Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29524921
[Au] Autor:Reis H; Reis C; Sharip A; Reis W; Zhao Y; Sinclair R; Beeson L
[Ad] Address:Loma Linda University School of Medicine, 11175 Campus Street, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA.
[Ti] Title:Diesel exhaust exposure, its multi-system effects, and the effect of new technology diesel exhaust.
[So] Source:Environ Int;114:252-265, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6750
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) from vehicles and industry is hazardous and affects proper function of organ systems. DE can interfere with normal physiology after acute and chronic exposure to particulate matter (PM). Exposure leads to potential systemic disease processes in the central nervous, visual, hematopoietic, respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal systems. In this review, we give an overview of the epidemiological evidence supporting the harmful effects of diesel exhaust, and the numerous animal studies conducted to investigate the specific pathophysiological mechanisms behind DE exposure. Additionally, this review includes a summary of studies that used biomarkers as an indication of biological plausibility, and also studies evaluating new technology diesel exhaust (NTDE) and its systemic effects. Lastly, this review includes new approaches to improving DE emissions, and emphasizes the importance of ongoing study in this field of environmental health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524758
[Au] Autor:Shahmohammadi S; Sahraian MA; Shahmohammadi A; Doosti R; Zare-Mirzaie A; Naser Moghadasi A
[Ad] Address:MS Research Center, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:A presentation of ulcerative colitis after rituximab therapy in a patient with multiple sclerosis and literature review.
[So] Source:Mult Scler Relat Disord;22:22-26, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2211-0356
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most important demyelinating diseases that affects the central nervous system. Its treatment often involves a long-term disease modifying therapy. According to some studies, the prevalence of autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is higher in MS patients than in the normal population. There are also few studies that have reported the onset of UC after rituximab therapy. The present study presents a report of a 31-years old female patient suffering from aggressive multiple sclerosis, which developed into autoimmune hepatitis during the MS therapy. Thereafter, she received rituximab for the treating both MS and AIH. One week after the third cycle of rituximab (6 doses of 1000 mg), she experienced abdominal pain, fever, and severe bloody diarrhea; finally, she was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). It seems that the administration of certain immunomodulators or immunosuppressive drugs may have a main role in the exacerbation of some autoimmune diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524628
[Au] Autor:Gabriel Enge T; Ecroyd H; Jolley DF; Yerbury JJ; Kalmar B; Dosseto A
[Ad] Address:Wollongong Isotope Geochronology Laboratory and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Wollongong, Australia. Electronic address: tge571@uowmail.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Assessment of metal concentrations in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its potential role in muscular denervation, with particular focus on muscle tissue.
[So] Source:Mol Cell Neurosci;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9327
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is among the most common of the motor neuron diseases, and arguably the most devastating. During the course of this fatal neurodegenerative disorder, motor neurons undergo progressive degeneration. The currently best-understood animal models of ALS are based on the over-expression of mutant isoforms of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1); these indicate that there is a perturbation in metal homeostasis with disease progression. Copper metabolism in particular is affected in the central nervous system (CNS) and muscle tissue. METHODS: This present study assessed previously published and newly gathered concentrations of transition metals (Cu, Zn, Fe and Se) in CNS (brain and spinal cord) and non-CNS (liver, intestine, heart and muscle) tissues from transgenic mice over-expressing the G93A mutant SOD1 isoform (SOD1 ), transgenic mice over-expressing wildtype SOD1 (SOD1 ) and non-transgenic controls. RESULTS: Cu accumulates in non-CNS tissues at pre-symptomatic stages in SOD1 tissues. This accumulation represents a potentially pathological feature that cannot solely be explained by the over-expression of mSOD1. As a result of the lack of Cu uptake into the CNS there may be a deficiency of Cu for the over-expressed mutant SOD1 in these tissues. Elevated Cu concentrations in muscle tissue also preceded the onset of symptoms and were found to be pathological and not be the result of SOD1 over-expression. CONCLUSIONS: It is hypothesized that the observed Cu accumulations may represent a pathologic feature of ALS, which may actively contribute to axonal retraction leading to muscular denervation, and possibly significantly contributing to disease pathology. Therefore, it is proposed that the toxic-gain-of-function and dying-back hypotheses to explain the molecular drivers of ALS may not be separate, individual processes; rather our data suggests that they are parallel processes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524456
[Au] Autor:Stapelberg NJC; Pratt R; Neumann DL; Shum DHK; Brandis S; Muthukkumarasamy V; Stantic B; Blumenstein M; Headrick JP
[Ad] Address:Bond University Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine and Gold Coast Hospital and Health Services, 14 University Dr, Robina, Queensland, 4226, Australia. Electronic address: cstapelb@bond.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:From Feedback Loop Transitions to Biomarkers in the Psycho-Immune-Neuroendocrine Network: Detecting the Critical Transition from Health to Major Depression.
[So] Source:Neurosci Biobehav Rev;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7528
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Biological pathways underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) can be viewed as systems biology networks. The psycho-immune-neuroendocrine (PINE) network comprises central nervous, immune, endocrine and autonomic systems, integrating biological mechanisms of MDD. Such networks exhibit recurrent motifs with specific functions, including positive and negative feedback loops, and are subject to critical transitions, influenced by feedback loop transitions (FLTs). AIMS: We aim to identify critical feedback loops and their FLTs, as well sentinel network nodes (SNNs), key network nodes that drive FLTs, within the PINE network. Examples of biomarkers are provided which may reflect early warning signs of impending critical transition to MDD. RESULTS: Disruption of homeostatic feedback loops reflects the physiological transition to MDD. Putative FLTs are identified within hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-parasympathetic axes, the kynurenine pathway, gut function and dysbiosis. CONCLUSIONS: Progression from health to disease is driven by FLTs in the PINE network, which is likely to undergo changes characteristic of system instability. Biomarkers of system instability may effectively predict the critical transition to MDD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514461
[Au] Autor:Moore IMK; Koerner KM; Gundy PM; Montgomery DW; Insel KC; Harris LL; Taylor OA; Hockenberry MJ
[Ad] Address:1 College of Nursing, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.
[Ti] Title:Changes in Oxidant Defense, Apoptosis, and Cognitive Abilities During Treatment for Childhood Leukemia.
[So] Source:Biol Res Nurs;:1099800418763124, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1552-4175
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aggressive central nervous system (CNS)-directed treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most prevalent cancer among children and adolescents, prevents metastasis of leukemia cells into the brain. Up to 60% of survivors experience cognitive problems, but knowledge about risk factors for and mechanisms of neurologic injury is lacking. Objectives of the present study were to (1) quantify changes in oxidant defense and apoptosis over the course of ALL therapy and (2) elucidate risk factors for long-term cognitive problems. The sample included 71 children with ALL. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected at diagnosis and during intrathecal chemotherapy administration. Oxidant defense was measured by reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and the ratio of GSH:GSSG. Apoptosis was measured by activity of several cysteine-dependent aspartate-specific protease (abbreviated as caspase) enzymes that initiate (caspases 8 and 9) or execute (caspases 3/7) apoptosis. Cognitive abilities were assessed by standardized measures of short-term memory, visual-motor integration, and attention 3 years after ALL diagnosis. GSH and GSSG concentration increased significantly during ALL therapy, and a low GSH:GSSG ratio was indicative of an oxidized extracellular environment. Caspase enzyme activity increased significantly, and caspases 3/7 activity was significantly and negatively associated with performance on measures of cognitive abilities. Younger age at time of ALL diagnosis was associated with some measures of attention. Efflux of glutathione into CSF maintains oxidant defense by scavenging free radicals and other reactive oxygen species and is an early event in apoptosis. These mechanisms may be involved in neurologic injury associated with CNS-directed treatment and subsequent cognitive problems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1099800418763124

  6 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512146
[Au] Autor:Manglani M; McGavern DB
[Ad] Address:Viral Immunology and Intravital Imaging Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
[Ti] Title:Intravital Imaging of Neuroimmune Interactions Through a Thinned Skull.
[So] Source:Curr Protoc Immunol;120:24.2.1-24.2.12, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1934-368X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Innate and adaptive immune interactions within the central nervous system (CNS) and surrounding meninges contribute significantly to neural homeostasis as well as a variety of different neurological disorders. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy is a deep tissue imaging technique that provides a means to image immune cell dynamics and interactions in the living CNS with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical access to the brain and meninges can be achieved through the creation of thinned skull windows, which can be made without inducing damage and inflammation in the underlying tissue. This protocol provides guidance on how to create a thinned skull window without causing CNS injury. We also describe a highly reproducible method to induce a mild traumatic brain injury using the thinned skull approach. © 2018 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/cpim.46

  7 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511174
[Au] Autor:Alberto FJ; Boyer F; Orozco-terWengel P; Streeter I; Servin B; de Villemereuil P; Benjelloun B; Librado P; Biscarini F; Colli L; Barbato M; Zamani W; Alberti A; Engelen S; Stella A; Joost S; Ajmone-Marsan P; Negrini R; Orlando L; Rezaei HR; Naderi S; Clarke L; Flicek P; Wincker P; Coissac E; Kijas J; Tosser-Klopp G; Chikhi A; Bruford MW; Taberlet P; Pompanon F
[Ad] Address:Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Univ. Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, LECA, F-38000, Grenoble, France.
[Ti] Title:Convergent genomic signatures of domestication in sheep and goats.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):813, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The evolutionary basis of domestication has been a longstanding question and its genetic architecture is becoming more tractable as more domestic species become genome-enabled. Before becoming established worldwide, sheep and goats were domesticated in the fertile crescent 10,500 years before present (YBP) where their wild relatives remain. Here we sequence the genomes of wild Asiatic mouflon and Bezoar ibex in the sheep and goat domestication center and compare their genomes with that of domestics from local, traditional, and improved breeds. Among the genomic regions carrying selective sweeps differentiating domestic breeds from wild populations, which are associated among others to genes involved in nervous system, immunity and productivity traits, 20 are common to Capra and Ovis. The patterns of selection vary between species, suggesting that while common targets of selection related to domestication and improvement exist, different solutions have arisen to achieve similar phenotypic end-points within these closely related livestock species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-018-03206-y

  8 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510721
[Au] Autor:Gill AJ; Garza R; Ambegaokar SS; Gelman BB; Kolson DL
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 415 Curie Boulevard, 280C Clinical Research Building, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
[Ti] Title:Heme oxygenase-1 promoter region (GT)n polymorphism associates with increased neuroimmune activation and risk for encephalitis in HIV infection.
[So] Source:J Neuroinflammation;15(1):70, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1742-2094
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a critical cytoprotective enzyme that limits oxidative stress, inflammation, and cellular injury within the central nervous system (CNS) and other tissues. We previously demonstrated that HO-1 protein expression is decreased within the brains of HIV+ subjects and that this HO-1 reduction correlates with CNS immune activation and neurocognitive dysfunction. To define a potential CNS protective role for HO-1 against HIV, we analyzed a well-characterized HIV autopsy cohort for two common HO-1 promoter region polymorphisms that are implicated in regulating HO-1 promoter transcriptional activity, a (GT)n dinucleotide repeat polymorphism and a single nucleotide polymorphism (A(-413)T). Shorter HO-1 (GT)n repeats and the 'A' SNP allele associate with higher HO-1 promoter activity. METHODS: Brain dorsolateral prefrontal cortex tissue samples from an autopsy cohort of HIV-, HIV+, and HIV encephalitis (HIVE) subjects (n = 554) were analyzed as follows: HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism allele lengths were determined by PCR and capillary electrophoresis, A(-413)T SNP alleles were determined by PCR with allele specific probes, and RNA expression of selected neuroimmune markers was analyzed by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: HIV+ subjects with shorter HO-1 (GT)n alleles had a significantly lower risk of HIVE; however, shorter HO-1 (GT)n alleles did not correlate with CNS or peripheral viral loads. In HIV+ subjects without HIVE, shorter HO-1 (GT)n alleles associated significantly with lower expression of brain type I interferon response markers (MX1, ISG15, and IRF1) and T-lymphocyte activation markers (CD38 and GZMB). No significant correlations were found between the HO-1 (GT)n repeat length and brain expression of macrophage markers (CD163, CD68), endothelial markers (PECAM1, VWF), the T-lymphocyte marker CD8A, or the B-lymphocyte maker CD19. Finally, we found no significant associations between the A(-413)T SNP and HIVE diagnosis, HIV viral loads, or any neuroimmune markers. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that an individual's HO-1 promoter region (GT)n polymorphism allele repeat length exerts unique modifying risk effects on HIV-induced CNS neuroinflammation and associated neuropathogenesis. Shorter HO-1 (GT)n alleles increase HO-1 promoter activity, which could provide neuroprotection through decreased neuroimmune activation. Therapeutic strategies that induce HO-1 expression could decrease HIV-associated CNS neuroinflammation and decrease the risk for development of HIV neurological disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12974-018-1102-z

  9 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510665
[Au] Autor:Sugiaman-Trapman D; Vitezic M; Jouhilahti EM; Mathelier A; Lauter G; Misra S; Daub CO; Kere J; Swoboda P
[Ad] Address:Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Characterization of the human RFX transcription factor family by regulatory and target gene analysis.
[So] Source:BMC Genomics;19(1):181, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Evolutionarily conserved RFX transcription factors (TFs) regulate their target genes through a DNA sequence motif called the X-box. Thereby they regulate cellular specialization and terminal differentiation. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of all the eight human RFX genes (RFX1-8), their spatial and temporal expression profiles, potential upstream regulators and target genes. RESULTS: We extracted all known human RFX1-8 gene expression profiles from the FANTOM5 database derived from transcription start site (TSS) activity as captured by Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) technology. RFX genes are broadly (RFX1-3, RFX5, RFX7) and specifically (RFX4, RFX6) expressed in different cell types, with high expression in four organ systems: immune system, gastrointestinal tract, reproductive system and nervous system. Tissue type specific expression profiles link defined RFX family members with the target gene batteries they regulate. We experimentally confirmed novel TSS locations and characterized the previously undescribed RFX8 to be lowly expressed. RFX tissue and cell type specificity arises mainly from differences in TSS architecture. RFX transcript isoforms lacking a DNA binding domain (DBD) open up new possibilities for combinatorial target gene regulation. Our results favor a new grouping of the RFX family based on protein domain composition. We uncovered and experimentally confirmed the TFs SP2 and ESR1 as upstream regulators of specific RFX genes. Using TF binding profiles from the JASPAR database, we determined relevant patterns of X-box motif positioning with respect to gene TSS locations of human RFX target genes. CONCLUSIONS: The wealth of data we provide will serve as the basis for precisely determining the roles RFX TFs play in human development and disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12864-018-4564-6

  10 / 516204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508455
[Au] Autor:Palma JA; Kaufmann H
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Dysautonomia Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies.
[So] Source:Mov Disord;33(3):372-390, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1531-8257
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system afflicts most patients with Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, and pure autonomic failure, reducing quality of life and increasing mortality. For example, gastrointestinal dysfunction can lead to impaired drug pharmacodynamics causing a worsening in motor symptoms, and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension can cause syncope, falls, and fractures. When recognized, autonomic problems can be treated, sometimes successfully. Discontinuation of potentially causative/aggravating drugs, patient education, and nonpharmacological approaches are useful and should be tried first. Pathophysiology-based pharmacological treatments that have shown efficacy in controlled trials of patients with synucleinopathies have been approved in many countries and are key to an effective management. Here, we review the treatment of autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies, summarize the nonpharmacological and current pharmacological therapeutic strategies including recently approved drugs, and provide practical advice and management algorithms for clinicians, with focus on neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, dysphagia, sialorrhea, gastroparesis, constipation, neurogenic overactive bladder, underactive bladder, and sexual dysfunction. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/mds.27344


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