Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29409743
[Au] Autor:Leventhal JR; Ildstad ST
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery - Comprehensive Transplant Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: jleventh@nm.org.
[Ti] Title:Tolerance induction in HLA disparate living donor kidney transplantation by facilitating cell-enriched donor stem cell Infusion: The importance of durable chimerism.
[So] Source:Hum Immunol;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1166
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Successful solid organ transplantation currently requires the life-long use of medications to suppress the immune system in order to prevent transplant rejection. Drug-based immunosuppression significantly increases the risk of infection and cancer, as well as being very costly. Development of new therapies to minimize or eliminate entirely the need for anti-rejection drugs is of great interest to the transplant community. Therapeutic cell transfer for the control of the human immune system represents a compelling approach to reduce or eliminate the need for anti-rejection drugs. Establishment of durable hematopoietic chimerism through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been shown in preclinical models and patients to lead to donor specific tolerance. However, the application HSCT is limited by the potential toxicity of conditioning regimens, the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and the challenge of HLA mismatching. In this review we describe the clinical outcomes and science behind a CD8 /TCR facilitating cell-based hematopoietic stem cell transplant approach (termed FCRx) to induce tolerance to mismatched renal allografts while minimizing the risk of graft-versus-host GVHD and achieving avoidance of long-term immunosuppressant drugs in living donor kidney transplant recipients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29348399
[Au] Autor:Wang MJ; Chen F; Liu QG; Liu CC; Yao H; Yu B; Zhang HB; Yan HX; Ye Y; Chen T; Wangensteen KJ; Wang X; Hu YP; He ZY
[Ad] Address:Department of Cell Biology, Center for Stem Cell and Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433, China.
[Ti] Title:Insulin-like growth factor 2 is a key mitogen driving liver repopulation in mice.
[So] Source:Cell Death Dis;9(2):26, 2018 Jan 18.
[Is] ISSN:2041-4889
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hepatocyte transplantation holds great promise as an alternative to orthotopic organ transplantation in the treatment of liver diseases. However, obtaining clinically meaningful levels of liver repopulation has not been achieved because the mechanisms regulating hepatocyte proliferation in recipient livers have not yet been well characterized. In the mouse model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I, the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (Fah ) mouse, we found gradually increasing expression level of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) in the hepatocytes of host livers. Similarly, high levels of IGF2 were found in the livers of patients with deficient FAH activity. Recombinant IGF2 directly promotes proliferation of primary hepatocytes in vitro. Inhibition on IGF2 expression through the interruption of PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways significantly reduced the level of liver repopulation in Fah mice. Interestingly, treatment with IGF2 before hepatocyte transplantation generally improved the amount of liver repopulation seen in various mice models of liver injury. Altogether, these findings underscore the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic liver repopulation in Fah mice, and indicate that IGF2 is a potential hepatocyte mitogen for liver cell transplantation therapies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41419-017-0186-1

  3 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29194969
[Au] Autor:Cullaro G; Sarkar M; Lai JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Sex-based disparities in delisting for being "too sick" for liver transplantation.
[So] Source:Am J Transplant;, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1600-6143
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Women with cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation (LT) experience higher rates of waitlist mortality than men; it is unknown whether practices surrounding delisting for being "too sick" for LT contribute to this disparity beyond death alone. We conducted an analysis of patients listed for LT in the United Network for Organ Sharing/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network not receiving exception points from May 1, 2007 to July 1, 2014 with a primary outcome of delisting with removal codes of "too sick" or "medically unsuitable." A total of 44 388 patients were included; 4458 were delisted for being "too sick" for LT. Delisting was more frequent in women (11% vs 9%, P < .001). Compared to delisted men, delisted women differed in age (58 vs 57), non-hepatitis C virus listing diagnoses (69% vs 56%), hepatic encephalopathy (36% vs 31%), height (161.9 vs 177.0 cm), private insurance (47% vs 52%), and Karnofsky performance status (60 vs 70) (P < .001 for all). There were no differences in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease including serum sodium and Child Pugh Scores. A competing risk analysis demonstrated that female sex was independently associated with a 10% (confidence interval 2%-18%) higher risk of delisting when accounting for rates of death and transplantation and adjusting for confounders. This study demonstrates a significant disparity in delisting practices by sex, highlighting the need for better assessments of sickness, particularly in women.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ajt.14608

  4 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524307
[Au] Autor:Cowan AJ; Johnson CK; Libby EN
[Ad] Address:Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Plasma Cell Diseases and Organ Transplant: A Comprehensive Review.
[So] Source:Am J Transplant;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1600-6143
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plasma cell diseases are a class of hematologic diseases that are sometimes present as pre-existing diagnoses prior to organ transplantation, causative factors leading to a need for organ transplantation, or may occur post-transplant as part of the spectrum of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders. Herein, we review the most common plasma cell diseases, both as co-existing with other causes of organ failure, but also as a primary underlying cause for organ failure. In many cases, treatment of the underlying clonal disease may be indicated before proceeding with organ transplant. This review aims to provide current and relevant data regarding the management of these conditions in the organ transplant patient, for transplant providers and those who take care of these patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ajt.14731

  5 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524068
[Au] Autor:Wang C; Li Q; Li J
[Ad] Address:Research Institute of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210002, China.
[Ti] Title:Gut microbiota and its implications in small bowel transplantation.
[So] Source:Front Med;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:2095-0225
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The gut microbiota is mainly composed of a diverse population of commensal bacterial species and plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, immune modulation and metabolism. The influence of the gut microbiota on solid organ transplantation has recently been recognized. In fact, several studies indicated that acute and chronic allograft rejection in small bowel transplantation (SBT) is closely associated with the alterations in microbial patterns in the gut. In this review, we focused on the recent findings regarding alterations in the microbiota following SBTand the potential roles of these alterations in the development of acute and chronic allograft rejection. We also reviewed important advances with respect to the interplays between the microbiota and host immune systems in SBT. Furthermore, we explored the potential of the gut microbiota as a microbial marker and/or therapeutic target for the predication and intervention of allograft rejection and chronic dysfunction. Given that current research on the gut microbiota has become increasingly sophisticated and comprehensive, large cohort studies employing metagenomic analysis and multivariate linkage should be designed for the characterization of host-microbe interaction and causality between microbiota alterations and clinical outcomes in SBT. The findings are expected to provide valuable insights into the role of gut microbiota in the development of allograft rejection and other transplant-related complications and introduce novel therapeutic targets and treatment approaches in clinical practice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11684-018-0617-0

  6 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523678
[Au] Autor:Wiseman AC
[Ad] Address:Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Transplant Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado Alexander.wiseman@ucdenver.edu.
[Ti] Title:Protecting Donors and Safeguarding Altruism in the United States: The Living Donor Protection Act.
[So] Source:Clin J Am Soc Nephrol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1555-905X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523417
[Au] Autor:Gallo A; Miele M; Badami E; Conaldi PG
[Ad] Address:Department of Laboratory Medicine and Advanced Biotechnologies, IRCCS-ISMETT (Istituto Mediterraneo per i Trapianti e Terapie ad alta specializzazione), Palermo, Italy. Electronic address: agallo@ismett.edu.
[Ti] Title:Molecular and cellular interplay in virus-induced tumors in solid organ recipients.
[So] Source:Cell Immunol;, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2163
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patients following solid organ transplantation show a higher risk of developing cancer compared to the general population. Elevated risk is likely due to the interplay of a combination of factors, such as chronic inflammation, coexisting medical conditions, immunosuppressive regimen and persistent infection with oncogenic viruses. In addition, the tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role in cancer progression, by driving recruitment and in situ differentiation of anti-inflammatory cells of the adaptive and innate immune system such as regulatory T cells, Th17, Dendritic Cells, Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells, Type 2 Macrophages. Here we discuss the molecular role and the contribution to oncogenesis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV8) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in immunocompromised patients and describe how these viruses may contribute to oncogenesis both directly and indirectly.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523185
[Au] Autor:Nacif LS; Waisberg DR; Pinheiro RS; Lima FR; Rocha-Santos V; Andraus W; D'Albuquerque LC
[Ad] Address:Liver and Gastrointestinal Transplant Division, Department of Gastroenterology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Rua Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 255-9o andar-sala 9113/9114, São Paulo, SP, CEP05403-900, Brazil. lucasnacif@usp.br.
[Ti] Title:Imatinib-induced fulminant liver failure in chronic myeloid leukemia: role of liver transplant and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):63, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is a worldwide problem of acute liver failure and mortality associated with remaining on the waiting for a liver transplant. In this study, we highlight results published in recent years by leading transplant centers in evaluating imatinib-induced acute liver failure in chronic myeloid leukemia and follow-up in liver transplantation. CASE PRESENTATION: A 36-year-old brown-skinned woman (mixed Brazilian race) diagnosed 1 year earlier with chronic myeloid leukemia was started after delivery of a baby and continued for 6 months with imatinib mesylate (selective inhibitor of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase), which induced liver failure. We conducted a literature review using the PubMed database for articles published through September 2017, and we demonstrate a role of liver transplant in this situation for imatinib-induced liver failure. We report previously published results and a successful liver transplant after acute liver failure due to imatinib-induced in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. CONCLUSIONS: We report a case of a successful liver transplant after acute liver failure resulting from imatinib-induced chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. The literature reveals the importance of prompt acute liver failure diagnosis and treatment with liver transplant in selected cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-018-1588-0

  9 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523082
[Au] Autor:Kork F; Rimek A; Andert A; Becker NJ; Heidenhain C; Neumann UP; Kroy D; Roehl AB; Rossaint R; Hein M
[Ad] Address:Department of Anaesthesiology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074, Aachen, Germany. fkork@ukaachen.de.
[Ti] Title:Visual quality assessment of the liver graft by the transplanting surgeon predicts postreperfusion syndrome after liver transplantation: a retrospective cohort study.
[So] Source:BMC Anesthesiol;18(1):29, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2253
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The discrepancy between demand and supply for liver transplants (LT) has led to an increased transplantation of organs from extended criteria donors (ECD). METHODS: In this single center retrospective analysis of 122 cadaveric LT recipients, we investigated predictors of postreperfusion syndrome (PRS) including transplant liver quality categorized by both histological assessment of steatosis and subjective visual assessment by the transplanting surgeon using multivariable regression analysis. Furthermore, we describe the relevance of PRS during the intraoperative and postoperative course of LT recipients. RESULTS: 53.3% (n = 65) of the patients suffered from PRS. Risk factors for PRS were visually assessed organ quality of the liver grafts (acceptable: OR 12.2 [95% CI 2.43-61.59], P = 0.002; poor: OR 13.4 [95% CI 1.48-121.1], P = 0.02) as well as intraoperative norepinephrine dosage before reperfusion (OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.26-3.86] per 0.1 µg kg min , P = 0.01). In contrast, histological assessment of the graft was not associated with PRS. LT recipients suffering from PRS were hemodynamically more instable after reperfusion compared to recipients not suffering from PRS. They had lower mean arterial pressures until the end of surgery (P < 0.001), received more epinephrine and norepinephrine before reperfusion (P = 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively) as well as higher rates of continuous infusion of norepinephrine (P < 0.001) and vasopressin (P = 0.02) after reperfusion. Postoperative peak AST was significantly higher (P = 0.001) in LT recipients with PRS. LT recipients with intraoperative PRS had more postoperative adverse cardiac events (P = 0.05) and suffered more often from postoperative delirium (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving ECD liver grafts are especially prone to PRS. Anesthesiologists should keep these newly described risk factors in mind when preparing for reperfusion in patients receiving high-risk organs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12871-018-0493-9

  10 / 96351 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29452273
[Au] Autor:Wang Z; Lee SJ; Cheng HJ; Yoo JJ; Atala A
[Ad] Address:Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.
[Ti] Title:3D bioprinted functional and contractile cardiac tissue constructs.
[So] Source:Acta Biomater;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1878-7568
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bioengineering of a functional cardiac tissue composed of primary cardiomyocytes has great potential for myocardial regeneration and in vitro tissue modeling. However, its applications remain limited because the cardiac tissue is a highly organized structure with unique physiologic, biomechanical, and electrical properties. In this study, we undertook a proof-of-concept study to develop a contractile cardiac tissue with cellular organization, uniformity, and scalability by using three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting strategy. Primary cardiomyocytes were isolated from infant rat hearts and suspended in a fibrin-based bioink to determine the priting capability for cardiac tissue engineering. This cell-laden hydrogel was sequentially printed with a sacrificial hydrogel and a supporting polymeric frame through a 300-µm nozzle by pressured air. Bioprinted cardiac tissue constructs had a spontaneous synchronous contraction in culture, implying in vitro cardiac tissue development and maturation. Progressive cardiac tissue development was confirmed by immunostaining for α-actinin and connexin 43, indicating that cardiac tissues were formed with uniformly aligned, dense, and electromechanically coupled cardiac cells. These constructs exhibited physiologic responses to known cardiac drugs regarding beating frequency and contraction forces. In addition, Notch signaling blockade significantly accelerated development and maturation of bioprinted cardiac tissues. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of bioprinting functional cardiac tissues that could be used for tissue engineering applications and pharmaceutical purposes. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in the United States and a major health-care burden. Myocardial infarction (MI) is a main cause of death in cardiovascular diseases. MI occurs as a consequence of sudden blocking of blood vessels supplying the heart. When occlusions in the coronary arteries occur, an immediate decrease in nutrient and oxygen supply to the cardiac muscle, resulting in permanent cardiac cell death. Eventually, scar tissue formed in the damaged cardiac muscle that cannot conduct electrical or mechanical stimuli thus leading to a reduction in the pumping efficiency of the heart. The therapeutic options available for end-stage heart failure is to undergo heart transplantation or the use of mechanical ventricular assist devices (VADs). However, many patients die while being on a waiting list, due to the organ shortage and limitation of VADs, such as surgical complications, infection, thrombogenesis, and failure of the electrical motor and hemolysis. Ultimately, 3D bioprinting strategy aims to create clinically applicable tissue constructs that can be immediately implanted in the body. To date, the focus on replicating complex and heterogeneous tissue constructs continues to increase as 3D bioprinting technologies advance. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of 3D bioprinting strategy to bioengineer the functional cardiac tissue that possesses a highly organized structure with unique physiological and biomechanical properties similar to native cardiac tissue. This bioprinting strategy has great potential to precisely generate functional cardiac tissues for use in pharmaceutical and regenerative medicine applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


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