Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29524559
[Au] Autor:Greenhawt M; Chan ES; Fleischer DM; Hicks A; Wilson R; Shaker M; Venter C; Stukus D
[Ad] Address:Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Section of Allergy and Immunology, Aurora, CO. Electronic address: Matthew.Greenhawt@childrenscolorado.org.
[Ti] Title:Caregiver and expecting caregiver support for early peanut introduction guidelines.
[So] Source:Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1534-4436
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent guidelines recommend early peanut introduction (EPI) beginning around 4-6 months in infants with either severe eczema and/or egg allergy, and around 6 months for all other infants. Caregiver preferences for such practices are unkown. METHODS: We explored preferences for EPI and in-office allergy risk assessment (IRA) through a nationally-representative survey of expecting (n=1000) and new caregivers of infants < 1 year (n=1000). RESULTS: Among a primarily female (99.7%), married (80.3%), and white (74.4%) sample, 29% had no/vague awareness of the new guidelines, 61% had no/minimal concern for their child developing food allergy, but 54% felt timing of introduction has moderate/strong importance for developing food allergy. Only 31% expressed willingness for EPI before/around 6 months of life, with 40% reporting willingness to introduce peanut after 11 months of life, similar to tree nuts and seafood. However, 60% reported willingness to introduce egg before 8 months. 51% and 56.8% were unwilling to allow IRA methods such as skin testing and oral challenge before 11 months of life, respectively. Odds of willingness to both delay peanut introduction and undergo challenge after 6 months of life were lower among expecting caregivers (OR 0.79, CI 0.65-0.96; OR 0.67, CI 0.54-0.82, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Among new and expecting caregivers, there is poor current willingness and questionable support for early allergenic solid food recommendations, including IRA before introduction. Willingness was better among expecting versus current caregivers. These trends underscore a need for broader formal implementation planning to facilitate early allergen introduction and maximize its preventive benefits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29474809
[Au] Autor:Blackwell AA; Banovetz MT; Qandeel; Whishaw IQ; Wallace DG
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Northern Illinois University, De Kalb, Illinois, 60115 USA.
[Ti] Title:The structure of arm and hand movements in a spontaneous and food rewarded on-line string-pulling task by the mouse.
[So] Source:Behav Brain Res;345:49-58, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7549
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Arm and hand use by the mouse have been studied in a variety of tasks in order to understand the structure of skilled movements and motor learning, the anatomy and function of neural pathways, and to develop animal models of neurological conditions. The present study describes string-pulling by the mouse, a behavior in which a mouse uses hand-over-hand movements to pull down a string that hangs from the top of a test cage. Mice both spontaneously string-pull and also string-pull to obtain cashew nuts tied to the end of the string as food reward. To string-pull, mice sat upright and tracked the string with their nose and then made hand-over-hand movements to reel in the string. A string-pull movement consists of four arm movements (Advance to make purchase, Pull, Push to draw the string down and Lift to return the hand for the next Advance) and four hand movements (Collect to aim the hand, Overgrasp to position the hand, and Grasp to make purchase, and Release). The kinematic profiles of the string-pull movement are distinctive with each hand making similar movements at a rate of 4 cycles per second and with the Lift and Advance movements occurring at a higher speed than Pull and Push movements. The results are discussed in relation to the antecedent repertoire of mouse behavior that lends itself to string-pulling, with respect to the utility of using string-pulling to investigate motor systems and adapting string-pulling to model neurological conditions in mice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524213
[Au] Autor:Reitsma M; Bastiaan-Net S; Sijbrandij L; de Weert E; Sforza S; Gerth van Wijk R; Savelkoul HFJ; de Jong NW; Wichers HJ
[Ad] Address:Food and Biobased Research, Wageningen Univ. and Research Centre, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Origin and Processing Methods Slightly Affect Allergenic Characteristics of Cashew Nuts (Anacardium occidentale).
[So] Source:J Food Sci;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1750-3841
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The protein content and allergen composition was studied of cashews from 8 different origins (Benin, Brazil, Ghana, India, Ivory Coast, Mozambique, Tanzania, Vietnam), subjected to different in-shell heat treatments (steamed, fried, drum-roasted). On 2D electrophoresis, 9 isoforms of Ana o 1, 29 isoforms of Ana o 2 (11 of the acidic subunit, 18 of the basic subunit), and 8 isoforms of the large subunit of Ana o 3 were tentatively identified. Based on 1D and 2D electrophoresis, no difference in allergen content (Ana o 1, 2, 3) was detected between the cashews of different origins (P > 0.5), some small but significant differences were detected in allergen solubility between differently heated cashews. No major differences in N- and C-terminal microheterogeneity of Ana o 3 were detected between cashews of different origins. Between the different heat treatments, no difference was detected in glycation, pepsin digestibility, or IgE binding of the cashew proteins.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/1750-3841.14003

  4 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523941
[Au] Autor:Oplatowska-Stachowiak M; Reiring C; Sajic N; Haasnoot W; Brabet C; Campbell K; Elliott CT; Salden M
[Ad] Address:EuroProxima B.V., Beijerinckweg 18, 6827 BN, Arnhem, The Netherlands. michalina.oplatowska@europroxima.com.
[Ti] Title:Development and in-house validation of a rapid and simple to use ELISA for the detection and measurement of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin.
[So] Source:Anal Bioanal Chem;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1618-2650
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sterigmatocystin (STG) is a highly toxic secondary fungal metabolite structurally closely related to the well-known carcinogenic aflatoxins. Its presence has been reported in grains and grain-based products as well as in other foodstuffs like nuts, green coffee beans, spices, beer and cheese. Due to the lack of suitable data on the occurrence of STG, in 2013, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) could not characterise its risk for human health and recommended that more data on STG in food and feed needed to be collected. In order to provide a new tool for the specific detection of STG, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed, optimised and validated in this study based on a sensitive monoclonal antibody specific to STG with no cross-reactivity with aflatoxins. The sample preparation method for rice, wheat and maize was based on a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) approach. The assay was validated for the detection of STG in rice, wheat and maize in accordance with the guidelines for validation of semi-quantitative screening methods included in Commission Regulation (EU) 519/2014. The screening target concentration (STC) was set at 1.5 µg/kg. The cutoffs for rice, wheat and maize were 1.2, 1.2 and 1.3 µg/kg and the false suspected rates were 0.34, 1.15 and 0.78%, respectively. Good correlation was found between the results obtained by the STG ELISA and LC-MS/MS method for naturally contaminated rice samples. This validated method can be applied as a sensitive and high-throughput screening for the presence of STG in a range of agricultural commodities. Graphical abstract A new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on an antibody specific to sterigmatocystin for the detection of this mycotoxin in corn, wheat and rice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00216-018-0988-8

  5 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522850
[Au] Autor:Molina-Infante J; Lucendo AJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitario San Pedro de Alcantara, Caceres, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: xavi_molina@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Dietary therapy for eosinophilic esophagitis.
[So] Source:J Allergy Clin Immunol;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6825
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune-mediated, esophageal disease triggered predominantly, but not excusively, by food antigens. Presently, available food allergy tests are suboptimal to predict food triggers for EoE, especially in adults. Elemental diet (exclusive feeding with aminoacid-based formulas) and empiric six-food elimination diet (6-FED; withdrawing milk, wheat, egg, soy, nuts and fish/seafood for 6 weeks), have consistently shown the best efficacy rates. However, their high level of restriction and need for multiple endoscopies have hampered their implementation in clinical practice. Currently, milk, wheat/gluten and egg are the most common food triggers in children and adults from US, Spain and Australia. Hence, less restrictive empiric schemes, like a four-food (4-FED; dairy, gluten-containing cereals, egg, and legumes) or a two-food (2-FED; dairy and gluten-containing cereals) have been lately developed with good efficacy rates (2-FED 43%; 4-FED adults 54%, children 64%). A step-up approach (2-4-6) may result in prompt recognition of a majority of responders with few food triggers, reducing the number of endoscopies and costs, and shortening the diagnostic process. Standardization of food reintroduction, novel food allergy testing and studies evaluating milk elimination diet in children and the long-term outcomes of dietary interventions are warranted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520721
[Au] Autor:Medeiros-Linard CFB; Andrade-da-Costa BLDS; Augusto RL; Sereniki A; Trevisan MTS; Perreira RCR; de Souza FTC; Braz GRF; Lagranha CJ; de Souza IA; Wanderley AG; Smailli SS; Lafayette SSL
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. da Engenharia, s/n, Cidade Universitária, Recife, Pernambuco, CEP 50740600, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Anacardic Acids from Cashew Nuts Prevent Behavioral Changes and Oxidative Stress Induced by Rotenone in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.
[So] Source:Neurotox Res;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1476-3524
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anacardic acids (AAs) are alkyl phenols mainly presenting in cashew nuts. The antioxidant effects of these compounds have been an area of interest in recent research, with findings suggesting potential therapeutic use for certain diseases. Nevertheless, none of these studies were performed in order to test the hypothesis of whether anacardic acids are capable of preventing behavioral changes and oxidative stress induced by the pesticide rotenone in experimental model of Parkinson's disease. In our research, adult male rats were treated orally with AAs (1, 3, 10, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg/day) 1 h before rotenone (3 mg/kg; s.c.) for five consecutive days. The behavioral testing strategies, including tests for general locomotor activity (open field), motor coordination (rotarod), and spatial memory performance (elevated T-maze), were carried out. Lipoperoxidation levels and total superoxide dismutase (t-SOD) activity, as well as cytoplasmic and mitochondrial SOD gene expression, were assessed in the substantia nigra (SN), striatum, and cerebral cortex. The results showed that AAs dose-dependently prevented the rotenone-induced learning and motor impairment from 10 mg/kg/day. AAs also precluded rotenone-induced lipoperoxidation in all doses, acting directly on the mitochondria, and improved the t-SOD activity in the doses 25-100 mg/kg/day. AAs per se (100 mg/kg/day) increased SOD gene expression and t-SOD activity. Our findings indicate that the oral administration of AAs prevents rotenone-induced behavioral changes and oxidative stress, in part due to a modulatory action on the mitochondria and SOD gene expression. These data suggest that AAs have promising neuroprotective action against degenerative changes in Parkinson's disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12640-018-9882-6

  7 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518923
[Au] Autor:Wall CR; Stewart AW; Hancox RJ; Murphy R; Braithwaite I; Beasley R; Mitchell EA; ISAAC Phase Three Study Group
[Ad] Address:Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand. c.wall@auckland.ac.nz.
[Ti] Title:Association between Frequency of Consumption of Fruit, Vegetables, Nuts and Pulses and BMI: Analyses of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).
[So] Source:Nutrients;10(3), 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6643
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diets which emphasize intakes of plant-based foods are recommended to reduce disease risk and for promoting healthy weight. The aim of this study was to examine the association between fruit, vegetables, pulses and nut intake and body mass index (BMI) across countries in adolescents (13-14 years) and children (6-7 years). Data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood; 77,243 children's parents and 201,871 adolescents was used to examine the association between dietary intake (Food Frequency Questionnaire) and BMI using general linear models, adjusting for country gross national index. Adolescents who consumed fruit, vegetables, pulses and nuts three or more times a week had a lower BMI than the never or occasional group; eating nuts three or more times a week, was associated with a BMI value of 0.274 kg/m² lower than the never group ( < 0.001). Compared to children who never or occasionally reported eating vegetables, those reporting that they ate vegetables three or more times per week had a lower BMI of -0.079 kg/m². In this large global study, an inverse association was observed between BMI and the reported increasing intake of vegetables in 6-7 years old and fruit, vegetables, pulses and nuts in adolescents. This study supports current dietary recommendations which emphasize the consumption of vegetables, nut and pulses, although the effect sizes were small.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29489429
[Au] Autor:Fadelu T; Zhang S; Niedzwiecki D; Ye X; Saltz LB; Mayer RJ; Mowat RB; Whittom R; Hantel A; Benson AB; Atienza DM; Messino M; Kindler HL; Venook A; Ogino S; Ng K; Wu K; Willett W; Giovannucci E; Meyerhardt J; Bao Y; Fuchs CS
[Ad] Address:Temidayo Fadelu, Sui Zhang, Robert J. Mayer, Shuji Ogino, Kimmie Ng, Jeffrey Meyerhardt, and Charles S. Fuchs, Dana-Farber/Partners CancerCare; Shuji Ogino, Kana Wu, Walter Willett, and Edward Giovannucci, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; Shuji Ogino, Edward Giovannucci, and Ying Bao, Brigha
[Ti] Title:Nut Consumption and Survival in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer: Results From CALGB 89803 (Alliance).
[So] Source:J Clin Oncol;:JCO2017755413, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1527-7755
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose Observational studies have reported increased colon cancer recurrence and mortality in patients with states of hyperinsulinemia, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and high glycemic load diet. Nut intake has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance. However, the effect of nut intake on colon cancer recurrence and survival is not known. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of 826 eligible patients with stage III colon cancer who reported dietary intake on food frequency questionnaires while enrolled onto a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we assessed associations of nut intake with cancer recurrence and mortality. Results After a median follow-up of 6.5 years, compared with patients who abstained from nuts, individuals who consumed two or more servings of nuts per week experienced an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for disease-free survival of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.37 to 0.92; P = .03) and an HR for overall survival of 0.43 (95% CI, 0.25 to 0.74; P = .01). In subgroup analysis, the apparent benefit was confined to tree nut intake (HR for disease-free survival, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.85; P = .04; and HR for overall survival, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.82; P = .04). The association of total nut intake with improved outcomes was maintained across other known or suspected risk factors for cancer recurrence and mortality. Conclusion Diets with a higher consumption of nuts may be associated with a significantly reduced incidence of cancer recurrence and death in patients with stage III colon cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1200/JCO.2017.75.5413

  9 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458161
[Au] Autor:Cunha SC; Sá SVM; Fernandes JO
[Ad] Address:LAQV-REQUIMTE, Laboratory of Bromatology and Hydrology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: sara.cunha@ff.up.pt.
[Ti] Title:Multiple mycotoxin analysis in nut products: Occurrence and risk characterization.
[So] Source:Food Chem Toxicol;114:260-269, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6351
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nuts consumption plays an important role in Mediterranean diet, being a good source of proteins, vitamins, minerals and unsaturated fatty acids. However, nuts can be also a source of harmful mycotoxins with negative impact on human health. In this work, the occurrence of 16 mycotoxins belonging to different chemical classes, was assessed in several nut products. The analytical method used was based on modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) procedure followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. An extensive evaluation of different sorbents used in dispersive SPE (d-SPE) cleanup step of QuEChERS was performed. Detection limits achieved were less than 3.5 µg/kg for all the compounds and the average recoveries varied from 70 to 91%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) ≤13%. Twelve out of sixteen mycotoxins under study were found in the 37 nut samples analysed. Overall, deoxynivalenol (DON), aflatoxin-G2 (AFG ), and fusarenon-X (FUS X) were the compounds more commonly detected. The higher contamination value was observed in a cashew sample containing 336.5 µg/kg of DON. The combination of occurrence and consumption data allowed to assess the exposure and characterize the associated risk of nut products consumption by the Portuguese population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 8178 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29300425
[Au] Autor:Vicinanza R; Troisi G; Cangemi R; De Martino U; Pastori D; Bernardini S; Crisciotti F; Di Violante F; Frizza A; Cacciafesta M; Pignatelli P; Marigliano V
[Ad] Address:Roberto Vicinanza, M.D., Ph.D. Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrologic, Anesthesiologic and Geriatric Sciences, «Sapienza¼ University of Rome, Rome, Italy. Email: dott.vicinanza@gmail.com Phone: +39.328.2710244.
[Ti] Title:Aging and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet: Relationship with Cardiometabolic Disorders and Polypharmacy.
[So] Source:J Nutr Health Aging;22(1):73-81, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1760-4788
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (Med-Diet), cardiometabolic disorders and polypharmacy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Geriatrics outpatient clinic, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome. PARTICIPANTS: 508 patients (219 male, 289 female) aged 50 to 89 who were evaluated for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. METHODS AND MEASUREMENTS: Patients underwent a comprehensive medical assessment including medical history and the use of medications. Adherence to Med-Diet was assessed using the validated Med-Diet 14-item questionnaire; for the analysis, patients were divided in high (≥8) and medium-low (<8) adherence. Polypharmacy was defined as taking ≥5 medications. RESULTS: 476 patients completed the study. Mean age was 70.4 years; 58% female. Median Med-Diet score was 8 (interquartile range, 6-9). Patients with medium-low adherence had higher body mass index (p=0.029) and higher prevalence of arterial hypertension (p<0.001), previous coronary (p=0.002) and cerebrovascular events (p=0.011), diabetes, (p<0.001) and dyslipidemia (p=0.001) compared to those at high adherence. Med-Diet score decreased with the number of cardiometabolic disorders (p<0.001). The prevalence of polypharmacy was 39%. Consumption of olive oil (p=0.005), vegetables, (p<0.001), wine (p=0.017), legumes (p=0.028), fish (p=0.046) and nuts (p=0.045) were all inversely associated with the overall number of medications. In a multivariable regression model, medium-low adherence to Med-Diet was independently associated to polypharmacy (O.R.:1.859; 95% CI 1.142 to 3.025; p=0.013), after adjusting for possible confounding factors. CONCLUSION: Med-Diet was inversely associated with cardiometabolic disorders and with polypharmacy, suggesting that improved Med-Diet adherence might potentially delay the onset of age-related health deterioration and reduce the need of multiple medications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12603-017-0922-3


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