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[PMID]: 29524559
[Au] Autor:Greenhawt M; Chan ES; Fleischer DM; Hicks A; Wilson R; Shaker M; Venter C; Stukus D
[Ad] Address:Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Section of Allergy and Immunology, Aurora, CO. Electronic address: Matthew.Greenhawt@childrenscolorado.org.
[Ti] Title:Caregiver and expecting caregiver support for early peanut introduction guidelines.
[So] Source:Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1534-4436
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent guidelines recommend early peanut introduction (EPI) beginning around 4-6 months in infants with either severe eczema and/or egg allergy, and around 6 months for all other infants. Caregiver preferences for such practices are unkown. METHODS: We explored preferences for EPI and in-office allergy risk assessment (IRA) through a nationally-representative survey of expecting (n=1000) and new caregivers of infants < 1 year (n=1000). RESULTS: Among a primarily female (99.7%), married (80.3%), and white (74.4%) sample, 29% had no/vague awareness of the new guidelines, 61% had no/minimal concern for their child developing food allergy, but 54% felt timing of introduction has moderate/strong importance for developing food allergy. Only 31% expressed willingness for EPI before/around 6 months of life, with 40% reporting willingness to introduce peanut after 11 months of life, similar to tree nuts and seafood. However, 60% reported willingness to introduce egg before 8 months. 51% and 56.8% were unwilling to allow IRA methods such as skin testing and oral challenge before 11 months of life, respectively. Odds of willingness to both delay peanut introduction and undergo challenge after 6 months of life were lower among expecting caregivers (OR 0.79, CI 0.65-0.96; OR 0.67, CI 0.54-0.82, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Among new and expecting caregivers, there is poor current willingness and questionable support for early allergenic solid food recommendations, including IRA before introduction. Willingness was better among expecting versus current caregivers. These trends underscore a need for broader formal implementation planning to facilitate early allergen introduction and maximize its preventive benefits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29511602
[Au] Autor:de Lima Pereira A; Southgate R; Ahmed H; O'Connor P; Cramond V; Lenglet A
[Ad] Address:Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), Operational Centre Amsterdam (OCA), Kobanê, Syria.
[Ti] Title:Infectious Disease Risk and Vaccination in Northern Syria after 5 Years of Civil War: The MSF Experience.
[So] Source:PLoS Curr;10, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:2157-3999
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: In 2015, following an influx of population into Kobanê in northern Syria, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in collaboration with the Kobanê Health Administration (KHA) initiated primary healthcare activities. A vaccination coverage survey and vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) risk analysis were undertaken to clarify the VPD risk and vaccination needs. This was followed by a measles Supplementary Immunization Activity (SIA). We describe the methods and results used for this prioritisation activity around vaccination in Kobanê in 2015. Methods: We implemented a pre-SIA survey in 135 randomly-selected households in Kobanê using a vaccination history questionnaire for all children <5 years. We conducted a VPD Risk Analysis using MSF 'Preventive Vaccination in Humanitarian Emergencies' guidance to prioritize antigens with the highest public health threat for mass vaccination activities. A Measles SIA was then implemented and followed by vaccine coverage survey in 282 randomly-selected households targeting children <5 years. Results: The pre-SIA survey showed that 168/212 children (79.3%; 95%CI=72.7-84.6%) had received one vaccine or more in their lifetime. Forty-three children (20.3%; 95%CI: 15.1-26.6%) had received all vaccines due by their age; only one was <12 months old and this child had received all vaccinations outside of Syria. The VPD Risk Analysis prioritised measles, Haemophilus Influenza type B (Hib) and Pneumococcus vaccinations. In the measles SIA, 3410 children aged 6-59 months were vaccinated. The use of multiple small vaccination sites to reduce risks associated with crowds in this active conflict setting was noted as a lesson learnt. The post-SIA survey estimated 82% (95%CI: 76.9-85.9%; n=229/280) measles vaccination coverage in children 6-59 months. Discussion: As a result of the conflict in Syria, the progressive collapse of the health care system in Kobanê has resulted in low vaccine coverage rates, particularly in younger age groups. The repeated displacements of the population, attacks on health institutions and exodus of healthcare workers, challenge the resumption of routine immunization in this conflict setting and limit the use of SIAs to ensure sustainable immunity to VPDs. We have shown that the risk for several VPDs in Kobanê remains high. Conclusion: We call on all health actors and the international community to work towards re-establishment of routine immunisation activities as a priority to ensure that children who have had no access to vaccination in the last five years are adequately protected for VPDs as soon as possible.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29510755
[Au] Autor:Calender A; Rollat Farnier PA; Buisson A; Pinson S; Bentaher A; Lebecque S; Corvol H; Abou Taam R; Houdouin V; Bardel C; Roy P; Devouassoux G; Cottin V; Seve P; Bernaudin JF; Lim CX; Weichhart T; Valeyre D; Pacheco Y; Clement A; Nathan N; in the frame of GSF (Groupe Sarcoïdose France)
[Ad] Address:Genetics Department, Hospices Civils de LYON (HCL), University Hospital, East Pathology Center, LYON, B-A3, 59 Bld Pinel, 69677, BRON Cedex, France. alain.calender@chu-lyon.fr.
[Ti] Title:Whole exome sequencing in three families segregating a pediatric case of sarcoidosis.
[So] Source:BMC Med Genomics;11(1):23, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1755-8794
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sarcoidosis (OMIM 181000) is a multi-systemic granulomatous disorder of unknown origin. Despite multiple genome-wide association (GWAS) studies, no major pathogenic pathways have been identified to date. To find out relevant sarcoidosis predisposing genes, we searched for de novo and recessive mutations in 3 young probands with sarcoidosis and their healthy parents using a whole-exome sequencing (WES) methodology. METHODS: From the SARCFAM project based on a national network collecting familial cases of sarcoidosis, we selected three families (trios) in which a child, despite healthy parents, develop the disease before age 15 yr. Each trio was genotyped by WES (Illumina HiSEQ 2500) and we selected the gene variants segregating as 1) new mutations only occurring in affected children and 2) as recessive traits transmitted from each parents. The identified coding variants were compared between the three families. Allelic frequencies and in silico functional results were analyzed using ExAC, SIFT and Polyphenv2 databases. The clinical and genetic studies were registered by the ClinicalTrials.gov - Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS) ( https://clinicaltrials.gov ) receipt under the reference NCT02829853 and has been approved by the ethical committee (CPP LYON SUD EST - 2 - REF IRB 00009118 - September 21, 2016). RESULTS: We identified 37 genes sharing coding variants occurring either as recessive mutations in at least 2 trios or de novo mutations in one of the three affected children. The genes were classified according to their potential roles in immunity related pathways: 9 to autophagy and intracellular trafficking, 6 to G-proteins regulation, 4 to T-cell activation, 4 to cell cycle and immune synapse, 2 to innate immunity. Ten of the 37 genes were studied in a bibliographic way to evaluate the functional link with sarcoidosis. CONCLUSIONS: Whole exome analysis of case-parent trios is useful for the identification of genes predisposing to complex genetic diseases as sarcoidosis. Our data identified 37 genes that could be putatively linked to a pediatric form of sarcoidosis in three trios. Our in-depth focus on 10 of these 37 genes may suggest that the formation of the characteristic lesion in sarcoidosis, granuloma, results from combined deficits in autophagy and intracellular trafficking (ex: Sec16A, AP5B1 and RREB1), G-proteins regulation (ex: OBSCN, CTTND2 and DNAH11), T-cell activation (ex: IDO2, IGSF3), mitosis and/or immune synapse (ex: SPICE1 and KNL1). The significance of these findings needs to be confirmed by functional tests on selected gene variants.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12920-018-0338-x

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[PMID]: 29506511
[Au] Autor:Seibt S; Gilchrist CA; Reed PW; Best EJ; Harnden A; Camargo CA; Grant CC
[Ad] Address:Paediatrics, Taranaki Base Hospital, New Plymouth, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Hospital readmissions with acute infectious diseases in New Zealand children < 2 years of age.
[So] Source:BMC Pediatr;18(1):98, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases are the leading cause of hospital admissions in young children. Hospitalisation with an infectious disease is a recurrent event for some children. Our objective was to describe risk factors for infectious disease readmission following hospital admission with an infectious disease in the first two years of life. METHODS: We performed a national cohort study of New Zealand children, born 2005-2009, with an infectious disease admission before age 24 months. Children readmitted with an infectious disease within 12 months of the first infectious disease admission were identified. Every infectious disease admission was categorised as a respiratory, enteric, skin and soft tissue, urinary or other infection. Independent associations of demographic and child health factors with infectious disease readmission were determined using multiple variable logistic regression. RESULTS: From 2005 to 2011, there were 69,902 infectious disease admissions for 46,657 children less than two years old. Of these 46,657 children, 10,205 (22%) had at least one infectious disease readmission within 12 months of their first admission. The first infectious disease admission was respiratory (54%), enteric (15%), skin or soft tissue (7%), urinary (4%) or other (20%). Risk of infectious disease readmission was increased if the first infectious disease admission was respiratory (OR = 1.87, 95% CI 1.78-1.95) but not if it was in any other infectious disease category. Risk factors for respiratory infectious disease readmission were male gender, Pacific or Maori ethnicity, greater household deprivation, presence of a complex chronic condition, or a first respiratory infectious disease admission during autumn or of ≥3 days duration. Fewer factors (younger age, male gender, presence of a complex chronic condition) were associated with enteric infection readmission. The presence of a complex chronic condition was the only factor associated with urinary tract infection readmission and none of the factors were associated with skin or soft tissue infection readmission. CONCLUSIONS: In children less than two years old, infectious disease readmission risk is increased if the first infectious disease admission is a respiratory infectious disease but not if it is another infectious disease category. Risk factors for respiratory infectious disease readmission are different from those for other infectious disease readmissions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12887-018-1079-x

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[PMID]: 29502636
[Au] Autor:Kornides ML; McRee AL; Gilkey MB
[Ad] Address:Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Mass. Electronic address: Melanie.Kornides@mail.harvard.edu.
[Ti] Title:Parents Who Decline HPV Vaccination: Who Later Accepts and Why?
[So] Source:Acad Pediatr;18(2S):S37-S43, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1876-2867
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Parental declination contributes to low human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage among US adolescents, resulting in missed opportunities for cancer prevention. We sought to characterize parents' acceptance of HPV vaccination after declination ("secondary acceptance"). METHODS: In September 2016, we conducted an online survey with a national sample of parents of children ages 11 to 17 years. For those who reported having ever declined HPV vaccination for their children (n = 494), our survey assessed whether they accepted the vaccine at a subsequent visit. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess correlates of secondary acceptance. RESULTS: Overall, 45% of parents reported secondary acceptance of HPV vaccination, and an additional 24% intended to vaccinate in the next 12 months. In multivariable analyses, secondary acceptance was associated with receiving follow-up counseling about HPV vaccination from a health care provider (odds ratio, 2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-3.28). However, only 53% of parents overall reported receiving such counseling. Secondary acceptance was also associated with receiving a higher quality HPV vaccine recommendation from a provider during the initial discussion and greater satisfaction with provider communication, as well as higher vaccination confidence. Among the reasons for secondary acceptance, parents most commonly reported the child getting older (45%), learning more about HPV vaccine (34%), and receiving a provider recommendation (33%). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest secondary acceptance of HPV vaccination is common, with more than two-thirds of parents in this national sample accepting or intending to accept HPV vaccination after declination. Providers should seek to motivate secondary acceptance by delivering repeated, high-quality recommendations for HPV vaccination.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29499348
[Au] Autor:Thabet Y; Lunter D; Breitkreutz J
[Ad] Address:Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Universitaetsstrasse 1, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: yasmin.thabet@hhu.de.
[Ti] Title:Continuous manufacturing and analytical characterization of fixed-dose, multilayer orodispersible films.
[So] Source:Eur J Pharm Sci;117:236-244, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0720
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Various drug therapies require more than one active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) for an effective treatment. There are many advantages, e.g. to improve the compliance or pharmacodynamic response in comparison to a monotherapy or to increase the therapy safety. Until now, there are only a few products available for the paediatric population due to the lack of age appropriate dosage forms or studies proving the efficacy and safety of these products. This study aims to develop orodispersible films (ODFs) in a continuous solvent casting process as child appropriate dosage form containing both enalapril maleate (EM) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) separated in different film layers. Furthermore, they should be characterised and the API migration analysed by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM). ODFs were successfully produced in a continuous manufacturing process in form of double- and triple-layer formulations based on hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) or a combination of HPC and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). CRM revealed that both APIs migrate within the film layers shortly after manufacturing. PVA inhibits the migration inside the double-layer film, but is not able to prevent the API migration as an interlayer inside a triple-layer ODF. With increasing film layers, the content of residual solvents and the disintegration time increases (mono-layer films: <10 s, triple-layer films: 37 s). In conclusion, it was feasible to produce fixed-dose combinations in therapeutic doses up to 9 mg HCT and 3.5 mg EM for the double-layer film with adequate mechanical properties, which enable coiling up onto jumbo rolls directly after production. The best separation of the two APIs was achieved by casting a double-layer ODF consisting of different film forming polymers, which can be beneficial when processing two incompatible APIs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29496602
[Au] Autor:Norman J; Kelly B; McMahon AT; Boyland E; Baur LA; Chapman K; King L; Hughes C; Bauman A
[Ad] Address:Early Start, School of Health and Society, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia. Electronic address: jan20@uowmail.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Children's self-regulation of eating provides no defense against television and online food marketing.
[So] Source:Appetite;125:438-444, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Exposure to unhealthy food marketing stimulates children's food consumption. A child's responsiveness is influenced by individual factors, resulting in an increased vulnerability to advertising effects among some children. Whether these differential responses may be altered by different parental feeding behaviours is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between parental feeding practices and children's food intake responses to food advertising exposure. A randomised, crossover, counterbalanced, within subject trial was conducted across four, six-day holiday camps in New South Wales, Australia between April 2016 and January 2017 with 160 children (7-12 years, n = 40/camp). Children were randomised to either a multiple media (TV and Internet) or single media (TV) condition and exposed to food (3 days) and non-food (3 days) advertising in an online game and/or a cartoon. Children's food consumption (kilojoules (kJ)) was measured at a snack immediately after advertising exposure and then at lunch later in the day. Parents completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire, and 'restriction' and 'pressure to eat' subscale scores were calculated. While food advertising affected all children in the multiple media condition, there was an increased effect on snack intake among children whose parents reported pressuring them to eat, with children consuming an additional 356 kJ after food advertising compared with non-food advertising. This was 209 kJ more than children whose parents did not pressure them to eat. In the single media condition, only children whose parents reported restrictive feeding practices ate more at lunch on food advertising days than non-food advertising days (240 kJ). These data highlight an increased susceptibility to food advertising among children whose parents report controlling feeding practices.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 215159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29428324
[Au] Autor:Eiden RD; Zhao J; Casey M; Shisler S; Schuetze P; Colder CR
[Ad] Address:Research Institute on Addictions, University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Electronic address: eiden@ria.buffalo.edu.
[Ti] Title:Pre- and postnatal tobacco and cannabis exposure and child behavior problems: Bidirectional associations, joint effects, and sex differences.
[So] Source:Drug Alcohol Depend;185:82-92, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0046
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: We examined prospective associations between pre-and-postnatal tobacco and cannabis exposure on child behavior problems from 2 to 3 years of child age, sex differences in these associations, and bidirectional associations between maternal postnatal substance use and child behavior problems across time. METHODS: The sample consisted of 247 primarily young, unmarried, low-income, minority mothers and their children (97 prenatally exposed to tobacco and cannabis, 81 exposed to tobacco only, and 69 non-exposed). Mothers were assessed during each trimester of pregnancy, at 2, 9, 16 months, 2 and 3 years of child age. RESULTS: Bivariate results indicated significant differences mainly for girls. Girls in the prenatal tobacco exposure group had higher internalizing problems compared to the other two groups, and higher attention and sleep problems at 3 years compared to the control group. Higher number of cigarettes per day during pregnancy was significantly associated with higher anxiety/depression and higher attention problems at 3 years, and the associations were stronger for girls compared to boys. In model testing controlling for prenatal exposure, results indicated bidirectional associations between behavior problems at 2 years and maternal postnatal cannabis use, such that higher cannabis use across the infant toddler period predicted higher behavior problems at 2 years, which in turn predicted higher cannabis use a year later. CONCLUSIONS: Results add to the literature on joint effects of tobacco and cannabis, highlight the importance of considering bidirectional associations between maternal substance use and child behavior problems, and indicate generally stronger prenatal tobacco exposure effects for girls.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 28449133
[Au] Autor:Eilertsen EM; Gjerde LC; Reichborn-Kjennerud T; Ørstavik RE; Knudsen GP; Stoltenberg C; Czajkowski N; Røysamb E; Kendler KS; Ystrom E
[Ad] Address:Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Maternal alcohol use during pregnancy and offspring attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a prospective sibling control study.
[So] Source:Int J Epidemiol;46(5):1633-1640, 2017 Oct 01.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3685
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Maternal alcohol use during pregnancy has repeatedly been associated with development of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. It is, however not known whether this reflects a direct casual intra-uterine effect or a non-causal relationship due to confounding. We used three different approaches to control for measured and unmeasured confounding: statistical adjustment for covariates, negative control comparison against maternal pre-pregnancy alcohol use, and comparison among differentially exposed siblings. Methods: The sample comprised 114 247 children (34 283 siblings) from 94 907 mothers, recruited to the Norwegian Mother and Child Birth Cohort Study between 1999 and 2008. Self-reported measurements of alcohol use were obtained in week 30 during the pregnancy. Mothers rated offspring ADHD symptoms at 5 years on two measures. Clinical ADHD diagnoses were obtained from the Norwegian Patient Registry. Results: We found an overall positive association between maternal alcohol use during pregnancy and offspring ADHD symptoms, which was only marginally attenuated after inclusion of measured covariates. Both the negative control and the sibling comparison analysis further attenuated the estimated association, but it remained greater than zero [ß = 0.017, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.005-0.030). No association was found between maternal alcohol use during pregnancy and offspring ADHD diagnosis. Conclusions: For offspring ADHD symptoms we found a weak, but possibly causal association with maternal alcohol use during pregnancy, but no such effect was observed for clinical ADHD diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/ije/dyx067

  10 / 215159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524099
[Au] Autor:Lopez KC; Luby JL; Belden AC; Barch DM
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
[Ti] Title:Emotion dysregulation and functional connectivity in children with and without a history of major depressive disorder.
[So] Source:Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1531-135X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recent interest has emerged in understanding the neural mechanisms by which deficits in emotion regulation (ER) early in development may relate to later depression. Corticolimbic alterations reported in emotion dysregulation and depression may be one possible link. We examined the relationships between emotion dysregulation in school age, corticolimbic resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) in preadolescence, and depressive symptoms in adolescence. Participants were 143 children from a longitudinal preschool onset depression study who completed the Children Sadness Management Scale (CSMS; measuring ER), Child Depression Inventory (CDI-C; measuring depressive symptoms), and two resting-state MRI scans. Rs-FC between four primary regions of interest (ROIs; bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [dlPFC] and amygdala) and six target ROIs thought to contribute to ER were examined. Findings showed that ER in school age did not predict depressive symptoms in adolescence, but did predict preadolescent increases in dlPFC-insula and dlPFC-ventromedial PFC rs-FC across diagnosis, as well as increased dlPFC-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) rs-FC in children with a history of depression. Of these profiles, only dlPFC-dACC rs-FC in preadolescence predicted depressive symptoms in adolescence. However, dlPFC-dACC connectivity did not mediate the relationship between ER in school age and depressive symptoms in adolescence. Despite the absence of a direct relationship between ER and depressive symptoms and no significant rs-FC mediation, the rs-FC profiles predicted by ER are consistent with the hypothesis that emotion dysregulation is associated with abnormalities in top-down control functions. The extent to which these relationships might confer greater risk for later depression, however, remains unclear.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3758/s13415-018-0564-x


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