Database : MEDLINE
Search on : osteochondrosis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29524049
[Au] Autor:Lewczuk D; Bereznowski A; Hecold M; Fraszczak M; Rusc A; Korwin-Kossakowska A; Szyda J; Kaminski S
[Ad] Address:Institute of Genetics and Animal Breeding PAS, ul.Postepu 36A, 05-552, Magdalenka, Poland. d.lewczuk@ighz.pl.
[Ti] Title:Differences between horse selection based on two forms of osteochondrosis in fetlock.
[So] Source:J Appl Genet;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:2190-3883
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Horses lose potential opportunities because of health problems. Available breeding strategies are not effective enough, probably also because of the different definition used and its genetic usefulness. The aim of the study was to compare the genetic background estimated by the genome-wide association study (GWAS) for osteochondrosis using two different scaling osteochondrosis (OC)/healthy and osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD)/healthy systems for evaluating the disease status of investigated fetlock joints. Two hundred one Warmblood horses trained for performance tests (87 stallions and 114 mares) were phenotyped and genotyped. Four fetlock x-ray images per horse were collected using the RTG Girth HF 80 and Vet Scan ray 3600. The DNA of each horse was genotyped using the BeadChip 70K. To identify SNPs that significantly affect the probability of osteochondrosis, two different methods were applied: the Cochran-Armitage test based on an additive mode of inheritance and logistic regression. The genetic background for osteochondrosis, expressed in the number of SNPs found with significant associations with osteochondrosis, was higher by evaluation in the scale of OCD/healthy horses (16 SNPs on several chromosomes mainly on the ECA1 and ECA10) than OC/healthy (2 SNPs on the ECA15 and one SNP on the ECA10). Detailed definition of osteochondrosis is needed in breeding and in veterinary practice. The genetic background for osteochondrosis and osteochondrosis dissecans seems not the same. Suggestive SNPs could be the candidate markers for osteochondrosis but should be checked on a larger population before usage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13353-018-0437-6

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[PMID]: 29523906
[Au] Autor:Yoshizawa T; Okamoto Y; Tanaka K; Makihara T; Tonoe T; Minami M; Yamazaki M
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Normal imaging laterality on magnetic resonance imaging of the medial epicondyle of the elbow on the dominant side of adolescent male baseball players.
[So] Source:Skeletal Radiol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2161
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Multimodality elbow screening of adolescent baseball players shows apparent laterality in morphology and signal intensity of the medial epicondyle on dedicated magnetic resonance imaging. We aimed to elucidate actual imaging laterality in the medial epicondyle by comparing magnetic resonance images of the dominant and contradominant elbows and to clarify the clinical meaning and mechanism of this phenomenon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used a 0.2-T dedicated magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Eighty adolescent baseball players were enrolled and divided into four age groups: 9-10 years (13 patients); 11 years (28 patients); 12 years (24 patients) and 13-14 years (15 patients). The long and short axes of the ossification center and distance of the epiphyseal plate and the cartilage of the lower pole of the medial epicondyle were measured. Signal intensity of the ossification center was visually evaluated. RESULTS: Owing to their age, ossification and cartilage size on the dominant side were significantly larger in all boys (P < 0.01). All age groups had larger ossification and cartilage in the dominant elbow (P < 0.01). Ossification showed an apparent lower signal intensity on the dominant side (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Larger ossification and cartilage size of the medial epicondyle in the dominant elbow suggested that the medial collateral ligament to the medial epicondyle induces excessive repetitive tensile stress, but without clinical symptoms. Functional or microanatomical damage of the medial epicondyle may induce a lower ossification signal in the dominant elbow, thereby decreasing fatty bone marrow and inducing sclerotic changes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00256-018-2921-9

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[PMID]: 29498750
[Au] Autor:Naccache F; Metzger J; Dist O
[Ad] Address:University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover Foundation,, Institute for Animal Breeding and Genetics, Bünteweg 17p, 30559, Hannover, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Genetic risk factors for osteochondrosis in various horse breeds.
[So] Source:Equine Vet J;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:2042-3306
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Osteochondrosis (OC) is an injury to cartilage canals with a following necrosis in the growth cartilage, from there it can develop to osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD). Due to its high impact in the equine industry, new insights into predisposing factors and potential high-risk genetic variants are warranted. This article reviews advancements in quantitative and molecular genetics in refining estimation of genetic parameters and identifying predisposing genetic loci. Heritabilities were highest for hock OC with estimates at 0.29-0.46 in Hanoverian warmblood and Norwegian trotters, whereas in Thoroughbreds only very low genetic variation seemed to be present in hock OC lesions. Whole genome scans using the Illumina Equine SNP50 or SNP70 Beadchip were performed in Thoroughbred, Standardbred, French and Norwegian trotter, Hanoverian and Dutch warmblood. Validation studies in Spanish Purebred and Hanoverian warmblood horses corroborated OC risk loci on ECA 3, 14, 27 and 29. Particularly, a strong association with hock-OCD was found for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on horse chromosome (ECA) 3 upstream to the LCORL gene. Gene expression and microRNA analyses may be helpful to understand pathophysiological processes in equine OC and to connect OCD-associated genomic regions with potential candidate genes. Further progress in elucidating the underlying genetic variants and pathophysiological changes in OC may be expected from whole genome DNA and RNA next-generation sequencing studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/evj.12824

  4 / 2579 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29481348
[Au] Autor:Hailer YD; Hailer NP
[Ad] Address:Section of Orthopaedics, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Is Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease a Local Manifestation of a Systemic Condition?
[So] Source:Clin Orthop Relat Res;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1528-1132
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Osteochondrosis includes numerous diseases that occur during rapid growth, characterized by disturbances of endochondral ossification. One example, Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, is characterized by disruption of the blood supply to the femoral head epiphysis, and a systemic etiology often has been suggested. If this were the case, secondary osteochondroses at locations other than the hip might be expected to be more common among patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, but to our knowledge, this has not been evaluated in a nationwide sample. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Do patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease have an increased prevalence of secondary osteochondroses at locations other than the hip? (2) Is the concept of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease a systemic etiology supported by a higher prevalence of the metabolic diseases obesity and hypothyroidism? METHODS: We designed a retrospective population-based cohort study with data derived from the Swedish Patient Registry (SPR). The SPR was established in 1964 and collects information on dates of hospital admission and discharge, registered diagnoses (categorized along the International Classification of Diseases [ICD]), and applied treatments during the entire lifetime of all Swedish citizens with high validity. Analyzing the time span from 1964 to 2011, we identified 3183 patients with an ICD code indicative of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease and additionally sampled 10 control individuals per patient with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, matching for sex, age, and residence, resulting in 31,817 control individuals. The prevalence of secondary osteochondroses, obesity, and hypothyroidism was calculated separately for patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease and control individuals based on the presence of ICD codes indicative of these conditions. Using logistic regression analysis, we compared the adjusted relative risk of having either of these conditions develop between patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease and their matched control subjects. The mean followup was 26.1 years (range, 2.8-65 years). RESULTS: The prevalence of secondary osteochondroses was greater among patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (3.11%) than among control subjects (0.31%), resulting in an increased adjusted risk of an association with such lesions in the patients (relative risk [RR], 10.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.7-13.6; p < 0.001). When stratified by sex, we attained a similarly increased risk ratio for females (RR, 12.5; 95% CI, 6.1-25.8; p < 0.001) as for males (RR, 9.9; 95% CI, 7.3-13.5; p < 0.001). Patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease had an increased adjusted risk of an association with obesity (RR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.9-4.0; p < 0.001) or hypothyroidism (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.7-3.8; p < 0.001) when compared with control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first population-based description of a robust association of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease with osteochondroses at locations other than the hip, and we also found increased risk estimates for an association with obesity and hypothyroidism in patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Our findings strengthen the hypothesis that Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease is the local manifestation of a systemic disease, indicative of an underlying common disease pathway that requires further investigation. Physicians should be aware that patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease may present with secondary osteochondroses and metabolic comorbidities. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, prognostic study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11999.0000000000000214

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[PMID]: 29468514
[Au] Autor:Gottschalk O; Altenberger S; Walther M
[Ad] Address:Zentrum für Fuß- und Sprunggelenkchirurgie, Schön Klinik München Harlaching, Harlachinger Str. 51, D-81347, München, Deutschland. ogottschalk@schoen-kliniken.de.
[Ti] Title:Ist der Talus-Knorpel noch zu retten? [Cartilage repair therapies of the talus].
[So] Source:MMW Fortschr Med;159(16):46-48, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1613-3560
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s15006-017-0065-9

  6 / 2579 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29309422
[Au] Autor:Itoh G; Ishii H; Kato H; Nagano Y; Hayashi H; Funasaki H
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Community and Human Services, Rikkyo University, Saitama, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Risk assessment of the onset of Osgood-Schlatter disease using kinetic analysis of various motions in sports.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190503, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Some studies have listed motions that may cause Osgood-Schlatter disease, but none have quantitatively assessed the load on the tibial tubercle by such motions. PURPOSES: To quantitatively identify the load on the tibial tubercle through a biomechanical approach using various motions that may cause Osgood-Schlatter disease, and to compare the load between different motions. METHODS: Eight healthy male subjects were included. They conducted 4 types of kicks with a soccer ball, 2 types of runs, 2 types of squats, 2 types of jump landings, 2 types of stops, 1 type of turn, and 1 type of cutting motion. The angular impulse was calculated for knee extension moments ≥1.0 Nm/kg, ≥1.5 Nm/kg, ≥2.0 Nm/kg, and ≥2.5 Nm/kg. After analysis of variance, the post-hoc test was used to perform pairwise comparisons between all groups. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: The motion with the highest mean angular impulse of knee extension moment ≥1.0 Nm/kg was the single-leg landing after a jump, and that with the second highest mean was the cutting motion. At ≥1.5 Nm/kg, ≥2.0 Nm/kg, and ≥2.5 Nm/kg, the cutting motion was the highest, followed by the jump with a single-leg landing. They have a large load, and are associated with a higher risk of developing Osgood-Schlatter disease. The mean angular impulse of the 2 types of runs was small at all the indicators. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Motions with a high risk of developing Osgood-Schlatter disease and low-risk motions can be assessed in further detail if future studies can quantify the load and number of repetitions that may cause Osgood-Schlatter disease while considering age and the development stage. Scheduled training regimens that balance load on the tibial tubercle with low-load motions after a training day of many load-intensive motions may prevent athletes from developing Osgood-Schlatter disease and increase their participation in sports.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Motion
Osteochondrosis/physiopathology
Sports
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Humans
Knee Joint/physiopathology
Male
Risk Assessment
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180109
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190503

  7 / 2579 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29373573
[Au] Autor:Robles M; Nouveau E; Gautier C; Mendoza L; Dubois C; Dahirel M; Lagofun B; Aubrière MC; Lejeune JP; Caudron I; Guenon I; Viguié C; Wimel L; Bouraima-Lelong H; Serteyn D; Couturier-Tarrade A; Chavatte-Palmer P
[Ad] Address:UMR BDR, INRA, ENVA, Université Paris Saclay, Jouy en Josas, France.
[Ti] Title:Maternal obesity increases insulin resistance, low-grade inflammation and osteochondrosis lesions in foals and yearlings until 18 months of age.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190309, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Obesity is a growing concern in horses. The effects of maternal obesity on maternal metabolism and low-grade inflammation during pregnancy, as well as offspring growth, metabolism, low-grade inflammation, testicular maturation and osteochondrotic lesions until 18 months of age were investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four mares were used and separated into two groups at insemination according to body condition score (BCS): Normal (N, n = 10, BCS ≤4) and Obese (O, n = 14, BCS ≥4.25). BCS and plasma glucose, insulin, triglyceride, urea, non-esterified fatty acid, serum amyloid A (SAA), leptin and adiponectin concentrations were monitored throughout gestation. At 300 days of gestation, a Frequently Sampled Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (FSIGT) was performed. After parturition, foals' weight and size were monitored until 18 months of age with plasma SAA, leptin, adiponectin, triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and cortisol concentrations measured at regular intervals. At 6, 12 and 18 months of age, FSIGT and osteoarticular examinations were performed. Males were gelded at one year and expression of genes involved in testicular maturation analysed by RT-qPCR. RESULTS: Throughout the experiment, maternal BCS was higher in O versus N mares. During gestation, plasma urea and adiponectin were decreased and SAA and leptin increased in O versus N mares. O mares were also more insulin resistant than N mares with a higher glucose effectiveness. Postnatally, there was no difference in offspring growth between groups. Nevertheless, plasma SAA concentrations were increased in O versus N foals until 6 months, with O foals being consistently more insulin resistant with a higher glucose effectiveness. At 12 months of age, O foals were significantly more affected by osteochondrosis than N foals. All other parameters were not different between groups. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, maternal obesity altered metabolism and increased low-grade inflammation in both dams and foals. The risk of developing osteochondrosis at 12 months of age was also higher in foals born to obese dams.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Horse Diseases/pathology
Horse Diseases/physiopathology
Inflammation/veterinary
Insulin Resistance/physiology
Obesity/veterinary
Osteochondrosis/veterinary
Pregnancy Complications/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adiponectin/blood
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Blood Glucose/metabolism
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Horses
Inflammation/etiology
Insulin/blood
Leptin/blood
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Obesity/complications
Obesity/physiopathology
Osteochondrosis/etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications/pathology
Pregnancy Complications/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adiponectin); 0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (Insulin); 0 (Leptin)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180127
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190309

  8 / 2579 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29362030
[Au] Autor:Seybold JD; Zide JR
[Ad] Address:Twin Cities Orthopedics, 4010 West 65th Street, Edina, MN 55435, USA. Electronic address: jseybold@tcomn.com.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of Freiberg Disease.
[So] Source:Foot Ankle Clin;23(1):157-169, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1934
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Freiberg disease, or osteochondrosis of the lesser metatarsal head, usually involves the second metatarsal and presents during the second or third decades of life. Conservative measures to relieve pressure on the affected metatarsal head are the first-line treatments, with good success for Smillie stage I to III disease. Operative treatments are divided into joint-preserving and joint-reconstructing procedures. Although multiple case series describe success with numerous techniques, there are no established guidelines for treatment. All surgical techniques carry a risk of a stiff or floating toe and transfer metatarsalgia. This article reviews the current surgical treatment options for Freiberg disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180124
[Lr] Last revision date:180124
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 2579 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29350649
[Au] Autor:D'Aprile P; Nasuto M; Tarantino A; Cornacchia S; Guglielmi G; Jinkins JR
[Ad] Address:. giuseppe.guglielmi@unifg.it.
[Ti] Title:Magnetic Resonance Imaging in degenerative disease of the lumbar spine: Fat Saturation technique and contrast medium.
[So] Source:Acta Biomed;89(1-S):208-219, 2018 01 19.
[Is] ISSN:0392-4203
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To examine both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine in patients with low back pain using MRI T2-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation (FS) and contrast enhanced T1-weighted sequences with FS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two thousand eight hundred and twenty (2820) patients (1628 male, 1192 female, mean age 54) presenting low back pain underwent MRI standard examination (Sagittal T1w TSE and T2w TSE, axial T1 SE) with the addition of sagittal and axial T2w Fat Sat (FS) sequences. Among all the patients, 987 (35%) have been studied adding Contrast Enhanced (CE) T1w FS sequences after administration of contrast medium. RESULTS: Among 987 patients studied with contrast medium, we found: active-inflammatory intervertebral osteochondrosis in 646 (65%) patients; degenerative-inflammatory changes in facet joints (facet joint effusion, synovitis, synovial cysts) in 462 (47%); spondylolysis in 69 (7%); degenerative-inflammatory changes of the flava, interspinous and supraspinous ligaments in 245 (25%); inflammatory changes of posterior perispinal muscles in 84 (8%) patients. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with suspected no-disc-related low back pain, the implementation of T2w FS and CE T1w FS sequences to the standard MR protocol could allow a better identification of degenerative-inflammatory changes more likely associated to the pain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.23750/abm.v89i1-S.7024

  10 / 2579 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29322745
[Au] Autor:Belov VG; Parfenov YA; Vasilevskaya MA; Parfenov SA; Sapozhnikov KV; Kovalenko AL; Zaplutanov VA
[Ad] Address:Municipal polyclinic â„– 91, 8, Otvaznykh str., St. Petersburg, 198329, Russian Federation.
[Ti] Title:[Peculiarities of clinical and psychophysiological status of elderly patients with osteochondrosis.]
[So] Source:Adv Gerontol;30(5):757-764, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1561-9125
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:We conducted a study of 220 patients in polyclinic â„– 91 in St. Petersburg. It was revealed that elderly patients with osteochondrosis are characterized by a high prevalence and severity of osteochondrosis against the background of metabolic disorders in the structures of the spine. At the same time, the actual condition of the spine does not always determine the severity of the pain syndrome. The effect of osteochondrosis on the development of comorbid pathology has been clarified. The ways of correction of the clinical and psychophysiological status of elderly patients with osteochondrosis such as appointment of Cytoflavin, behavioral therapy and biofeed back therapy are suggested.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180111
[Lr] Last revision date:180111
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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