative efficacy in a manner dependent of MDR1 expression in HCC cells. The synergistic antitumor effect of OSI-027 and doxorubicin was also observed in a HCC xenograft mouse model. Moreover, AKT was required for OSI-027-induced cell-cycle arrest and downregulation of MDR1. Our findings provide a rationale for dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors, such as OSI-027, as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic agents to treat HCC. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(8); 1805-15. ©2015 AACR.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibiotics, Antineoplastic/pharmacology
Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects
Doxorubicin/pharmacology
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/drug effects
Multiprotein Complexes/antagonists & inhibitors
P-Glycoprotein/genetics
TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apoptosis/drug effects
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/metabolism
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Proliferation/drug effects
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Synergism
Gene Knockdown Techniques
Humans
Imidazoles/pharmacology
Inhibitory Concentration 50
Liver Neoplasms/genetics
Liver Neoplasms/metabolism
Mice
Multiprotein Complexes/metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism
Signal Transduction/drug effects
TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
Triazines/pharmacology
Tumor Burden/drug effects
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibiotics, Antineoplastic); 0 (Imidazoles); 0 (Multiprotein Complexes); 0 (OSI 027); 0 (P-Glycoprotein); 0 (TOR complex 2); 0 (Triazines); 0 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1); 80168379AG (Doxorubicin); EC 2.7.1.1 (TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases); EC 2.7.11.1 (Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150807
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-15-0029

  7 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26200337
[Au] Autor:Zauri M; Berridge G; Thézénas ML; Pugh KM; Goldin R; Kessler BM; Kriaucionis S
[Ad] Address:Ludwig Cancer Research, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK....
[Ti] Title:CDA directs metabolism of epigenetic nucleosides revealing a therapeutic window in cancer.
[So] Source:Nature;524(7563):114-8, 2015 Aug 6.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cells require nucleotides to support DNA replication and repair damaged DNA. In addition to de novo synthesis, cells recycle nucleotides from the DNA of dying cells or from cellular material ingested through the diet. Salvaged nucleosides come with the complication that they can contain epigenetic modifications. Because epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation mainly relies on copying of the modification pattern from parental strands, random incorporation of pre-modified bases during replication could have profound implications for epigenome fidelity and yield adverse cellular phenotypes. Although the salvage mechanism of 5-methyl-2'deoxycytidine (5mdC) has been investigated before, it remains unknown how cells deal with the recently identified oxidized forms of 5mdC: 5-hydroxymethyl-2'deoxycytidine (5hmdC), 5-formy-2'deoxycytidine (5fdC) and 5-carboxyl-2'deoxycytidine (5cadC). Here we show that enzymes of the nucleotide salvage pathway display substrate selectivity, effectively protecting newly synthesized DNA from the incorporation of epigenetically modified forms of cytosine. Thus, cell lines and animals can tolerate high doses of these modified cytidines without any deleterious effects on physiology. Notably, by screening cancer cell lines for growth defects after exposure to 5hmdC, we unexpectedly identify a subset of cell lines in which 5hmdC or 5fdC administration leads to cell lethality. Using genomic approaches, we show that the susceptible cell lines overexpress cytidine deaminase (CDA). CDA converts 5hmdC and 5fdC into variants of uridine that are incorporated into DNA, resulting in accumulation of DNA damage, and ultimately, cell death. Our observations extend current knowledge of the nucleotide salvage pathway by revealing the metabolism of oxidized epigenetic bases, and suggest a new therapeutic option for cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, that have CDA overexpression and are resistant to treatment with other cytidine analogues.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cytidine Deaminase/metabolism
Cytidine/analogs & derivatives
Cytidine/metabolism
Cytosine/metabolism
Cytosine/pharmacology
Epigenesis, Genetic
Neoplasms/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 5-Methylcytosine/metabolism
5-Methylcytosine/pharmacology
Animals
Cell Death/drug effects
Cell Line, Tumor
Cytidine/chemistry
Cytidine/pharmacology
Cytidine Deaminase/genetics
Cytosine/analogs & derivatives
Cytosine/chemistry
DNA/biosynthesis
DNA/chemistry
DNA Damage/drug effects
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase/metabolism
Deoxycytidine/analogs & derivatives
Deoxycytidine/metabolism
Deoxycytidine/pharmacology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Mice
Neoplasms/genetics
Neoplasms/metabolism
Nucleotides/chemistry
Nucleotides/metabolism
Nucleotides/pharmacology
Oxidation-Reduction
Phosphotransferases/metabolism
Substrate Specificity
Up-Regulation
Uridine/analogs & derivatives
Uridine/chemistry
Uridine/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (5-carboxyl-2'-deoxycytidine); 0 (5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine); 0 (5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine); 0 (Nucleotides); 0W860991D6 (Deoxycytidine); 5CSZ8459RP (Cytidine); 6R795CQT4H (5-Methylcytosine); 8J337D1HZY (Cytosine); 9007-49-2 (DNA); B200GV71QM (5-methyldeoxycytidine); EC 2.7.- (Phosphotransferases); EC 2.7.1.77 (nucleoside phosphotransferase); EC 2.7.7.7 (DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase); EC 3.5.4.5 (Cytidine Deaminase); WHI7HQ7H85 (Uridine)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150806
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nature14948

  8 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26060887
[Au] Autor:Bergner M; Duquette DC; Chio L; Stoltz BM
[Ad] Address:The Warren and Katharine Schlinger Laboratory for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 101-20, Pasadena, California 91125, United States....
[Ti] Title:Exceedingly Efficient Synthesis of (±)-Grandifloracin and Acylated Analogues.
[So] Source:Org Lett;17(12):3008-10, 2015 Jun 19.
[Is] ISSN:1523-7052
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A highly efficient regio- and stereoselective total synthesis of (±)-grandifloracin via a tandem dearomative epoxidation/spontaneous Diels-Alder cyclodimerization from salicylic acid in only four steps is reported. The synthetic route allows for late-stage diversification of the core structure to give ready access to analogues of this promising agent against pancreatic cancer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Agents/chemical synthesis
Bridged Compounds/chemical synthesis
Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy
Salicylic Acid/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acylation
Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology
Bridged Compounds/pharmacology
Bridged Compounds/therapeutic use
Cycloaddition Reaction
Dimerization
Molecular Structure
Stereoisomerism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Bridged Compounds); 0 (grandifloracin); O414PZ4LPZ (Salicylic Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150619
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.orglett.5b01292

  9 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26080803
[Au] Autor:Chamard-Jovenin C; Jung AC; Chesnel A; Abecassis J; Flament S; Ledrappier S; Macabre C; Boukhobza T; Dumond H
[Ad] Address:CNRS-Université de Lorraine, UMR 7039, Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy, BP70239, F-54506, VandÅ“uvre-lès-Nancy, France. clemence.jovenin@univ-lorraine.fr....
[Ti] Title:From ERα66 to ERα36: a generic method for validating a prognosis marker of breast tumor progression.
[So] Source:BMC Syst Biol;9:28, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1752-0509
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Estrogen receptor alpha36 (ERalpha36), a variant of estrogen receptor alpha (ER) is expressed in about half of breast tumors, independently of the [ER+]/[ER-] status. In vitro, ERalpha36 triggers mitogenic non-genomic signaling and migration ability in response to 17beta-estradiol and tamoxifen. In vivo, highly ERalpha36 expressing tumors are of poor outcome especially as [ER+] tumors are submitted to tamoxifen treatment which, in turn, enhances ERalpha36 expression. RESULTS: Our study aimed to validate ERalpha36 expression as a reliable prognostic factor for cancer progression from an estrogen dependent proliferative tumor toward an estrogen dispensable metastatic disease. In a retrospective study, we tried to decipher underlying mechanisms of cancer progression by using an original modeling of the relationships between ERalpha36, other estrogen and growth factor receptors and metastatic marker expression. Nonlinear correlation analyses and mutual information computations led to characterize a complex network connecting ERalpha36 to either non-genomic estrogen signaling or to metastatic process. CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies ERalpha36 expression level as a relevant classifier which should be taken into account for breast tumors clinical characterization and [ER+] tumor treatment orientation, using a generic approach for the rapid, cheap and relevant evaluation of any candidate gene expression as a predictor of a complex biological process.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics
Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis
Breast Neoplasms/genetics
Computational Biology/methods
Disease Progression
Estrogen Receptor alpha/genetics
Genetic Variation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Breast Neoplasms/classification
Breast Neoplasms/pathology
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Gene Regulatory Networks
Humans
Neoplasm Metastasis
Prognosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers, Tumor); 0 (Estrogen Receptor alpha); 0 (estrogen receptor alpha, human)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150619
[Lr] Last revision date:150619
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150617
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12918-015-0178-7

  10 / 2155584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25971253
[Au] Autor:de Matos Simoes R; Dalleau S; Williamson KE; Emmert-Streib F
[Ad] Address:Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB), Queens University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK. r.dematossimoes@qub.ac.uk....
[Ti] Title:Urothelial cancer gene regulatory networks inferred from large-scale RNAseq, Bead and Oligo gene expression data.
[So] Source:BMC Syst Biol;9:21, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1752-0509
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Urothelial pathogenesis is a complex process driven by an underlying network of interconnected genes. The identification of novel genomic target regions and gene targets that drive urothelial carcinogenesis is crucial in order to improve our current limited understanding of urothelial cancer (UC) on the molecular level. The inference of genome-wide gene regulatory networks (GRN) from large-scale gene expression data provides a promising approach for a detailed investigation of the underlying network structure associated to urothelial carcinogenesis. METHODS: In our study we inferred and compared three GRNs by the application of the BC3Net inference algorithm to large-scale transitional cell carcinoma gene expression data sets from Illumina RNAseq (179 samples), Illumina Bead arrays (165 samples) and Affymetrix Oligo microarrays (188 samples). We investigated the structural and functional properties of GRNs for the identification of molecular targets associated to urothelial cancer. RESULTS: We found that the urothelial cancer (UC) GRNs show a significant enrichment of subnetworks that are associated with known cancer hallmarks including cell cycle, immune response, signaling, differentiation and translation. Interestingly, the most prominent subnetworks of co-located genes were found on chromosome regions 5q31.3 (RNAseq), 8q24.3 (Oligo) and 1q23.3 (Bead), which all represent known genomic regions frequently deregulated or aberated in urothelial cancer and other cancer types. Furthermore, the identified hub genes of the individual GRNs, e.g., HID1/DMC1 (tumor development), RNF17/TDRD4 (cancer antigen) and CYP4A11 (angiogenesis/ metastasis) are known cancer associated markers. The GRNs were highly dataset specific on the interaction level between individual genes, but showed large similarities on the biological function level represented by subnetworks. Remarkably, the RNAseq UC GRN showed twice the proportion of significant functional subnetworks. Based on our analysis of inferential and experimental networks the Bead UC GRN showed the lowest performance compared to the RNAseq and Oligo UC GRNs. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating genome-scale UC GRNs. RNAseq based gene expression data is the data platform of choice for a GRN inference. Our study offers new avenues for the identification of novel putative diagnostic targets for subsequent studies in bladder tumors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Computational Biology
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Regulatory Networks
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/genetics
Urothelium/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Signal Transduction/genetics
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology
Urothelium/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150610
[Lr] Last revision date:150610
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150609
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12918-015-0165-z


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