Database : MEDLINE
Search on : observational and study [Words]
References found : 110837 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 11084 go to page                         

  1 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524774
[Au] Autor:Garcia K; Dowling D; Mettler G
[Ad] Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, United States. Electronic address: ksg11@case.edu.
[Ti] Title:Teaching Guatemalan traditional birth attendants about obstetrical emergencies.
[So] Source:Midwifery;61:36-38, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1532-3099
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Guatemala's Maternal Mortality Rate is 65th highest in the world at 120 deaths per 100,000 births. Contributing to the problem is traditional birth attendants (TBAs) attend most births yet lack knowledge about obstetrical emergencies. Government trainings in existence since 1955 have not changed TBA knowledge. Government trainings are culturally insensitive because they are taught in Spanish with written material, even though most TBAs are illiterate and speak Mayan dialects. The purpose of the observational study was to evaluate the effect of an oral training, that was designed to be culturally sensitive in TBAs' native language, on TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies. METHODS: one hundred ninety-one TBAs participated. The study employed a pretest-posttest design. A checklist was used to compare TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies before and after the training. FINDINGS: the mean pretest score was 5.006±SD 0.291 compared to the mean posttest score of 8.549±SD 0.201. Change in knowledge was a P value of 0.00. DISCUSSION: results suggest an oral training that was designed to be culturally sensitive in the native language improved TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies. Future trainings should follow a similar format to meet the needs of illiterate audiences in remote settings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29524759
[Au] Autor:Cohan SL; Moses H; Calkwood J; Tornatore C; LaGanke C; Smoot KE; Meka V; Okwuokenye M; Hotermans C; Mendoza JP; Mann MK; Meltzer LA
[Ad] Address:Providence Multiple Sclerosis Center, Providence Health & Services, 9427 SW Barnes Road, Portland, OR 97225, USA; Providence Brain and Spine Institute, Providence Health & Services, 9135 SW Barnes Road, Suite 461, Portland, OR 97225, USA. Electronic address: stanley.cohan@providence.org.
[Ti] Title:Clinical outcomes in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who switch from natalizumab to delayed-release dimethyl fumarate: A multicenter retrospective observational study (STRATEGY).
[So] Source:Mult Scler Relat Disord;22:27-34, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:2211-0356
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF) may be a therapeutic option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who are treated with natalizumab and require a change in therapy. However, there is limited information regarding predictors of favorable treatment outcomes in patients switching from natalizumab to DMF. Clinical practices and sequencing protocols vary. Herein, we present the clinical results, including annualized relapse rate (ARR) and risk of relapse, of a phase 4 retrospective observational study of patients with RRMS who switched from natalizumab to DMF in a community practice setting (STRATEGY). METHODS: STRATEGY was performed through a single time point medical record abstraction; no study visits or procedures were required. Key inclusion criteria included age ≥ 18 years, RRMS diagnosis (McDonald criteria, 2010 revised), ≥ 12 months of continuous treatment with natalizumab monotherapy before DMF initiation, and initiation of DMF ≥ 12 months before enrollment. Patients were eligible to enroll regardless of current DMF use. RESULTS: A total of 530 patients at 45 US sites enrolled, and 506 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the modified evaluable population for analysis. Mean (SD) age at DMF initiation was 47.0 (10.9) years, with a mean (SD) of 12.7 (7.2) years since MS diagnosis. The mean (SD) duration of natalizumab treatment was 3.4 (1.9) years, and the mean (SD) washout from natalizumab discontinuation to DMF initiation (n = 502) was 101.6 (164.0) days. Overall risk of relapse 12 months after DMF initiation was 19.6%. Overall unadjusted ARR was higher during the 12 months following initiation of DMF treatment compared with the 12 months following initiation of natalizumab treatment (rate ratio, 2.32 [95% CI, 1.69-3.18]; p < 0.0001), but was lower compared with that observed in the year before initiation of natalizumab (rate ratio, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.40-0.64]; p < 0.0001). At 1 year following initiation of DMF treatment, the relapse rate was lower for patients who did not experience a relapse during 1 year following initiation of natalizumab treatment than for those who did (rate ratio for relapse rate, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.16-1.38]; p = 0.1664). The relapse rate for patients who did not relapse during natalizumab treatment was significantly lower with a washout period of ≤ 90 days as compared with a washout period of > 90 days (rate ratio for relapse rate, 0.49 [95% CI, 0.26-0.90]; p = 0.0216). A total of 42 (8%) patients reported ≥ 1 adverse event leading to DMF discontinuation during the study; the most commonly reported events were gastrointestinal disorders (n = 21; 4%). CONCLUSIONS: Results from this multicenter retrospective observational study suggest that DMF may be an effective treatment option for patients who discontinue natalizumab in routine clinical practice. ARR was lower in patients who initiated DMF within 90 days of natalizumab discontinuation compared with patients who initiated DMF after 90 days of natalizumab discontinuation. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02159573.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524718
[Au] Autor:Schär RT; Schwarz C; Söll N; Raabe A; Z'Graggen WJ; Beck J
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Switzerland; Division of Neurosurgery, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: ralph.schaer@insel.ch.
[Ti] Title:Early postoperative perils of intraventricular tumors: An observational comparative study.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Early postoperative patient surveillance after removal of intraventricular tumors is often hindered by delayed awakening and prolonged somnolence. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence of early critical postoperative events after elective craniotomies for intraventricular tumors in adults as compared to extraventricular lesions. METHODS: An observational comparative study was conducted on adult patients who had undergone first-time elective craniotomies from November 2011 until August 2016. Patients were stratified into extraventricular lesions (group 1) and intraventricular tumors (group 2). The rates of late extubation, early postoperative seizures, emergency head CTs, and urgent surgical intervention within 48 hours and mortality within 30 days of surgery were analyzed from a prospective database. RESULTS: A total of 977 elective craniotomies were analyzed: group 1 (951 patients, 97.3%) vs. group 2 (26, 2.7%). In group 2 emergency CTs were significantly more often ordered (rate 34.6 % vs. 8.4%; OR 5.76, 95% CI 2.49-13.35, p = 0.0002), and the incidence of urgent surgical intervention was significantly higher (rate 11.5% vs. 0.8%; OR 15.38, 95% CI 3.83-61.72, p = 0.002) than in group 1. Main reason for urgent surgical intervention in group 2 was acute obstructive hydrocephalus. Overall surgical mortality after 30 days was 0.3% (3 cases in group 1, no case in group 2). CONCLUSION: Intraventricular tumors are at significantly higher risk for early emergency head CT and urgent surgical intervention. This patient cohort might benefit from routine intra- and early postoperative imaging, as well as intraoperative extraventricular drain placement.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524396
[Au] Autor:Hawley L; Ketchum JM; Morey C; Pharm D KC; Charlifue S
[Ad] Address:Research Department, Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO. Electronic address: lhawley@craighospital.org.
[Ti] Title:Cannabis Use in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury or Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Colorado.
[So] Source:Arch Phys Med Rehabil;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1532-821X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of cannabis use in an adult sample with spinal cord injury (SCI) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Colorado, and to describe the self-reported reasons and side effects of cannabis use in this sample. DESIGN: Mixed methods observational study, using focus group data and telephone survey SETTING: Community PARTICIPANTS: Colorado adults who have sustained SCI or moderate to severe TBI and have received services through the rehabilitation hospital conducting the study. INTERVENTIONS: None; Measures: Survey RESULTS: Focus group participants identified issues that were then included in the survey development. Seventy percent of the 116 surveyed reported cannabis use pre-injury (67% SCI, 74% TBI) with 48% reporting use after injury (53% SCI, 45% TBI). Overall, the most common reason for use was recreational (67%), followed by reducing stress/anxiety (62.5%), and improving sleep (59%). Among the respondents with SCI, the most common reasons for use were to reduce spasticity (70%), recreation (63%), and to improve sleep (63%). Among those with TBI, reasons endorsed were recreational (72%), reducing stress/anxiety (62%), and improving sleep (55%). Smoking was the most common method of use. CONCLUSIONS: A majority of this sample report using cannabis prior to injury, and approximately half report using cannabis post-injury. Both groups report recreational use, while the group with SCI also highly endorses using cannabis to address chronic medical conditions. Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of cannabis use in these populations and the impact such use may have on the individual's medical management. Further research in this area is needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29520388
[Au] Autor:Chong JT; Kan KM; Phillips CK; Greenstein A
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Ureteral catheters for colorectal surgery: Influence on operative times and complication outcomes: An observational study.
[So] Source:Investig Clin Urol;59(2):119-125, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2466-054X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: Placement of pre-operative ureteral catheters for colorectal surgery can aid in the identification of ureteral injuries. This study investigates whether simultaneous ureteral catheterization with surgery skin preparation can minimize operating room times without increasing post-operative complications. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing simultaneous colorectal surgery skin preparation and placement of pre-operative ureteral catheters (n=21) were compared to those who underwent these events sequentially (n=28). Operative time-points of anesthesia ready (AR), surgery procedure start (PS), dorsal lithotomy and catheter insertion (CI) times were compared to assess for differences between groups. Complications were compared between groups. Results: There were no differences in age, gender, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), comorbidities, current procedure terminology (CPT) or International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) codes between groups. Simultaneous catheterization saved 11.82 minutes of operative time between CI to PS (p=0.005, t-test). There was a significant difference in mean time between CI to PS (11.82 minutes, p=0.008) between simultaneous and sequential ureteral catheterization groups in a linear regression multivariate analysis controlling for age, BMI, CPT and ICD-9 codes. There were 4 complications in the simultaneous (19%) and 3 in the sequential group (11%) (p=0.68). Conclusions: Ureteral catheterization and colorectal surgery skin preparation in a simultaneous fashion decreases the time between CI and PS without significant increase in complications. Mean time saved with simultaneous ureteral catheterization was 11.82 minutes per case. Simultaneous ureteral catheterization may be an option in colorectal surgery and may result in cost savings without additional complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4111/icu.2018.59.2.119

  6 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29520188
[Au] Autor:Lee GY; Lee JW; Yeom JS; Kim KJ; Shin HI; Kang HS
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 13620, Korea.
[Ti] Title:The Incidence of Various Types of Systemic Reactions Related to Epidural Steroid Injections: A Prospective Observational Study.
[So] Source:Korean J Radiol;19(2):301-310, 2018 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2005-8330
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: To evaluate the incidence, types and association of systemic reactions after an epidural steroid injection (ESI) with patient demographics, ESI factors and repeated occurrence of an ESI. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our hospital, and written informed consent was obtained from all the participants. From October to December 2011, systemic reactions at 2 weeks after 960 ESIs among 885 patients were measured. Patients were evaluated by phone interviews to obtain the patients' demographics, history of previous ESI, ESI factors, and ESI reoccurrence. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-square tests, Fisher's exact tests and a binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Overall, 557 types of systemic reactions occurred after 292 injections (30.4%) of a total of 960 ESIs in which facial flushing was most common (131/557, 23.5%) and 144 ESIs were followed by a mixed form of systemic reactions (49.3%). Age of 62 years or younger (odds ratio [OR], 2.361), female sex (OR, 1.674), and history of diabetes mellitus (OR, 1.681) were significant risk factors in the occurrence of systemic reactions after an ESI. In 73 patients with repeated ESI, 14 patients re-experienced systemic reactions (19.2%), of which twelve re-experienced the same systemic reaction as the previous one. Conclusion: Systemic reactions followed about 30% of ESIs, and more commonly occurred in patients 62 years of age or younger, women, and diabetic patients. Half of the patients experienced a mixed form of systemic reactions. Patients with recurring systemic reactions tend to re-experience the same systemic reaction as the prior one after an ESI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3348/kjr.2018.19.2.301

  7 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29516046
[Au] Autor:Iliescu IM; Constantin MA; Cozma C; Moraru OM; Moraru CM
[Ad] Address:Oculus Eye Clinic, Bucharest, Romania.
[Ti] Title:Posterior Capsule Opacification and Nd-YAG rates evaluation in a large series of pseudophakic cases.
[So] Source:Rom J Ophthalmol;61(4):267-274, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2457-4325
[Cp] Country of publication:Romania
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: To evaluate the influence of Intraocular Lens (IOL) material and design on Posterior Capsule Opacification (PCO) and Neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) rates in eyes implanted with different Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lenses (PC IOLs) designs at the end of uncomplicated cataract surgeries. Setting: Oculus Eye Clinic, Bucharest, Romania. Design: Retrospective, observational study. Methods: This study comprised 4805 eyes operated for cataract in 2012 and 2013 with a post-operative average follow up of 40 ± 6,15 months (27-54 months). The PCO and Nd-YAG rates were recorded and compared among different IOL materials and designs and among different pathology groups. Results: From 4805 IOLs implanted, 2560 (53,27%) were hydrophilic and 2245 (45,73%) hydrophobic, 2937 (61%) were aspherical and 1868 (39%) spherical. We found statistical significant differences in the PCO and Nd-YAG rates between hydrophilic (18% and 14% respectively) and hydrophobic lenses (4% and 2% respectively) (p<0.0001). There were also statistically significant differences in the sub-group of hydrophilic aspheric IOLs, finding lower PCO and Nd:YAG rates with the C-loop haptics configuration (12,6% and 3,3% respectively) compared with the broad optic/ haptic junction (29,75% and 24,73% respectively) (p<0.001). No statistically significant differences on PCO and Nd:YAG rates were found for the different associated pathologies (p>0.05). Conclusions: Hydrophilic lenses showed statistically higher PCO and Nd:YAG rates than hydrophobic lenses. In contrast, the optic asphericity and the associated pathologies had no influence on the PCO and Nd:YAG rates. IOL design and material seem to be the main characteristics influencing PCO and Nd-YAG rates. Abbreviations: LECs = lens epithelial cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29514787
[Au] Autor:Wagner J; Marquart J; Ruby J; Lammers A; Mailankody S; Kaestner V; Prasad V
[Ad] Address:School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA.
[Ti] Title:Frequency and level of evidence used in recommendations by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines beyond approvals of the US Food and Drug Administration: retrospective observational study.
[So] Source:BMJ;360:k668, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1756-1833
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the differences between recommendations by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCNN) guidelines and Food and Drug Administration approvals of anticancer drugs, and the evidence cited by the NCCN to justify recommendations where differences exist. DESIGN: Retrospective observational study. SETTING: National Comprehensive Cancer Network and FDA. PARTICIPANTS: 47 new molecular entities approved by the FDA between 2011 and 2015. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of all FDA approved indications (new and supplemental) with all NCCN recommendations as of 25 March 2016. When the NCCN made recommendations beyond the FDA's approvals, the recommendation was classified and the cited evidence noted. RESULTS: 47 drugs initially approved by the FDA between 2011 and 2015 for adult hematologic or solid cancers were examined. These 47 drugs were authorized for 69 FDA approved indications, whereas the NCCN recommended these drugs for 113 indications, of which 69 (62%) overlapped with the 69 FDA approved indications and 44 (39%) were additional recommendations. The average number of recommendations beyond the FDA approved indications was 0.92. 23% (n=10) of the additional recommendations were based on evidence from randomized controlled trials, and 16% (n=7) were based on evidence from phase III studies. During 21 months of follow-up, the FDA granted approval to 14% (n=6) of the additional recommendations. CONCLUSION: The NCCN frequently recommends beyond the FDA approved indications even for newer, branded drugs. The strength of the evidence cited by the NCCN supporting such recommendations is weak. Our findings raise concern that the NCCN justifies the coverage of costly, toxic cancer drugs based on weak evidence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmj.k668

  9 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29510922
[Au] Autor:Ku E; Vittinghoff E; Jacobs DR; Lewis CE; Allen NB; Bibbins-Domingo K; Shlipak M; Kramer H; Peralta CA
[Ad] Address:Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA; Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Electronic address: elaine.ku@ucsf.edu.
[Ti] Title:Changes in Blood Pressure During Young Adulthood and Subsequent Kidney Function Decline: Findings From the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adulthood (CARDIA) Study.
[So] Source:Am J Kidney Dis;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1523-6838
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Many studies have focused on the association between a single blood pressure (BP) measurement and risk for adverse outcomes. However, the association of BP trajectories during young adulthood with subsequent decline in kidney function has not been well defined. STUDY DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 3,429 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adulthood (CARDIA) Study enrolled between the ages of 18 and 30 years. PREDICTORS: BP slope during the first 10 years of participation in CARDIA, derived from linear mixed models incorporating all repeated BP measures. OUTCOME: Decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) during the interval between years 10 and 20 of CARDIA participation using cystatin C measured at years 10, 15, and 20. RESULTS: Mean age of CARDIA participants at year 0 was 25.1 years, 56% were women, and 53% were white. Every 10-mmHg higher level of systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) in year 10 was associated with change in eGFR of -0.09 (95% CI, -0.13 to -0.06) and -0.07 (95% CI, -0.12 to -0.03) mL/min/1.73m per year, respectively. Every 10-mmHg increase in SBP slope between years 0 and 10 was associated with a subsequent -0.52 (95% CI, -1.02 to -0.03) mL/min/1.73m per year change in kidney function after adjustment for comorbid conditions and SBP at year 10. Similarly, every 10-mmHg increase in DBP slope between years 0 and 10 was associated with a subsequent change in kidney function of -0.65 (95% CI, -1.23 to -0.07) mL/min/1.73m per year, after adjustment for comorbid conditions and DBP in year 10. LIMITATIONS: Observational design. CONCLUSIONS: During young adulthood, increasing SBP and DBP are associated with a higher rate of subsequent kidney function decline, independent of BP measured at the beginning of eGFR assessment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 110837 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29510194
[Au] Autor:Barry T; Headon M; Glynn R; Conroy N; Tobin H; Egan M; Bury G
[Ad] Address:School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: tomas.barry@ucd.ie.
[Ti] Title:Ten years of cardiac arrest resuscitation in Irish general practice.
[So] Source:Resuscitation;126:43-48, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1570
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The aim of this study is to establish the role and outcome of general practitioner (GP) involvement in out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: A ten year prospective observational study involving a cohort of Irish general practices. SETTING: 521 general practice settings distributed throughout the Republic of Ireland, representing approximately one quarter of all practices and a third of Irish GPs. PARTICIPANTS: 534 patients suffering cardiac arrest in the community for whom resuscitation was attempted. INTERVENTIONS: Cardiac arrest with resuscitation attempted (CARA) in which a GP played a role. RESULTS: Over a ten year period almost half of participating practices reported one or more CARAs. A total of 534 CARAs were reported at a variety of locations; 161 (30%) had ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation) at some point, with outcome data available for 147/161; 90 patients survived to hospital discharge. Most survivors for whom follow up data are available were discharged home and were completely independent. The highest rate of survival was achieved when CARAs occurred at a GP practice premises (47.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Resuscitation following OHCA is a key task in general practice. Over time a significant number of GPs encounter OHCA, attempt resuscitation and achieve higher survival to hospital discharge rates than occur nationally among OHCAs in Ireland. We conclude that a defibrillator should be routinely available at all general practices and staff should have appropriate resuscitation skills.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 11084 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information