Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 25024634
[Au] Autor:Yamamoto K; Yamamoto F; Maeda A; Igimi H; Yamamoto M; Yamaguchi R; Yamashita Y
[Ad] Address:Kentaroh Yamamoto, Fumio Yamamoto, Hirotsune Igimi, Mami Yamamoto, Department of Surgery, Yamamoto Memorial Hospital, Saga 848-0031, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Tubulopapillary adenoma of the gallbladder accompanied by bile duct tumor thrombus.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;20(26):8736-9, 2014 Jul 14.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is recognized as a precancerous lesion; however, both its pathogenesis and progression remain unclear. We present here a case of IPNB arising from the gallbladder accompanied by bile duct tumor thrombus in a 79-year-old female. The resected specimen revealed a tubulopapillary adenoma with no malignant cells. This case suggests that even in the absence of malignant cells, these tumors can behave as malignant tumors requiring aggressive treatment. Even if no malignant cells are present, intraepithelial neoplasms occurring in the ampullopancreatobiliary tract can behave as malignant tumors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v20.i26.8736

  2 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024892
[Au] Autor:Chugh AP; Gandhoke CS; Mohite AG; Khedkar BV
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery unit), B. J. Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune, Maharashtra, India....
[Ti] Title:Primary angiosarcoma of the skull: A rare case report.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:92, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Angiosarcomas are rare high grade endothelial tumors characterized by rapidly proliferating anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood filled spaces. Primary neoplasms of the skull are rare, representing 2.6% of primary neoplasms of bone. Primary malignant neoplasms of the skull are even rarer, accounting for only 0.8% of primary malignant neoplasms of bone. CASE DESCRIPTION: We report a 32-year-old female who presented with right parieto-occipital swelling, which gradually increased in size. Radiology was suggestive of a calvarial soft tissue lesion in the right parieto-occipital region with destruction of the adjacent parieto-occipital bone with intracranial extra-axial extension. Complete surgical excision of the calvarial lesion was done under general anesthesia. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan of brain (plain and with contrast) showed complete excision of the tumor mass. Histopathological diagnosis was consistent with 'an angiosarcoma of the skull'. On immunohistochemistry, the atypical endothelial cells were highlighted by CD34, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy to the tumor bed. CONCLUSION: Primary angiosarcoma of the skull is a rare tumor with less than 20 cases reported worldwide till date. The treatment should include complete surgical excision with a wide bony margin followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, which in our case has given a good locoregional control even at the end of 2 years. However, these patients should be followed up with repeated scans yearly to rule out locoregional as well as distant recurrence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134365

  3 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019450
[Au] Autor:Fritz J; Lurie B; Miller TT; Potter HG
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E 70th St, New York, NY 10021.
[Ti] Title:MR Imaging of Hip Arthroplasty Implants.
[So] Source:Radiographics;34(4):E106-32, 2014 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1527-1323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hip arthroplasty has become the standard treatment for end-stage hip disease, allowing pain relief and restoration of mobility in large numbers of patients; however, pain after hip arthroplasty occurs in as many as 40% of cases, and despite improved longevity, all implants eventually fail with time. Owing to the increasing numbers of hip arthroplasty procedures performed, the demographic factors, and the metal-on-metal arthroplasty systems with their associated risk for the development of adverse local tissue reactions to metal products, there is a growing demand for an accurate diagnosis of symptoms related to hip arthroplasty implants and for a way to monitor patients at risk. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of hip arthroplasty implants. Optimized conventional pulse sequences and metal artifact reduction techniques afford improved depiction of bone, implant-tissue interfaces, and periprosthetic soft tissue for the diagnosis of arthroplasty-related complications. Strategies for MR imaging of hip arthroplasty implants are presented, as well as the imaging appearances of common causes of painful and dysfunctional hip arthroplasty systems, including stress reactions and fractures; bone resorption and aseptic loosening; polyethylene wear-induced synovitis and osteolysis; adverse local tissue reactions to metal products; infection; heterotopic ossification; tendinopathy; neuropathy; and periprosthetic neoplasms. A checklist is provided for systematic evaluation of MR images of hip arthroplasty implants. MR imaging with optimized conventional pulse sequences and metal artifact reduction techniques is a comprehensive imaging modality for the evaluation of the hip after arthroplasty, contributing important information for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification, and surgical planning. ©RSNA, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1148/rg.344140010

  4 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24810934
[Au] Autor:Blake DM; Husain Q; Kanumuri VV; Svider PF; Eloy JA; Liu JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA....
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic endonasal resection of sinonasal and anterior skull base schwannomas.
[So] Source:J Clin Neurosci;21(8):1419-23, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2653
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sinonasal and anterior skull base (ASB) schwannomas are rare entities. The majority of these lesions are found within the sinonasal tract, although some have intracranial extension via invasion of the ASB. Often, these tumors can be confused for other entities, especially olfactory groove meningiomas and esthesioneuroblastomas in the olfactory groove region, and juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas in the infratemporal fossa. We present a single institutional series of four patients with sinonasal and ASB schwannomas that were resected purely via an endoscopic endonasal approach. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify individuals with sinonasal and/or ASB schwannomas. Demographic data, presenting symptoms, imaging, treatment, and follow-up were recorded. Two male and two female patients were included in this study. The average age was 53.5years (range, 21 to 71). The most common presenting symptoms were facial pain and hyposmia. All tumors were treated with endoscopic endonasal resection. One patient had intradural intracranial extension and required an extended endoscopic endonasal transcribriform approach with ASB resection, while another case involving the infratemporal fossa was treated with an extended endoscopic endonasal transpterygoid approach to this region. There were no major complications at an average follow-up of 9months (range, 0 to 16). Sinonasal and ASB schwannomas are rare entities, with often nondescript symptoms and can often mimic other types of skull base tumors. Total resection via a purely endoscopic endonasal approach can be considered for these rare neoplasms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24613764
[Au] Autor:Yoshida K; Ichikawa T; Kurozumi K; Yanai H; Onoda K; Date I
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Fatal glioblastoma after Gamma Knife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation in a child.
[So] Source:J Clin Neurosci;21(8):1453-5, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2653
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We describe a fatal case of glioblastoma multiforme that was induced by Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS; Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). A 4-year-old girl presented with repeated convulsions. Imaging studies revealed an AVM located in the right thalamus. One year after initial symptoms, GKS was performed to obliterate the nidus. The maximum and marginal radiation doses were 32 and 16Gy, respectively. Seventy months after GKS, the patient represented with severe headache. MRI showed a poorly demarcated tumor with heterogeneous gadolinium enhancement in the right thalamus and adjacent to the white matter of the temporal lobe. After a generalised convulsion, the patient deteriorated into a deep coma. CT scans showed severe brain swelling with intratumoral hemorrhage. An emergency craniotomy was performed, and the hematoma was removed. During this surgery, a tumor mass, which was found adjacent to the hematoma, was resected. Microscopic examination revealed glioblastoma multiforme. Despite intensive treatment, the patient died 1month after surgery. A GKS-induced secondary tumor is a rare but serious complication. It is important to be aware of the adverse effects of GKS, including secondary neoplasms, before its clinical application, especially in young patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25022420
[Au] Autor:Massironi S; Rossi RE; Ferrero S; Cavalcoli F; Spampatti MP; Conte D; Corbetta S; Peracchi M
[Ad] Address:Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplant, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Italy.
[Ti] Title:An esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a patient with MEN1-related pancreatic gastrinoma: An unusual association and review of the literature.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Ther;10(2):443-5, 2014 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1998-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Both multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-related gastrinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare neoplasms, and their association has been rarely reported. We describe an unusual association between a GIST and a MEN1-related gastrinoma. A 44-year-old man had undergone surgical removal of a pancreatic gastrinoma in 2004 and was then administered long-term somatostatin analogs, and diagnosed as having MEN1 syndrome. Following an uneventful follow-up, in April 2009, an upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy showed esophageal narrowing, with evidence of a 2-cm solid mass on endoscopic ultrasonography. Histology revealed a tumor composed of elongated cells with plump cytoplasm arranged in a storiform pattern. The immunophenotype of the lesion was CD117 and Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) positive, whereas alpha-1 muscle actin and S-100 protein were negative. Due to morphological and immunohistochemical results, a final diagnosis of esophageal GIST was made. The association between GISTs and MEN1 could be casual, although a single case of the coexistence of a GIST and a MEN1-related gastrinoma has already been reported. A role of the MEN1 gene in the pathogenesis of GISTs could be hypothesized.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1482.136685

  7 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25022407
[Au] Autor:Jayaprakash PG; Mathews S; Azariah MB; Babu G
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, India.
[Ti] Title:Pure epitheliod perivascular epitheloid cell tumor (epitheliod angiomyolipoma) of kidney: Case report and literature review.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Ther;10(2):404-6, 2014 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1998-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Malignant kidney tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for 3% of adult malignancies. Majority of these arises in the renal parenchyma and are adenocarcinomas. Malignant mesenchymal tumors of kidney are extremely rare. We report on the clinical behavior, the radiological and histopathological details of one such case of malignant mesenchymal tumor, we encountered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1482.136672

  8 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25022393
[Au] Autor:Deb P; Singh V; Dutta V; Kapoor K
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India.
[Ti] Title:An unusual case of cavernous haemangioma of the Fallopian tube.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Ther;10(2):363-4, 2014 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1998-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fallopian tubes are one of the uncommon sites for neoplastic lesions in the female genital tract. Haemangiomas of the fallopian tubes are rare benign neoplasms that are documented as isolated case reports only. We present a rare case of incidentally detected cavernous haemangioma of the fallopian tube in a post menopausal female who underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salphingoopherectomy for dysfunctional uterine bleeding.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1482.136658

  9 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024531
[Au] Autor:Telischak NA; Wu JS; Eisenberg RL
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston MA 02215, USA.
[Ti] Title:Cysts and cystic-appearing lesions of the knee: A pictorial essay.
[So] Source:Indian J Radiol Imaging;24(2):182-91, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0971-3026
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cysts and cystic-appearing lesions around the knee are common and can be divided into true cysts (synovial cysts, bursae, ganglia, and meniscal cysts) and lesions that mimic cysts (hematomas, seromas, abscesses, vascular lesions, and neoplasms). The specific anatomic location of the cystic lesion often permits the correct diagnosis. In difficult cases, identifying a cystic mass in an atypical location and/or visualizing internal solid contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should raise concern for a neoplasm and the need for further evaluation and intervention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0971-3026.134413

  10 / 1893557 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25021926
[Au] Autor:Bracey T; King J; Shetty D; Fox B
[Ad] Address:Department of Cellular Pathology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK....
[Ti] Title:PTU-057 The "poor Man's Cell-block" Sample Preparation Method For Eus-fna Of Mediastinal And Retroperitoneal Lesions Does Not Require Attending Pathology Staff Or Cytology Expertise.
[So] Source:Gut;63 Suppl 1:A63, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1468-3288
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: We present a novel technique of sample preparation for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) that is simple, convenient and yields a high diagnostic success rate. EUS-guided fine needle aspirate (FNA) is increasingly used to obtain tissue in the mediastinum and retroperitoneum. Compared with surgical biopsy, EUS is minimally invasive and safe. The procedure, however is not without risk and can occasionally be poorly tolerated. It is therefore imperative that sampled tissue is optimally prepared. Ideally sample preparation should be simple without the need for an attending pathologist, and enable specific diagnosis and prognostics. The novel "poor man's cell block"(1) (PMCB) technique, recently adopted in our institution for all EUS FNA, fulfils this need. The PMCB technique allows the entire sample to be processed "as a biopsy". No slide preparation skills are needed and pathology staff need not be present. Special equipment or centrifugation is unnecessary, and samples can be reported without specific expertise or training in cytopathology. PCMB enables additional studies such as immunohistochemistry to enable subclassification and risk stratification of some neoplasms. METHODS: All mediastinal and retroperitoneal histology/cytology reports since starting we started using the PMCB technique (2012-2013) were retrieved from the pathology database. RESULTS: 23 mediastinal and 33 retroperitoneal reports were retrieved, of which 18 mediastinal and 27 retroperitoneal samples respectively were prepared with the PMCB technique. All of the mediastinal PMCB samples (100%) were diagnostic. Neoplasms were accurately subclassified, and several benign samples were corroborated by the presence of non-necrotising granulomas. 63% of retroperitoneal PMCB samples were diagnostic. More specific diagnoses were afforded by the PMCB technique vs cytology (stromal and perineural invasion was seen in many pancreatic PMCB samples, enabling a "definitive" invasive diagnosis). In addition, a spindle cell GIST, and well differentiated endocrine carcinoma were diagnosed and both approximately graded/risk stratified. CONCLUSION: The PMCB technique is a simple, reliable and cost-effective EUS-FNA sample preparation technique that in our hands appears superior to conventional cytology preparations (83% diagnostic rate PMCB vs 57% cytology). We suggest PCMB can be reported by pathologists without cytology training/expertise. PMCB allows more accurate diagnosis with the additional benefit of immunohistochemistry allowing more accurate diagnosis and risk stratification for some neoplasms. REFERENCE: Mayall, F, Darlington, A. The poor man's cell block. J Clin Pathol 63:837-838. DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST: None Declared.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1136/gutjnl-2014-307263.131


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